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2006 School Certificate Specimen Test SCIENCE

Introduction This document accompanies the specimen test for the 2006 School Certificate test in Science. A mapping grid is also included with the test. It shows how each question in the test relates to the relevant syllabus outcomes and content, and to the performance bands used to report student achievement in the test. In 2006, the first cohort of students studying the Science Years 710 Syllabus (2003) will sit for the School Certificate Science test. The scope of the test and the test specifications have been reviewed for 2006, and this specimen test is indicative of the type of test that will be produced for 2006 and subsequent years. Because much of the content of the new syllabus is similar to that in the previous syllabus, many of the questions in past School Certificate Science tests would continue to be suitable for tests from 2006. The inclusion of questions from past tests in the specimen paper reflects this. The purpose of the School Certificate tests The School Certificate credential marks the end of compulsory schooling. It records student achievement in the courses studied in Stage 5, and provides results in five state-wide tests in areas considered foundational to subsequent achievement. Further information about the School Certificate can be found on the Boards Assessment Resource Centre (http://www.arc.nsw.edu.au/). A major purpose of the School Certificate tests at the end of Year 10 is to strengthen the foundation skills students need to pursue further learning or to succeed in the workplace. The scope of the School Certificate tests The tests focus on foundational aspects of their related syllabuses, and do not cover all areas of the syllabus. The Science test scope statement provides further details of the relationship between the School Certificate Science test and the Science syllabus. Specimen tests Specimen tests are produced in accordance with the Boards Principles for Setting School Certificate Tests and Developing Marking Guidelines in a StandardsReferenced Framework, published in Board Bulletin Volume 10 Number 1 (March 2001). Questions are closely related to a subset of syllabus outcomes from the related course. The test as a whole is structured to show how appropriate differentiation of student performance at all levels on the performance scale can be obtained The Science specimen test The specimen test is an example of the type of test that could be prepared within the School Certificate Science test specifications. Tests in Science will be based on a representative sample of syllabus outcomes. The mapping grid accompanying the specimen test shows how the test as a whole samples a range of content and

outcomes, and allows all students the opportunity to demonstrate their level of achievement. The range and balance of outcomes tested in the School Certificate tests in 2006 and subsequent years may differ from those addressed in the specimen test. There are a number of points to note in considering the Science specimen test: The School Certificate Science test is now a two-hour test. The types of question asked and the level of difficulty of the questions will be similar to previous years. However, increasing the time available for students to complete the test will enable them to have more time to answer all sections of the paper to the best of their ability. The format of the test has been simplified to make it easier for students to work through the paper. Note that the test specifications on the Boards website have been modified to include the ten objective questions, Questions 51 to 60, in Section 1 rather than in Section 2. This specimen test has been formatted accordingly. A stimulus booklet has been included in this test. Questions from both Section 1 and Section 2 draw on the material presented in the stimulus booklet. The inclusion of the stimulus booklet will enable the stimulus material to be used for a number of different questions, which can reduce the amount of reading and allow students more time to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do in Science.

Science
2006 School Certificate Specimen Test

General Instructions

Total marks 100

Reading time: 10 minutes Working time: 2 hours Write using black or blue pen You may use a pencil to draw or complete diagrams Attempt ALL questions Calculators may be used A stimulus booklet is provided with this paper Write your Centre Number and Student Number at the top of pages 21, 25 and 29

Section 1
Pages 223 60 marks Allow about 1 hour and 10 minutes for this section This section has TWO parts Part A Questions 150 50 marks Part B Questions 5160 10 marks

Section 2
Pages 2535 40 marks Allow about 50 minutes for this section This section has SIX questions Question 61 3 marks Question 62 10 marks Question 63 4 marks Question 64 6 marks Question 65 9 marks Question 66 8 marks

Print run

Section 1
60 marks Allow about 1 hour and 20 minutes for this section Use the Section 1 Answer Sheet for Questions 160 Part A Questions 150 50 marks

