The Adolescent Health Program

The Adolescents Youth and Heath Development Programs was established in 2001 under the oversight of the
Department of Health in partnership with other government agencies with adolescent concerns and other
stakeholdres. The program is targeting youth ages 10²24, and the program provides comprehensive
implementation guidelines for youth-friendly comprehensive health care and services on multiple levels³national,
regional, provincial/city, and municipal.
The program is solidly achored on International and laws, passages and polices meant to address adolescent·s
health concerns. It is operating then within the facets and adolescents and youth health that includes disability,
mental and environmental health, reproductive and sexuality, violence and injury prevention and among others.
It employed strategies to ensure integration of the program intothe health care system in addition, broader
society such as building a supportive policy environment, intensifying IEC and advocacy particularly among
teachers, families, and peers, building the technical capacity of providers of care, and support for youth;
improving accessibility and availability of quality health services, strengthening multi-sectoral partnerships,
resource mobilization, allocation and improved data collection and management.
The program to address sexual and reproductive health issues likewise adopts gender-sensitive approaches. The
primary responsibility for implementation of the AYHDP, and its mainstreaming into the health system, falls to
regional and provincial/city sectors. Guidelines cover service delivery, IEC, training, research and information
collection, monitoring and evaluation, and quality assurance.



Botika Ng Barangay (BnB)
Print Email PDF
Botika ng Barangay
I. What is Botika ng Barangay?
Botika ng Barangay (BnB) - refers to a drug outlet managed by a legitimate community organization (CO)
/ non-government organization (NGO) and/or the Local Government Unit (LGU), with a trained operator and a
supervising pharmacist specifically established in accordance with this Order. The BnB outlet should be initially
identified, evaluated and selected by the concerned Center for Health Development (CHD), approved by the
PHARMA 50 Project Management Unit (PMU) and specially licensed by the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD) to
sell, distribute, offer for sale and/or make available low-priced generic home remedies, over-the-counter (OTC)
Drugs and two (2) selected, publicly-known prescription antibiotics drugs (i.e. Amoxicillin and Cotrimoxazole).
The establishment of the Botika ng Barangay (BnB) in the communities, including the insurgent areas,
ensures accessibility of low-priced generic over-the-counter drugs and eight (8) prescription drugs as
recommended by the National Drug Formulary Committee. Under Memorandum # 31 and its amendment, as
much as 40 essential medicines that address common diseases can be made available in BnBs depending on the
morbidity and mortality profiles of the community. And the policies surrounding the BnB (AO 144) ensure that
such can be sustained in the medium term.
II. Objectives
The objectives of this Order are as follows:
1. To promote equity in health by ensuring the availability and accessibility of affordable, safe and effective,
quality essential drugs to all, with priority for marginalized, underserved, critical and hard to reach areas.
2. To integrate all related issuances of the DOH that provides rules and regulations in the establishment and
operations of BnBs; and
3. To define the roles and responsibilities of the different units of the DOH and other partners from the
different sectors in facilitating and regulating the establishment of BnBs.



Breastfeeding TSEK
Print Email PDF
On February 23, 2011, the Department of Health (DOH) launched the exclusive breastfeeding campaign
dubbed ´Breastfeeding TSEK: (Tama, Sapat, Eksklusibo)µ. The primary target of this campaign is the new and
expectant mothers in urban areas.
This campaign encourages mothers to exclusively breastfeed their babies from birth up to 6 months.
Exclusive breastfeeding means that for the first six months from birth, nothing except breast milk will be given
to babies.
Moreover, the campaign aims to establish a supportive community, as well as to promote public
consciousness on the health benefits of breastfeeding. Among the many health benefits of breastfeeding are
lower risk of diarrhea, pneumonia, and chronic illnesses.



Blood Donation Program
Print Email PDF
Republic Act No. 7719, also known as the National Blood Services Act of 1994, promotes voluntary
blood donation to provide sufficient supply of safe blood and to regulate blood banks. This act aims to inculcate
public awareness that blood donation is a humanitarian act.
The National Voluntary Blood Services Program (NVBSP) of the Department of Health is targeting the
youth as volunteers in its blood donation program this year. In accordance with RA No. 7719, it aims to create
public consciousness on the importance of blood donation in saving the lives of millions of Filipinos.
Based from the data from the National Voluntary Blood Services Program, a total of 654,763 blood
units were collected in 2009. Fifty-eight percent of which was from voluntary blood donation and the remaining
from replacement donation. This year, particular provinces have already achieved 100% voluntary blood
donation. The DOH is hoping that many individuals will become regular voluntary unpaid donors to guarantee
sufficient supply of safe blood and to meet national blood necessities.

Mission:
y Blood Safety
y Blood Adequacy
y Rational Blood Use
y Efficiency of Blood Services



Goal
The ultimate goal of Children's Health 2025 is to achieve good health for all Filipino children by the year 2025.
Introduction
The Philippine National Strategic Framework for lan Development for CHildren or CHILD 21 is a
strategic framework for planning programs and interventions that promote and safegurad the
rights of Filipino children. Covering the period 2000-2005, it paints in broad strokes a vision for
the quality of life of Filipino children in 2025 and a roadmap to achieve the vision.
Children's Health 2025, a subdocument of CHILD 21, realizes that health is a critical and fundamental
element in children's welfare. However, health programs cannot be implemented in isolation from the other
component that determine the safety and well being of children in society. Children's Health 2025, therefore,
should be able to integrate the strategies and interventions into the overall plan for children's development.
Children's Health 2025 contains both mid-term strategies, which is targeted towards the year 2004,
while long-term strategies are targeted by the year 2025. It utilizes a life cycle approach and weaves in the rights
of children. The life cycle approach ensures that the issues, needs and gaps are addressed at the different
stages of the child's growth and development.
The period year 2002 to 2004 will put emphasis on timely diagnosis and management of common
diseases of childhood as well as disease prevention and health promotion, particularly in the fields of
immunization, nutrition and the acquisisiton of health lifestyles. Also critical for effective pallning and
implementation would be addressing the components of the health infrastructure such as human resource
development, quality assurance, monitoring and disease surveillance, and health information and education.
The successful implementation of these strategies will require collaborative efforts with the other
stakeholdres and also implies integration with the other developmental plan of action for children.



CHD Scorecard
Print Email PDF
CHD Scorecard shall reflect performance of the CHD as extension producers of the DOH in its mandate and
function of steering and leading the national health system. Performance indicators shall include extent and
quality of goods and services desired by the local health systems in the regional coverage area, and prescribed
by DOH management, along the 4 main strategies of F1. Performance indicators shall also include satisfaction of
clients with CHD services and products.



Committee of Examiners for Undertakers and Embalmers
Print Email PDF
Rationale
Embalming is the funeral custom of cleaning and disinfecting bodies after death. It has been part of the funeral
parlors so with our lives. For the past decades, embalming has been undergoing profound transformational
events, not only in the Philippines but worldwide. Today, embalming is also considered an art. It is done to
preserve the dead body from natural decomposition and for restoration for a more pleasing appearance.
Likewise, the procedure is significant for restoration of evidences such as in medico-legal cases.
These changes were made possible by the multitudes of forces converging in the national as well as the local
levels, which is impacting on the quality of embalming practice in the country. Embalmers today should
therefore, be looked up to, because of the significant manifold tasks they are rendering including the counseling
assistance they are providing the bereaved parties.
Objective:
The Department of Health (DOH) created the CEUE to regulate embalming practice in the country. The creation
was made possible by Presidential Decree (PD) No. 856 "Code of Sanitation of the Philippines" Chapter XXI
"Disposal of Dead Persons" and Executive Order No. 102 s. 1999 "Rationalization and Streamlining Plan of the
DOH".



The Department of Health created the Committee of Examiners for Massage Therapy (CEMT) to regulate the
practice of massage therapy in accordance to the provisions of the Sanitation Code of the Philippines (PD 856)
and Executive Order No. 102 s. 1999, Reorganization and Streamlining of the Department of Health. It provides
the CEMT the function to ensure that only qualified individuals enter the regulated profession and that the care
and services which the massage therapists provide are within the standards of practice.


OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS:
1. The prevalence of dental caries is reduce
Annual Target : 5% reduction of the prevalence rate every year
2. The prevalence of periodontal disease is reduced
Annual Targets : 5% reduction of the prevalence rate every year
3. Dental caries experience is reduced
Annual Target : 5% reduction of the mean dmft/DMFT for 5/6 years old and 12 years old children every year
4. The proportion of Orally Fit Children (OFC) 12-71 months old is increased
Annual Targets : Increased by 20% yearly



STRATEGIES AND ACTION POINTS:
1. Formulate policy and regulations to ensure the full implementation of OHP
a. Establishment of effective networking system (Deped, DSWD, LGU, PDA, Fit for School, Academe and
others)
b. Development of policies, standards, guidelines and clinical protocols
- Fluoride Use
- Toothbrushing
- Other Preventive Measures
2. Ensure financial access to essential public and personal oral health services
a. Develop an outpatient benefit package for oral health under the NHIP of the government
b. Develop financing schemes for oral health applicable to other levels of care ( Fee for service,
Cooperatives, Network with HMOS)
c. Restoration of oral health budget line item in the GAA of DOH Central Office
3. Provide relevant, timely and accurate information management system for oral Health.
a. Improve existing information system/data collection (reporting and recording dental services and
accomplishments )
- setting of essential indicators
- development of IT system on recording and reporting oral health service accomplishments and indices
- Integrate oral health in every family health information tools, recording books/manuals
b. Conduct Regular Epidemiological Dental Surveys ± every 5 years
4. Ensure access and delivery of quality oral health care servicesa.
a. Upgrading of facilities, equipment, instruments, supplies
b. Develop packages of essential care/services for different groups (children, mothers and marginalized
groups)
-revival of the sealant program for school children
- toothbrushing program for pre-school children
- outreach programs for marginalized groups
c. Design and implement grant assistance mechanism for high performing LGUs
- Awards and incentives
- Sub-allotment of funds for priority programs/activities
d. Regular conduct of consultation meetings, technical updates and program implementation reviews with
stakeholders
5. Build up highly motivated health professionals and trained auxilliaries to manage and provide quality
oral health care
a. Provision of adequate dental personnel
b. Capacity enhancement programs for dental personnel and non-dental personnel




Diabetes Mellitus Prevention and Control Program
Print Email PDF

Diabetes Mellitus, a chronic disabling disorder, becomes a major public health problem as it is one of the top
ten leading causes of mortality in the country.
In accordance with the 42
nd
World Health Assembly Resolution on Diabetes Mellitus and the Republic Act No.
8191 or the National Diabetes Act of 1996, the Department of Health (DOH) implemented a nationwide Diabetes
Mellitus Prevention and Control Program. It shall aim to reduce morbidity and mortality from diabetes and its
complications. It utilizes all levels of preventive care in the community and hospital settings.

Program Strategies/Components:
The program has five components ² health promotion and education, manpower development and capabilities
strengthening, service delivery, monitoring/evaluation, and research.
1. Health Promotion and Education
Intersectoral collaboration is necessary to educate the public on the nature and extent of diabetes, including its
risks factors, complications and the need for early detection and management.
2. Manpower Development and Strengthening of existing diabetes management capabilities
Continuing training and education shall be provided to core trainers and implementers. This also includes
strengthening of existing diabetes treatment/management capabilities of medical clinics.
3. Service delivery/Integration of diabetes prevention and control at the community level
The program shall provide for the integration and provision of services at the lowest possible level of community
health care interventions, from primary to tertiary prevention.
4. Monitoring/Evaluation
A periodic process and impact evaluation shall be conducted every year and five years thereafter and/or
depending on the need of the program.
5. Research
The program shall support research/studies in the clinical, behavioral, and epidemiological areas.




Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Disease Program
Print Email PDF
Emerging and re-emerging infections (e.g., SARS, meningococcemia, Avian Influenza or bird flu, A (H1N1) virus
infection) threaten countries all over the world.
In 2003, SARS affected at least 30 countries with most of the countries from Asia. In response to its sudden and
unexpected emergence, quarantine and isolation measures and rapid contract tracing were carried out. The
Philippines was able to minimize the impact of SARS through effective information dissemination, risk
communication, and efficient conduct of measures.
The unexpected and unusual increase in cases of meningococcal disease (meningococcemia as the predominant
form) in the Cordillera Autonomous Region resulted to at least 50% of cases in the early stage of occurrence.
In 2009, the influenza A (H1N1) virus infection led to global epidemic, or most popularly known as pandemic.
On June 11, 2009, a full pandemic alert was declared by the World Health Organization (WHO).
However, some local health offices from many provinces were not able to respond effectively and rapidly. With
the lack of strong linkages and coordinating mechanisms, the Department of Health (DOH) hopes to further
improve the functionality and effectiveness of local response systems.
Efforts to prepare for emerging infections with potential for causing high morbidity and mortality are being done
by the program. Applicable prevention and control measures are being integrated while the existing systems
and organizational structures are further strengthened.

Goal: Prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging infectious disease from becoming public health
problems.

Objectives:
The program aims to:
1. Reduce public health impact of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases; and
2. Strengthen surveillance, preparedness, and response to emerging and re-emerging infectious
diseases.

Program Strategies:
The DOH, in collaboration with its partner organizations/agencies, employs the key strategies:
1. Development of systems, policies, standards, and guidelines for preparedness and response to
emerging diseases;
2. Technical Assistance or Technical Collaboration;
3. Advocacy/Information dissemination;
4. Intersectoral collaborations;
5. Capability building for management, prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging diseases
that may pose epidemic/pandemic threat; and
6. Logistical support for drugs and vaccines for meningococcemia and anti-viral drugs and vaccine for
Pandemic Influenza Preparedness.



Environmental Health
Print Email PDF
Environmental Health is concerned with preventing illness through managing the environment
and by changing people's behavior to reduce exposure to biological and non-biological agents
of disease and injury. It is concerned primarily with effects of the environment to the health of
the people.
Program strategies and activities are focused on environmental sanitation, environmental health impact
assessment and occupational health through inter-agency collaboration. An Inter-Agency COmmittee on
Environmental Health was created by virute of E.O. 489 to facilitate and improve coordination among concerned
agencies. It provides the venue for technical collaboration, effective monitoring and communication, resource
mobilization, policy review and development. The Committee has five sectoral task forces on water, solid waste,
air, toxic and chemical substances and occupational health.


Expanded Program on Immunization
Print Email PDF
Children need not die young if they receive complete and timely immunization. Children who are not fully
immunized are more susceptible to common childhood diseases. The Expanded Program on Immunization is
one of the DOH Programs that has already been institutionalized and adopted by all LGUs in the region. Its
objective is to reduce infant mortality and morbidity through decreasing the prevalence of six (6) immunizable
diseases (TB, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio and measles)Special campaigns have been undertaken to
improve further program implementation, notably the National Immunization Days (NID),Knock Out Polio
(KOP) and Garantisadong Pambata (GP) since 1993 to 2000. This is being supported by increasing/sustaining the
routine immunization and improved surveillance system.



ssential Newborn Care
Profile/Rationale of the Health Program
The Child Survival Strategy published by the Department of Health has emphasized the need to strengthen
health services of children throughout the stages. The neonatal period has been identified as one of the most
crucial phase in the survival and development of the child. The United Nations Millennium Development Goal
Number 4 of reducing under five child mortality can be achieved by the Philippines however if the neonatal
mortality rates are not addressed from its non-moving trend of decline, MDG 4 might not be achieved.

Vision and Mission: None to mention as these are inclusive in the MNCHN Strategy and NOH 2011-2016
Goals: To reduce neonatal mortality rates by 2/3 from 1990 levels
Objectives:
1. To provide evidence-based practices to ensure survival of the newborn from birth up to the first 28 days
of life
2. To deliver time-bound core intervention in the immediate period after the delivery of the newborn
3. To strengthen health facility environment for breastfeeding initiation to take place and for breastfeeding
to be continued from discharge up to 2 years of life
4. To provide appropriate and timely emergency newborn care to newborns in need of resuscitation
5. To ensure access of newborns to affordable life-saving medicines to reduce deaths and morbidity from
leading causes of newborn conditions
6. To ensure inclusion of newborn care in the overall approach to the Maternal, Newborn, Child Health and
Nutrition Strategy

Stakeholders:
1. Both public and private sector at all levels of health service delivery providing maternal and newborn
services
2. Health Professional Organizations and their member health professionals
a. Pediatricians/neonatalogists of the Philippine Pediatric Society (PPS) and the Philippine Society
of Newborn Medicine (PSNbM)
b. Obstetrician-Gynecologists of the Philippine Obstetrical and Gynecological Society (POGS)
c. Perinatologists of the Perinatal Association of the Philippines, Inc., (PAPI)
d. Anesthesiologists and obstetric anesthesiologists of the Philippine Society of Anesthesiologists
(PSA) and the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia of the Philippines (SOAP),
e. Family medicine specialists of the Philippine Academy of Family Physicians (PAFP)
f. Nurses, Maternal and child nurses, intensive care nurses of the Philippine Nurses Association
and its affiliate nursing societies
g. Midwives of the Integrated Midwives of the Philippines (IMAP), Philippine League of
Government and Private Midwives, Inc. (PLGPMI), Midwives Foundation of the Philippines (MFP)
and Well Family Midwives Clinic
3. Government regulatory bodies e.g. Professional Regulations Commission
4. Academe - professors and instructors from members schools and colleges of:
a. Association of Philippine Medical Colleges (APMC)
b. Association of Deans of Philippine Colleges of Nursing (ADPCN)
c. Association of Philippine Schools of Midwifery
5. Hospital, health care administrator and infection control associations
a. Philippine Hospital Association (PHA)
b. Private Hospitals Association of the Philippines (PHAP)
c. Philippine College of Hospital Administrators
d. Philippine Hospital Infection Control Society
6. Local government units - local chief executives and LGU legislative bodies

Beneficiaries:
a. Newborns all over the country
b. Parents
c. communities

Program Strategies:
1. Health Sector Reform
a. Policy and Guideline Issuance
i) Administrative Order 2009-0025 - Adopting Policies and Guidelines on Essential
Newborn Care - December 1, 2009
ii) Clinical Pocket Guide on Essential Newborn Care
b. Aquino Health Agenda and Achieving Universal Health Care - Administrative Order 2010-0036
c. PhilHealth Circular 2011-011 dated August 5, 2011 on Newborn Care Package
d. Development of Operationalization of Essential Newborn Care Protocol in Health Facilities
2 Identification of Centers of Excellence
- Adoption of essential newborn care protocol(including intrapartum care and the MNCHN
Strategy)
3. Curriculum Reforms
- Curriculum integration of essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN
Strategy) in undergraduate health courses
- Integration and revision of board exam questions in licensure examinations for physicians,
nurses and midives
4. Social Marketing
- Development of social marketing tools - Unang Yakap MDG 4 & 5


Major Activities and its Guidelines:
a. Conduct of one-day orientation-workshop on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and
the MNCHN Strategy)
b. Regional MNCHN Conference for CHDs and LGUs including DOH-retained hospitals and LGU hospitals


Current Status of the Program
A. What have been achieved/done
1. Policy was issued in December 1, 2009
2. DOH/WHO Scale-up Implementation was done in 11 hospitals
3. Advocacy Partners Forum on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN
Strategy)
4. One-day orientation-workshop on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN
Strategy) among health workers in different health facilities
5. Inclusion of dexamethasone and surfactant as core medicines in the essential medicines list for
children in the Philippine National Formulary

B. Statistics
Early outcomes of EINC implementation has shown reduction on neonatal deaths in select DOH-retained
hospitals including deaths from neonatal sepsis and complicatons of prematurity

Partner organizations/agencies:
y National Nutrition Council
y Population Commission
y WHO
y UNICEF
y UNFPA
y AusAID
y USAID
y health professional and academic organizations mentioned above.

