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Curriculum Manual 3

FOREWORD

I feel honoured to write a few words to commend this important contribution to the
discussion of an appropriate curriculum for theological education. I also appreciate the hard
work put into this booklet, which though small, like precious things which are kept in small
packets, contains a great deal of solid and useful information for those involved in theological
education. What is meant by “Curriculum” has been clearly defined and what might be
contained in a theological curriculum has been fully described.

The discussion is divided into three sections. The first is concerned with the situation in
which we find ourselves at present, as reflected by certain educational models. These are
followed by a brief but comprehensive Curriculum of Theological Education expertly outlined
by the compiler. The second section presents an honest and intelligent evaluation of different
models that might be adopted, together with a Biblical perspective of Christian learning and
instruction.* This leads to the third section describing ways to construct a curriculum using
principles reached in the previous sections.

This booklet without doubt gives a sense of direction to our theological training and
should help us to ensure a good balance in our teaching. Indeed I feel proud of the effort of the
compiler and acknowledge his ability and commitment to theological education. With these
comments I commend this booklet to all who are engaged in theological education with the
hope that it may bring about a revolution in our approach to this whole area of training people
for ministry.

Rev. Prof. Arthur James,


Principal,
Gujranwala Theological Seminary

March 1995

* Placed as an Appendix in the Revised Edition of February 1997 and printed separately from 1999 onward.
Curriculum Manual 4

PREFACE
TO THE THIRD EDITION

Since the publication of the second edition, Gujranwala Theology Seminary has
experienced two significant changes. First its Library has been refurbished to provide a modern
environment for study. More importantly its volumes have been re-organised under the
Progressive Classification system advocated in this manual, thus allowing what is “said” in the
classroom to be easily accessed and “read” in the Library reading room. The shelf
arrangements thus follow the classification of curriculum subjects exemplified in the following
pages.

Secondly the Faculty have worked through a programme of re-appraisal of what is


needed to be taught to those coming in today’s world for theological education and ministerial
training. There has also been an Evaluation conducted by an accredited outside agency
followed by a three day Strategic Planning exercise. These various workshops have resulted in
the authorisation of a new Seminary Curriculum drawn up from the first principles worked out
in this manual. Indeed much of the content of the manual itself is the fruit of Faculty
deliberation, though latterly refined and added to by the present compiler.

Notable additions include an article on Writing a Mission Statement, examples of Seminary


Profiles, and Exercises for an Introductory Workshop. Further Appendices have been created.
These include the current Gujranwala curriculum set out at the stage when individual courses
were being apportioned their relevant “weight” within the total curriculum.(There was
considerable “horse-trading” at this point!) This is followed by a Schedule showing the final
stage in creating a Three Year Syllabus.

Another addition is the concept of a small personal library constituting a “home” Bible School,
the authors being the “faculty”. Thus The Reading List offers a core self-study programme
equivalent to a three year study period at the Seminary. (It does not, of-course, claim to provide
the practical training and communal experience that a residential programme offers.)

Appendix I shows how a course on a particular subject can be quickly outlined from a scanning
of the Progressive Classification menu. Finally a Check-List is offered for preliminary self-
evaluation of any institution involved in basic Theological Education.

It is hoped that this edition, improved by practical testing in Seminary life and enlarged by
additional material, will prove a help and stimulation to those engaged in the crucial work of
preparing God’s people for ministry in His Church and the world around us.

Paul Burgess

June 2003
Curriculum Manual 5

PREFACE
TO THE SECOND EDITION

Over the past two years since these papers were first presented, the value of the whole
exercise of re-thinking curriculum from first principles has been recognised. In particular the
Progressive Classification listing has been well received as a helpful reference document
providing a “menu” from which to make selections for working curricula. Indeed, it developed
a life of its own, being continuously revised (with copies distributed to enquirers) up till the
publication of this second edition of “Curriculum for Theological Education” where it now
appears as a separate document in the Appendices.