Instructions for answering multiple-choice questions

Select the alternative A, B, C or D that best answers the question. Fill in the response oval completely. Sample: 2 + 4 = (A) 2
A

(B) 6
B

(C) 8
C

(D) 9
D

If you think you have made a mistake, put a cross through the incorrect answer and fill in the new answer.
A B C D

If you change your mind and have crossed out what you consider to be the correct answer, then indicate the correct answer by writing the word correct and drawing an arrow as follows.

correct
A B C D

What is the name of the solution represented by the formula HCl? (A) Hydrochloric acid (B) Hydrogen chlorine

(C) Sulfur hydroxide (D) Sulfuric acid

Which of the following is called a greenhouse gas? (A) Carbon dioxide (B) Hydrogen

(C) Nitrogen (D) Oxygen

The table presents some properties of six rocks. High silica content Small crystals Medium crystals Large crystals Rhyolite Microgranite Granite Low silica content Basalt Dolerite Gabbro

Which rock has large crystals and low silica content? (A) Dolerite (B) Gabbro

(C) Granite (D) Obsidian

Which of the following is associated with the death explosion of a massive star? (A) Asteroid (B) Comet

(C) Galaxy (D) Supernova

5 Biodiesel is a new type of diesel fuel made from plants such as canola. The manufacturers of biodiesel promote its use as it is considered to be environmentally friendly. This is because, when biodiesel burns, it makes some products that are used by plants.

What kind of argument is being used by the manufacturers to promote the use of biodiesel? (A) Economic (B) Ethical

(C) Legal (D) Scientific

Which term names the change in the pathway of light as it passes from air into the lens of a camera? (A) Absorption (B) Interference

(C) Refraction (D) Scattering

Which of these human activities is likely to have a positive impact on the natural environment? (A) Generating electricity using coal (B) Removing forest areas

(C) Recycling materials (D) Using petrol-driven cars

Use the graph to answer Questions 8 and 9. The graph shows some of the sources of solid particles in the atmosphere. Sources of solid particles in the atmosphere 2000

Mass of solid particles in Eart atmosphere (million tonnes)

1500
Awaiting Copyright Clearance

1000Graph showing sources of solid particles in the atmosphere.

Available online in 2003 Science School Certificate Test, page 6.

500

Industrial emissions

Sea salt

Soil dust

Ash

Volcanic dust

Other particles

Which list ranks sources of solid particles in the atmosphere from greatest to smallest? (A) Ash, soil dust, sea salt, other particles (B) Sea salt, soil dust, ash, volcanic dust (C) Industrial emissions, sea salt, ash, volcanic dust (D) Volcanic dust, industrial emissions, ash, soil dust

What mass of solid particles in the atmosphere comes from soil dust? (A) 250 million tonnes (B) 300 million tonnes (C) 375 million tonnes (D) 425 million tonnes

10

Which particle moves through a metal when the metal conducts electricity? (A) Electron (B) Neutron

(C) Nucleus (D) Proton

Use the diagram to answer Questions 11 and 12. The diagram shows pebbles of different sizes cemented together to form a rock.

Cementing material Y

Fossil (Actual size) 11 How was this rock formed? (A) By magma cooling underground (B) By lava cooling above the ground

(C) By heat and pressure under the ocean (D) By compaction of sediment and chemical changes

12

What is the average of the lengths of pebbles X and Y in the sample? (A) 1.0 cm (B) 1.6 cm

(C) 2.2 cm (D) 3.2 cm

Use the newspaper article to answer Questions 1315.

Giant squid taking over the world


Giant Awaiting Copyright Clearance world well, at least the oceans as squid are taking over the they are getting bigger. According to scientists, giant squid have Newspaper article: Giant of total biomass. That means they take up overtaken humans in termssquid taking over the world. Available the planet than us. The Certificate Test, page put more space ononline in 2003 Science Schoolreasons have been 8. down to overfishing of other species and climate change.

13

What is one reason given for the increase in the total biomass of giant squid? (A) They have more predators. (B) Their body size has increased. (C) The ocean temperatures have risen. (D) They have a larger total biomass than humans.