Program Manager:
Dr. Anthony Calibo
Supervising Health Program Officer
Direct Line: (63 2) 7392-956; (63 2) 6517800 local 1726, 1728, 1729
Telefax (Director IV's Office): (63 2) 711-7846
Mobile: 09174810661 or 09237764870



Family Planning
Print Email PDF
Brief Description of Program
A national mandated priority public health program to attain the country's national health development: a health
intervention program and an important tool for the improvement of the health and welfare of mothers, children
and other members of the family. It also provides information and services for the couples of reproductive age
to plan their family according to their beliefs and circumstances through legally and medically acceptable family
planning methods.
The program is anchored on the following basic principles.
y Responsible Parenthood which means that each family has the right and duty to determine the desired
number of children they might have and when they might have them. And beyond responsible parenthood
is Responsible Parenting which is the proper ubringing and education of chidren so that they grow up to
be upright, productive and civic-minded citizens.
y Respect for Life. The 1987 Constitution states that the government protects the sanctity of life. Abortion is
NOT a FP method:
y Birth Spacing refers to interval between pregnancies (which is ideally 3 years). It enables women to recover
their health improves women's potential to be more productive and to realize their personal aspirations
and allows more time to care for children and spouse/husband, and;
y Informed Choice that is upholding and ensuring the rights of couples to determin the number and spacing
of their children according to their life's aspirations and reminding couples that planning size of their
families have a direct bearing on the quality of their children's and their own lives.

Intended Audience:
Men and women of reproductive age (15-49) years old) including adolescents

Area of Coverage:
Nationwide

Mandate:
EO 119 and EO 102

Vision:
Empowered men and women living healthy, productive and fulfilling lives and exercising the right to regulate
their own fertility through legally and acceptable family planning services.

Mission
The DOH in partnership with LGUs, NGOs, the private sectors and communities ensures the availability of FP
information and services to men and women who need them.

Program Goals:
To provide universal access to FP information, education and services whenever and wherever these are needed.

Objectives
General
To help couples, individuals achieve their desired family size within the context of responsible parenthood and
improve their reproductive health. Specifically, by the end of 2004:
Reduce
y MMR from 172 deaths 100,000 LB in 1998 to less than 100 deaths/100,000 LB
y IMR from 35.3 deaths/1000 livebirths in 1998 to less than 30 deaths/1000 live births
y TFR from 3.7 children per woman in 1998 to 2.7 chidren per woman
Increase
y Contraceptive Prevalence Rate from 45.6% in 1998 to 57%
y Proportion of modern FP methods use from 28>2% to 50.5%

Key Result Areas
1. Policy, guidelines and plans formulation
2. Standard setting
3. Technical assistance to CHDs/LGUs and other partner agencies
4. Advocacy, social mobilization
5. Information, education and counselling
6. Capability building for trainers of CHDs/LGUs
7. Logistics management
8. Monitoring and evaluation
9. Research and development

Strutegles
1. Frontline participation of DOH-retained hospitals
2. Family Planning for the urban and rural poor
3. Demand Generation through Community-Based Management Information System
4. Mainstreaming Natural Family Planning in the public and NGO health facilities
5. Strengthening FP in the regions with high unmet need for FP: CAR, CHD 5, 8, NCR, ARMM
6. Contraceptive Interdependence Initiative

Major Activities
I. Frontline participation of DOH-retained hospitals
y Establishment of FP Itinerant team by each hospital to respond to the unmet needs for
permanent FP methods and to bring the FP services nearer to our urban and rural poor
communities
y FP services as part of medical and surgical missions of the hospital
y Provide budget to support operations of the itenerant teams inclduing the drugs and medical
supplies needed for voluntary surgical sterilization (VS) services
y Partnership with LGU hospitals which serve as the VS site
II. Family Planning for the urban and rural poor
y Expanded role of Volunteer Health Workers (VHWs) in FP provision
y Partnership of itenerant team and LGU hospitals
y Provision of FP services
III. Demund Generutlon through Communlty-Bused Munugement Informutlon System
y Identification and masterlisting of potential FP clients and users in need of PF services
(permanent or temporary methods)
y Segmentation of potential clients and users as to what method is preferred or used by clients
IV. Mainstreaming Natural Family Planning in the public and NGO health facilities
y Orientation of CHD staff and creation of Regional NFP Management Committee
y Diacon with stakeholders
y Informutlon, Educutlon und counsellng uctlvltles
y Advocacy and social mobilization efforts
y Production of NFP IEC materials
y Monitoring and evaluation activities
V. Strengthening FP in the regions with high unmet need for FP: CAR, CHD 5, 8, NCR, ARMM
y )leld of ltlnerunt teums by retulned hospltuls to provlde VS servlces neurer to the communlty
y Installation of COmmunity Based Management Information System
y Provision of augmentation funds for CBMIS activities
VI. Contraceptive Interdependence Initiative
y Expansion of PhilHealth coverage to include health centers providing No Scalpel Vasectomy and FP
Itenerant Teams
y Expansion of Philhealth benefit package to include pills, injectables and IUD
y Social Marketing of contraceptives and FP services by the partner NGOs
y National Funding/Subsidy
VIII. Development /Updutlng of )3 CLlnlcul Stundurds
IX. Formulation of FP related policies/guidelines. E.g. Creation of VS Outreach team by retained hospitals and its
operationalization, GUidelines on the Provision of VS services, etc.
X. Production and reproduction of FP advocacy and IEC materials
XI. Provision of logistics support such as FP commodities and VS drugs and medical supplies

Other Partners
1. Funding Agencies
y United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
y Unlted Nutlons )unds for 3opulutlon Actlvltles (UN)3A)
y Management Sciences for Health (MSH)
y Engender Health
y The Futures Group
2. NGOs
y Reachout foundation
y DKT
y Philippine Federation for Natual Family Planning (PFNFP)
y John Snow Inc. - Well Family Clinic
y Phlippine Legislators Committee on Population Development (PLPCD)
y Remedios Foundation
y Family Planning Organization of the Philippines (FPOP)
y Institute of Maternal and Child Health (IMCH)
y Integrated Maternal and Child Care Services and Development, Inc.
y Friendly Care Foundation, Inc.
y Institute of Reproductive Health
3. Other GOs
y Commission on Population
y DILG
y DOLE
y LGUs



ood and Waterborne Diseases Prevention and Control Program
Print Email PDF
The program covers diseases of a parasitic, fungal, viral, and bacteria in nature, usually acquired through the
ingestion of contaminated drinking water or food. The more common of these diseases are bacterial in nature,
the most common of which are typhoid fever and cholera. These two organisms had been the cause of major
outbreaks in the Philippines in the last two years. Parasitic organisms are also an important factor, among them
capillariasis, Heterophydiasis, and paragonimiasis, which are endemic in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao.
Cysticercosis is also a major problem since it has a neurologic component to the illness. The approaches to
control and prevention is centered on public health awareness regarding food safety as well as strengthening
treatment guidelines.



Food Fortification Program
Print Email PDF
Objectives:
1. To provide the basis for the need for a food fortification program in the Philippines: The Micronutrient
Malnutrition Problem
2. To discuss various types of food fortification strategies
3. To provide an update on the current situation of food fortification in the Philippines
Fortification as defined by Codex Alimentarius
´the addition of one or more essential nutrients to food, whether or not it is normally contained in the food, for
the purpose of preventing or correcting a demonstrated deficiencyof one or more nutrients in the population or
specific population groupsµ
Vitamin A, Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) and its Consequences
y ¿Vitamin A - an essential nutrient as retinol needed by the body for normal sight, growth, reproduction
and immune competence
y ¿Vitamin A deficiency - a condition characterized by depleted liver stores & low blood levels of vitamin A
due to prolonged insufficient dietary intake of vit. A followed by poor absorption or utilization of vit. A in
the body
y ¿VAD affects children·s proper growth, resistance to infection, and chances of survival (23 to 35%
increased child mortality), severe deficiency results to blindness, night blindness and bitot·s spot
Prevalence of Vitamin A Deficiency:
1993, 1998, 2003, 2008
(DOST ² FNRI, NNS)
Physiological State 1993 1998 2003 2008
6 months - 5 yrs. 35.3 38.0 40.1 15.2
Pregnant 16.4 22.2 17.5 9.5
Lactating 16.4 16.5 20.1 6.4
WHO Cut ² off Point to be considered a public health problem = >15%
Iron and Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) and its consequences
y ¿Iron - an essential mineral and is part of hemoglobin, the red protein in red blood cells that carries
oxygen from the lungs to the cells
y ¿Iron Deficiency Anemia - condition where there is lack of iron in the body resulting to low hemoglobin
concentration of the blood
y ¿IDA results in premature delivery, increased maternal mortality, reduce ability to fight infection and
transmittable diseases and low productivity
Prevalence of anemia by age, sex and physiologic state: Philippines, 2008

Source: NNS:FNRI
Iodine and Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD)
y ¿Iodine -a mineral and a component of the thyroid hormones
y ¿Thyroid hormones - needed for the brain and nervous system to develop & function normally
y ¿Iodine Deficiency Disorders refers to a group of clinical entities caused by inadequacy of dietary iodine
for the thyroid hormone resulting into various condition e.g. goiter, cretinism, mental retardation, loss of
IQ points
Progress in the Philippines towards the Elimination of IDD, 1998-2008
Indicator Goal*
Achievements
1998 2003 2008
Proportion of Households using Iodized Salt, % >90 9.7 56.0 81.1
Median Urinary Iodine, ug/L
6-12 yrs. 100-200 71 201 132
Lactating Women 100-200 - 111 81
Pregnant Women 150-249 - 142 105
Proportion < 50µg/L, % < 20
6-12 yrs. 35.8 11.4 19.7
Lactating Women - 23.7 34.0
Pregnant Women - 18.0 25.8
*ICC-IDD 2007
Policy on Food Fortification
y ASIN LAW
Republic Act 8172, ´An Act Promoting Salt Iodization Nationwide and for other purposesµ, Signed into law on
Dec. 20, 1995
y Food Fortification Law
Republic Act 8976, ´An Act Establishing the Philippine Food Fortification Program and for other purposesµ
mandating fortification of flour, oil and sugar with Vitamin A and flour and rice with iron by November 7, 2004
and promoting voluntary fortification through the SPSP, Signed into law on November 7, 2000

Status of the Philippine Food Fortification Program
Status and Recommendations for the Sangkap Pinoy Seal Program
y ¿There are 139 processed food products with SangkapPinoySeal with 83% with vitamin A, 29% with iron and
14% with iodine (2008)
y ¿37% of the products are snack foods
y ¿Most of the products FDA analyzed are within the standard
y ¿Based on 2003 NNS Households· awareness of SPS- and FF-products is 11% and 14%, respectively, in 2008
awareness is 11.6%
y ¿Although awareness is low, usage of SPS-products is 99.2%
Recommendations:
y ¿Review voluntary fortification standards as standards were developed prior to mandatory fortification
y ¿Conduct in-depth analysis of the coverage of SangkapPinoySeal of the 2008 NNS
y ¿Update list of Sangkap Pinoy Seal products as some companies have stopped using the seal in their
products
y ¿Intensify promotions of Sangkap Pinoy Seal
Status and Recommendation on Flour Fortification with Vitamin A and Iron
Status:
y ¿Based on FDA monitoring all local flour millers are fortifying with vitamin A and iron
y ¿94% and 92% of all samples tested by FDA in 2009 were fortified with vitamin A and iron respectively
while 77% and 99% were fortified with vitamin A and iron respectively. In 2010 decrease in vitamin A due
to non-fortified imported and market samples flour.
y ¿58% of samples from local mills for vitamin A and 67% of imported flour for iron were fortified according
to standards.
Recommendations:
y ¿Review fortificantsfor iron and possible other micronutrients to be added to wheat flour
y Continue monitoring wheat fortification
y ¿Assist flour millers to improve quality of fortification
y ¿Need to show impact of flour fortification
Status and Recommendations on Mandatory Fortification of Refined Sugar with Vitamin A
Status:
y ¿Non ² fortification by industry due to the unresolved issue of who will bear the cost of fortification
brought about by the quedansystem of transferable certificates of sugar ownership.
y ¿Lack of premix production
y ¿Fortification of refined sugar would benefit mainly those in the high income group.
Recommendations:
y ¿Continue discussions with sugar industry to explore a compromise for fortification ie. fortification of
washed sugar
y ¿Review policy on mandatory fortification of refined sugar
Status and Recommendations on Rice Fortification with Iron
Status:
y ¿NFA is fortifying 50% of its rice in 2009 and 2010
y ¿With the non ² fortification of NFA rice, private sector has an excuse for non ² fortification of its rice.
y ¿There is limited commercial/private sector iron rice premix and iron fortified rice production and
distribution mostly in Mindanao (Region XII and XI) with Gen San having the only commercial iron rice
premix plant in the Philippines and Davao City implementing mandatory rice fortification in food outlets
y ¿NFA conducted communications campaign for its iron fortified rice thru the so called ´I-riceµ campaign
though issues remain on the acceptability of its product
Recommendation:
y ¿Review of mandatory fortification of rice with iron
Status and Recommendations on Cooking Oil Fortification with Vitamin A
Status:
y ¿Based on the samples analyzed by FDA in 2009 and 2010, more than 90% are fortified (91% in 2009 and
94% in 2010)
y ¿Samples monitored were labeled and packed
y FDA is not monitoring "takal"
Recommendations:
y To increase frequency of monitoring by FDA and other agencies such as PCA and LGU·s, to ensure all oil
refiners and repackersare monitored at least once a year
y ¿Monitoring of ´takalµ oil, use of test kit
y ¿Monitoring imported oil, FDA and BOC to coordinate
y ¿Review policy of mandatory fortification of oil to possibly limit to those mostly used by at risk population
(coconut and palm oil)
Status and Recommendations on Salt Iodization
Status:
y Based on the 2008 NNS, 81.1% of households were positive for iodine using Rapid Test Kit (RTK)
y In the same survey for Region III, 55.7% were positive for RTK but only 34.2% and 24.2% have iodine
content >5ppm and >15ppm respectively using WYD Tester
y For FDA monitoring in 2010, 88% were >5ppm while 44% were >15ppm
y FDA started implementing localization of ASIN Law with General Santos City as the 1stto have a MOA with
FDA on localization
Recommendation:
y FDA to expand localization of ASIN Law
y Set ² up iodine titration for testing iodine in salt
y Continue to intensify monitoring particularly imported and takal salt
Food Fortification Day Theme 2010:
EO 382 declares November 7 as the National Food Fortification Day

Program Coordinator:
Ms. Liberty Importa
National Center for Disease Prevention and Control - Family Health Office
Phone: 651-7800 local 1726-1728
Email: limporta@yahoo.com



Garantisadong Pambata
Print Email PDF
The Mandate: A.O. 36, s2010
Aquino Health Agenda (AHA): Achieving Universal Health Care for All Filipinos
Goal
y ¿Achievement of better health outcomes, sustained health financing and responsive health system by
ensuring that all Filipinos, esp. the disadvantaged group (lowest 2 income quintiles) have equitable access
to affordable health care
Universal Health Care
Strategies:
y Financial risk protection.
y Improved access to quality hospitals and facilities
y Attainment of health-related MDGs by:
y Deploy CHTs to actively assist families in assessing and acting on their health needs
y Utilize life cycle approach in providing needed services: FP, ANC, FBD, ENC, IPP, GP for 0-14 years old
y Aggressive promotion of healthy lifestyle change
y Harness strengths of inter-agency and intersectoralcooperation with DepEd, DSWD and DILG
EXPANDED GARANTISADONG PAMBATA
Comprehensive and integrated package of services and communication on health, nutrition and environment for
children available everyday at various settings such as home, school, health facilities and communities by
government and non-government organizations, private sectors and civic groups.



Human Resource for Health Network
Print Email PDF

The Department of Health (DOH) spearheaded the creation of Human Resource for Health Network (HRHN),
which is a multi-sectoral organization composed of government agencies and non-government organizations.
The network seeks to address and respond to human resource for health (HRH) concerns and problems.
HRHN was formally established during the launching and signing of the Memorandum of Understanding among
its member agencies and organizations held on October 25, 2006. This network was grounded on the Human
Resources for Health Master Plan (HRHMP) developed by the DOH and the World Health Organization (WHO). The
HRHN was conceived to implement programs and activities that require multi-sectoral coordination.



Health Development Program for Older Persons - (Bureau or Office:
National Center for Disease Prevention and Control )
Print Email PDF
Bureuu or Offlce: Nutlonul Center for Dlseuse 3reventlon und Control
Program Briefer
Cognizant of its mandate and crucial role, the Philippine Department of Heallth (DOH)
formulated the Health Care Program for Older Persons (HCPOP) in 1998. The DOH HCPOP
(presently renamed Health Development Program for Older Persons) sets the policies,
standards and guidelines for local governments to implement the program in collaboration with
other government agencies, non-government organizations and the private sector.
The program intends to promote and improve the quality of life of older persons through the establishment and
provision of basic health services for older persons, formulation of policies and guidelines pertaining to older
persons, provision of information and health education to the public, provision of basic and essential training of
manpower dedicated to older persons and, the conduct of basic and applied researches.



REPUBLIC ACT NO. 7876
AN ACT ESTABLISHING A SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER IN ALL CITIES AND MUNICIPALITIES OF THE
PHILIPPINES, AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS THEREFOR.
Sec. 1. Title. ³ This Act shall be known as the "Senior Citizens Center Act of the Philippines."
Sec. 2. Declaration of Policy. ³ It is the declared policy of the State to provide adequate social services and an
improved quality of life for all. For this purpose, the State shall adopt an integrated and comprehensive
approach towards health development giving priority to elderly among others.chan robles virtual law library


Health Development Program for Older Persons (Global Movement for
Active Ageing (Global Embrace 1999))
Print Email PDF
The Global Movement for Active Ageing, which was conceived by the World Health
Organization (WHO), will need the collaboration of many different partners from all
over the world. Active ageing is the capacity of the people, as they grow older to lead
productive and healthy lives in their families, societies and economies.
The Global Movement will be a network for all those interested in moving policies and practice towards Actives
Ageing. It will provide models and ideas for programme and projects that promote active ageing.
The key messages of the Global Movement are:
1. CELEBRATE ²
Celebrate ageing ; getting older is good; the alternative dying prematurely is not
2. A SOCIETY FOR ALL
Active ageing is key for older persons continuing to contribute to society; all dimensions for being active should
be taken into account : the physical, mental, social, and spiritual
3. INTEGENERATIONAL SOLIDARITY
Older persons should not be marginalized: reflecting the theme of the UN International Year of Older Persons,
´towards a society for all agesµ
What is the Global Embrace 1999?
The Global Embrace, which will mark simultaneously the launching of Global Movement for Active Ageing 1999
International Year for Older Persons, is exactly as the title implies, a series of walk events embracing the globe:
in time zone after time zone, ageing will be celebrated in cities around the world, through these walk events.
The walk will start in countries in the Pacific, where the date line marks the start of a new day.
Thus, the first walk will be in New Zealand .. followed by Australia, then Japan, Korea, China, Thailand, the
Philippines, Indonesia and India.. Always at a set time, a group of cities, within the same time zone, will be
starting their celebrations. Eventually, they will reach the Middle East, Africa, Europe, the America, until the very
last locations will close the day and embrace. The Global embrace is a round the clock around the world party
which every country is invited.



