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No. 99 1/6
ONEVALVE
RECEIVERS
Comprehensive instructions fo,
building 8 single valve sets.
I. PORTABLE TRIODE RECEIVER
2. DOUBlE-DIODETRlODE RECEIVER
3. MIDGET PENTODE RECEIVER
of. DOUBLE-TRIODE MAINS RECEIVER
S. THE" OSClllODYNE ..
6. TRlODEPENTODE REFLEX RECEIVER
7. TRiODE-PENTODE RECEIVER
8. ELECTRON.cOUPlED PENTODE RECEIVEr.
*
BERNARDS RADIO MANUALS
-
BERNARDS RADIO MANUALS No. 99
GeaeraI Editor: W. J. MAY
First Published 1951
Second Edition J952
Reprinted 1953
Reprinted 1954
Reprinted 1955
Reprinted 1956
Reprinted 1957
Reprinted 1958
Reprinted 1960
Reprinted 1961
Printed by v. Coopet &: PJrtners Ltd flircro[t Street:. W.C.2
(or BccollTd', (PuNbhersl Ltd . 1be O .... mpiall5. Wesl.erD Gale. Loodoo, W.6
. .




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("'ONTENh
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Portable Triode Receiver (FiJI. J)

S
Doublediode-triode Receiver (Fig. 2)

..

6
Midget Pentode Receiver (Fig. 3) ..

8
Doubletriode Mains Receiver (Fig. <}
.

9
The ~ . Oscillodyne " (Fig. S)

.. .. 12
Triode-pentode Reflex Recei\lCf (Fig. 6) .
.
. . 14
Triodepentode Shortwave Receiver (F18. 7)
.
.. 16
Elcctron-coupled Pentode Receiver (Fig. 8) .. .. l ~

INTRODUCTION
Most people with an interest in radio have constructed aystaI
receiver at one time or another. cothw;iasu feel that until DOW the
gulf between this simple type of JU:e1VCl' aDd the more ambitious val'Vt:
receiver bas not received the attention it merits. While it is easy to airily
discuss the construction of four- and five-vaive ra::eiven 011 paper. many
intending constructon are disheartened by the 8I?PlmDt complexity of
such receiven and feel that their cbancca of obtaining satisfactory results
arc remote at least until sucb time as they have gained the right kind of
experience with smallcr receivers.
All the designs La this manual are well-tricd circuits, aod no specialised
c:ompooents arc called for. In many cases specifications aro given to
enable the constructor to build his own coils. In all cases the type of wire
used on the original is given; but it is pointed out that where D.C.C. or
enamel.led wire is specified it is quite in order to use any available covering
such as D.s.C. or rayon-covered wire-winding space permitting. As &
auide, using 24 S.W.O. enamelled wire. 42 turns per inch can bewound;
40 with double si1Jc (D.s.c.); and 30 with D.C.C. (double cotton). If
cardboard is used for coil formers it should be treated in a bath oj
wax-paraffin wax should NOT be used. Regarding layout provided
the usual precautions are observec:1-lch as keeping control grid and
anode leach as short as possible and apart from each other-tbc layout
can be ananged to suit individual tastes.
Refereoce to the comportellU lists will show that some capacitor
arc given in micro-farads and others in pico-farads. The reason is that the
-anit of capacitance is the Farad, which is too large for radio wod: and
-41ues are often expressed in mkro-farads (mfd). 1 mfd beiDg equal to So
:aIlIionth of a Farad. Even tb.is unit is oftell cumbersome and it is usual
.0 express small values of capacitance iD micro-microfarads or pJarads
(pfd). 1 pfd being equal to ooe millionth of 1 mfd. From this it will tx
teeD that while a given capacitor value can be exprcs.socl .. sa)
o-ooo.s mfd. it it also corroc1. to show it 81 SOO pfd..