14

Giant squid are taking over the world . . . The reasons have been put down to overfishing of other species and climate change. How would scientists classify these reasons? (A) Arguments (B) Conclusions (C) Inferences (D) Observations

15

Which of the following is the best reason why scientists should further investigate this issue? (A) Giant squid may kill too many humans. (B) Giant squid may overpopulate and become extinct. (C) Giant squid may compete with humans for living space. (D) Giant squid numbers may change the food webs on which humans depend.

Use the graph to answer Questions 1618. The graph represents Tristans journey as he rode his bicycle from his house to his friends house.

5 Distance (km) 4 3 2 1 0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21

Time (minutes) 16 How far is it from Tristans house to his friends house? (A) 2 km (B) 5 km

(C) 9 km (D) 18 km

17

Tristan stopped for a rest during the ride. For how long did he stop? (A) 1 minute (B) 1.5 minutes

(C) 2 minutes (D) 9 minutes

18

Between which times was Tristan travelling fastest? (A) 09 minutes (B) 910.5 minutes

(C) 10.515 minutes (D) 1518 minutes

Use the diagram to answer Questions 1921. The diagram illustrates the formation of a black hole. Objects in the diagram are not drawn to scale.

Star forms from a cloud of gas and dust

5 million km radius; star burns hydrogen for 10 million years 50 million km radius; star burns helium for 1 million years

10 km radius; black hole

Nuclear burning ends; star collapses, explodes and then collapses again

700 million km radius; star burns carbon, neon, oxygen, then silicon for 1000 years

19

Which element must be present in the cloud of gas and dust for a star to form? (A) Carbon (B) Helium (C) Hydrogen (D) Oxygen

20

How many times bigger is the radius of the star when it burns helium than when it burns hydrogen? (A) 2 (B) 10 (C) 14 (D) 140

21

Which of the following correctly compares the burning in stars with the burning of fossil fuels? Burning in stars (A) (B) (C) (D) Atoms rearrange Carbon atoms combine with oxygen Carbon dioxide is produced Nuclei of atoms interact Burning of fossil fuels Atoms do not rearrange Carbon atoms do not combine with oxygen Carbon dioxide is not produced Nuclei of atoms do not interact

22

Jamie and Joanne mixed two clear, colourless liquids. A solid formed as the liquids mixed. What type of reaction were they observing? (A) Absorption (B) Combustion

(C) Corrosion (D) Precipitation

Use the following information to answer Questions 23 and 24.

AIDS virus resistant


Miracle drugs have transformed AIDS into a disease that can be much more successfully managed. The virus that causes AIDS is rapidly developing resistance to anti-retroviral drugs designed to prolong the lives of those affected by the disease.

23

According to the article, what causes AIDS? (A) Anti-retrovirus (B) Bacterium

(C) Fungus (D) Virus

24

What has caused the increase in resistance to anti-retroviral drugs? (A) Acquired characteristics (B) Cloning

(C) Natural selection (D) Virulence

10

25

What happens to atoms during a decomposition reaction? (A) They are created. (B) They are destroyed. (C) They are rearranged to form more substances. (D) They are rearranged to form fewer substances.

Use the graph to answer Questions 26 and 27.


How Australia uses its energy

Key Transport Domestic Agriculture Other industries Mining

26

Approximately what percentage of the total energy is used by mining? (A) 10% (B) 15%

(C) 30% (D) 60%

27

Which of the following combinations uses the most energy? (A) Agriculture and domestic (B) Agriculture and transport

(C) Domestic and mining (D) Domestic and other industries

11

28

Where are you most likely to find DNA? (A) Field mushroom (B) Mineral crystal

(C) Natural gas (D) Snail shell

29

The diagram illustrates how the African and South American continents seem to fit against each other.

Africa South America

Which theory best explains this fit? (A) Big Bang (B) Evolution

(C) Natural selection (D) Plate tectonics

12

Use the diagram to answer Questions 3032. The diagram illustrates the fossils found at four different locations W, X, Y and Z.