Health Development Program for Older Persons - R.A. 7432 (An Act to
Maximize the Contribution of Senior Citizens to Nation Building, Grant
Benefits and Special Privileges)
Print Email PDF
AN ACT TO MAXIMIZE THE CONTRIBUTION OF SENIOR CITIZENS TO NATION BUILDING, GRANT BENEFITS
AND SPECIAL PRIVILEGES AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representative of the Philippines in Congress assembled:
SECTION 1. Declaration of Policies and Objectives ² Pursuant to Article XV, Section 4 of the Constitution, it is
the duty of the family to take care of its elderly members while the State may design programs of social security
for them. In addition to this, Section 10 in the Declaration of Principles and State Policies provides: ´The State
shall provide social justice in all phases of national developmentµ. Further, Article XIII, Section II provides: ´The
State shall adopt an integrated and comprehensive approach to health development which shall endeavor to
make essential goods, health and other social services available to all the people at affordable cost. There shall
be priority for the needs of the underprivileged, sick, elderly, disabled, women and children.µ Consonant with
these constitutional principles the following are the declared policies of this Act:
a) To motivate and encourage the senior citizens to contribute to nation building;
b) To encourage their families and communities they live with to reaffirm the valued Filipino tradition of
caring for the senior citizens.
In accordance with these policies, this act aims to:
1) Establish mechanism whereby the contribution of the senior citizens are maximized;
2) Adopt measures whereby our senior citizens are assisted and appreciated by the community as a
whole;
3) Establish a program beneficial to the senior citizens, their families and the rest of the community that
they serve.



Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF)
Print Email PDF
I. Profile/Rationale of the Health Program
A global strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) was issued jointly by the World Health Organization
(WHO) and the United Nations Children·s Fund (UNICEF) in 2002, to reverse the disturbing trends in infant and
young child feeding practices. This global strategy was endorsed by the 55th World Health Assembly in May
2002 and by the UNICEF Executive Board in September 2002 respectively.
In 2004, infant and young child feeding practices were assessed using the WHO assessment protocol and rated
poor to fair. Findings showed four out of ten newborns were initiated to breastfeeding within an hour after birth,
three out of ten infants less than six months were exclusively breastfed and the median duration of
breastfeeding was only thirteen months. The complementary feeding indicator was also rated as poor since only
57.9 percent of 6-9 months children received complementary foods while continuing to breastfed. The
assessment also found out that complementary foods were introduced too early, at the age of less than two
months. These poor practices needed urgent action and aggressive sustained interventions.
To address these problems on infant and young child feeding practices, the first National IYCF Plan of Action
was formulated. It aimed to improve the nutritional status and health of children especially the under-three and
consequently reduce infant and under-five mortality. Specifically, its objectives were to improve, protect and
promote infant and young child feeding practices, increase political commitment at all levels, provide a
supportive environment and ensure its sustainability. Figure 1 shows the identified key objectives, supportive
strategies and key interventions to guide the overall implementation and evaluation of the 2005-2010 Plan of
Action. The main efforts were directed towards creating a supportive environment for appropriate IYCF practices.
The approval of the National Plan of Action in 2005 helped the Department of Health (DOH) and its partners, in
the development of the first (1st) National Policy on Infant and Young Child Feeding. Thus on May 23, 2005,
Administrative Order (AO) 2005-0014: National Policies on IYCF was signed and endorsed by the Secretary of
Health. The policy was intended to guide health workers and other concerned parties in ensuring the protection,
promotion and support of exclusive breastfeeding and adequate and appropriate complementary feeding with
continued breastfeeding. (1)



Iligtas sa Tigdas ang Pinas
Print Email PDF

A Door-to-Door Measles-Rubella (MR) Immunization Campaign Vaccinating All Children, 9
months to below 8 years old From April 4 to May 4, 2011
The Philippines has committed to eliminate measles in 2012, the target year agreed upon with the other
countries in the Western Pacific Region. Three (3) mass measles immunization campaigns were conducted in
1998, 2004 and 2007, achieving 95% coverage in each round. In contrast, the annual coverage for routine
measles vaccination given to infants· ages 9-11 months never reached the target of at least 95%. The highest
coverage ever attained is 92% and the lowest coverage was 67% (1987 DOH EPI Report).
The lower the coverage, the faster is the accumulation of unimmunized susceptible infants, resulting in measles
outbreaks in different areas of the Philippines. Laboratory confirmed measles cases continued to be reported all
over the country, which indicates uninterrupted circulation of measles virus transmission resulting to illness and
deaths among children.
Mass measles immunization campaigns provide a ´second opportunityµ to ´catch missed childrenµ, but these are
done every 2-3 years interval and therefore not enough to prevent seasonal outbreaks from occurring in areas
with low immunization coverage. The administration of a 2nd dose of measles containing vaccines on a routine
schedule will provide this ´second opportunityµ at an earlier time and ensure the protection against measles of
infants/children who failed to be protected during the first dose.
As a response to interrupt the transmission of the measles virus and prevent a potential large measles outbreak
to occur, there is an urgent need to conduct a measles supplemental immunization activity this April 2011. All
children ages 9-95 months old nationwide should be given a dose of measles-rubella vaccine through a door-to-
door vaccination campaign. Unlike previous campaign, a measles-free certification will be issued to city/province
meeting all the criteria of (1) all barangays passed the RCA with no missed child and 95% and above house
marking accuracy; (2) there are no measles cases for the next 3 months after the campaign and (3) measles
surveillance indicators have met the national standards.



Inter Local Health Zone
Print Email PDF
An ILHZ is defined to be any form or organized arrangement for coordinating the operations of an array and
hierarchy of health providers and facilities, which typically includes primary health providers, core referral
hospital and end-referral hospital, jointly serving a common population within a local geographic area under the
jurisdictions of more than one local government.
ILHZ, as a form of inter-LGU cooperation is established in order to better protect the public or collective health of
their community, assure the constituents access to a range of services necessary to meet health care needs of
individuals, and to manage their limited resources for health more efficiently and equitably.
For these to happen, existing ILHZs in the country must strengthen their operations and sustain their
functionality. Regardless of the organizational nature of each ILHZ, whether these are formally organized,
informally organized or DOH-initiated, the overall aim is to make each ILHZ functional in order to perform its
abovementioned purposes and tasks.
It must be recognized that a good inter-LGU coordination in health is one that secures health benefits for the
people living in LGUs that are coordinating with one another. A functional ILHZ therefore is to be viewed as one
that provides health benefits to its individual residents and to the zone population as a whole. The ILHZ
functionality is defined mainly by observable zone-wide health sector performance results in terms of:
(i) improved health status and coverage of public health intervention of the zone population;



Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI)
Print Email PDF
One million children under five years old die each year in less developed countries. Just five diseases
(pneumonia, diarrhea, malaria, measles and dengue hemorrhagic fever) account for nearly half of these deaths
and malnutrition is often the underlying condition. Effective and affordable interventions to address these
common conditions exist but they do not yet reach the populations most in need, the young and impoverish.
The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy has been introduced in an increasing
number of countries in the region since 1995. IMCI is a major strategy for child survival, healthy growth and
development and is based on the combined delivery of essential interventions at community, health facility and
health systems levels. IMCI includes elements of prevention as well as curative and addresses the most common
conditions that affect young children. The strategy was developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and
United Nations Children·s Fund (UNICEF).
In the Philippines, IMCI was started on a pilot basis in 1996, thereafter more health workers and
hospital staff were capacitated to implement the strategy at the frontline level.

Objectives of IMCI
y Reduce death and frequency and severity of illness and disability, and
y Contribute to improved growth and development
Components of IMCI
y Improving case management skills of health workers
11-day Basic Course for RHMs, PHNs and MOHs
5 - day Facilitators course
5 ² day Follow-up course for IMCI Supervisors
y Improving over-all health systems
y Improving family and community health practices

Rationale for an integrated approach in the management of sick children
Majority of these deaths are caused by 5 preventable and treatable conditions namely: pneumonia,
diarrhea, malaria, measles and malnutrition. Three (3) out of four (4) episodes of childhood illness
are caused by these five conditions
Most children have more than one illness at one time. This overlap means that a single diagnosis may
not be possible or appropriate.

Who are the children covered by the IMCI protocol?
Sick children birth up to 2 months (Sick Young Infant)
Sick children 2 months up to 5 years old (Sick child)

Strategies/Principles of IMCI
y All sick children aged 2 months up to 5 years are examined for GENERAL DANGER signs and all Sick
Young Infants Birth up to 2 months are examined for VERY SEVERE DISEASE AND LOCAL BACTERIAL
INFECTION. These signs indicate immediate referral or admission to hospital
y The children and infants are then assessed for main symptoms. For sick children, the main symptoms
include: cough or difficulty breathing, diarrhea, fever and ear infection. For sick young infants, local
bacterial infection, diarrhea and jaundice. All sick children are routinely assessed for nutritional,
immunization and deworming status and for other problems
y Only a limited number of clinical signs are used
y A combination of individual signs leads to a child·s classification within one or more symptom groups
rather than a diagnosis.
y IMCI management procedures use limited number of essential drugs and encourage active participation of
caretakers in the treatment of children
y Counseling of caretakers on home care, correct feeding and giving of fluids, and when to return to clinic is
an essential component of IMCI

BASIS FOR CLASSIFYING THE CHILD·S ILLNESS (please see enclosed portion of the IMCI Chartbooklet) The
child·s illness is classified based on a color-coded triage system:
PINK- indicates urgent hospital referral or admission
YELLOW- indicates initiation of specific Outpatient Treatment
GREEN ² indicates supportive home care

Steps of the IMCI Case management Process
The following is the flow of the iMCI process. At the out-patient health facility, the health worker should
routinely do basic demographic data collection, vital signs taking, and asking the mother about the child's
problems. Determine whether this is an initial or a follow-up visit. The health worker then proceeds with the IMCI
process by checking for general danger signs, assessing the main symptoms and other processes indicated in
the chart below.
Take note that for the pink box, referral facility includes district, provincial and tertiary hospitals. Once
admitted, the hospital protocol is used in the management of the sick child.

THE INTEGRATED CASE MANAGEMENT PROCESS



Program Manager:
Ms. Elizabeth M. Joven
Department of Health - National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (DOH-NCDPC)
Contact Number: 651-7800 local 1726-1730
Email: beth3joven@yahoo.com
y 4182 reads



Knock Out Tigdas 2007
Print Email PDF
Knock-out Tigdas Logo
ի.nock-out Tlgdus 2007լ ls u sequel to the 1998 und 2004 իLlgtus Tlgdusլ muss meusles lmmunlzutlon cumpulgn.
All chlldren 9 months to 48 months old ( born October 1, 2003 գ Junuury 1,2007) should be vucclnuted ugulnst
meusles from October 15 - November 15, 2007 , door-to-door. All heulth centers, burunguy heulth stutlons, hospltuls
und other temporury lmmunlzutlon sltes such us busketbull court, town pluzus und other ldentlfled publlc pluces wlll
ulso offer )5EE vucclnutlon servlces durlng the cumpulgn perlod.
Other servlces to be glven lnclude Vltumln A Cupsule und dewormlng tublet.




LEPROSY

Vision: Empowered primary stakeholders in leprosy and eliminated leprosy as a public health problem by 2020

Mission: To ensure the provision of a comprehensive, integrated quality leprosy services at all levels of health
care

Goal: To maintain and sustain the elimination status



LGU Scorecard
Print Email PDF
The performance indicators in the LGU Scorecard are a subset of the Performance Indicator Framework (PIF) of
the ME3. The performance indicators measure basic intermediate outcomes and major outputs of health reform
programs, projects and activities (PPAs).
There are 46 performance indicators in the LGU Scorecard categorized in two sets (Set I and Set II). The two sets
of performance indicators are the following:
Set I is composed of 27 outcome indicators mostly representing intermediate outcomes that can be assessed
every year (See Annex 1: Data Definitions for Set I Indicators in LGU Scorecard). Set II is composed of 27 output
indicators representing major thrusts and key interventions for the four reform components of service delivery,
regulation, financing, and governance. They are mostly composed of health system reform outputs. These
indicators are assessed only every 3-5 years, since these require more time and more resources to set up. The
equity dimensions of these indicators are not measured (See Annex 2: Data Definitions for Set II Indicators in
LGU Scorecard).
Set I performance indicators of the LGU Scorecard are standardized as to numerators, denominators, multipliers
and data sources. The definition of performance indicators is consistent with the Department of Health FHSIS
data dictionary. The other references used in defining performance indicators in the LGU Scorecard are
PhilHealth data definitions and WHO definitions of indicators. The standardization of performance indicators
guarantees consistency of data across various LGUs and across years of implementation. It also facilitates the
automation of the LGU Scorecard collection and publication of results.
The sources of data utilized for the LGU Scorecard are the institutional data sources in the Department of Health.
The availability of data on an annual basis was an important consideration for inclusion of Set I performance
indicators in the LGU Scorecard.



Licensure Examinations for Paraprofessionals Undertaken by the
Department of Health
Print Email PDF
I. Mandates
Presidential Decree No. 856 ´Code of Sanitation of the Philippinesµ


y Massage Therapists


Administrative Order No. 2010-0034 ² ´Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations Governing Massage Clinics
and Sauna Bath Establishmentsµ
y Embalmers
Administrative Order No. 2010-0033 ´Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations Governing Disposal of Dead
Personsµ

Committees
The Committee of Examiners for Massage Therapy (CEMT) and the Committee of Examiners for Undertakers and
Embalmers (CEUE) were created by the DOH to regulate the practice of massage therapy and embalming to
ensure that only qualified individuals enter the profession and that the care and services to be provided are
within the standards of practice.



Malaria Control Program
Print Email PDF
malaria_thumb.jpg
Malaria is a parasite-caused disease that is usually acquired through the bite of a female Anopheles mosquito. It
can be transmitted in the following ways: (1) blood transfusion from an infected individual; (2) sharing of IV
needles; and (3) transplacenta (transfer of malaria parasites from an infected mother to its unborn child).
This parasite-caused disease is the 9
th
leading cause of morbidity in the country. As of this year, there are 58 out
of 81 provinces that are malaria endemic and 14 million people are at risk. In response to this health problem,
the Department of Health (DOH) coordinated with its partner organizations and agencies to employ key
interventions with regard to malaria control.

Vision: Malaria-free Philippines

Mission: To empower health workers, the population at risk and all others concerned to eliminate malaria in the
country.

Goal: To significantly reduce malaria burden so that it will no longer affect the socio-economic development of
individuals and families in endemic areas.



Measles Elimination Campaign (Ligtas Tigdas)



National Tuberculosis Control Program
Print Email PDF
Tuberculosis is a disease caused by a bacterium called Mycobeacterium tuberculosis that
is mainly acquired by inhalation of infectious droplets containing viable tubercle bacilli.
Infectious droplets can be produced by coughing, sneezing, talking and singing. Coughing is
generally considered as the most efficient way of producing infectious droplets.
In 2007, there are 9.27 million incident cases of TB worldwide and Asia accounts for 55% of the
cases. Through the National TB Program (NTP), the Philippines achieved the global targets of
70% case detection for new smear positive TB cases and 89% of these became successfully
treated. The various initiatives undertaken by the Program, in partnership with critical
stakeholders, enabled the NTP to sustain these targets. Nonetheless, emerging concerns like drug
resistance and co-morbidities need to be addressed to prevent rapid transmission and future
generation of such threats. Coverage should also be broadened to capture the marginalized
populations and the vulnerable groups namely, urban and rural poor, captive populations
(inmates/prisoners), elderly and indigenous groups.
Last 2009, the National Center for Disease Prevention and Control of the Department of
Health led the process of formulating the 2010-2016 Philippine Plan of Action to Control
TB (PhilPACT) that serves as the guiding direction for the attainment of the Millenium
Development Goals (MDGs). Learning from the Directly-Observed Treatment Shortcourse
(DOTS) strategy, the eight (8) strategies of PhilPACT are anchored on this TB control
framework. Moreover, these strategies are also attuned with the Government¶s health reform
agenda known as Kalusugang Pangkalahatan (KP) to ensure sustainability and risk protection.



Natural Family Planning
Print Email PDF
Population/Family Planning Issue
Senate Bill No. 1546: "Reproductive Health Act of 2004"
House Bill No. 16: "Reproductive Health Act of 2004"
The Truth About the P50M CFC Contract with DOH
CFC-DOH Partnership
Letter to the Editor: Philippine Daily Inquirer
Family Planning
Brief Description of Program
A national mandated priority public health program to attain the country's national health development: a health
intervention program and an important tool for the improvement of the health and welfare of mothers, children
and other members of the family. It also provides information and services for the couples of reproductive age
to plan their family according to their beliefs and circumstances through legally and medically acceptable family
planning methods.
The program is anchored on the following basic principles.
* Responsible Parenthood which means that each family has the right and duty to determine the desired number
of children they might have and when they might have them. And beyond responsible parenthood is Responsible
Parenting which is the proper ubringing and education of chidren so that they grow up to be upright, productive
and civic-minded citizens.



National Filariasis Elimination Program
Print Email PDF
Filariasis is a major parasitic infection, which continues to be a public health problem in the Philippines. It was
first discovered in the Philippines in 1907 by foreign workers. Consolidated field reports showed a prevalence
rate of 9.7% per 1000 population in 1998. It is the second leading cause of permanent and long-term disability.
The disease affects mostly the poorest municipalities in the country about 71% of the case live in the 4
th
-6
th
class
type of municipalities.
The World Health Assembly in 1997 declared ´Filariasis Elimination as a priorityµ and followed by WHO·s call for
global elimination. A sign of the DOH·s commitment to eliminate the disease, the program·s official shift from
control to elimination strategies was evident in an Administrative Order #25-A,s 1998 disseminated to endemic
regions. A major strategy of the Elimination Plan was the Mass Annual Treatment using the combination drug,
Diethylcarbamazine Citrate and Albendazole for a minimum of 2 years & above living in established endemic
areas after the issuance from WHO of the safety data on the use of the drugs. The Philippine Plan was approved
by WHO which gave the government free supply of the Albendazole (donated b y GSK thru WHO) for filariasis
elimination. In support to the program, an Administrative Order declaring ´November as Filariasis Mass
Treatment Month was signed by the Secretary of Health last July 2004 and was disseminated to all endemic
regions.



Program Achievements:
The DOH, together with the partner organizations/agencies, has already developed the guidelines for managing
rabies exposures. With the implementation of the program strategies, five islands were already declared to be
rabies-free.
In 2010, 257 rabies cases and 266,200 animal bites or rabies exposures were reported. A total of 365 ABTCs
were established and strategically located all over the country. Post Exposure Prophylaxis against rabies was
provided in all the 365 ABTCs.



Republic Act 9288

Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at the early identification of infants who are affected
by certain genetic/metabolic/infectious conditions. Early identification and timely intervention can lead to
significant reduction of morbidity, mortality, and associated disabilities in affected infants. NBS in the Philippines
started in June 1996 and was integrated into the public health delivery system with the enactment of the
Newborn Screening Act of 2004 (Republic Act 9288). From 1996 to December 2010, the program has saved 45
283 patients. Five conditions are currently screened: Congenital Hypothyroidism, Congenital Adrenal
Hyperplasia, Phenylketonuria, Galactosemia, and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.



National HIV/STI Prevention Program
Print Email PDF

Objective:
Reduce the transmission of HIV and STI among the Most At Risk Population and General Population and mitigate
its impact at the individual, family, and community level.

Program Activities:
With regard to the prevention and fight against stigma and discrimination, the following are the strategies and
interventions:
1. Availability of free voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing Service;
2. 100% Condom Use Program (CUP) especially for entertainment establishments;
3. Peer education and outreach;
4. Multi-sectoral coordination through Philippine National AIDS Council (PNAC);
5. Empowerment of communities;
6. Community assemblies and for a to reduce stigma;
7. Augmentation of resources of social Hygiene Clinics; and
8. Procured male condoms distributed as education materials during outreach.