The original material of the total workshop, by the nature of the conference at which it
was first presented, was somewhat of a rag-bag of ideas and charts. It has now all be carefully
sifted and re-organised, much of the material being re-located as appendices to give the core
material a clearer sense of direction.

Many theological institutes are engaged in, or seriously considering, the task of
integrating their fields of study to ensure a more holistic approach to theological learning. The
exercise encouraged in the pages of this booklet pre-supposes this intention, but represents
only the preparatory steps necessary before full integration can be attempted. For the whole
must be surveyed before any attempts at integrating our students’ learning can be truly holistic.
It is important to clarify goals and priorities before weaving a complex texture of learning
materials taken from different departments and disciplines.

Publication of this second edition happily coincides with the Silver Jubilee celebrations
of the Open Theological Seminary (formerly the Pakistan Committee for Theological
Education by Extension, an organisation born at this Seminary). Theological training has
developed in many ways in recent years in this country, not least in the recognition given to the
role of laity in the ministry of the church and the acceptance of women students to study
theology alongside men training for the ministry.

We live in a technically stimulating age, as evidenced by the fact that this booklet was
prepared and made ready for reproduction on two small machines together smaller than a
single Library reference book! The entire contents of the Seminary Library (approaching
20,000 volumes) could today, in theory, be recorded on a few discs and carried in the pocket.
Such is the pace of advance. We do well to come to terms with it and plan for the future if we
are to be good stewards of the heritage God has entrusted to us, alert to the Spirit moving in
Christ’s church and keen to spread the news of Christ’s kingdom in our land. It is hoped this
booklet will, under God, forward that process.

Paul Burgess

February 1997
Curriculum Manual 6

PREFACE

The Theological Education Forum is an informal gathering of those engaged in some


form of Theological Education in Pakistan. Initiated jointly by Mr Mike Raiter of the
Zarephath Bible Institute, Attock (Pakistan’s newest Bible training institute) and Professor
Aslam Ziai, Vice-Principal of Gujranwala Theological Seminary (Pakistan’s oldest Theological
institute), its first meeting in January 1994 was an initial attempt at sharing mutual concerns
and experiences. It was particularly felt that resources should not be duplicated where a little
sharing of information could eliminate the re-invention of various “wheels”.

The forum’s first birthday gathering was, as with the original meeting, hosted by the
United Bible Training Centre. Gujranwala Theological Seminary, whose students’ wives are
regularly taught by the staff of U.B.T.C., had the privilege of presenting three Seminars on
Curriculum for Theological Education. The material following presents the revised version of
the papers given and ideas arising from the ensuing discussion.

Because of the discursive nature of the gathering the presentation was largely inter-
active. This format has been preserved in the hope that some other institutions may find it
helpful not only to read the papers but also to carry out some of the exercises contained the
text.
In particular we commend for reflection the Classification list in the Appendix together
with the discussion of the four Learning Domains presented in Part 2. (The diagram for the
latter “came” to the compiler of this document overnight between sessions and stimulated
much discussion. The list, on the other hand, was the product of much research and refinement
arising out of initial class discussion with students.)

Thanks are due to those who have read these papers and offered suggestions for
improvement. In particular Professor Neil Foster offered a searching critique and his helpful
insights on modelling appear as an Appendix. To my son, Graham Burgess, is also due thanks
for the many hours of his school holidays spent computerising the material and patiently
entering in many revisions. Mr Marcus Fauchiger, Mrs Sally Davis and Mr Tom McCulloch all
contributed printing facilities at critical moments in the production. The compiler, however,
must take responsibility for any errors, or obscurities, as well as for the general content of these
papers.