W 30

Y ?

Which of these fossils is younger than fossil (A) (B) (C) (D)

31

At which location was the oldest fossil found? (A) W (B) X (C) Y (D) Z

32

In which of the following environments would these fossils most likely have formed? (A) Coastal lake (B) Eucalyptus forest (C) Fast-flowing river (D) Sandy desert 13

Use the diagram to answer Questions 33 and 34. The following tracks were found at the scene of a road accident. Key Dog Kangaroo Car Motorbike

33

Which of the following lists the order in which the tracks were made? (A) Dog, kangaroo, motorbike, car (B) Dog, motorbike, car, kangaroo

(C) Motorbike, dog, car, kangaroo (D) Motorbike, kangaroo, dog, car

34

What could be inferred from the tracks? (A) The dog was frightened by the car. (B) The kangaroo was being chased by the dog.

(C) The rider of the motorbike was driving unsafely. (D) The car crossed from one lane of the road to the other lane.

14

35

A car leaking oil at a constant rate left spots on the road as shown in the diagram.

West

East

Which statement describes the motion of the car as it moved from west to east? (A) The car was accelerating. (B) The car was slowing down.

(C) The car was not accelerating. (D) The car was moving at a constant speed.

36

The diagram shows the arrangement of particles in brittle and non-brittle materials.

Non-brittle

Brittle

From the diagram, what may be one cause of brittleness in materials? (A) The size of the particles (B) The shape of the particles

(C) The space between the particles (D) The way the particles are held together

37

Refer to Source A in the stimulus booklet. Which of the following correctly identifies a chemical reactant and a piece of equipment used in making a superball? Chemical reactant (A) (B) (C) (D) Wood glue Borax Toothpick Medicine droppers Piece of equipment Borax Toothpick Wood glue Bottle top

15

Use Diagrams 1 and 2 to answer Questions 3841. Diagram 1 represents the electromagnetic spectrum. Diagram 1 X-rays Visible light Ultraviolet Gamma rays 1013 1011 109 107 105 103 101 Infrared Radio 101 103 Microwave

Wavelength (m)

Diagram 2 illustrates two electromagnetic waves Q and R, both drawn to the same scale. Diagram 2 W 60 m X Q

Y R

38

Which type of radiation has the shortest wavelength? (A) Gamma rays (B) Microwave

(C) Radio (D) Visible light

16

39

The distance from crest W to crest X of wave Q is 60 m. What is the distance from crest Y to crest Z on wave R? (A) 20 m (B) 30 m

(C) 40 m (D) 50 m

40

What type of wave is Q? (A) Microwave (B) Radio

(C) Visible light (D) X-rays

41

Which statement is correct for waves Q and R? (A) Q carries more energy than R. (B) Q has more acceleration than R.

(C) Q has a greater frequency than R. (D) Q has a longer wavelength than R.

17

Use the diagram to answer Questions 4244. The diagram represents the geological time scale. Eras are divided into periods, and some periods are divided into epochs. Ages are shown in millions of years before the present (MaBP). Eras
0 68 225 570

Periods
0 2.5 68

Epochs
0 2.5 7

Cainozoic Mesozoic Palaeozoic

Quaternary Tertiary Cretaceous

Recent < 5000 years Pleistocene Pliocene Miocene

136

Jurassic
190 225 280

26

Triassic Permian Carboniferous


38

Oligocene

Eocene
54

Precambrian

345

Devonian
395 430 500

Silurian Ordovician Cambrian


68 MaBP

Palaeocene

570 MaBP 4500 MaBP

Formation of Earths crust

42

How long did the Devonian period last? (A) 50 million years (B) 54 million years (C) 345 million years (D) 395 million years

43

In which period is the Pliocene epoch? (A) Cainozoic (B) Mesozoic (C) Quaternary (D) Tertiary 18

44

Which is the most recent? (A) Mesozoic (B) Miocene

(C) Pleistocene (D) Tertiary

45

Refer to Source B in the stimulus booklet. Lavoisiers new theory is the one we still use today. How do we now explain why coal and wood lose weight when they burn? (A) They both give out heat energy, which has weight. (B) They both lose weight by drying out. (C) They both lose other substances as gases that spread out into the air. (D) They both make new substances that are gases and that spread out into air.