Program Accomplishments:
As of the first quarter of 2011, the program has attained particular targets for the three major final outputs:
health policy and program development; capability building of local government units (LGUs) and other
stakeholders; and leveraging services for priority health programs.
For the health policy and program development, the Manual of Procedures/ Standards/ Guidelines is already
finalized and disseminated. The ARV Resistance surveillance among People Living with HIV (PLHIV) on Treatment
is being implemented through the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM). Moreover, both the Strategic
Plan 2012-2016 for Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission and the Strategic Plan 2012-2016 for Most at
Risk Young People and HIV Prevention and Treatment are being drafted.
With regard to capability building, the Training Curriculum for HIV Counseling and Testing is already revised.
Twenty five priority LGUs provided support in strengthening Local AIDS councils. as of March 2011, there were
already 17 Treatment Hubs nationwide.
Lastly, for the leveraging services, baseline laboratory testing is being provided while male condoms are being
distributed through social Hygiene Clinics. A total of 1,250 PLHIV were provided with treatment and 4,000 STI
were treated.



National Mental Health Program
Print Email PDF

Vision: Better Quality of Life through Total Health Care for all Filipinos.
Mission: A Rational and Unified Response to Mental Health.
Goal: Quality Mental Health Care.
Objective: Implementation of a Mental Health Program strategy

The National Mental Health Policy shall be pursued through a Mental Health Program strategy prioritizing the
promotion of mental health, protection of the rights and freedoms of persons with mental diseases and the
reduction of the burden and consequences of mental ill-health, mental and brain disorders and disabilities.



National Dengue Prevention and Control Program
Print Email PDF

The National Dengue Prevention and Control Program was first initiated by the Department of Health (DOH) in
1993. Region VII and the National Capital Region served as the pilot sites. It was not until 1998 when the
program was implemented nationwide. The target populations of the program are the general population, the
local government units, and the local health workers.

Vision: Dengue Risk-Free Philippines
Mission: To improve the quality of health of Filipinos by adopting an integrated dengue control
approach in the prevention and control of dengue infection.
Goal: Reduce morbidity and mortality from dengue infection by preventing the transmission of the
virus from the mosquito vector human.

Objectives:
The objectives of the program are categorized into three: health status objectives; risk reduction objectives; and
services & protection objectives.




Occupational Health Program
Print Email PDF
Vision/Mission Statement
y Health for all occupations in partnership with the workers, employers, local
government authorities and other sectors in promoting self-sustaining programs
and improvement of workers' health and working environment.
Program Objectives and Targets
To promote and protect the health and well being of the working population thru improved health, better
working conditions and workers' environment.



Persons with Disabilities
Print Email PDF

Vision: Improve the total well-being of Person with Disabilities (PWD)
Mission: The Department of Health, as the focal organization, shall ensure the development,
implementation, and monitoring of relevant and efficient health programs and systems for PWDs that are
available, affordable, and acceptable.
Strategic Goals:
The program goals are:
1. Reduce the prevalence of all types of disabilities; and
2. Promote, and protect the human rights and dignity of PWDs and their caregivers.



Pinoy MD Program
Print Email PDF
"Gusto kong Maging Doktor"
A Medical Scholarship Grant for Indigenous People, Local Health Workers, Barangay Health Workers, Department
of Health Employees or their children. This is a jJoint program of the Department of Health (DOH), Philippine
Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO), and several State Universities and Medical Schools. For interested applicants
see the PinoyMD flyer for the qualification and scholarship package details.



Philippine Cancer Control Program
Print Email PDF
The Philippine Cancer Control Program, begun in 1988, is an integrated approach utilizing primary, secondary
and tertiary prevention in different regions of the country at both hospital and community levels. Six lead
cancers (lung, breast, liver, cervix, oral cavity, colon and rectum) are discussed. Features peculiar to the
Philippines are described; and their causation and prevention are discussed. A recent assessment revealed
shortcomings in the Cancer Control Program and urgent recommendations were made to reverse the anticipated
¶cancer epidemic·. There is also today in place a Community-based Cancer Care Network which seeks to develop
a network of self-sufficient communities sharing responsibility for cancer care and control in the country.
Sources: Department of Medicine, University of the Phil-Phil General Hospital and Jose R. Reyes Memorial Medical
Center, Department of Health and 2Cancer Institute, Philippine General Hospital and Department of
Orthopaedics, University of the Phil-Phil General Hospital, Manila, Philippines.



Province-wide Investment Plan for Health (PIPH)
Print Email PDF
A five year medium term plan prepared by F1 convergence provinces using the Fourmula One for Health
framework to improve the highly decentralized system; financing, regulation, good governance and service
delivery
The five year province-wide investment plan for health is an important evidence-based platform for local health
system management and a milestone in DoH engagement at the local level.
PIPH was adopted on a pilot basis by 16 provinces in 2007, followed by 21 more in 2008, including six provinces
from the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). In 2009, 44 provinces and eqight cities have
completed their own five year plans.



Philippine Medical Tourism Program
Print Email PDF
Vision:
"The global leader in providing quality health care for all through universal health care"

Mission:
To ensure that the Philippines is globally competitive through implementation of quality standards in both public
and private sector.




Prevention and Control of Chronic Lifestyle Related Non Communicable
Diseases
Print Email PDF
1. BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE
Cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes are among the top killers in the
Philippines, causing more than half of all deaths annually. Hypertension and diseases of the heart are among the
ten leading causes of illnesses each year. These diseases are collectively known as Lifestyle Related Non-
Communicable Diseases (NCDs), as defined in the National Objectives for Health 2005-2010, particularly
because these diseases have common risk factors which are to a large extent related to unhealthy lifestyle.
The risk factors involved are tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and alcohol use.A study conducted
by Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI) in 2003 revealed that 90% of Filipinos have one or more of the
following risk factors: physical inactivity, smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes and abnormal cholesterol.
Among adults, 20% are overweight and 5% are obese, 22.5% are hypertensive, 60.5% are physically inactive, and
a significant number have high levels of blood cholesterol and sugar. More than half (56%) of adult males and
12% of adult females are current smokers. Alcohol use has also risen steadily since the 1960s.
Children and adolescents are also exposed to the above-mentioned risks. The prevalence of overweight among
adolescents 9-11 years old had increased two folds from 2.4% in 1993 to 4.8% in 2005. Similarly, the prevalence
rate of overweight for children 6-10 years old doubled from 0.8% in 2001 to 1.6% in 2005. (Source: Philippine
Nutrition Facts and Figures 2005)
Twenty two (22) per cent of teenagers currently smoke cigarettes. (Source: Philippines Global Youth Tobacco
Survey, 2007). About 30% of teenage students are physically inactive, spending three or more hours per day
sitting and watching television, playing computer games, talking with friends, or doing other sitting activities.
(Source: Philippines Global School-based Student Health Survey, 2007)
The cost of care of lifestyle-related diseases may cause people to fall into poverty and create a downward spiral
of worsening poverty and illness. They also undermine the country's economic development. In response to the
increasing prevalence of lifestyle related diseases in the country, vertical programs on the prevention and
control of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and diabetes were put in place in the mid 1990·s. The individual
programs however, were focused on treatment and management of those who were already sick and thus were
competing with each other for resources and for attention upon field implementation.
Recent evidence shows that the most cost-effective way of controlling these non-communicable lifestyle related
diseases is by the prevention of the emergence of the risk factors in an integrated manner, employing health
promotion strategies across the life course and intervening at the level of family and community. This is
essential because the causal risk factors causing these illnesses are deeply entrenched in the social and cultural
framework of the society. Thus, an integrated comprehensive program for the prevention and control of these
non-communicable lifestyle related diseases has to be put in place.
1. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Goals:
To reduce morbidity, mortality and disability rates due to chronic lifestyle related NCDs through an
integrated and comprehensive program on the prevention and control of lifestyle related



Rural Health Midwives Placement Program (RHMPP) / Midwifery
Scholarship Program of the Philippines (MSPP)
Print Email PDF
Rationale:
The Philippines· maternal and infant morbidity and mortality rates have been marked despite its efforts to assist
local government units for the past decade. An important factor identified was the lack of trained healthcare
providers particularly, in the far flung areas of the country. This hinders the recognition of basic obstetric needs
and delivery of quality health service to the community.
To intensify the country·s capacity in the provision of quality health service to the people, the Department of
Health (DOH) has adopted the facility-based basic emergency obstetric care strategy. The midwives, being the
frontline healthcare providers, have been identified by the DOH to serve as the link between health service
delivery and the community in the reduction of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.
The RHMPP aims to provide competent midwives to areas that have not performed well in terms of facility-based
deliveries, fully immunized child and contraceptive prevalence rates, hence, improve facility-based health
services. By augmenting health staff to selected government units, the DOH may improve maternal and child
health and attain the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
In order to ensure a constant supply of competent midwives and to deliver their services to the people in dire
need, the DOH created the MSPP that aims to produce competent midwives from qualified residents of priority
areas.
Program Description:
The World Health Organization (WHO) affirms that approximately 15% of all pregnant women develop a
potentially life-threatening complication that calls for either skilled care or major obstetrical interventions to
survive. Readily accessible Emergency Obstetric Care may thus reduce maternal and perinatal morbidity and
mortality.
The DOH is restating its commitment towards a health nation through more aggressive safe motherhood
initiatives, hence, the upgrading of obstetric deliveries to strategic facility-based Basic Emergency Obstetric Care
(BEmONC), where these facilities are manned by a team composed of a licensed physician, public health nurse,
and a rural health midwife at the primary level.
Since the rural health midwives are considered as the frontline health workers in the rural areas and have
progressed to become multi-task personnel in the delivery of healthcare services, amidst migration of other
healthcare professionals, the DOH created the Rural Health Midwife Placement Program (RHMPP) to address the
inequitable distribution of midwives and equip them for facility-based BEmONC practice. In support to the
RHMPP, thus, ensure constant supply of competent midwives, the DOH created the Midwifery Scholarship
Program of the Philippines (MSPP).




Schistosomiasis Control Program
Print Email PDF
Schistosomiasis is an infection caused by blood fluke, specifically Schistosoma japonicum. An
individual may acquire the infection from fresh water contaminated with larval cercariae, which develop in snails.
Infected yet untreated individuals could transmit the disease through discharging schistosome eggs in feces into
bodies of water.
Long term infections can result to severe development of lesions, which can lead to blockage of
blood flow. The infection can also cause portal hypertension, which can make collateral circulation, hence,
redirecting the eggs to other parts of the body.
Schistosomiasis is still endemic in 12 regions with 28 provinces, 190 municipalities, and 2,230
barangays. Approximately 12 million people are affected and about 2.5 million are directly exposed.
Goal: To reduce the disease prevalence by 50% with a vision of eliminating the disease eventually in
all endemic areas

Soil Transmitted Helminth Control Program
Print Email PDF

Profile/Rationale of the Health Program
Given the relatively high prevalence rate of STH infections in the country and the existing issues
confronting the implementation of the STHCP nationwide, there is a need to integrate all related efforts and
strengthen coordination of those involved to ensure better complementation of resource, obtain higher coverage
and generate better health outcomes. Within the Department of Health (DOH), several programs exist which are
viable mechanisms to operationalize an integrated approach in preventing and controlling STH infections more
effectively and efficiently. This needs to expand to the other national and local agencies and organizations
engaged in the same endeavor.
The IHCP envisions healthy and productive Filipinos. It aims to reduce the deaths and diseases due to STH
infections by reducing the prevalence of the infection among population groups found most at risk. Helminth
infections adversely affect the health of the children and women. Program interventions and related measures
have to be focused on them. Children are classified into preschoolers and school children while women include
adolescent females and pregnant women. In addition, there are also special groups, which by the nature of their
work and situation, are gravely exposed to helminthes infection. These include the soldiers, farmers, food
handlers and operators as well as indigenous people. They also require the necessary attention.
The IHCP interventions consist primarily of chemotherapy, WASH and several behavior changing approaches.
Chemotherapy remains as the core package in helminth infection control. The IHCP identifies the corresponding
approach of deworming that must be applied for each identified population group. Water, sanitation and hygiene
(WASH) serves as the cornerstone in reducing the prevalence of worm infection. The expansion of these
measures reduces more effectively the transmission of worm infection. The promotion of desired behaviors
ensures that these efforts on chemotheraphy and WASH are translated into actual healthy practices and better
utilization of these facilities.
These interventions only become viable and effective if they are carried out in a supportive environment.
Enabling mechanisms must therefore be established to support their implementation. An enabling environment
entails good governance of the IHCP at all levels of operations. The political will and support of national and
local leaders are essential to propel the cause of the IHCP. Quality of deworming services and expansion of
service outlet to increase access must be given due to consideration. Financing reforms must likewise introduce.
The LGUs must begin to allocate budget for their own deworming program. A more equitable or rationalized
allocation of deworming assistance from the DOH must be established. Local financing mechanisms to sustain
the delivery of STHCP services need to be explored and established. Strict monitoring of LGUs compliance to
national laws and policies must be undertaken while several program support systems (e.g., procurement and
logistics management, information management system, surveillance and research) have to be installed.
Central to the achievement of the IHCP vision is the commitment and participation of all sectors concerned
considering that helminth infection is a multi-faceted problem. While the LGUs are expected to be primarily
responsible for the controlling helminth infection, the support of DOH, DepEd and other national government
agencies including the private sector, civil society and the community is very critical to the success of IHCP.




Smoking Cessation Program
Print Email PDF

Rationale:
The use of tobacco continues to be a major cause of health problems worldwide. There is currently an estimated
1.3 billion smokers in the world, with 4.9 million people dying because of tobacco use in a year. If this trend
continues, the number of deaths will increase to 10 million by the year 2020, 70% of which will be coming from
countries like the Philippines. (The Role of Health Professionals in Tobacco Control, WHO, 2005)
The World Health Organization released a document in 2003 entitled Policy Recommendations for Smoking
Cessation and Treatment of Tobacco Dependence. This document very clearly stated that as current statistics
indicate, it will not be possible to reduce tobacco related deaths over the next 30-50 years unless adult smokers
are encouraged to quit. Also, because of the addictiveness of tobacco products, many tobacco users will need
support in quitting. Population survey reports showed that approximately one third of smokers attempt to quit
each year and that majority of these attempts are undertaken without help. However, only a small percentage of
cigarette smokers (1-3%) achieve lasting abstinence, which is at least 12 months of abstinence from smoking,
using will power alone (Fiore et al 2000) as cited by the above policy paper.
The policy paper also stated that support for smoking cessation or ´treatment of tobacco dependenceµ refers to
a range of techniques including motivation, advise and guidance, counseling, telephone and internet support,
and appropriate pharmaceutical aids all of which aim to encourage and help tobacco users to stop using tobacco
and to avoid subsequent relapse. Evidence has shown that cessation is the only intervention with the potential
to reduce tobacco-related mortality in the short and medium term and therefore should be part of an overall
comprehensive tobacco-control policy of any country.
The Philippine Global Adult Tobacco Survey conducted in 2009 (DOH, Philippines GATS Country Report, March
16, 2010) revealed that 28.3% (17.3 million) of the population aged 15 years old and over currently smoke
tobacco, 47.7% (14.6 million) of whom are men, while 9.0% (2.8 million) are women. Eighty percent of these
current smokers are daily smokers with men and women smoking an average of 11.3 and 7 sticks of cigarettes
per day respectively.
The survey also revealed that among ever daily smokers, 21.5% have quit smoking. Among those who smoked
in the last 12 months, 47.8% made a quit attempt, 12.3% stated they used counseling and or advise as their
cessation method, but only 4.5% successfully quit. Among current cigarette smokers, 60.6% stated they are
interested in quitting, translating to around 10 million Filipinos needing help to quit smoking as of the moment.
The above scenario dictates the great need to build the capacity of health workers to help smokers quit
smoking, thus the need for the Department of Health to set up a national infrastructure to help smokers quit
smoking.
The national smoking infrastructure is mandated by the Tobacco Regulations Act which orders the Department
of Health to set up withdrawal clinics. As such DOH Administrative Order No. 122 s. 2003 titled The Smoking
Cessation Program to support the National Tobacco Control and Healthy Lifestyle Program allowed the setting
up of the National Smoking Cessation Program.
Vision: Reduced prevalence of smoking and minimizing smoking-related health risks.



Urban Health System Development (UHSD) Program
Print Email PDF
(As contained in Administrative Order No. 2011-0008 dated July 12, 2011)
I. RATIONALE
In developing countries, the rapid rate of urbanization has outpaced the ability of governments to build essential
infrastructure for health and social services. Among many features of urbanization in developing countries
include greater population densities and more congestion, concentrated poverty and slum formation, and
greater exposure to risks, hazards and vulnerabilities to health (eg. violence, traffic injuries, obesity, and
settlement in unsafe areas). The concentration of risks is seen in the poorest neighborhoods resulting to health
inequities.
From the above, it will require more than the provision and use of health services to improve the health of urban
populations. UHSD must help cities address the challenges of rapid urbanization brought about by the interplay
of different social determinants of health.



Violence and Injury Prevention Program
Print Email PDF

Accidents consistently remain one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the country. The Philippine
Health Statistics from 1975 to 2002 revealed that there has been increasing trend of mortality due to accidents
per 100,000 populations. Mortality rate increased from 19.1/100,000 population in 1975 to 42.3/100,000
populations in 2002 corresponding to 33,617 deaths, majority of which is caused by assaults (13,276); transport
accidents (6,131); accidental drowning and submersion (2,871); and accidental falls (1,536). Accidents ranked
8
th
in 1975, 7
th
in 1985 and 6
th
in 1995 and 5
th
in 2002 among the 10 leading causes of death.
The Department of Health (DOH) shall serve as the focal agency with respect to violence and injury prevention.
As such, it shall design, coordinate and integrate activities, plans, and programs of various stakeholders into an
effective and efficient system. The Violence and Injury Prevention Program is hereby institutionalized as one of
the programs of the National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (NCDPC).
To ensure coordination and sustainability of the program, a Program Management Committee (PMC) shall be
organized. The Committee shall then be subdivided into Sub-Committees according to the areas of concern:
road traffic injuries, thermal injuries (burns and scalds), drowning, physical injuries (fall, violence), and chemical
injuries (poisoning, etc.). For a comprehensive approach, the Program shall coordinate with other programs like
the Maternal and Child Health and other DOH Offices such as the National Center for Health Facility
Development, Health Emergency and Management Services, among others, solicit active representation from
public and private stakeholders that are involved in violence and injury prevention.



Women's Health and Safe Motherhood Project
Print Email PDF

Being that the Philippines had one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in Southeast Asia, the Women·s
Health and Safe Motherhood (WHSM) Project was commenced with the aim of strengthening women·s health and
safe motherhood services for the disadvantaged Filipino women. This was the very first health-sector project
funded and supported by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) that is primarily concerned in the improvement of
women·s reproductive health.
In its first implementation from 1995 to 2002, the WHSM Project had integrated 550 hospitals and rural health
facilities, with the provision of general reproductive and emergency obstetric medical supplies. About 1.4 million
safe home-delivery kits were also given to midwives. According to the Performance Report of ADB, the project
strengthened the capacity of the DOH into more effective planning and management of women·s health and
donor-funded projects.
For the second implementation of WHSM Project, combined performance-based grants provided payments to
women·s health teams who attend to deliveries of disadvantaged women. Contributing to the global initiatives to
achieving the MDGs, WHSM Project 2 improves women·s health through:
y Demonstrating in selected sites a sustainable, cost-effective model of delivering health services that
increase access of disadvantaged women to acceptable and high quality reproductive health services, and
enables them to safely attain their desired spacing and number of children; and
y Establishing a core knowledge base and support system that can facilitate countrywide replication of
the project experience as part of mainstream approaches to reproductive health care within the framework
of the Health Sector Reform Agenda.
The components of the WHSM Project 2 are as follows:
1. Local Delivery of the Integrated WHSM Service Package (WHSM-SP)
This will support local governments in mobilizing networks of public and private providers to deliver the
integrated WHSM-SP focusing on maternal care, family planning, and STI/HIV control services. This component is
initially being implemented in the provinces of Sorsogon and Surigao del Sur.
The two subcomponents are: Critical Capacities to Provide Quality WHSM Services and Reliable Sustainable
Support Systems.
2. National Capacity to Sustain WHSM Services
This component will develop DOH capacity to create an operating environment conducive to LGUs managing and
sustaining delivery of the WHSM-SP and integrating the WHSM service model throughout the country.