Paul Burgess,

February 1995
Curriculum Manual 7

CONTENTS

PART 1. UNPACKING OUR LUGGAGE


Present Concerns . . . . . . . . 9
A Curriculum Check-List . . . . . . . 10
Western Influences on Curriculum . . . . . . 11

PART 2. WEIGHING OUR LUGGAGE


Contrasting Curriculum Models . . . . . . 13
RELEVANCE – 5 dimensions: . . . . . . 15
Theological – Spiritual – Practical – Evangelistic – Educational . 15
COURSE BENEFITS for the STUDENT - Why Study this course?. . 16
Defining “Curriculum” . . . . . . . 18
TYPES of LEARNING – Learning About Learning Domains: . . 19
Knowing and Doing . . . . . . 19
Ministerial Formation: Being . 20
Apollos: the Need for Understanding.. . . . . 21
Combining all 4 Domains: The Pyramid Model of Learning . . 22
Clarifying our Educational Objectives. . . . . 22
What are our GOALS? What are we trying to achieve? . . 23
MODES of LEARNING: Formal, non-formal, informal . . . 24
LEVELS of LEARNING – Spiral Learning . . . . . 25
COMPETENCIES PROFILE – What end results do we hope for? . . 26
CONSTRAINTS . . . . . . . . 27

PART 3. RE-PACKING OUR LUGGAGE


COMMON PRACTICES in CURRICULUM PLANNING (Short Term) . 29
CONSTRUCTING CURRICULUM – Western Models in Vogue. . . 31
Oxbridge . . . . . . . . 31
Contemporary British . . . . . . . 32
North American . . . . . . . 33
WRITING A MISSION STATEMENT – What is our Purpose? . . 35
SEMINARY PROFILES – What is the Ethos? . . . . 37
CONSTRUCTING LEARNING OBJECTIVES – Balancing the Range . 39
CONSOLIDATION – Exercises for a WORKSHOP. . . . 40
THE PROCESS of CURRICULUM CONSTRUCTION . . . 41
Stage 1: Needs, Requirements & Constraints . . . 41
Stage 2: Subjects (relevant to Needs) . . . . . 42
Stage 3: Credit Hours (Weighting) and Timetable. . . . 43
REFORM, not REVOLUTION. . . . . . . 44
Curriculum Manual 8

APPENDICES

Construction Tools
A. THE TASK of CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT: Chart of the OVERALL PICTURE 47
B. SUMMARY of SUBJECTS: PRIORITIES CHECK-LIST . . . 48
C. APPORTIONING RELATIVE “WEIGHT” to each COURSE. . . . 50
Examples
D. A SEMINARY CURRICULUM: RELATIVE WEIGHTING of COURSES. . 52
E. A CURRICULUM SCHEDULE: . . . . . . 54
F. 3 YEAR TRAINING PLAN ( Indian example) . . . . . 55
G. A BEGINNER’S SCHOOL (Starting from Core TEXT BOOKS) . . 56
The “PROGRAMME” . . . . . . . 57
H. THE READING LIST: A Core Self-Study Programme . . . 58
Constructing a Course (Examples)

I. USING THE MENU FRAMEWORK for INTEGRATIVE COURSE Worship example 61


J. CONSTRUCTING A COURSE from the MENU: Discipleship example . 62

More on Learning Domains


K. RANGES OF LEARNING outlined (4 Domains) . . . . 65
Categories of DOINGs, KNOWINGs & UNDERSTANDINGs. . . 66
LEARNING DOMAINS Summary Chart of Theory and Practice .. . 69
L. LEARNING DOMAINS: As Personal Growth. . . . . . 70
In Proverbs . . . . . 71
Reflections
M. PASTORAL OBJECTIVES Bible Study . . . . . 72
N. WESTERN MODELS Critique . . . . . . . 73
O. Essay on MODELLING – Neil Foster . . . . . . 74
P. TOWARDS A THEOLOGY OF TRAINING METHODS – Robert Ferris. . 78
Q. TAIL- PIECE - A Fable . . . . . . . . 79

Survey
R. EVALUATION CHECK-LIST of AN INSTITUTION . . . 80