Refer to Source C in the stimulus booklet to answer Questions 4647. 46 The new lie detector test detects stress-related changes in the subjects voice. Which statement best describes the accuracy of the new device? (A) It can be easily attached to a mobile phone. (B) The software claims to detect 8 out of 10 lies.

(C) The subject does not know that they are being tested. (D) The LED emits a brighter light when a bigger lie is detected.

47

What is one scientific development that was needed before the polygraph could be developed? (A) The ability to detect a lie. (B) The ability to locate a pulse.

(C) The ability to measure sweat production. (D) The production of LEDs.

19

48

Why does an astronaut weigh less on the Moon than on Earth? (A) There is no air on the Moon. (B) The astronaut is out in space.

(C) The Moon has less mass than Earth. (D) The Moon is further away from the Sun than it is from Earth.

Use the diagrams to answer Questions 49 and 50.

49

Which diagram best represents the WatsonCrick model of DNA? (A) P (B) Q

(C) R (D) S

50

What is one limitation of using the WatsonCrick model for DNA? (A) The DNA model is too old. (B) Scientists do not agree on the DNA model.

(C) The DNA model oversimplifies DNA structure. (D) Scientists cannot use the DNA model to make predictions.

20

Section 1 (continued) Part B Questions 5160 10 marks

Use the Section 1 Part B Answer Sheet for Questions 5160 Instructions for answering Questions 5160

Write firmly and clearly. Use BLOCK LETTERS for words. Like this: NOT like this:

A L P H A B E T a l p h a b e t

Numbers must be used for numerical answers. Decimal points and negative signs must be clearly shown in separate boxes. Do NOT let any part of the letter or number touch the sides of the answer boxes. Examples: 7 2 = How many days are in a week? What is the fifth month?

3 7

M A Y

If you make a mistake, put a line through the incorrect answer, and write the correct answer above the boxes.

M A Y J U N E

21

51

Name the component of an electric circuit represented by this symbol.

52

Name the organ that produces eggs in humans.

53

Complete the following general word equation. acid + alkali salt + .............................

54

The human bodys functions are coordinated by two main systems. One is the endocrine system. Name the other system.

55

Name the section of a chromosome that carries information for a particular characteristic.

56

Name the smallest unit of an element.

57

Litmus, phenolphthalein, and some plant extracts are examples of chemicals that change colour when added to acid or alkali. Name this group of chemicals.

58

A common group of chemical compounds contains these substances: H2CO3 , FeCO3 , Al2(CO3) 3 , CaCO3 . Name this group of chemical compounds.

59

Refer to Source D in the stimulus booklet. Name the particle made of two protons and two neutrons.

22

60

Kim wants to identify a rock. She cannot see any crystals with the naked eye. She performs two tests on the rock and observes that it does not react with dilute acid and it does not burn. Use the following key to identify the rock. 1. Rock fizzes with dilute acid Rock does not fizz with dilute acid Crystals can be seen without a hand lens Crystals cannot be seen without a hand lens Small pebbles visible Grains all look like sand Rock will burn Rock will not burn Can be scratched with a fingernail Cannot be scratched with a fingernail ............... limestone ............... go to 2 ............... go to 3 ............... go to 4 ............... conglomerate ............... sandstone ............... go to 5 ............... shale ............... peat ............... coal

2.

3.

4.

5.

23

BLANK PAGE

24 Board of Studies NSW 2006

2006 School Certificate Specimen Test

Science
Section 2
40 marks Allow about 50 minutes for this section Questions 6166 40 marks

Centre Number

Student Number

Answer the questions in the spaces provided.