(As stated in the Women·s Health and Safe Motherhood Project 2 Implementation Plan)

Women's Health Safe Motherhood Program 2



Women and Children Protection Program
Print Email PDF
I. BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE
The Aquino Health Agenda (AHA): Achieving Universal Health Care for All Filipinos embodied in Administrative
Order No. 2010-0036, dated December 16, 2010 states that poor Filipino families ´have yet to experience equity
and access to critical health services.µ A.0. 2010-0036 further recognizes that the public hospitals and health
facilities have suffered neglect due to the inadequacy of health budgets in terms of support for upgrading to
expand capacity and improve quality of services.
AHA also states ´the poorest of the population are the main users of government health facilities. This means
that the deterioration and poor quality of many government health facilities is particularly disadvantageous to
the poor who needs the services the most.µ
In 1997, Administrative Order 1-B or the ´Establishment of a Women and Children Protection Unit in All
Department of Health (DOH) Hospitalsµ was promulgated in response to the increasing number of women and
children who consult due to violence, rape, incest, and other related cases.
Since A.O. 1-B was issued, the partnership among the Department of Health (DOH), University of the
Philippines Manila, the Child Protection Network Foundation, several local government units, development
partners and other agencies resulted in the establishment of women and child protection units (WCPUs) in DOH-
retained and Local Government Unit (LGU) -supported hospitals. As of 2011, there are 38 working WCPUs in 25
provinces of the country. For the past years, there have been attempts to increase the number of WCPUs
especially in DOH-retained hospitals but they have been unsuccessful for many reasons.





http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001153/

PHARMA 50 Project Management Unit (PMU) and specially licensed by the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD) to sell, distribute, offer for sale and/or make available low-priced generic home remedies, over-the-counter (OTC) Drugs and two (2) selected, publicly-known prescription antibiotics drugs (i.e. Amoxicillin and Cotrimoxazole). The establishment of the Botika ng Barangay (BnB) in the communities, including the insurgent areas, ensures accessibility of low-priced generic over-the-counter drugs and eight (8) prescription drugs as recommended by the National Drug Formulary Committee. Under Memorandum # 31 and its amendment, as much as 40 essential medicines that address common diseases can be made available in BnBs depending on the morbidity and mortality profiles of the community. And the policies surrounding the BnB (AO 144) ensure that such can be sustained in the medium term. II. Objectives The objectives of this Order are as follows: 1. 2. 3. To promote equity in health by ensuring the availability and accessibility of affordable, safe and effective, quality essential drugs to all, with priority for marginalized, underserved, critical and hard to reach areas. To integrate all related issuances of the DOH that provides rules and regulations in the establishment and operations of BnBs; and To define the roles and responsibilities of the different units of the DOH and other partners from the different sectors in facilitating and regulating the establishment of BnBs.

Breastfeeding TSEK
Print Email PDF

On February 23, 2011, the Department of Health (DOH) launched the exclusive breastfeeding campaign dubbed ´Breastfeeding TSEK: (Tama, Sapat, Eksklusibo)µ. The primary target of this campaign is the new and expectant mothers in urban areas. This campaign encourages mothers to exclusively breastfeed their babies from birth up to 6 months. Exclusive breastfeeding means that for the first six months from birth, nothing except breast milk will be given to babies. Moreover, the campaign aims to establish a supportive community, as well as to promote public consciousness on the health benefits of breastfeeding. Among the many health benefits of breastfeeding are lower risk of diarrhea, pneumonia, and chronic illnesses.

Blood Donation Program
Print Email PDF

Republic Act No. 7719, also known as the National Blood Services Act of 1994, promotes voluntary blood donation to provide sufficient supply of safe blood and to regulate blood banks. This act aims to inculcate public awareness that blood donation is a humanitarian act. The National Voluntary Blood Services Program (NVBSP) of the Department of Health is targeting the youth as volunteers in its blood donation program this year. In accordance with RA No. 7719, it aims to create public consciousness on the importance of blood donation in saving the lives of millions of Filipinos. Based from the data from the National Voluntary Blood Services Program, a total of 654,763 blood units were collected in 2009. Fifty-eight percent of which was from voluntary blood donation and the remaining from replacement donation. This year, particular provinces have already achieved 100% voluntary blood donation. The DOH is hoping that many individuals will become regular voluntary unpaid donors to guarantee sufficient supply of safe blood and to meet national blood necessities.

Mission:

y y y y

Blood Safety Blood Adequacy Rational Blood Use Efficiency of Blood Services

Goal The ultimate goal of Children's Health 2025 is to achieve good health for all Filipino children by the year 2025.

Introduction
The Philippine National Strategic Framework for lan Development for CHildren or CHILD 21 is a strategic framework for planning programs and interventions that promote and safegurad the rights of Filipino children. Covering the period 2000-2005, it paints in broad strokes a vision for the quality of life of Filipino children in 2025 and a roadmap to achieve the vision.
Children's Health 2025, a subdocument of CHILD 21, realizes that health is a critical and fundamental element in children's welfare. However, health programs cannot be implemented in isolation from the other component that determine the safety and well being of children in society. Children's Health 2025, therefore, should be able to integrate the strategies and interventions into the overall plan for children's development.

Children's Health 2025 contains both mid-term strategies, which is targeted towards the year 2004, while long-term strategies are targeted by the year 2025. It utilizes a life cycle approach and weaves in the rights of children. The life cycle approach ensures that the issues, needs and gaps are addressed at the different stages of the child's growth and development. The period year 2002 to 2004 will put emphasis on timely diagnosis and management of common diseases of childhood as well as disease prevention and health promotion, particularly in the fields of immunization, nutrition and the acquisisiton of health lifestyles. Also critical for effective pallning and implementation would be addressing the components of the health infrastructure such as human resource development, quality assurance, monitoring and disease surveillance, and health information and education. The successful implementation of these strategies will require collaborative efforts with the other stakeholdres and also implies integration with the other developmental plan of action for children.

CHD Scorecard
Print Email PDF

CHD Scorecard shall reflect performance of the CHD as extension producers of the DOH in its mandate and function of steering and leading the national health system. Performance indicators shall include extent and quality of goods and services desired by the local health systems in the regional coverage area, and prescribed by DOH management, along the 4 main strategies of F1. Performance indicators shall also include satisfaction of clients with CHD services and products.

Committee of Examiners for Undertakers and Embalmers
Print Rationale Embalming is the funeral custom of cleaning and disinfecting bodies after death. It has been part of the funeral parlors so with our lives. For the past decades, embalming has been undergoing profound transformational events, not only in the Philippines but worldwide. Today, embalming is also considered an art. It is done to preserve the dead body from natural decomposition and for restoration for a more pleasing appearance. Likewise, the procedure is significant for restoration of evidences such as in medico-legal cases. Email PDF

These changes were made possible by the multitudes of forces converging in the national as well as the local levels, which is impacting on the quality of embalming practice in the country. Embalmers today should therefore, be looked up to, because of the significant manifold tasks they are rendering including the counseling assistance they are providing the bereaved parties. Objective: The Department of Health (DOH) created the CEUE to regulate embalming practice in the country. The creation was made possible by Presidential Decree (PD) No. 856 "Code of Sanitation of the Philippines" Chapter XXI "Disposal of Dead Persons" and Executive Order No. 102 s. 1999 "Rationalization and Streamlining Plan of the DOH".

The Department of Health created the Committee of Examiners for Massage Therapy (CEMT) to regulate the practice of massage therapy in accordance to the provisions of the Sanitation Code of the Philippines (PD 856) and Executive Order No. 102 s. 1999, Reorganization and Streamlining of the Department of Health. It provides the CEMT the function to ensure that only qualified individuals enter the regulated profession and that the care and services which the massage therapists provide are within the standards of practice.

OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS: 1. The prevalence of dental caries is reduce Annual Target : 5% reduction of the prevalence rate every year 2. The prevalence of periodontal disease is reduced Annual Targets : 5% reduction of the prevalence rate every year 3. Dental caries experience is reduced Annual Target : 5% reduction of the mean dmft/DMFT for 5/6 years old and 12 years old children every year 4. The proportion of Orally Fit Children (OFC) 12-71 months old is increased Annual Targets : Increased by 20% yearly

STRATEGIES AND ACTION POINTS: 1. Formulate policy and regulations to ensure the full implementation of OHP a. Establishment of effective networking system (Deped, DSWD, LGU, PDA, Fit for School, Academe and others) b. Development of policies, standards, guidelines and clinical protocols - Fluoride Use

Provision of adequate dental personnel b. becomes a major public health problem as it is one of the top ten leading causes of mortality in the country. Improve existing information system/data collection (reporting and recording dental services and accomplishments ) . timely and accurate information management system for oral Health. a.development of IT system on recording and reporting oral health service accomplishments and indices .outreach programs for marginalized groups c. Develop financing schemes for oral health applicable to other levels of care ( Fee for service. Cooperatives.Other Preventive Measures 2. Upgrading of facilities. . supplies b. mothers and marginalized groups) -revival of the sealant program for school children . Ensure financial access to essential public and personal oral health services a. instruments. Develop packages of essential care/services for different groups (children. technical updates and program implementation reviews with stakeholders 5.. Ensure access and delivery of quality oral health care servicesa.setting of essential indicators . Conduct Regular Epidemiological Dental Surveys ± every 5 years 4.Sub-allotment of funds for priority programs/activities d.Awards and incentives . Design and implement grant assistance mechanism for high performing LGUs . a chronic disabling disorder. Provide relevant. a. Restoration of oral health budget line item in the GAA of DOH Central Office 3. Network with HMOS) c. Develop an outpatient benefit package for oral health under the NHIP of the government b. Capacity enhancement programs for dental personnel and non-dental personnel Diabetes Mellitus Prevention and Control Program Print Email PDF Diabetes Mellitus.Toothbrushing .Integrate oral health in every family health information tools. recording books/manuals b.toothbrushing program for pre-school children . Build up highly motivated health professionals and trained auxilliaries to manage and provide quality oral health care a. equipment. Regular conduct of consultation meetings.

the Department of Health (DOH) implemented a nationwide Diabetes Mellitus Prevention and Control Program. It utilizes all levels of preventive care in the community and hospital settings. behavioral. Health Promotion and Education Intersectoral collaboration is necessary to educate the public on the nature and extent of diabetes. 2. Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Disease Program Print Email PDF . This also includes strengthening of existing diabetes treatment/management capabilities of medical clinics. 1. and epidemiological areas. from primary to tertiary prevention. manpower development and capabilities strengthening. complications and the need for early detection and management. Research The program shall support research/studies in the clinical. and research. monitoring/evaluation. Service delivery/Integration of diabetes prevention and control at the community level The program shall provide for the integration and provision of services at the lowest possible level of community health care interventions. It shall aim to reduce morbidity and mortality from diabetes and its complications. 3. service delivery. Manpower Development and Strengthening of existing diabetes management capabilities Continuing training and education shall be provided to core trainers and implementers. Program Strategies/Components: The program has five components ² health promotion and education.In accordance with the 42nd World Health Assembly Resolution on Diabetes Mellitus and the Republic Act No. 4. 8191 or the National Diabetes Act of 1996. including its risks factors. Monitoring/Evaluation A periodic process and impact evaluation shall be conducted every year and five years thereafter and/or depending on the need of the program. 5.

Technical Assistance or Technical Collaboration. . quarantine and isolation measures and rapid contract tracing were carried out. A (H1N1) virus infection) threaten countries all over the world. the influenza A (H1N1) virus infection led to global epidemic. Development of systems. Applicable prevention and control measures are being integrated while the existing systems and organizational structures are further strengthened. standards. On June 11.. In response to its sudden and unexpected emergence. policies. SARS affected at least 30 countries with most of the countries from Asia. preparedness. and efficient conduct of measures. The unexpected and unusual increase in cases of meningococcal disease (meningococcemia as the predominant form) in the Cordillera Autonomous Region resulted to at least 50% of cases in the early stage of occurrence. employs the key strategies: 1. Avian Influenza or bird flu. In 2009. and 2. Strengthen surveillance. risk communication.g. Reduce public health impact of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. the Department of Health (DOH) hopes to further improve the functionality and effectiveness of local response systems. and guidelines for preparedness and response to emerging diseases. Objectives: The program aims to: 1. Program Strategies: The DOH. in collaboration with its partner organizations/agencies. The Philippines was able to minimize the impact of SARS through effective information dissemination.Emerging and re-emerging infections (e. Efforts to prepare for emerging infections with potential for causing high morbidity and mortality are being done by the program. or most popularly known as pandemic. and response to emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases. 2009. some local health offices from many provinces were not able to respond effectively and rapidly. meningococcemia. However. SARS. With the lack of strong linkages and coordinating mechanisms. 2. Goal: Prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging infectious disease from becoming public health problems. a full pandemic alert was declared by the World Health Organization (WHO). In 2003.

Its objective is to reduce infant mortality and morbidity through decreasing the prevalence of six (6) immunizable diseases (TB. prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging diseases that may pose epidemic/pandemic threat. 489 to facilitate and improve coordination among concerned agencies. solid waste. environmental health impact assessment and occupational health through inter-agency collaboration. Intersectoral collaborations. The Expanded Program on Immunization is one of the DOH Programs that has already been institutionalized and adopted by all LGUs in the region. This is being supported by increasing/sustaining the routine immunization and improved surveillance system. Program strategies and activities are focused on environmental sanitation. polio and measles)Special campaigns have been undertaken to improve further program implementation. Children who are not fully immunized are more susceptible to common childhood diseases. effective monitoring and communication. It is concerned primarily with effects of the environment to the health of the people. policy review and development. notably the National Immunization Days (NID). pertussis. toxic and chemical substances and occupational health. It provides the venue for technical collaboration. An Inter-Agency COmmittee on Environmental Health was created by virute of E. air. The Committee has five sectoral task forces on water. 5. .O. Expanded Program on Immunization Print Email PDF Children need not die young if they receive complete and timely immunization. Capability building for management. and 6.3. Logistical support for drugs and vaccines for meningococcemia and anti-viral drugs and vaccine for Pandemic Influenza Preparedness. diphtheria. 4. Environmental Health Print Email PDF Environmental Health is concerned with preventing illness through managing the environment and by changing people's behavior to reduce exposure to biological and non-biological agents of disease and injury.Knock Out Polio (KOP) and Garantisadong Pambata (GP) since 1993 to 2000. tetanus. Advocacy/Information dissemination. resource mobilization.

To provide evidence-based practices to ensure survival of the newborn from birth up to the first 28 days of life To deliver time-bound core intervention in the immediate period after the delivery of the newborn To strengthen health facility environment for breastfeeding initiation to take place and for breastfeeding to be continued from discharge up to 2 years of life To provide appropriate and timely emergency newborn care to newborns in need of resuscitation To ensure access of newborns to affordable life-saving medicines to reduce deaths and morbidity from leading causes of newborn conditions To ensure inclusion of newborn care in the overall approach to the Maternal. Pediatricians/neonatalogists of the Philippine Pediatric Society (PPS) and the Philippine Society of Newborn Medicine (PSNbM) b. 5. Anesthesiologists and obstetric anesthesiologists of the Philippine Society of Anesthesiologists (PSA) and the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia of the Philippines (SOAP). Vision and Mission: None to mention as these are inclusive in the MNCHN Strategy and NOH 2011-2016 Goals: To reduce neonatal mortality rates by 2/3 from 1990 levels Objectives: 1.. Perinatologists of the Perinatal Association of the Philippines. Health Professional Organizations and their member health professionals a. The neonatal period has been identified as one of the most crucial phase in the survival and development of the child. Newborn. Child Health and Nutrition Strategy Stakeholders: 1. MDG 4 might not be achieved. 6.ssential Newborn Care Profile/Rationale of the Health Program The Child Survival Strategy published by the Department of Health has emphasized the need to strengthen health services of children throughout the stages. 2. The United Nations Millennium Development Goal Number 4 of reducing under five child mortality can be achieved by the Philippines however if the neonatal mortality rates are not addressed from its non-moving trend of decline. Both public and private sector at all levels of health service delivery providing maternal and newborn services 2. Inc. Obstetrician-Gynecologists of the Philippine Obstetrical and Gynecological Society (POGS) c. . 4. (PAPI) d. 3.

Inc. Health Sector Reform a. intensive care nurses of the Philippine Nurses Association and its affiliate nursing societies g.g. Midwives Foundation of the Philippines (MFP) and Well Family Midwives Clinic 3. (PLGPMI). Nurses. Newborns all over the country b. Association of Deans of Philippine Colleges of Nursing (ADPCN) c. Academe .local chief executives and LGU legislative bodies Beneficiaries: a.professors and instructors from members schools and colleges of: a. Association of Philippine Schools of Midwifery 5. Hospital. Philippine Hospital Association (PHA) b. communities Program Strategies: 1. Maternal and child nurses. Parents c. Midwives of the Integrated Midwives of the Philippines (IMAP). health care administrator and infection control associations a. Family medicine specialists of the Philippine Academy of Family Physicians (PAFP) f. Local government units .e. Private Hospitals Association of the Philippines (PHAP) c. Philippine Hospital Infection Control Society 6. Policy and Guideline Issuance . Professional Regulations Commission 4. Philippine League of Government and Private Midwives. Government regulatory bodies e. Association of Philippine Medical Colleges (APMC) b. Philippine College of Hospital Administrators d.

Curriculum Reforms .Administrative Order 2010-0036 c.Adoption of essential newborn care protocol(including intrapartum care and the MNCHN Strategy) 3. Aquino Health Agenda and Achieving Universal Health Care . Social Marketing . PhilHealth Circular 2011-011 dated August 5.Adopting Policies and Guidelines on Essential Newborn Care .Curriculum integration of essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN Strategy) in undergraduate health courses . Regional MNCHN Conference for CHDs and LGUs including DOH-retained hospitals and LGU hospitals Current Status of the Program A.December 1. Development of Operationalization of Essential Newborn Care Protocol in Health Facilities 2 Identification of Centers of Excellence .i) Administrative Order 2009-0025 . Policy was issued in December 1. 2011 on Newborn Care Package d. What have been achieved/done 1. 2009 2. Conduct of one-day orientation-workshop on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN Strategy) b. nurses and midives 4.Development of social marketing tools . 2009 ii) Clinical Pocket Guide on Essential Newborn Care b.Integration and revision of board exam questions in licensure examinations for physicians. DOH/WHO Scale-up Implementation was done in 11 hospitals .Unang Yakap MDG 4 & 5 Major Activities and its Guidelines: a.

1729 Telefax (Director IV's Office): (63 2) 711-7846 Mobile: 09174810661 or 09237764870 Family Planning . 1728. Anthony Calibo Supervising Health Program Officer Direct Line: (63 2) 7392-956. (63 2) 6517800 local 1726. Statistics Early outcomes of EINC implementation has shown reduction on neonatal deaths in select DOH-retained hospitals including deaths from neonatal sepsis and complicatons of prematurity Partner organizations/agencies: y y y y y y y y National Nutrition Council Population Commission WHO UNICEF UNFPA AusAID USAID health professional and academic organizations mentioned above.3. Advocacy Partners Forum on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN Strategy) 4. One-day orientation-workshop on essential newborn care (including intrapartum care and the MNCHN Strategy) among health workers in different health facilities 5. Program Manager: Dr. Inclusion of dexamethasone and surfactant as core medicines in the essential medicines list for children in the Philippine National Formulary B.