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ONE VALVE RECEIVERS ,
PORTABLE TRIODE RECEIVER (Fig. I)
It sometimes happens that an interesting item is put on the air late at
niaht
l
and. in the absence of a suitable receiver, one bas to staY up late
or IDl5S it altogether. A singlc..valve beadphooe receiver will therefore be
found to be very convenient for use in thc bedroom.
The receiver shown in Fig. 1 requires no external aerial connecoon
provided the listener is within reasonable distance of the transmitter.
U, however, it is found. desirable to havc some external pick-up source it
is suggested tbat a connection be made from a spring-bed mattress or
other aerial through a 100 pfd pre-set condenser to the grid condenser C2
on the tuned circuitside, i.e. thejunctioo ofCI-C2. As far as the choice of
V1 is concerned. almost any triode of the HL dass should prove suitable:
most amateurs have a selection of such valves in their junk boxes. The
author found an old Cossor 2lOHF which worked very well, and later an
05ram HL2 was tried without any noticeable difference in performance.
The frame aerial former should be constructed of stiff cardboard with
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6 ONE VALVE RECEIVERS

slots cut as shown on Fig. I. The wire should be locked through two
adjacent boles at the start IeavinS about six inches for connection purposes.
The former should be bcld firmly and the wire wound alternately over and
under each slot until 18 turns have been completed. At this point a tap
is required; no break in the wire should be made, but a loop some six
inches IOD8 brought out which may be twisted throughout its lenglh.
Having completed. the tap. 8 further 18 turns should be added bringing the
total to the required 36. The direction ofthowioding is ofna consequence:
the important point is that tho whole winding is wound in the same
direction.
Layout is Dot c;:ritb1 and the constructor can use any form he please$.
It is suggested, however. that the receiver be built on a small baseboard
with a front panel to take the tuning and reaction controls (CI , 0)
togelherwith thcOn-Ofl'switcb (5). 1beframeaeriaJ may bccoo\IeDiendy
screwed to the rear of the baseboard. Operation of the receiver is simple.
The required station is tuned in by mcansofCI to its optimum setting 1lfKl.
since a frame aerial is being used, tho receiver rotated to give maximlm
signal strength. The reaction coodenser (0) is advanced at the same time
resettina: the tuninS condenser (el). Best results will be obtained when
the reaction control is set just abort of the point of oscillation.
COMPONENTS UST Fig. I
Rl 33 MO resistor S S.P. touie IWitcb
CI SOO pfd tuning cooden.tcr VI see text
C2 300 pfd mi<:a fixed condeDJet ) B4 valve holder (or to suit valve)
C3 300 pfd variable: reaction Phones, tenninals,. coonccting wire.
oondcnser batteries, ....
(oolid di,lcotno \YJ>O)
DOUBLE-DIODE-TRIODE RECEIVER (F".2)
Twenty yean or so ago it was nOC uncommon to find circuit. utillsint
triodes with grid and anode strapped functioning as diodes.. This c0m-
promise had to be effected since there were DO commercial diodes available.
Used in this way the valve required DO HT supply; but the results were
no better than obtainable from a crystal set, and the oo1y advantage was
Ibat DO cat's-whisker adjustment was necessary. The circuit of F"ag. 2
.:ombines the priDciplcs of diode detection aDd low frequency amplifica
tion in one valve. Since there is no regeneration, m::eption is limited to
local stations. but the quality of the reproduction is excellent in every way.
The lack of reseneratM;)n bas other advantageS. 1be number of controls
is reduced to a minimum and the receiver is admirable for the childrc:n's
nursery, as there is no fear oftbe receiver going into" state of oscillation
and ruining reception for the entire neighbourhood. The coil assembly
is coostructed on a onc-inc:b dWneter fonna four inches long, whi<:h may
be of waxed cardboard or bakelite construction. All three coils are close
wound with No. 34 S.W.G. enamelled copper wire aDd it is important to
ub.etve that the 1hroe windings are wound in the same direction. The
general construction can be clearly seen from the diagram. The entire
receiver can be mounted on a small wooden baseboard with a front pacel
,
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ONE VALVE RECEIVERS ./
to take tbe tuning condenser and switch. Valve type KBC 32 requires a
heater supply of 2 volts at 50 rnA and if required it can be run from dry
ceUs as the consumption is very low. This may be accomplished by
wiring two U2 cells in series, which will produce three volts, and wiring a
2O!l resistor in series with the positive filament lead. A 200 resistor can