Marks Question 61 (3 marks) Refer to Source A in the stimulus booklet. The diagram shows the steps written on a childrens kit for making and testing a superball. Describe THREE improvements you would need to include if this was a procedure for a scientific investigation. ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... 3

25
Print run

Marks Question 62 (10 marks)

The people of Xinbu, a village in China, are now generating electricity and producing their own fertilisers using biogas digesters. A biogas digester is a place where plant and animal wastes decay to produce heat, methane gas and decayed waste. The wastes used include human and animal wastes, sugar, grass and bananas. The methane gas produced is used for cooking, lighting and generating electricity. The decayed wastes are then recycled as fertilisers for crops.

(a)

Use the information above to complete the flowchart. Human and animal wastes

...........................

...........................

...........................

...........................

Heat

...........................

Decayed wastes

Generator

Cooking and lighting

Fertilisers

...........................

Question 62 continued on page 27

26

Marks Question 62 (continued) (b) Assess TWO impacts on the environment of using biogas digesters. ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... 6

27

BLANK PAGE

28 Board of Studies NSW 2006

2006 School Certificate Specimen Test

Science
Section 2 (continued) Answer the questions in the spaces provided.

Centre Number

Student Number

Marks Question 63 (4 marks) Refer to Source B in the stimulus booklet. Using this example, or another historical case you have studied, describe how advancements in science have led to the development of new technologies. ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................................... 4

29
Print run

Question 64 (6 marks) The diagrams illustrate the South Pacific Ocean under normal climate conditions and under El Nio conditions. Normal climate conditions
N W S E

Trade winds The warm waters result in moist air being carried onto the mainland causing rain Strong trade winds from South America keep warm water near Australia
PACIFIC OCEAN

South America

Au

Warm upper ocean layer

Cold lower ocean layer

tr

a lia

El Nio conditions
Diagram: El Nino and US-Climate conditions. The Sun Herald, November 24, 2002.
N W S E

Trade winds

South America

Au

Central Pacific waters warm, resulting in rain area moving towards South America
PACIFIC OCEAN

a lia

Weakened trade winds allow warm water to move towards South America

Warm upper ocean layer

Cold lower ocean layer

tr

Question 64 continues on page 31 30

Marks Question 64 (continued) (a) State ONE feature of the South Pacific Ocean that changes when normal climate conditions are replaced by El Nio conditions. ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... (b) Using information in the diagrams, explain why the east coast of Australia is likely to experience drought during El Nio conditions. ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... 5 1

31

BLANK PAGE

32 Board of Studies NSW 2006

2006 School Certificate Specimen Test

Science
Section 2 (continued) Answer the questions in the spaces provided.

Centre Number

Student Number

Marks Question 65 (9 marks) Refer to Source D in the stimulus booklet. (a) What does a deuterium particle consist of? ............................................................................................................................... (b) Write a word equation to represent the third step in the chain of reactions. ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... (c) As part of a different chain of reactions occuring in the Sun, two helium3 particles combine to form one helium4 particle, two protons, and radiation. Using the same key as used in Source D, draw a diagram to represent this reaction. 4 3 2

33
Print run

Question 66 (8 marks) A team of students wished to investigate how quickly two different materials absorb and release heat energy. They set up this experimental model. The light bulb was switched on at the start of the investigation, and turned off after 10 minutes.

Light bulb

Thermometer Evaporating basin Dry sand Water

The results table that the students created is shown below. Time
(minutes)

Temperature (C) Dry sand 20.0 21.0 22.0 23.0 24.0 25.0 26.0 27.0 27.0 26.5 26.0 Water 20.0 20.5 21.0 21.5 22.0 22.5 23.0 23.0 23.0 23.0 23.0

Light bulb on

0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

Light bulb off

Question 66 continues on page 35

34

Question 66 (continued) (a) Name TWO variables that would have to be kept the same in this experiment. ............................................................................................................................... ............................................................................................................................... (b) Graph the results for sand from the table. 4 2

10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 Time (minutes)

(c)

State ONE trend that is shown in your graph. ............................................................................................................................... ...............................................................................................................................