. The program is anchored on the following basic principles. y Responsible Parenthood which means that each family has the right and duty to determine the desired number of children they might have and when they might have them. productive and civic-minded citizens. The 1987 Constitution states that the government protects the sanctity of life. And beyond responsible parenthood is Responsible Parenting which is the proper ubringing and education of chidren so that they grow up to be upright. It also provides information and services for the couples of reproductive age to plan their family according to their beliefs and circumstances through legally and medically acceptable family planning methods. productive and fulfilling lives and exercising the right to regulate their own fertility through legally and acceptable family planning services. and. Abortion is NOT a FP method: y Birth Spacing refers to interval between pregnancies (which is ideally 3 years).Print Email PDF Brief Description of Program A national mandated priority public health program to attain the country's national health development: a health intervention program and an important tool for the improvement of the health and welfare of mothers. y Informed Choice that is upholding and ensuring the rights of couples to determin the number and spacing of their children according to their life's aspirations and reminding couples that planning size of their families have a direct bearing on the quality of their children's and their own lives. children and other members of the family. It enables women to recover their health improves women's potential to be more productive and to realize their personal aspirations and allows more time to care for children and spouse/husband. y Respect for Life. Intended Audience: Men and women of reproductive age (15-49) years old) including adolescents Area of Coverage: Nationwide Mandate: EO 119 and EO 102 Vision: Empowered men and women living healthy.

Specifically. 2.7 children per woman in 1998 to 2. by the end of 2004: Reduce y y y MMR from 172 deaths 100.7 chidren per woman Increase y Contraceptive Prevalence Rate from 45. NGOs.3 deaths/1000 livebirths in 1998 to less than 30 deaths/1000 live births TFR from 3. Objectives General To help couples. 8. education and services whenever and wherever these are needed. individuals achieve their desired family size within the context of responsible parenthood and improve their reproductive health. 6. social mobilization Information.000 LB in 1998 to less than 100 deaths/100. the private sectors and communities ensures the availability of FP information and services to men and women who need them. 9. 7. education and counselling Capability building for trainers of CHDs/LGUs Logistics management Monitoring and evaluation Research and development 6WUDWHJLHV . 5. 4.Mission The DOH in partnership with LGUs. guidelines and plans formulation Standard setting Technical assistance to CHDs/LGUs and other partner agencies Advocacy.6% in 1998 to 57% y Proportion of modern FP methods use from 28>2% to 50.5% Key Result Areas 1.000 LB IMR from 35. Policy. Program Goals: To provide universal access to FP information. 3.

4. CHD 5. ARMM Contraceptive Interdependence Initiative Major Activities I.QIRUPDWLRQ(GXFDWLRQDQGFRXQVHOLQJDFWLYLWLHV y Advocacy and social mobilization efforts y Production of NFP IEC materials y Monitoring and evaluation activities V. NCR. NCR. injectables and IUD y Social Marketing of contraceptives and FP services by the partner NGOs y National Funding/Subsidy 9. 5. Provision of logistics support such as FP commodities and VS drugs and medical supplies .g. Production and reproduction of FP advocacy and IEC materials XI. CHD 5. 8.1. E. Creation of VS Outreach team by retained hospitals and its operationalization. 6. 3. 2. Formulation of FP related policies/guidelines. Mainstreaming Natural Family Planning in the public and NGO health facilities y Orientation of CHD staff and creation of Regional NFP Management Committee y Diacon with stakeholders y . Frontline participation of DOH-retained hospitals y Establishment of FP Itinerant team by each hospital to respond to the unmet needs for permanent FP methods and to bring the FP services nearer to our urban and rural poor communities y FP services as part of medical and surgical missions of the hospital y Provide budget to support operations of the itenerant teams inclduing the drugs and medical supplies needed for voluntary surgical sterilization (VS) services y Partnership with LGU hospitals which serve as the VS site II..'HPDQG*HQHUDWLRQWKURXJK&RPPXQLW\%DVHG0DQDJHPHQW. Family Planning for the urban and rural poor y Expanded role of Volunteer Health Workers (VHWs) in FP provision y Partnership of itenerant team and LGU hospitals y Provision of FP services . X.. Frontline participation of DOH-retained hospitals Family Planning for the urban and rural poor Demand Generation through Community-Based Management Information System Mainstreaming Natural Family Planning in the public and NGO health facilities Strengthening FP in the regions with high unmet need for FP: CAR. 8..'HYHORSPHQW8SGDWLQJRI)3&/LQLFDO6WDQGDUGV IX. Strengthening FP in the regions with high unmet need for FP: CAR.. Contraceptive Interdependence Initiative y Expansion of PhilHealth coverage to include health centers providing No Scalpel Vasectomy and FP Itenerant Teams y Expansion of Philhealth benefit package to include pills.QIRUPDWLRQ6\VWHP y Identification and masterlisting of potential FP clients and users in need of PF services (permanent or temporary methods) y Segmentation of potential clients and users as to what method is preferred or used by clients IV. GUidelines on the Provision of VS services. etc. ARMM y )LHOGRILWLQHUDQWWHDPVE\UHWDLQHGKRVSLWDOVWRSURYLGH96VHUYLFHVQHDUHUWRWKHFRPPXQLW\ y Installation of COmmunity Based Management Information System y Provision of augmentation funds for CBMIS activities VI.

Funding Agencies y y y y y United States Agency for International Development (USAID) 8QLWHG1DWLRQV)XQGVIRU3RSXODWLRQ$FWLYLWLHV 81)3$.Other Partners 1.

fungal. Other GOs ood and Waterborne Diseases Prevention and Control Program Print Email PDF The program covers diseases of a parasitic. Visayas. which are endemic in Luzon. Inc. . viral. These two organisms had been the cause of major outbreaks in the Philippines in the last two years. the most common of which are typhoid fever and cholera. and Mindanao. Institute of Reproductive Health Commission on Population DILG DOLE LGUs 3. The approaches to control and prevention is centered on public health awareness regarding food safety as well as strengthening treatment guidelines. Cysticercosis is also a major problem since it has a neurologic component to the illness. and bacteria in nature. among them capillariasis. usually acquired through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water or food. Heterophydiasis. and paragonimiasis. Inc. Management Sciences for Health (MSH) Engender Health The Futures Group 2.Well Family Clinic Phlippine Legislators Committee on Population Development (PLPCD) Remedios Foundation Family Planning Organization of the Philippines (FPOP) Institute of Maternal and Child Health (IMCH) Integrated Maternal and Child Care Services and Development. Friendly Care Foundation. The more common of these diseases are bacterial in nature. NGOs y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y Reachout foundation DKT Philippine Federation for Natual Family Planning (PFNFP) John Snow Inc. Parasitic organisms are also an important factor. .

To provide the basis for the need for a food fortification program in the Philippines: The Micronutrient Malnutrition Problem 2.5 yrs.4 1998 38.5 6.5 20.4 WHO Cut ² off Point to be considered a public health problem = >15% Iron and Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA) and its consequences y y ¿Iron .condition where there is lack of iron in the body resulting to low hemoglobin concentration of the blood .2 9. night blindness and bitot·s spot Prevalence of Vitamin A Deficiency: 1993.3 16. the red protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the cells ¿Iron Deficiency Anemia . To provide an update on the current situation of food fortification in the Philippines Fortification as defined by Codex Alimentarius ´the addition of one or more essential nutrients to food.an essential nutrient as retinol needed by the body for normal sight.Food Fortification Program Print Email PDF Objectives: 1. 1998. Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD) and its Consequences y y ¿Vitamin A .4 16.1 2008 15. NNS) Physiological State 6 months . growth. A in the body y ¿VAD affects children·s proper growth. A followed by poor absorption or utilization of vit.5 2003 40. 2003. To discuss various types of food fortification strategies 3. and chances of survival (23 to 35% increased child mortality).2 16.0 22. reproduction and immune competence ¿Vitamin A deficiency . Pregnant Lactating 1993 35.a condition characterized by depleted liver stores & low blood levels of vitamin A due to prolonged insufficient dietary intake of vit. whether or not it is normally contained in the food. for the purpose of preventing or correcting a demonstrated deficiencyof one or more nutrients in the population or specific population groupsµ Vitamin A.1 17. 2008 (DOST ² FNRI. severe deficiency results to blindness. resistance to infection.an essential mineral and is part of hemoglobin.

cretinism. loss of IQ points Progress in the Philippines towards the Elimination of IDD.1 201 132 .0 81. ug/L 6-12 yrs.y ¿IDA results in premature delivery. 1998-2008 Indicator Proportion of Households using Iodized Salt. reduce ability to fight infection and transmittable diseases and low productivity Prevalence of anemia by age. increased maternal mortality.g. 2008 Source: NNS:FNRI Iodine and Iodine Deficiency Disorders (IDD) y y y ¿Iodine -a mineral and a component of the thyroid hormones ¿Thyroid hormones . sex and physiologic state: Philippines. mental retardation. Goal* >90 100-200 Achievements 1998 2003 2008 9. goiter. % Median Urinary Iodine.7 71 56.needed for the brain and nervous system to develop & function normally ¿Iodine Deficiency Disorders refers to a group of clinical entities caused by inadequacy of dietary iodine for the thyroid hormone resulting into various condition e.

6% ¿Although awareness is low. ´An Act Establishing the Philippine Food Fortification Program and for other purposesµ mandating fortification of flour.7 34. respectively. 1995 y Food Fortification Law Republic Act 8976. in 2008 awareness is 11. Signed into law on Dec.2% Recommendations: y y y y ¿Review voluntary fortification standards as standards were developed prior to mandatory fortification ¿Conduct in-depth analysis of the coverage of SangkapPinoySeal of the 2008 NNS ¿Update list of Sangkap Pinoy Seal products as some companies have stopped using the seal in their products ¿Intensify promotions of Sangkap Pinoy Seal Status and Recommendation on Flour Fortification with Vitamin A and Iron . 29% with iron and 14% with iodine (2008) ¿37% of the products are snack foods ¿Most of the products FDA analyzed are within the standard ¿Based on 2003 NNS Households· awareness of SPS.7 23. ´An Act Promoting Salt Iodization Nationwide and for other purposesµ. Lactating Women Pregnant Women *ICC-IDD 2007 Policy on Food Fortification 100-200 150-249 < 20 - 111 81 142 105 35.and FF-products is 11% and 14%. 2000 Status of the Philippine Food Fortification Program Status and Recommendations for the Sangkap Pinoy Seal Program y y y y y ¿There are 139 processed food products with SangkapPinoySeal with 83% with vitamin A.8 11.0 18. oil and sugar with Vitamin A and flour and rice with iron by November 7. % 6-12 yrs. Signed into law on November 7. 2004 and promoting voluntary fortification through the SPSP.4 19. usage of SPS-products is 99.0 25. 20.8 y ASIN LAW Republic Act 8172.Lactating Women Pregnant Women Proportion < 50µg/L.

In 2010 decrease in vitamin A due to non-fortified imported and market samples flour. ¿Lack of premix production ¿Fortification of refined sugar would benefit mainly those in the high income group. y ¿58% of samples from local mills for vitamin A and 67% of imported flour for iron were fortified according to standards.Status: y y ¿Based on FDA monitoring all local flour millers are fortifying with vitamin A and iron ¿94% and 92% of all samples tested by FDA in 2009 were fortified with vitamin A and iron respectively while 77% and 99% were fortified with vitamin A and iron respectively. Recommendations: y y y y ¿Review fortificantsfor iron and possible other micronutrients to be added to wheat flour Continue monitoring wheat fortification ¿Assist flour millers to improve quality of fortification ¿Need to show impact of flour fortification Status and Recommendations on Mandatory Fortification of Refined Sugar with Vitamin A Status: y y y ¿Non ² fortification by industry due to the unresolved issue of who will bear the cost of fortification brought about by the quedansystem of transferable certificates of sugar ownership. fortification of washed sugar ¿Review policy on mandatory fortification of refined sugar Status and Recommendations on Rice Fortification with Iron Status: y y y ¿NFA is fortifying 50% of its rice in 2009 and 2010 ¿With the non ² fortification of NFA rice. ¿There is limited commercial/private sector iron rice premix and iron fortified rice production and distribution mostly in Mindanao (Region XII and XI) with Gen San having the only commercial iron rice premix plant in the Philippines and Davao City implementing mandatory rice fortification in food outlets y ¿NFA conducted communications campaign for its iron fortified rice thru the so called ´I-riceµ campaign though issues remain on the acceptability of its product Recommendation: y ¿Review of mandatory fortification of rice with iron Status and Recommendations on Cooking Oil Fortification with Vitamin A Status: . private sector has an excuse for non ² fortification of its rice. Recommendations: y y ¿Continue discussions with sugar industry to explore a compromise for fortification ie.

1% of households were positive for iodine using Rapid Test Kit (RTK) In the same survey for Region III. 88% were >5ppm while 44% were >15ppm FDA started implementing localization of ASIN Law with General Santos City as the 1stto have a MOA with FDA on localization Recommendation: y y y FDA to expand localization of ASIN Law Set ² up iodine titration for testing iodine in salt Continue to intensify monitoring particularly imported and takal salt Food Fortification Day Theme 2010: EO 382 declares November 7 as the National Food Fortification Day Program Coordinator: Ms.2% have iodine content >5ppm and >15ppm respectively using WYD Tester For FDA monitoring in 2010.2% and 24. 55.com . more than 90% are fortified (91% in 2009 and 94% in 2010) ¿Samples monitored were labeled and packed FDA is not monitoring "takal" Recommendations: y y y y To increase frequency of monitoring by FDA and other agencies such as PCA and LGU·s. to ensure all oil refiners and repackersare monitored at least once a year ¿Monitoring of ´takalµ oil. 81.y y y ¿Based on the samples analyzed by FDA in 2009 and 2010. use of test kit ¿Monitoring imported oil. FDA and BOC to coordinate ¿Review policy of mandatory fortification of oil to possibly limit to those mostly used by at risk population (coconut and palm oil) Status and Recommendations on Salt Iodization Status: y y y y Based on the 2008 NNS.Family Health Office Phone: 651-7800 local 1726-1728 Email: limporta@yahoo. Liberty Importa National Center for Disease Prevention and Control .7% were positive for RTK but only 34.

O. GP for 0-14 years old Aggressive promotion of healthy lifestyle change Harness strengths of inter-agency and intersectoralcooperation with DepEd. Improved access to quality hospitals and facilities Attainment of health-related MDGs by: Deploy CHTs to actively assist families in assessing and acting on their health needs Utilize life cycle approach in providing needed services: FP. private sectors and civic groups. health facilities and communities by government and non-government organizations. DSWD and DILG EXPANDED GARANTISADONG PAMBATA Comprehensive and integrated package of services and communication on health. IPP. nutrition and environment for children available everyday at various settings such as home. esp. ENC. the disadvantaged group (lowest 2 income quintiles) have equitable access to affordable health care Universal Health Care Strategies: y y y y y y y Financial risk protection. which is a multi-sectoral organization composed of government agencies and non-government organizations. sustained health financing and responsive health system by ensuring that all Filipinos. Human Resource for Health Network Print Email PDF The Department of Health (DOH) spearheaded the creation of Human Resource for Health Network (HRHN). . ANC. s2010 Aquino Health Agenda (AHA): Achieving Universal Health Care for All Filipinos Goal y ¿Achievement of better health outcomes. school.Garantisadong Pambata Print Email PDF The Mandate: A. 36. The network seeks to address and respond to human resource for health (HRH) concerns and problems. FBD.

HRHN was formally established during the launching and signing of the Memorandum of Understanding among its member agencies and organizations held on October 25. the Philippine Department of Heallth (DOH) formulated the Health Care Program for Older Persons (HCPOP) in 1998.(Bureau or Office: National Center for Disease Prevention and Control ) Print Email PDF %XUHDXRU2IILFH1DWLRQDO&HQWHUIRU'LVHDVH3UHYHQWLRQDQG&RQWURO Program Briefer Cognizant of its mandate and crucial role.chan robles virtual law library . 1. For this purpose. AND APPROPRIATING FUNDS THEREFOR. the conduct of basic and applied researches. 2006. provision of basic and essential training of manpower dedicated to older persons and. standards and guidelines for local governments to implement the program in collaboration with other government agencies. ³ This Act shall be known as the "Senior Citizens Center Act of the Philippines. The program intends to promote and improve the quality of life of older persons through the establishment and provision of basic health services for older persons. REPUBLIC ACT NO. formulation of policies and guidelines pertaining to older persons. This network was grounded on the Human Resources for Health Master Plan (HRHMP) developed by the DOH and the World Health Organization (WHO)." Sec. non-government organizations and the private sector. Title. provision of information and health education to the public. The HRHN was conceived to implement programs and activities that require multi-sectoral coordination. Sec. The DOH HCPOP (presently renamed Health Development Program for Older Persons) sets the policies. 2. Health Development Program for Older Persons . the State shall adopt an integrated and comprehensive approach towards health development giving priority to elderly among others. 7876 AN ACT ESTABLISHING A SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER IN ALL CITIES AND MUNICIPALITIES OF THE PHILIPPINES. ³ It is the declared policy of the State to provide adequate social services and an improved quality of life for all. Declaration of Policy.

7432 (An Act to Maximize the Contribution of Senior Citizens to Nation Building. Always at a set time. the Philippines. Grant Benefits and Special Privileges) Print Email PDF .. the alternative dying prematurely is not 2. followed by Australia. The walk will start in countries in the Pacific. Korea. Thailand. will be starting their celebrations. social. the first walk will be in New Zealand . societies and economies. ageing will be celebrated in cities around the world. a group of cities. Europe.. which will mark simultaneously the launching of Global Movement for Active Ageing 1999 International Year for Older Persons.Health Development Program for Older Persons (Global Movement for Active Ageing (Global Embrace 1999)) Print Email PDF The Global Movement for Active Ageing. It will provide models and ideas for programme and projects that promote active ageing. CELEBRATE ² Celebrate ageing . which was conceived by the World Health Organization (WHO). is exactly as the title implies. until the very last locations will close the day and embrace. then Japan.A. will need the collaboration of many different partners from all over the world. getting older is good. they will reach the Middle East. Indonesia and India. The Global embrace is a round the clock around the world party which every country is invited. within the same time zone.R. mental. INTEGENERATIONAL SOLIDARITY Older persons should not be marginalized: reflecting the theme of the UN International Year of Older Persons. The key messages of the Global Movement are: 1. Eventually. the America. A SOCIETY FOR ALL Active ageing is key for older persons continuing to contribute to society. as they grow older to lead productive and healthy lives in their families. China. through these walk events. and spiritual 3. a series of walk events embracing the globe: in time zone after time zone. Active ageing is the capacity of the people. where the date line marks the start of a new day. The Global Movement will be a network for all those interested in moving policies and practice towards Actives Ageing. all dimensions for being active should be taken into account : the physical. Health Development Program for Older Persons . ´towards a society for all agesµ What is the Global Embrace 1999? The Global Embrace. Africa. Thus.

In addition to this. GRANT BENEFITS AND SPECIAL PRIVILEGES AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES. health and other social services available to all the people at affordable cost. In accordance with these policies. Section 10 in the Declaration of Principles and State Policies provides: ´The State shall provide social justice in all phases of national developmentµ. Findings showed four out of ten newborns were initiated to breastfeeding within an hour after birth. 2) Adopt measures whereby our senior citizens are assisted and appreciated by the community as a whole. Section 4 of the Constitution. Section II provides: ´The State shall adopt an integrated and comprehensive approach to health development which shall endeavor to make essential goods. their families and the rest of the community that they serve. Further. disabled. In 2004. to reverse the disturbing trends in infant and young child feeding practices. elderly. This global strategy was endorsed by the 55th World Health Assembly in May 2002 and by the UNICEF Executive Board in September 2002 respectively.µ Consonant with these constitutional principles the following are the declared policies of this Act: a) To motivate and encourage the senior citizens to contribute to nation building.AN ACT TO MAXIMIZE THE CONTRIBUTION OF SENIOR CITIZENS TO NATION BUILDING. Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) Print I. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representative of the Philippines in Congress assembled: SECTION 1. . There shall be priority for the needs of the underprivileged. sick. Declaration of Policies and Objectives ² Pursuant to Article XV. infant and young child feeding practices were assessed using the WHO assessment protocol and rated poor to fair. it is the duty of the family to take care of its elderly members while the State may design programs of social security for them. Email PDF Profile/Rationale of the Health Program A global strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) was issued jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children·s Fund (UNICEF) in 2002. b) To encourage their families and communities they live with to reaffirm the valued Filipino tradition of caring for the senior citizens. this act aims to: 1) Establish mechanism whereby the contribution of the senior citizens are maximized. Article XIII. 3) Establish a program beneficial to the senior citizens. women and children.