be made up of two 10nt watt 10% resistors wired in series. !fa different
type of valve is used it may be necessary to add a grid bias batte'! of
some It volts. This should be connected betwetn the bottom eod 0 the
LF secondary aDd LT and HT negative. If instability occurs
connect HT -, LT - to the earth leoninaL
CO/.fPONEN'Ill UST Fis- 2
1 Jnt. Octal holder CI 200 pfd trimmer condcuJer
VI KBC 32 C2 ISO or 200 pfd tuning condenser
TI LF interva1ve transfonner SSP. toggle switcb
4 oz. 34 S. W.O. en7-tlcl1ed wire Pbones, terminals. connecting wire. etc.
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DOU'!IU-DIOOI-,..,..OCE IIICUIU
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ONE VALVE RECEIVERS
MIDGET PENTODE RECEIVER (Fig. 3)
'Ibe midget receiver shown in Fig. 3 is designed to use 000 of (be
B70 range of RF pentodes. In the original. a 1T4 was used as these are
often available from surplus dealers at a very attractive price. The coil
used was a Wearite PAl suitably modified by the addition of a reaction
winding (Ll). This winding consists of 25 turns of a6 S.W.G. D.S.C.
wound over the earthy end of the grid winding (L2). A suitable chassis
may be constructed from sheet aluminium, the ends being bent down at
right angles. The overall size showd be about 3i inches x 3 inches when
CQmpleled; the depth will be aovemed by tOO size of the reaction control
R2, since this component. together with the switch S, is mounted below
the chassis. A 25 mh RF choke is satisfact ory for RFC and should be
mounted on the rear apron of the chassis, the tuning condenser CI,
together with the coil. are mounted on the top side. 1be valve holder is,
of course, chassis mounting and the remainder of the components may be
suspended in the wiring. On completion of the wiring. batteries and
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ONE VALVE RllCEIVERS 9
phonee should be connected, the rccejver awitcbed on aDd a atation
tuned in by me8113 of Ct. To bring the signal to maximum atrcn,gth. the
reaction control should be advanced 50 that the sUder travels towards the
anode end of its path, As the control is rotated, signals sbouId increase
until the receiver bursts into oscillation. If" bowevcr, this docs not occur
and it is found that the signal strength weakens it is a Iisn that the reaction
winding is connected in the wrong sense and the two c:onncctiODS to L3
should. be
L123
RFC
S
C\
COMPONENTS LIST FIB. J
PA2 Wearite C3 .soopfdmicafiJ:edcondeoser
2S mH choice Rl ],3 MO resistor
$.P. switch R2 20 kO variable potentiometer
3SO-SOO pfd tuning VI IT4 or DF 91
condenser I B7G valve bolder
(solid dielectric type) Hf 4S or 67s v.
C2 200 pfd mica fixed condenser LT 1'5 Y. C:C:U
Phones. conoectina wire, etc.
DOUBLE-TRIODE MAINS RECEIVER (FJg. 4)
When contemplating the construction or single-valve n>eeivers
majority ofcon&rUctors automatically think in terms of battery receive
There are, however. a number of wonh while designs using maios equip
ment and Fig.. 4 shows an ingenious application of the 836 double triode.
One half of tre valve is used as a Jeaky grid detector. regeocration bein.a
effected by Ll-c2. The output of the detector is transfonner-coupled
to the grid of the second half of the valvo which is used as a normal LF
amplifier. One of the special transformers can be used
for the coupling as it is paraUeI fed so that no DC Hows throuah the
primary. Although designed for AC operatioll only. the circuitry fon..)W5
OCJAC practice in that half-wave rectification is used and one Slde of the
mams is connected to chassis (which prohibits the use of a direct co&-
10 ONE VALVE RECEIVERS
acction between earth and. chassis). Any such connection DlUSt be made
Yla a condenser as shown on the diagram. The heater is supplied frem a
bcU transformerorany filament transformer capable of delivering 12 volll
at 06 amp. If it is desired to usc the receiver on a DC supply the bell
transformer may be replaced by a .resistor or line cord as shown in dotted
outline in the diagram. For a supply. a value of 760 n rated at
70 watts is necessary. Ifit is intended to use the receiver in this way, it is
much botter to use a 25 sm valve which has a lower current ratina; the
required resistor value is 1430 n at 32 mitts.
While tho receiver is capable of gjving loud-speaker results on tho mOl"e
powed'uJ local atatkma, many constructors will wish to use headphones
for diltant receptioo, and. it is emphasised that headphones should be .
connected onJ,y through an isolating output transformer. A J:I or 2:1
is quile satisfactory; the prim.aJy is wired in the same way as TI on the
diaaraaI. and tho headpbr"'cs IU'O connected across the secondaIy. The