(d)

Use your graph to predict the sand temperature 20 minutes after the light bulb was turned off. ...............................................................................................................................

End of test

35

BLANK PAGE

36 Board of Studies NSW 2006

2006 School Certificate Specimen Test

Science

Stimulus Booklet
Source A How to make and test a Superball

Yo

need: wood glu ill e w


1. Use the droppers to mix the glue and borax together in the bottle top. Use a toothpick to stir the mixture until it begins to stick together.

bo

2. Pick up the sticky lump and squeeze it with your fingers. Roll it into a ball and see if it will bounce. 3. If it bounces, record the height of the bounce. 4. Add more glue or borax and stir again with the toothpick. Repeat steps 2 and 3.

rax
h toot picks

p. to le

t w o

ic ed

5. Record the highest bounce.

rop pers ine d

bo tt

Source B

Science Foundation for Physics

Source C Liar Liar

ether determine wh find a way to es ted to were sometim ple have wan centuries peo ject. dle Ages, lies For many . In the Mid ld by the sub lling the truth lour when he te ged co changes a person was er metal chan . It measures w quickly silv as developed es in tector w tested by ho include chang graph Lie De lls a lie. These tury the Poly rson te Last cen ur when a pe body that occ in the ting. ge in creased swea -related chan lse rate and in pu detects stress itting ed that been develop LED (light em ghter e phone. The e detector has A new li es to a mobil nesty. The bri oice. It attach entifies disho software id f 10 lies, and the subjects v up when the detect 8 out o ims to y lights diode) displa e software cla ger the lie. Th sted. big y are being te the lights, the ven know the es not e the subject do
RM Image U172363INP. Reproduced with permission by the Australian Picture Library.

New software claims to make lie detection possible for anyone with a computer. Unlike with the polygraph, you may not even know youre being tested.

July - August 2001, reproduced by courtesy of Australian Geographic.

Source D

The Suns energy.


The Sun is the source of energy for all living things at the Earths surface. The first step in most food chains and cycles is the use of ultra violet light from the Sun by plants in the process of photosynthesis producing sugars on which all the other organisms ultimately depend. The energy from the Sun is produced by a series of nuclear reactions. Part of a series of reactions is shown in the diagram below. It describes the five steps in the chain of reactions that produces helium4 particles in the core of the Sun.

Helium4

Beryllium7 Deuterium Helium3 KEY Proton Neutron Neutrino Positron Electron Radiation Reaction Step Helium4