The policy was intended to guide health workers and other concerned parties in ensuring the protection. (1) Iligtas sa Tigdas ang Pinas Print Email PDF A Door-to-Door Measles-Rubella (MR) Immunization Campaign Vaccinating All Children. It aimed to improve the nutritional status and health of children especially the under-three and consequently reduce infant and under-five mortality. The approval of the National Plan of Action in 2005 helped the Department of Health (DOH) and its partners. the target year agreed upon with the other countries in the Western Pacific Region. 9 months to below 8 years old From April 4 to May 4. Administrative Order (AO) 2005-0014: National Policies on IYCF was signed and endorsed by the Secretary of Health. These poor practices needed urgent action and aggressive sustained interventions. promotion and support of exclusive breastfeeding and adequate and appropriate complementary feeding with continued breastfeeding. provide a supportive environment and ensure its sustainability. Three (3) mass measles immunization campaigns were conducted in 1998. Specifically. The assessment also found out that complementary foods were introduced too early. achieving 95% coverage in each round. The complementary feeding indicator was also rated as poor since only 57. 2004 and 2007. 2011 The Philippines has committed to eliminate measles in 2012. To address these problems on infant and young child feeding practices. protect and promote infant and young child feeding practices. 2005.three out of ten infants less than six months were exclusively breastfed and the median duration of breastfeeding was only thirteen months. In contrast. Thus on May 23. The main efforts were directed towards creating a supportive environment for appropriate IYCF practices. Figure 1 shows the identified key objectives. increase political commitment at all levels. supportive strategies and key interventions to guide the overall implementation and evaluation of the 2005-2010 Plan of Action. the first National IYCF Plan of Action was formulated. the annual coverage for routine . its objectives were to improve. at the age of less than two months. in the development of the first (1st) National Policy on Infant and Young Child Feeding.9 percent of 6-9 months children received complementary foods while continuing to breastfed.

All children ages 9-95 months old nationwide should be given a dose of measles-rubella vaccine through a door-todoor vaccination campaign. The administration of a 2nd dose of measles containing vaccines on a routine schedule will provide this ´second opportunityµ at an earlier time and ensure the protection against measles of infants/children who failed to be protected during the first dose. core referral hospital and end-referral hospital. but these are done every 2-3 years interval and therefore not enough to prevent seasonal outbreaks from occurring in areas with low immunization coverage. which typically includes primary health providers. Mass measles immunization campaigns provide a ´second opportunityµ to ´catch missed childrenµ. informally organized or DOH-initiated. which indicates uninterrupted circulation of measles virus transmission resulting to illness and deaths among children. . ILHZ. Unlike previous campaign. The highest coverage ever attained is 92% and the lowest coverage was 67% (1987 DOH EPI Report). whether these are formally organized. jointly serving a common population within a local geographic area under the jurisdictions of more than one local government. there is an urgent need to conduct a measles supplemental immunization activity this April 2011. Inter Local Health Zone Print Email PDF An ILHZ is defined to be any form or organized arrangement for coordinating the operations of an array and hierarchy of health providers and facilities. For these to happen. assure the constituents access to a range of services necessary to meet health care needs of individuals.measles vaccination given to infants· ages 9-11 months never reached the target of at least 95%. and to manage their limited resources for health more efficiently and equitably. existing ILHZs in the country must strengthen their operations and sustain their functionality. a measles-free certification will be issued to city/province meeting all the criteria of (1) all barangays passed the RCA with no missed child and 95% and above house marking accuracy. the faster is the accumulation of unimmunized susceptible infants. The lower the coverage. resulting in measles outbreaks in different areas of the Philippines. Regardless of the organizational nature of each ILHZ. As a response to interrupt the transmission of the measles virus and prevent a potential large measles outbreak to occur. the overall aim is to make each ILHZ functional in order to perform its abovementioned purposes and tasks. Laboratory confirmed measles cases continued to be reported all over the country. as a form of inter-LGU cooperation is established in order to better protect the public or collective health of their community. (2) there are no measles cases for the next 3 months after the campaign and (3) measles surveillance indicators have met the national standards.

Just five diseases (pneumonia. health facility and health systems levels. healthy growth and development and is based on the combined delivery of essential interventions at community. Objectives of IMCI y y Reduce death and frequency and severity of illness and disability. In the Philippines. The ILHZ functionality is defined mainly by observable zone-wide health sector performance results in terms of: (i) improved health status and coverage of public health intervention of the zone population. Effective and affordable interventions to address these common conditions exist but they do not yet reach the populations most in need. The strategy was developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children·s Fund (UNICEF). PHNs and MOHs 5 . IMCI includes elements of prevention as well as curative and addresses the most common conditions that affect young children. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy has been introduced in an increasing number of countries in the region since 1995. and Contribute to improved growth and development Components of IMCI y Improving case management skills of health workers 11-day Basic Course for RHMs. malaria. Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) Print Email PDF One million children under five years old die each year in less developed countries.It must be recognized that a good inter-LGU coordination in health is one that secures health benefits for the people living in LGUs that are coordinating with one another. thereafter more health workers and hospital staff were capacitated to implement the strategy at the frontline level. A functional ILHZ therefore is to be viewed as one that provides health benefits to its individual residents and to the zone population as a whole. IMCI is a major strategy for child survival. the young and impoverish. diarrhea. IMCI was started on a pilot basis in 1996. measles and dengue hemorrhagic fever) account for nearly half of these deaths and malnutrition is often the underlying condition.day Facilitators course 5 ² day Follow-up course for IMCI Supervisors .

diarrhea. and when to return to clinic is an essential component of IMCI y y y y y BASIS FOR CLASSIFYING THE CHILD·S ILLNESS (please see enclosed portion of the IMCI Chartbooklet) The child·s illness is classified based on a color-coded triage system: PINKindicates urgent hospital referral or admission YELLOW. For sick young infants. local bacterial infection. malaria. correct feeding and giving of fluids. All sick children are routinely assessed for nutritional. immunization and deworming status and for other problems Only a limited number of clinical signs are used A combination of individual signs leads to a child·s classification within one or more symptom groups rather than a diagnosis. diarrhea and jaundice.y y Improving over-all health systems Improving family and community health practices Rationale for an integrated approach in the management of sick children Majority of these deaths are caused by 5 preventable and treatable conditions namely: pneumonia. For sick children. diarrhea. measles and malnutrition. IMCI management procedures use limited number of essential drugs and encourage active participation of caretakers in the treatment of children Counseling of caretakers on home care. Who are the children covered by the IMCI protocol? Sick children birth up to 2 months (Sick Young Infant) Sick children 2 months up to 5 years old (Sick child) Strategies/Principles of IMCI y All sick children aged 2 months up to 5 years are examined for GENERAL DANGER signs and all Sick Young Infants Birth up to 2 months are examined for VERY SEVERE DISEASE AND LOCAL BACTERIAL INFECTION. Three (3) out of four (4) episodes of childhood illness are caused by these five conditions Most children have more than one illness at one time. These signs indicate immediate referral or admission to hospital The children and infants are then assessed for main symptoms. This overlap means that a single diagnosis may not be possible or appropriate.indicates initiation of specific Outpatient Treatment . the main symptoms include: cough or difficulty breathing. fever and ear infection.

GREEN ² indicates supportive home care Steps of the IMCI Case management Process The following is the flow of the iMCI process. the hospital protocol is used in the management of the sick child. provincial and tertiary hospitals. THE INTEGRATED CASE MANAGEMENT PROCESS . Once admitted. The health worker then proceeds with the IMCI process by checking for general danger signs. assessing the main symptoms and other processes indicated in the chart below. At the out-patient health facility. the health worker should routinely do basic demographic data collection. Determine whether this is an initial or a follow-up visit. referral facility includes district. Take note that for the pink box. vital signs taking. and asking the mother about the child's problems.

Joven Department of Health .com .National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (DOH-NCDPC) Contact Number: 651-7800 local 1726-1730 Email: beth3joven@yahoo. Elizabeth M.Program Manager: Ms.

QRFNRXW7LJGDV LVDVHTXHOWRWKHDQG /LJWDV7LJGDV PDVVPHDVOHVLPPXQL]DWLRQFDPSDLJQ $OOFKLOGUHQPRQWKVWRPRQWKVROG ERUQ2FWREHU -DQXDU\.y 4182 reads Knock Out Tigdas 2007 Print Email PDF Knock-out Tigdas Logo .

VKRXOGEHYDFFLQDWHGDJDLQVW PHDVOHVIURP2FWREHU1RYHPEHUGRRUWRGRRU$OOKHDOWKFHQWHUVEDUDQJD\KHDOWKVWDWLRQVKRVSLWDOV DQGRWKHUWHPSRUDU\LPPXQL]DWLRQVLWHVVXFKDVEDVNHWEDOOFRXUWWRZQSOD]DVDQGRWKHULGHQWLILHGSXEOLFSODFHVZLOO DOVRRIIHU)5((YDFFLQDWLRQVHUYLFHVGXULQJWKHFDPSDLJQSHULRG 2WKHUVHUYLFHVWREHJLYHQLQFOXGH9LWDPLQ$&DSVXOHDQGGHZRUPLQJWDEOHW LEPROSY Vision: Empowered primary stakeholders in leprosy and eliminated leprosy as a public health problem by 2020 Mission: To ensure the provision of a comprehensive. integrated quality leprosy services at all levels of health care .

financing. Set II is composed of 27 output indicators representing major thrusts and key interventions for the four reform components of service delivery. There are 46 performance indicators in the LGU Scorecard categorized in two sets (Set I and Set II). It also facilitates the automation of the LGU Scorecard collection and publication of results. The equity dimensions of these indicators are not measured (See Annex 2: Data Definitions for Set II Indicators in LGU Scorecard). multipliers and data sources. The two sets of performance indicators are the following: Set I is composed of 27 outcome indicators mostly representing intermediate outcomes that can be assessed every year (See Annex 1: Data Definitions for Set I Indicators in LGU Scorecard). They are mostly composed of health system reform outputs. The sources of data utilized for the LGU Scorecard are the institutional data sources in the Department of Health.Goal: To maintain and sustain the elimination status LGU Scorecard Print Email PDF The performance indicators in the LGU Scorecard are a subset of the Performance Indicator Framework (PIF) of the ME3. and governance. These indicators are assessed only every 3-5 years. projects and activities (PPAs). Licensure Examinations for Paraprofessionals Undertaken by the Department of Health . The performance indicators measure basic intermediate outcomes and major outputs of health reform programs. since these require more time and more resources to set up. The availability of data on an annual basis was an important consideration for inclusion of Set I performance indicators in the LGU Scorecard. The other references used in defining performance indicators in the LGU Scorecard are PhilHealth data definitions and WHO definitions of indicators. denominators. regulation. The definition of performance indicators is consistent with the Department of Health FHSIS data dictionary. The standardization of performance indicators guarantees consistency of data across various LGUs and across years of implementation. Set I performance indicators of the LGU Scorecard are standardized as to numerators.

Print Email PDF I. 856 ´Code of Sanitation of the Philippinesµ y Massage Therapists Administrative Order No. Malaria Control Program Print Email PDF malaria_thumb. Mandates Presidential Decree No.jpg . 2010-0033 ´Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations Governing Disposal of Dead Personsµ Committees The Committee of Examiners for Massage Therapy (CEMT) and the Committee of Examiners for Undertakers and Embalmers (CEUE) were created by the DOH to regulate the practice of massage therapy and embalming to ensure that only qualified individuals enter the profession and that the care and services to be provided are within the standards of practice. 2010-0034 ² ´Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations Governing Massage Clinics and Sauna Bath Establishmentsµ y Embalmers Administrative Order No.

As of this year. In response to this health problem. Measles Elimination Campaign (Ligtas Tigdas) National Tuberculosis Control Program Print Email PDF Tuberculosis is a disease caused by a bacterium called Mycobeacterium tuberculosis that is mainly acquired by inhalation of infectious droplets containing viable tubercle bacilli.27 million incident cases of TB worldwide and Asia accounts for 55% of the cases. Goal: To significantly reduce malaria burden so that it will no longer affect the socio-economic development of individuals and families in endemic areas. Vision: Malaria-free Philippines Mission: To empower health workers. Coughing is generally considered as the most efficient way of producing infectious droplets. Infectious droplets can be produced by coughing. there are 9. This parasite-caused disease is the 9th leading cause of morbidity in the country. the Department of Health (DOH) coordinated with its partner organizations and agencies to employ key interventions with regard to malaria control. talking and singing. In 2007. Through the National TB Program (NTP). and (3) transplacenta (transfer of malaria parasites from an infected mother to its unborn child). It can be transmitted in the following ways: (1) blood transfusion from an infected individual. the Philippines achieved the global targets of . (2) sharing of IV needles. there are 58 out of 81 provinces that are malaria endemic and 14 million people are at risk. the population at risk and all others concerned to eliminate malaria in the country.Malaria is a parasite-caused disease that is usually acquired through the bite of a female Anopheles mosquito. sneezing.

emerging concerns like drug resistance and co-morbidities need to be addressed to prevent rapid transmission and future generation of such threats. urban and rural poor. in partnership with critical stakeholders. children and other members of the family. The various initiatives undertaken by the Program.70% case detection for new smear positive TB cases and 89% of these became successfully treated. Natural Family Planning Print Email PDF Population/Family Planning Issue Senate Bill No. . The program is anchored on the following basic principles. It also provides information and services for the couples of reproductive age to plan their family according to their beliefs and circumstances through legally and medically acceptable family planning methods. captive populations (inmates/prisoners). the eight (8) strategies of PhilPACT are anchored on this TB control framework. these strategies are also attuned with the Government¶s health reform agenda known as Kalusugang Pangkalahatan (KP) to ensure sustainability and risk protection. Coverage should also be broadened to capture the marginalized populations and the vulnerable groups namely. Last 2009. 16: "Reproductive Health Act of 2004" The Truth About the P50M CFC Contract with DOH CFC-DOH Partnership Letter to the Editor: Philippine Daily Inquirer Family Planning Brief Description of Program A national mandated priority public health program to attain the country's national health development: a health intervention program and an important tool for the improvement of the health and welfare of mothers. the National Center for Disease Prevention and Control of the Department of Health led the process of formulating the 2010-2016 Philippine Plan of Action to Control TB (PhilPACT) that serves as the guiding direction for the attainment of the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs). elderly and indigenous groups. Nonetheless. 1546: "Reproductive Health Act of 2004" House Bill No. Learning from the Directly-Observed Treatment Shortcourse (DOTS) strategy. enabled the NTP to sustain these targets. Moreover.

200 animal bites or rabies exposures were reported.s 1998 disseminated to endemic regions.7% per 1000 population in 1998. productive and civic-minded citizens. It is the second leading cause of permanent and long-term disability. A major strategy of the Elimination Plan was the Mass Annual Treatment using the combination drug.* Responsible Parenthood which means that each family has the right and duty to determine the desired number of children they might have and when they might have them. has already developed the guidelines for managing rabies exposures. together with the partner organizations/agencies. Post Exposure Prophylaxis against rabies was provided in all the 365 ABTCs. The World Health Assembly in 1997 declared ´Filariasis Elimination as a priorityµ and followed by WHO·s call for global elimination. Diethylcarbamazine Citrate and Albendazole for a minimum of 2 years & above living in established endemic areas after the issuance from WHO of the safety data on the use of the drugs. With the implementation of the program strategies. A sign of the DOH·s commitment to eliminate the disease. National Filariasis Elimination Program Print Email PDF Filariasis is a major parasitic infection. In 2010. The Philippine Plan was approved by WHO which gave the government free supply of the Albendazole (donated b y GSK thru WHO) for filariasis elimination. five islands were already declared to be rabies-free. Consolidated field reports showed a prevalence rate of 9. In support to the program. 257 rabies cases and 266. It was first discovered in the Philippines in 1907 by foreign workers. And beyond responsible parenthood is Responsible Parenting which is the proper ubringing and education of chidren so that they grow up to be upright. . an Administrative Order declaring ´November as Filariasis Mass Treatment Month was signed by the Secretary of Health last July 2004 and was disseminated to all endemic regions. which continues to be a public health problem in the Philippines. A total of 365 ABTCs were established and strategically located all over the country. The disease affects mostly the poorest municipalities in the country about 71% of the case live in the 4th-6th class type of municipalities. the program·s official shift from control to elimination strategies was evident in an Administrative Order #25-A. Program Achievements: The DOH.

Program Activities: With regard to the prevention and fight against stigma and discrimination. Early identification and timely intervention can lead to significant reduction of morbidity. 4. Multi-sectoral coordination through Philippine National AIDS Council (PNAC). Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia. Galactosemia. 100% Condom Use Program (CUP) especially for entertainment establishments. National HIV/STI Prevention Program Print Email PDF Objective: Reduce the transmission of HIV and STI among the Most At Risk Population and General Population and mitigate its impact at the individual. Availability of free voluntary HIV Counseling and Testing Service. the program has saved 45 283 patients. family. the following are the strategies and interventions: 1. and associated disabilities in affected infants. and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.Republic Act 9288 Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at the early identification of infants who are affected by certain genetic/metabolic/infectious conditions. From 1996 to December 2010. 3. and community level. NBS in the Philippines started in June 1996 and was integrated into the public health delivery system with the enactment of the Newborn Screening Act of 2004 (Republic Act 9288). Phenylketonuria. mortality. Five conditions are currently screened: Congenital Hypothyroidism. . 2. Peer education and outreach.

Augmentation of resources of social Hygiene Clinics. Program Accomplishments: As of the first quarter of 2011. for the leveraging services.250 PLHIV were provided with treatment and 4.000 STI were treated. 7. For the health policy and program development. Lastly. Procured male condoms distributed as education materials during outreach. Twenty five priority LGUs provided support in strengthening Local AIDS councils.5. and 8. the Manual of Procedures/ Standards/ Guidelines is already finalized and disseminated. both the Strategic Plan 2012-2016 for Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission and the Strategic Plan 2012-2016 for Most at Risk Young People and HIV Prevention and Treatment are being drafted. Empowerment of communities. The ARV Resistance surveillance among People Living with HIV (PLHIV) on Treatment is being implemented through the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine (RITM). baseline laboratory testing is being provided while male condoms are being distributed through social Hygiene Clinics. National Mental Health Program Print Email PDF Vision: Mission: Goal: Better Quality of Life through Total Health Care for all Filipinos. the program has attained particular targets for the three major final outputs: health policy and program development. Community assemblies and for a to reduce stigma. as of March 2011. A total of 1. and leveraging services for priority health programs. With regard to capability building. Moreover. capability building of local government units (LGUs) and other stakeholders. A Rational and Unified Response to Mental Health. there were already 17 Treatment Hubs nationwide. 6. Quality Mental Health Care. . the Training Curriculum for HIV Counseling and Testing is already revised.