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ONE VALVE RECEIVERS II
coil construction will present no difficulties. It is wound on a threo-inch
diameter former. three inches long, and the grid winding L1 consists of
45 turns of 22 S. W.O. enamelled wirc with looped taps brought out at
I S and 30 turns. L2 is wound in the same direction and requires 28 turns
of the same gauge wire. Constructional details of the coil are shown in
Fig. 4-
Assembly may bo carried out on a small wooden baseboard with a
suitable front panel. Care should be taken to keep the LF transformer
well away from the LF choke and bell transformer, otherwise hum will be
picked up. When mounting the components, the core of the LF choke
should boat right angles to that of the heater transformer. On completion,
even with precautions, it may bo found that hum is being picked Up by the
LF transfonner and if this is suspected it should be unscrewed from the
baseboard and rotated until a minimum pick-up point is found.
When operating the receiver. the aerial1ead should be ronnected to the
tap which gitICS the required selectivity in conjunction with Ct . It
advancing the reaction condensec weakens rather than strengthens the
sensitivity it is a clear indication that the reaction winding is connected
in the wrong sense and connections 3 and 4 should be reversed.
The ratio of T3 will depend on the impedance of the speech coil For
either of the valve types specified the required anode impedance is
210000 and. the tran5former ratio may be found from the following
formula:
R
/ 21000
abo - 'V Speech coll impedaoce
Eztlmpk-Por a speecb coil impedance of IS 0:
tTIOOo -
Ratio .... "" --.r - ,,1400 - 37-4
say 37
COMPONENTS LIST Fig. 4
CI
C2
C3
C4
es-;;
C1
100 pfd trimmer coo-
denser
SOO pfd tuning condenser
300 pfd reaction con-
denser
O-OSmfd paper condenser
100 pl'd mica condenser
2S mfd 12-volt Eloc:tro-
lytic condenser
C8 G-2Smfd paperconderuer
C9 2-0 mfd paper condenser
CII)'!I 16 - 8 mfd electrolytic
coo<lenser
(C10 - 16 mfe!)
RI
R2
RJ.4
R5
TI
T2
1"3
MRI
81
RFC
L1-2
VI
I
470 KO resistor
I'S KO resistor
47 KD resistor
See text
LF transfonner
Bell transformer
OutpUt transformer. Set'
text
SB3 rectifier (Brimar)
DpOT switch
HFchoke
See text
BJ6 or 12 SN7GT
Int. Octal valve holder
PhonC!!J, terminats. coonecting wire, etc.
)
12 ONE VALVE RECEIVERS
THE .. OSCILLODYNE .. (Fig. S)
1be sphere of the single valve is by no means limited to the broadcast
band. Man)' hours of entertainment are assured by the construction of a
receiver wbich will cover the short waves. Many years ago the author
constructed a receiver from the American magazine I I Short Wave and
Television," This recei\tc was called the Dscillodyne and its performance
certainly was excellent. Shortly before World Wac n this magazine (now
called Radio and Television ") published a revised circuit suited to 8 more
modem valve. 1be performance is as fine as ever and the circuit is shown
in Fig. 5 Jt consists essentially of an HF pcIltode as a regenerative
detector. Regeneration is controlled by R2 and will be found to be veo
smooth. The success of any regenerative receiver depends on
the smoothness of the regeneration control, and constructon will find
that this circuit is beyond reproach in this direction.