Lithium7 Helium4

Board of Studies NSW 2006

Science
2006 School Certificate Specimen Test Mapping Grid
For each item in the test, the grid shows the marks allocated, the syllabus content and syllabus outcomes it relates to, and the bands on the performance scale it is targeting. The range of bands shown indicates the performance candidates may be able to demonstrate in their responses. That is, if an item is shown as targeting Bands 35, it indicates that candidates who demonstrate performance equivalent to the Band 3 descriptions should be able to score some marks on the item, while those who perform at Band 5 or above could reasonably be expected to gain high marks. In the case of one-mark items, candidates who demonstrate performance at or above the bands shown generally could be expected to answer the item correctly. Question Section 1 Part A 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 Marks 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Content 5.7.3d 5.11.2b 4/5.16c, 4/5.17f 5.9.3b 4/5.2b 5.6.4 5.10c 4/5.16c, 4/5.17f 4/5.16c, 4/5.17g 5.6.3b, 5.7.1c 5.9.4b 4/5.16c, 4/5.17g 4/5.17b, 4/5.21e 4/5.16c 4/5.3d, 5.10c 5.6.2, 4/5.16c 5.6.2, 4/5.16c 5.6.2, 4/5.16c, 4/5.17f, g 4/5.16c 4/5.16c, 4/5.17g 5.6.5a, 5.7.3e(i), 5.9.3b 5.7.3e(iii) 4/5.16c, 4/5.17b 5.8.3b 5.7.3a, e(vi) 4/5.16c, 4/5.17b, g 4/5.16c, 4/5.17b, f 5.8.2c 5.9.2a 5.9.4a, 4/5.16c 5.9.4a, 4/5.16c, 4/5.19d 5.9.4b, 4/5.21e 4/5.17f, 4/5.19c, d 4/5.16c, 4/5.19c, d 5.6.2, 4/5.16c 4/5.17f Syllabus Outcomes 5.7 5.11 5.16, 5.17 5.9 5.2 5.6 5.10 5.16, 5.17 5.16, 5.17 5.6, 5.7 5.9 5.16, 5.17 5.17, 5.21 5.16 5.3, 5.10 5.6, 5.16 5.6, 5.16 5.6, 5.16, 5.17 5.16 5.16, 5.17 5.6, 5.7, 5.9 5.7 5.16, 5.17 5.8 5.7 5.16, 5.17 5.16, 5.17 5.8 5.9 5.9, 5.16 5.9, 5.16, 5.19 5.9, 5.21 5.17, 5.19 5.16, 5.19 5.6, 5.16 5.17 K/S K K S K K K K S S K K S S S K K/S K/S K/S S S K K S K K S S K K K/S K/S K/S S S K/S S Targeted Performance Bands 23 34 23 34 45 34 34 34 34 34 45 34 56 56 34 34 34 23 34 34 56 45 23 45 45 45 34 45 23 34 34 45 45 34 45 23

Question 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Section 1 Part B 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 Section 2 61 62a 62b 63 64a 64b 65a 65b 65c 66a 66b 66c 66d

Marks 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 4 6 4 1 5 2 3 4 2 4 1 1

Content 4/5.17b 5.6.1b 5.6.1b, 4/5.17f, g 5.6.1c 5.6.1b , 4/5.19d 5.9.4c, 4/5.16c 5.9.4c, 4/5.17f 4/5.16c 5.7.3a, e(i), 4/5.16c 4/5.16c 4/5.3a, 4/5.16c 5.6.6a 5.8.2 , 4/5.16c 4/5.2f 5.6.3a 5.8.4c 5.7.3c, e(v) 5.8.4a 5.8.2d 5.7.2a 5.7.3f 5.7.3d 5.6.5a, 5.7.1, 4/5.17f 4/5.16c, 4/5.17b 4/5.14e 4/5.16c, 4/5.17d, 4/5.18e 4/5.3b, 5.10c, 4/5.21e, f 4/5.1e 5.9.4f, 4/5.16c, d, 4/5.21f 5.9.4f, 4/5.16c, d, 4/5.18a, 4/5.21d, f 4/5.16c 5.6.5a, 4/5.16c 4/5.18d, e, 4/5.19f 4/5.13.2a 4/5.18e, f 4/5.17f 4/5.16c, 4/5.19c

Syllabus Outcomes 5.17 5.6 5.6, 5.17 5.6 5.6, 5.19 5.9, 5.16 5.9, 5.17 5.16 5.7, 5.16 5.16 5.3, 5.16 5.6 5.8, 5.16 5.2 5.6 5.8 5.7 5.8 5.8 5.7 5.7 5.7 5.6, 5.7, 5.17 5.16, 5.17 5.14 5.3, 5.16, 5.17, 5.18 5.3, 5.10, 5.21 5.1 5.9, 5.16, 5.21 5.9, 5.16, 5.18, 5.21 5.16 5.6, 5.16 5.18, 5.19 5.13 5.18 5.17 5.16, 5.19

K/S S K K/S K K/S K/S K/S S K/S S K/S K K/S K K K K K K K K K K/S S S S K/S K K/S K/S S K/S S S S S S

Targeted Performance Bands 56 45 45 45 34 45 34 34 34 45 34 45 34 45 23 34 45 34 34 23 34 45 45 46 25 24 26 26 23 26 24 35 26 24 36 34 45