Objective: Implementation of a Mental Health Program strategy The National Mental Health Policy shall be pursued through a Mental Health Program strategy prioritizing the promotion of mental health. The target populations of the program are the general population. National Dengue Prevention and Control Program Print Email PDF The National Dengue Prevention and Control Program was first initiated by the Department of Health (DOH) in 1993. Objectives: The objectives of the program are categorized into three: health status objectives. It was not until 1998 when the program was implemented nationwide. . Goal: Reduce morbidity and mortality from dengue infection by preventing the transmission of the virus from the mosquito vector human. mental and brain disorders and disabilities. and services & protection objectives. protection of the rights and freedoms of persons with mental diseases and the reduction of the burden and consequences of mental ill-health. risk reduction objectives. and the local health workers. Region VII and the National Capital Region served as the pilot sites. the local government units. Vision: Mission: Dengue Risk-Free Philippines To improve the quality of health of Filipinos by adopting an integrated dengue control approach in the prevention and control of dengue infection.

as the focal organization. and acceptable. affordable. shall ensure the development. local government authorities and other sectors in promoting self-sustaining programs and improvement of workers' health and working environment. Program Objectives and Targets To promote and protect the health and well being of the working population thru improved health. better working conditions and workers' environment. employers. and protect the human rights and dignity of PWDs and their caregivers. Reduce the prevalence of all types of disabilities. Persons with Disabilities Print Email PDF Vision: Mission: Improve the total well-being of Person with Disabilities (PWD) The Department of Health. and monitoring of relevant and efficient health programs and systems for PWDs that are available. implementation. Strategic Goals: The program goals are: 1. Pinoy MD Program Print Email PDF "Gusto kong Maging Doktor" .Occupational Health Program Print Email PDF Vision/Mission Statement y Health for all occupations in partnership with the workers. 2. and Promote.

A Medical Scholarship Grant for Indigenous People. Philippines. financing. cervix. Local Health Workers. and several State Universities and Medical Schools. begun in 1988. Department of Health Employees or their children. is an integrated approach utilizing primary. PIPH was adopted on a pilot basis by 16 provinces in 2007. good governance and service delivery The five year province-wide investment plan for health is an important evidence-based platform for local health system management and a milestone in DoH engagement at the local level. followed by 21 more in 2008. 44 provinces and eqight cities have completed their own five year plans. Province-wide Investment Plan for Health (PIPH) Print Email PDF A five year medium term plan prepared by F1 convergence provinces using the Fourmula One for Health framework to improve the highly decentralized system. Sources: Department of Medicine. Philippine Cancer Control Program Print Email PDF The Philippine Cancer Control Program. This is a jJoint program of the Department of Health (DOH). University of the Phil-Phil General Hospital. Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO). regulation. Six lead cancers (lung. Philippine General Hospital and Department of Orthopaedics. Department of Health and 2Cancer Institute. Reyes Memorial Medical Center. Manila. and their causation and prevention are discussed. including six provinces from the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). secondary and tertiary prevention in different regions of the country at both hospital and community levels. Features peculiar to the Philippines are described. There is also today in place a Community-based Cancer Care Network which seeks to develop a network of self-sufficient communities sharing responsibility for cancer care and control in the country. University of the Phil-Phil General Hospital and Jose R. oral cavity. colon and rectum) are discussed. A recent assessment revealed shortcomings in the Cancer Control Program and urgent recommendations were made to reverse the anticipated ¶cancer epidemic·. breast. Barangay Health Workers. For interested applicants see the PinoyMD flyer for the qualification and scholarship package details. liver. In 2009. .

smoking. Hypertension and diseases of the heart are among the ten leading causes of illnesses each year. The risk factors involved are tobacco use. physical inactivity and alcohol use. These diseases are collectively known as Lifestyle Related NonCommunicable Diseases (NCDs). causing more than half of all deaths annually. Prevention and Control of Chronic Lifestyle Related Non Communicable Diseases Print Email PDF 1. . Alcohol use has also risen steadily since the 1960s. 60. hypertension. Among adults.Philippine Medical Tourism Program Print Vision: "The global leader in providing quality health care for all through universal health care" Email PDF Mission: To ensure that the Philippines is globally competitive through implementation of quality standards in both public and private sector. chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes are among the top killers in the Philippines. as defined in the National Objectives for Health 2005-2010. More than half (56%) of adult males and 12% of adult females are current smokers. and a significant number have high levels of blood cholesterol and sugar. 22. particularly because these diseases have common risk factors which are to a large extent related to unhealthy lifestyle.A study conducted by Food and Nutrition Research Institute (FNRI) in 2003 revealed that 90% of Filipinos have one or more of the following risk factors: physical inactivity.5% are hypertensive. 20% are overweight and 5% are obese. diabetes and abnormal cholesterol. obesity.5% are physically inactive. unhealthy diet. cancers. BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE Cardiovascular diseases.

They also undermine the country's economic development. 1. and diabetes were put in place in the mid 1990·s. the prevalence rate of overweight for children 6-10 years old doubled from 0. an integrated comprehensive program for the prevention and control of these non-communicable lifestyle related diseases has to be put in place. (Source: Philippines Global Youth Tobacco Survey. Thus. The individual programs however. Recent evidence shows that the most cost-effective way of controlling these non-communicable lifestyle related diseases is by the prevention of the emergence of the risk factors in an integrated manner. employing health promotion strategies across the life course and intervening at the level of family and community. (Source: Philippines Global School-based Student Health Survey. An important factor identified was the lack of trained healthcare Email PDF . 2007). GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Goals: To reduce morbidity. The prevalence of overweight among adolescents 9-11 years old had increased two folds from 2.8% in 2001 to 1. or doing other sitting activities. playing computer games. cancers. 2007) The cost of care of lifestyle-related diseases may cause people to fall into poverty and create a downward spiral of worsening poverty and illness.8% in 2005. This is essential because the causal risk factors causing these illnesses are deeply entrenched in the social and cultural framework of the society. mortality and disability rates due to chronic lifestyle related NCDs through an integrated and comprehensive program on the prevention and control of lifestyle related Rural Health Midwives Placement Program (RHMPP) / Midwifery Scholarship Program of the Philippines (MSPP) Print Rationale: The Philippines· maternal and infant morbidity and mortality rates have been marked despite its efforts to assist local government units for the past decade. talking with friends. vertical programs on the prevention and control of cardiovascular diseases. About 30% of teenage students are physically inactive.6% in 2005.4% in 1993 to 4. spending three or more hours per day sitting and watching television. (Source: Philippine Nutrition Facts and Figures 2005) Twenty two (22) per cent of teenagers currently smoke cigarettes. Similarly. were focused on treatment and management of those who were already sick and thus were competing with each other for resources and for attention upon field implementation.Children and adolescents are also exposed to the above-mentioned risks. In response to the increasing prevalence of lifestyle related diseases in the country.

ensure constant supply of competent midwives. hence. improve facility-based health services. where these facilities are manned by a team composed of a licensed physician. Schistosomiasis Control Program Print Email PDF . The DOH is restating its commitment towards a health nation through more aggressive safe motherhood initiatives. the upgrading of obstetric deliveries to strategic facility-based Basic Emergency Obstetric Care (BEmONC). the DOH created the Rural Health Midwife Placement Program (RHMPP) to address the inequitable distribution of midwives and equip them for facility-based BEmONC practice.providers particularly. This hinders the recognition of basic obstetric needs and delivery of quality health service to the community. In support to the RHMPP. To intensify the country·s capacity in the provision of quality health service to the people. hence. the DOH created the MSPP that aims to produce competent midwives from qualified residents of priority areas. public health nurse. amidst migration of other healthcare professionals. fully immunized child and contraceptive prevalence rates. Program Description: The World Health Organization (WHO) affirms that approximately 15% of all pregnant women develop a potentially life-threatening complication that calls for either skilled care or major obstetrical interventions to survive. The midwives. By augmenting health staff to selected government units. being the frontline healthcare providers. the Department of Health (DOH) has adopted the facility-based basic emergency obstetric care strategy. Readily accessible Emergency Obstetric Care may thus reduce maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. and a rural health midwife at the primary level. the DOH may improve maternal and child health and attain the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). thus. in the far flung areas of the country. the DOH created the Midwifery Scholarship Program of the Philippines (MSPP). In order to ensure a constant supply of competent midwives and to deliver their services to the people in dire need. The RHMPP aims to provide competent midwives to areas that have not performed well in terms of facility-based deliveries. have been identified by the DOH to serve as the link between health service delivery and the community in the reduction of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Since the rural health midwives are considered as the frontline health workers in the rural areas and have progressed to become multi-task personnel in the delivery of healthcare services.

WASH and several behavior changing approaches. 190 municipalities. The expansion of these measures reduces more effectively the transmission of worm infection. Within the Department of Health (DOH).230 barangays. Program interventions and related measures have to be focused on them. are gravely exposed to helminthes infection. hence. which can lead to blockage of blood flow. It aims to reduce the deaths and diseases due to STH infections by reducing the prevalence of the infection among population groups found most at risk. farmers. redirecting the eggs to other parts of the body. Water. several programs exist which are viable mechanisms to operationalize an integrated approach in preventing and controlling STH infections more effectively and efficiently. Schistosomiasis is still endemic in 12 regions with 28 provinces. food handlers and operators as well as indigenous people. These include the soldiers. specifically Schistosoma japonicum. Helminth infections adversely affect the health of the children and women. which by the nature of their work and situation.5 million are directly exposed. which develop in snails. The IHCP identifies the corresponding approach of deworming that must be applied for each identified population group. In addition.Schistosomiasis is an infection caused by blood fluke. obtain higher coverage and generate better health outcomes. Chemotherapy remains as the core package in helminth infection control. An individual may acquire the infection from fresh water contaminated with larval cercariae. The promotion of desired behaviors . there is a need to integrate all related efforts and strengthen coordination of those involved to ensure better complementation of resource. Infected yet untreated individuals could transmit the disease through discharging schistosome eggs in feces into bodies of water. This needs to expand to the other national and local agencies and organizations engaged in the same endeavor. The IHCP interventions consist primarily of chemotherapy. The infection can also cause portal hypertension. Goal: all endemic areas To reduce the disease prevalence by 50% with a vision of eliminating the disease eventually in Soil Transmitted Helminth Control Program Print Email PDF Profile/Rationale of the Health Program Given the relatively high prevalence rate of STH infections in the country and the existing issues confronting the implementation of the STHCP nationwide. and 2. Children are classified into preschoolers and school children while women include adolescent females and pregnant women. sanitation and hygiene (WASH) serves as the cornerstone in reducing the prevalence of worm infection. They also require the necessary attention. there are also special groups. which can make collateral circulation. The IHCP envisions healthy and productive Filipinos. Long term infections can result to severe development of lesions. Approximately 12 million people are affected and about 2.

the number of deaths will increase to 10 million by the year 2020. These interventions only become viable and effective if they are carried out in a supportive environment. Also. This document very clearly stated that as current statistics indicate. Population survey reports showed that approximately one third of smokers attempt to quit each year and that majority of these attempts are undertaken without help. surveillance and research) have to be installed. The political will and support of national and local leaders are essential to propel the cause of the IHCP. civil society and the community is very critical to the success of IHCP. If this trend continues. There is currently an estimated 1. WHO. Financing reforms must likewise introduce. the support of DOH. While the LGUs are expected to be primarily responsible for the controlling helminth infection.. Smoking Cessation Program Print Email PDF Rationale: The use of tobacco continues to be a major cause of health problems worldwide. many tobacco users will need support in quitting. Quality of deworming services and expansion of service outlet to increase access must be given due to consideration. The LGUs must begin to allocate budget for their own deworming program. 70% of which will be coming from countries like the Philippines. procurement and logistics management. Local financing mechanisms to sustain the delivery of STHCP services need to be explored and established. DepEd and other national government agencies including the private sector. However.9 million people dying because of tobacco use in a year. information management system.g. Central to the achievement of the IHCP vision is the commitment and participation of all sectors concerned considering that helminth infection is a multi-faceted problem. Strict monitoring of LGUs compliance to national laws and policies must be undertaken while several program support systems (e.3 billion smokers in the world. only a small percentage of . Enabling mechanisms must therefore be established to support their implementation. 2005) The World Health Organization released a document in 2003 entitled Policy Recommendations for Smoking Cessation and Treatment of Tobacco Dependence. A more equitable or rationalized allocation of deworming assistance from the DOH must be established.ensures that these efforts on chemotheraphy and WASH are translated into actual healthy practices and better utilization of these facilities. because of the addictiveness of tobacco products. with 4. it will not be possible to reduce tobacco related deaths over the next 30-50 years unless adult smokers are encouraged to quit. An enabling environment entails good governance of the IHCP at all levels of operations. (The Role of Health Professionals in Tobacco Control.

122 s. Among those who smoked in the last 12 months. Vision: Reduced prevalence of smoking and minimizing smoking-related health risks.8% made a quit attempt. the rapid rate of urbanization has outpaced the ability of governments to build essential infrastructure for health and social services. concentrated poverty and slum formation.5% successfully quit. and .3 and 7 sticks of cigarettes per day respectively. Among many features of urbanization in developing countries include greater population densities and more congestion.3% stated they used counseling and or advise as their cessation method. The Philippine Global Adult Tobacco Survey conducted in 2009 (DOH. but only 4. The policy paper also stated that support for smoking cessation or ´treatment of tobacco dependenceµ refers to a range of techniques including motivation.6 million) of whom are men. telephone and internet support. The survey also revealed that among ever daily smokers. 60. RATIONALE In developing countries. 12. thus the need for the Department of Health to set up a national infrastructure to help smokers quit smoking. 47. and appropriate pharmaceutical aids all of which aim to encourage and help tobacco users to stop using tobacco and to avoid subsequent relapse. As such DOH Administrative Order No. while 9. which is at least 12 months of abstinence from smoking.5% have quit smoking.3 million) of the population aged 15 years old and over currently smoke tobacco. Urban Health System Development (UHSD) Program Print Email PDF (As contained in Administrative Order No. advise and guidance. 21. 2010) revealed that 28.3% (17.cigarette smokers (1-3%) achieve lasting abstinence. 47.0% (2. using will power alone (Fiore et al 2000) as cited by the above policy paper. Eighty percent of these current smokers are daily smokers with men and women smoking an average of 11. 2011) I. 2003 titled The Smoking Cessation Program to support the National Tobacco Control and Healthy Lifestyle Program allowed the setting up of the National Smoking Cessation Program.8 million) are women.7% (14. 2011-0008 dated July 12. The above scenario dictates the great need to build the capacity of health workers to help smokers quit smoking. Among current cigarette smokers. counseling. Evidence has shown that cessation is the only intervention with the potential to reduce tobacco-related mortality in the short and medium term and therefore should be part of an overall comprehensive tobacco-control policy of any country. translating to around 10 million Filipinos needing help to quit smoking as of the moment.6% stated they are interested in quitting. The national smoking infrastructure is mandated by the Tobacco Regulations Act which orders the Department of Health to set up withdrawal clinics. March 16. Philippines GATS Country Report.

it shall design. physical injuries (fall. solicit active representation from public and private stakeholders that are involved in violence and injury prevention.536). majority of which is caused by assaults (13.3/100. traffic injuries. As such. the Program shall coordinate with other programs like the Maternal and Child Health and other DOH Offices such as the National Center for Health Facility Development. The Committee shall then be subdivided into Sub-Committees according to the areas of concern: road traffic injuries.871). plans. thermal injuries (burns and scalds). Health Emergency and Management Services. drowning. and programs of various stakeholders into an effective and efficient system. a Program Management Committee (PMC) shall be organized. hazards and vulnerabilities to health (eg.276). among others. obesity.000 population in 1975 to 42. The Violence and Injury Prevention Program is hereby institutionalized as one of the programs of the National Center for Disease Prevention and Control (NCDPC).617 deaths. coordinate and integrate activities. it will require more than the provision and use of health services to improve the health of urban populations. Accidents ranked 8th in 1975. For a comprehensive approach. The Philippine Health Statistics from 1975 to 2002 revealed that there has been increasing trend of mortality due to accidents per 100. violence. The concentration of risks is seen in the poorest neighborhoods resulting to health inequities.1/100.000 populations in 2002 corresponding to 33. The Department of Health (DOH) shall serve as the focal agency with respect to violence and injury prevention. and accidental falls (1. UHSD must help cities address the challenges of rapid urbanization brought about by the interplay of different social determinants of health.). 7th in 1985 and 6th in 1995 and 5th in 2002 among the 10 leading causes of death. and settlement in unsafe areas). To ensure coordination and sustainability of the program. violence).greater exposure to risks. and chemical injuries (poisoning. transport accidents (6. Women's Health and Safe Motherhood Project .000 populations. accidental drowning and submersion (2. Mortality rate increased from 19. From the above. Violence and Injury Prevention Program Print Email PDF Accidents consistently remain one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the country. etc.131).

cost-effective model of delivering health services that increase access of disadvantaged women to acceptable and high quality reproductive health services. with the provision of general reproductive and emergency obstetric medical supplies.Print Email PDF Being that the Philippines had one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in Southeast Asia. For the second implementation of WHSM Project. National Capacity to Sustain WHSM Services This component will develop DOH capacity to create an operating environment conducive to LGUs managing and sustaining delivery of the WHSM-SP and integrating the WHSM service model throughout the country. Contributing to the global initiatives to achieving the MDGs. WHSM Project 2 improves women·s health through: y Demonstrating in selected sites a sustainable. combined performance-based grants provided payments to women·s health teams who attend to deliveries of disadvantaged women. (As stated in the Women·s Health and Safe Motherhood Project 2 Implementation Plan) . the project strengthened the capacity of the DOH into more effective planning and management of women·s health and donor-funded projects. and enables them to safely attain their desired spacing and number of children. According to the Performance Report of ADB. This was the very first health-sector project funded and supported by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) that is primarily concerned in the improvement of women·s reproductive health. In its first implementation from 1995 to 2002. Local Delivery of the Integrated WHSM Service Package (WHSM-SP) This will support local governments in mobilizing networks of public and private providers to deliver the integrated WHSM-SP focusing on maternal care. This component is initially being implemented in the provinces of Sorsogon and Surigao del Sur. About 1.4 million safe home-delivery kits were also given to midwives. the WHSM Project had integrated 550 hospitals and rural health facilities. and Establishing a core knowledge base and support system that can facilitate countrywide replication of the project experience as part of mainstream approaches to reproductive health care within the framework of the Health Sector Reform Agenda. The two subcomponents are: Critical Capacities to Provide Quality WHSM Services and Reliable Sustainable Support Systems. and STI/HIV control services. y The components of the WHSM Project 2 are as follows: 1. family planning. the Women·s Health and Safe Motherhood (WHSM) Project was commenced with the aim of strengthening women·s health and safe motherhood services for the disadvantaged Filipino women. 2.

dated December 16. Since A.Women's Health Safe Motherhood Program 2 Women and Children Protection Program Print Email PDF I. rape. there have been attempts to increase the number of WCPUs especially in DOH-retained hospitals but they have been unsuccessful for many reasons.0. and other related cases. several local government units. AHA also states ´the poorest of the population are the main users of government health facilities.O.nlm. 1-B was issued.ncbi.nih. there are 38 working WCPUs in 25 provinces of the country.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001153/ . As of 2011.µ In 1997. incest. 2010 states that poor Filipino families ´have yet to experience equity and access to critical health services. For the past years. 2010-0036. BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE The Aquino Health Agenda (AHA): Achieving Universal Health Care for All Filipinos embodied in Administrative Order No. development partners and other agencies resulted in the establishment of women and child protection units (WCPUs) in DOHretained and Local Government Unit (LGU) -supported hospitals. the Child Protection Network Foundation. http://www. 2010-0036 further recognizes that the public hospitals and health facilities have suffered neglect due to the inadequacy of health budgets in terms of support for upgrading to expand capacity and improve quality of services. Administrative Order 1-B or the ´Establishment of a Women and Children Protection Unit in All Department of Health (DOH) Hospitalsµ was promulgated in response to the increasing number of women and children who consult due to violence. This means that the deterioration and poor quality of many government health facilities is particularly disadvantageous to the poor who needs the services the most. the partnership among the Department of Health (DOH). University of the Philippines Manila.µ A.