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ONE VALVE RECEIVERS
IS
The coils are wound on Ii-inch diameter plug in coil formers. 'lbc
author used Eddystone 6-pin formers which arc readily obtaioable in
England though. of course, there is no reason why the constructor should
not make: up his own.
The two windings should be spaced about t inch.
"The gauge of wire required for Lt-2 is not aitical. Enamdled wire is
suitable; the two tower wave bands may be wound in 18 S. W.G. and for
the remainder 24 S.W.G. may be used.
A slow-motion drive is essential for the tuning condenser C2 owing to
the delicate tuning encountered on the short wave bands. When using
the receiver the regeneration control R2 should be advanced until it is
just short of the point of oscillation and. the tuning condenser slowly
rotated, Cl should be set for optimum signal strength. Adjustment of
this condenser will pi"obably affect the regeneration control setting. A3
with the other regenerative receivers shown in this book care must be
taken to see that L2 is conncctod in the correct sense. as failW'C to obtain
rea
eneration
may be due to the connections on this coD being reversed .
Waw:/x;urd
(Metru)
14{25
23{41 .
40{85
83{I25
120/200
COIL DATA
Nwnbe,o/tunII
LI 1.2
4 6
7 9
14 12
23 23
36 36
COMPONENTS UST Fog. l
Rt 33 Mn resistor C3 100 pfd mica coodenscr
R2 SO kO variable potmlio- C4 SOO pfd mi ca condenSCl'
meter CS 0) mfd paper coodeoler
LJ-2 See text VI IN5G{GT
CI 25 pfd trinuner condenser 1 Int. Octal valve bokier
C2 100 pfd tuning condenser S DPST switcb
Phones. terminals, connecting wire, etc.
,
14 ONE VALVE RECElVEIU
TRIODE-PENTODE/REFLEX RECEIVER (Fig. 6)
The receiver shown in Fig. 6 is a single-valve reflex receiver. 'Ibi!
circuit is definitely not recommended for newcomers who have little or no
experience of receiver construction. The idea of the re8ex originated in
the 1920's when valves and were even more expensive than

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ONE VALVE RECEIVERS I>
to-uay. and any method by which parts cou1d be dispensed with was
considered a major advantage. In a reflex receiver, one valve is made to
perform the duty of two or more by shunting the signal round the circuit,
by-pa.ssing any unwanted portion and returning it to its point of entry
for yet further amplification. This system is not to be confused with the
more orthodox process of using, perhaps, a double triode in a straight
circuit onc half as a detector and the other half as an amplifier.
The circuit of Fig. 6 combines tluee distinct functions in one valve.
Admittedly rhe valve is in reality two valves in one envelope, but by using
a straight circuit only two functions would be possible. Can:fuI analysis of
Fig. 6 will show that the signal is fed to the control grid of VI. a triode
pentode primarily designed as a frequency chall8er. From the anode it
passes via C6 to the grid of the triode section. Constructors will observe
that the tuned circuit Ll-C2 is quite in order as the bottom eod of the coil
is by-passed by 0. The valve of this component is critical as will be socn
later when the pentode section is used as an audio amplifier.
The triode section functions as a normal leaky grid detector and the
rectified output is passed back to the grid of the pentode section. If 0
is too large, audio will be lost; and if too small it will be ineffective as an
RF by-pass. This point illustrates why specified values must be adhered
to in a reflex circuit and why such circuits are unsuitable for beginners
since the novice woukl have no idea to look for trouble. whereas
the more experienced constructor can analyse the symptoms and decide
what part of the circuit is at fauk. Having arrived back at the pentooe
section control grid the signal will be amplified, and ignoring C6 and Cil
(provided their values are not too high) will appear across the L.F.C.
From here it is picked off in the normal way through C14 to the head-
phones. Unfortunately it is necessary to use crystal headphones with this
circuit because the impedance of the pentode section is too high to allow
the use of ordinary headphones. No practical diagram is given with this
circuit as experienced constructors will not require it: a suggested layout
however, is shown on the diagram. The chassis may be of aluminium
n inch thick. a suitable size is 7 inches x 9 inches x 2 inches deeJ!.
Almost any TRP coils can be used for U-2-3 but a specification IS
included for those wishing to make their own. Ll consists of 45 turns
26 S.W.G. enameUed copper wire on a 21 inch former 2 inches long.
which is tapped 20 turns from the start. L2. 4S turns on a 2t-inch former
21 inches long. The start of these windings is No. I and. the end No. 2.
Spaced linch from the end ofL2, L3 is wound. This winding has 2.5 turns.
and the start is No.3, the end No.4. On completion, the headphones and
batteries should be connected and the receiver switched on. As the
regeneration control (R4) is advanced the usual hiss shoukl become
apparent, and as the tuning dial is rotated, stations should be received.
Tune io a station at the high-frequency end of the band and adjust C4
for maximum volume; once this trimmer bas been set it will not require
further adjustmenl. If, when R4 is advanced, signals become weaker, it
is a sign that L3 is connected in the wrong sense and the two connections
(3 and 4) should be reversed. If, however. signals increase in volume, but
not to the point of oscillation, it will be necessary to adjust the setting of
C6. decrease the value of RS, or add a few extra turns to the reaction
winding LJ. The receiver should burst into oscnIation with the control
R4 set at about three-quarters of its travel. A poor quality RFC will lead
to endless troubie: lack of signals, no regeneration, etc., and only a
component of repute should be used. One possible IOUlCC of trouble is
It ONB VALVE RECEIVJlRS
Ibe capacit ... of 0-9-11, but if the vaJues specilIod ...
tbouJd be cooountcrcd.
Cl
0-10

QH;
C5-14
C/
C9
ell
Cl2
Cl3
COMPONENI'S UST F,.. 6
100 pfd trimmer c:on- Rl. 68 to rc:siItor
denser R2 22 MO resistor
2 x -ooos mf'd tu..o.iq Rl 220 ItO resistor
condeoscr R4 SO leO variable reeiator
-()Q2 mfd mica condenser R5 47 itO I-watt resittor
SOpfd trin:unercondcnser RFCI RF choke
1 mfd paper condenser LFCI 100 - JOO henries LP
100 pfd mica condenser coupling choJce
.soo ped mic:a condenser L1-2-3 See te,.;t
-000 mfd mica condenser VI TP22 Mazda
1 mfd paper condenser S DPDT switch
001 mfd paper condenser 1 B9 valve holder
Phooea. termi.nal.s, connecting wire. etc.
TRIODE-PENTODE SHORTWAVE RECEIVER (Fig. 7)
Tbe use of a dual-purpose va1ve such as the TP22 makes possible a
receiver of far greater sensitivity than that nonnally associated with a
ainalc valw:. It is regrettable that in this country the n. nge of single
dual-purpose valves is limited as compared with America and Australia.
Some of their types make possible all manner of elaborate designs without
recourse to more than a singJc valve. However. we are fortunat e in
still baving the TP22 which enables the advantage; of a pentode detector
to be fully utilised.. The anode impedance of the pentode is too high 10
have headphones connected directly in its anode circuit (un\es.s, of courso,
CJYstaJ phones arc used), but the triode section permits a reasonable
match to be obtained, at the same time obtaining the ampl ification of an
ema triode stase. Tumina to the circuit design. it will be not iced from
Pia. 7 that the regeneration arrangements differ considerably from tOO
conventional. ru everv is well aware a smooth
ONE VALVE RECEIVER:.
17
regeneration control is the most important (actor governing efficient
operation with simple T.R.F. designs. For this reason every care has been
taken with the design of the regeneration circuits. First. there is the normal
inductive-capacity coupling governed by C2; in addition there is a
variable control feeding the scrceoing grid. which provides a vernier
regeneration control.
'I1le coil design is by no means critical. Similar coils to those used for
the .. OscilJodyne" circuit could be used. However. those who do not
wisb to make their own will find the Wearite" P" range quite satisfactory_
The circuit diagram has been numbered for these coils.
Ranges obtainable are as follows:-
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III

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Wtn-e-bturd
(Me",,)
12(3S
34(100
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II ONE VALVE RECEIVERS
If required, the range may be extended to cover the lona and medium
wave bands as well as the short waves by means of the PAl and PAl.
Another refinement in this circuit is the provision of bandspread
C3 is the bandt condenser with which the desired part of the
band IS selected. C4 is the band-spread condenser which provides a fine
tuning control over the part of the band selected. In this way the receiver
can cover a very large band. of frequencies compared with a receiver fiued
with a single tuning condenser. When using the receiver, HT voltage of
100-120 is suitable although it will function on lower voltages.
The method of operation is similar to that of any other regenerative
receiver. but a little initial CJtperiment should be carried out to find the
heM average seuing for RI. In most cases this will be found to be about
one-third of it! travel between minimum and maximum travel. After
this position hU been found for smooth regeneration, the regeneration
control condenser C2 is used in the normal way.
If the receiver is used for medium and long-wave m:eptiO.ll the band-
spread condenser C4 should be left with the vanes disengaged, i.e., at
minimum capadty sioce, apart from the fact that baIKkpread facilities
arc Im......cessary (XI these bands. the total capacity of C4 1$ too ama1J tel
cover any useful part of the band.
CI
C2
C3
C4
CS
C6-7
RI
COMPONENTS UST t-... 7
100 pfd trimmer c0n-
denser
JOe) pfd reaction con-.
denser
SOO pfd tuning condenser
60 pfd tuning oondenser
100 pfd mica condenser
'01 mfd paper condenser
100 to potentiometer
R2 33 MQ resistor
R3 100 KO resistor
R4 470 K!l resistor
See text
VI TP22 Mazda
R.F.C AlL wave HF choke
I B9 valve holder
S DPST switch
Phones. terminals. connecting wire, etc.
ELECTRON-COUPLED PENTODE RECEIVER (Fi3- 8)
As most constructon will already be aware the suocess or failure of.
single valve receiver designed for short-wave reception depends largely
on the smoothness of the reaction control The earliest receivers used the
swinging coil principle to obtain regeneration; this offered as
far as smooth control was concerned. The variation of ctn:uit capacil,Y
caused by this swinging coil howe ... er. introduced serious de-tuning in the
grid circuit which rendered the circuit useIeu from the abort wave point or
ONE VALVE RECEIVERS 19
view (though it enjoyed a certain amount of popularity among broadcast-
band constructors). One of the oldest. and perhaps the most popular
regeneration systems, is the Reinartz.
One system which docs not appear to have gained the popularity it
deserves is electron-coupled regeneration as used in Fig. 8. It will be
noticed that the negative side of the filament is returned to the supply
through a tappi ng on the grid coil, the precise po:si tion of this tap
ing the amount of regeneration available. A hUle experiment will decide
the best position for the tap. R.F.C.l should be a good quality comJXlnent:
R.F.C.2 may be home-built and consists of 36 turns 24 S.W.G. enamelled
copper wire on a i-ulcb diamet er former some 3 inches long. A length of
wooden dowelling could be used provided it is impregnated. Each turn
should be spaced by its own thickness and the easiest way to wind the
choke is to wind on two lengths of wire side by side. treat them with
Durafix. and. when dry, remove the unwanted
The recei ... er may be constructed OIl a wooden baseboard with a front
I I - i" ._< II
1. __ _. I . LL I
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a ,-
o
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I
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ow
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..... ELECTAOH-COUPLIEO AECtI'lR
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.1:0 OJ IE VALVE RECEIVERS
panel of metal. VI should be mounted horizontally to avoid having the
anode lead unnecessarily long. The coils L1-2 are best wound on 6-pin
formers, obtainable from any supplier dealing with short-wave com-
ponems, complete with sockets to fit. Eddystone-threaded formers were
used on the original. Three coils are usually sufficient to cover the popular
bands. and the table gives the required turns and wave-band covered_
COIL DATA
Wave-band
L1 1.2 S.W.G .
15/30 Mc 2 4
22 enam_
6'5/14 Mc S 9 22
..
3/6-5 10 2S 22 .,
L2 is wound on first and LI immediately underneath. Note that Ll
is wound in the same direction as L2. On the 3-6-5 Mc band L1 must be
pile wound in a slot cut round the former as there is insufficient length to
permit a spaced winding.
The tap is best found by experiment. Counting from the earthy end
L2 should be tapped tt turns up on the 15-30 Mc Coil, 3 turns up on the
6'5-14 Mc Coil and 8 turns up on the 3-6-5 Mc ~ o i l . lbis tapping position
may be considered satisfactory when R2 gives smooth regeneration over
the whole wave-band. Care must be taken when tapping the coil; the
required turns should be pulled forward with a knife blade. the enamel
cleaned off with emery paper and a good soldered joint made.
In conclusion it should be stated that only a good mica componellt
should be used for C5, otherwise results will be disappointing.
CI-3
C2
C4
C5
RFCI
RFC2
RI
COMPONENTS LIST
100 pfd condenser mica R2
140 pfd tuning condenser R3
SOO pfd condenser mica SI
001 mfd condenser mica VI
High quality HF 1
See text L1-2
2'2 MO resistor
Fig. 8
25 kO potentiometer
47 kO resistor
S.P. switch
SP2
B7 valve holder
See text
Phones, terminals, connecting wire. etc.