You are on page 1of 12

www.hopewellsun.

com
FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Bikes needed
One club is looking for bicycle
donations. PAGE 5
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Sewerage
capacity
vote
May 8
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
The Hopewell Township
Committee is planning a May 8
referendum for funding $4.1
million of additional sewerage
capacity with the Ewing
Lawrence Sewerage Authority.
The Committee on Feb. 14
voted 3-2 to plan for the May
date in order not to interfere
with school board elections on
April 17.
Mayor Michael Markulec,
Committeewoman Vanessa
Sandom and Committeeman
Allen Cannon voted in favor of
the May 8 date, while Commit-
teeman James Burd and Com-
mitteewoman Kimberly John-
son cast the dissenting votes.
I thought it made sense be-
cause the school board election
is nonpartisan, Johnson said.
The voters asked for this
referendum and they need to
have it on the terms that they
want it, Cannon said. We
want it as soon as possible, but
we dont want it to interfere
with anything else.
Resident Harvey Lester had
urged the committee to sched-
ule the election for May 8. He
also expressed concern about
voting districts being com-
bined in order to save money
Comedy celebrates romance
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
Things just kind of fell into
place for Austin Begley to get the
lead role in The Game of Love
and Chance, just like things
kind of fall into place on the lat-
est play at the Off Broadstreet
Theatre in Hopewell.
Romance is celebrated in the
classic comedy by Pierre Mari-
vaux, in which the heroine, Sil-
via, learns her father has prom-
ised her hand to Dorante, a man
she has never met. In an effort to
discover the true ways of her in-
tended, Silvia disguises herself
as a servant. Unbeknownst to
her, her intended has done the
same.
Soon, Silvia, dressed as her
maid, Lisette, and Dorante, in his
valet Harlequins outfit, find
themselves flirting dangerously.
Its fun because this character
is a lot of things that Im not, Be-
gley said as his role of Dorante.
He is very proper and very ec-
centric. I work in the corporate
environment, but I like to have
fun. Its exciting to portray some-
one like that truthfully, but at the
same time, make fun of it.
Theater owners Robert and
Julie Thick got in touch with Be-
gley through Joe Farina, his for-
mer high school drama teacher.
By chance, Begely was looking to
get back into acting after a two-
year break in a capella choruses
and some acting in small films.
I was looking for something
to do, and this just kind of fell
into my lap, he said, taking a few
minutes before a recent rehears-
al. When someone offers you the
lead, you take it.
Katie Munley, of Raritan, ap-
pears as Lisette, Silvias maid. In
order to help Silvia, Lisette dis-
guises herself as her master, but
soon is in a quandary when her
own heartstrings are pulled.
Munley, who also serves as the
house manager at the theater
getting the tables set up and su-
pervising such aspects of the the-
ater as reservations was wrap-
ping up her day with the off-book,
no script rehearsal.
Its fun, she said of the act-
ing. Its good to play a character
that is playing a character.
Munley has performed in
three or four plays at the theater
since 2007.
She (Munley) was actually in
my dance class when she was
about 8 years old, she said. A fa-
miliar face at OBT, Curtis Kaine
of Princeton appears as Mon-
sieur Orgon, Silvias father.
Orgon starts as the only person
with knowledge of both sides of
the charade that is about to un-
fold. Newcomer Ryan Diminick,
of Ringoes, plays Harlequin, Do-
rantes valet. Harlequin, dressed
as his master, soon discovers his
own love interest in the house.
The play, Julie said, was origi-
nally set in the 18th century, but
has been pushed forward to
about 1900, since: It was harder
to come down the steps in those
big fluffy dresses.
Stuart Grow, of North
Brunswick, plays Mario, Silvias
uncle and, like Begley, has re-
turned to the Off Broadstreet
Theatre after working in Los An-
Special to The Sun
From left, Melissa Rittman, Katie Munley and Curtis Kaine rehearse a scene from The Game of Love and
Chance, now playing weekends through March 23 at the Off Broadstreet Theatre in Hopewell.
please see ALL, page 7 please see POLLING, page 2
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012
El Sham in conjunction with Alexia's Belly Dance & Beyond
presents an afternoon of belly dance performance and instruction!
Entertainment provided on behalf of Alexia's Belly Dance & Beyond
Lawrence, NJ www.drumdancecenter.com
|K|| |V|NI
#a:c| I\, I0|I I1a
Come out and experience the beauty of this timeless art. Enjoy enchanting perform-
ances provided by Bridgette and even test out your moves with a free mini lesson!
ln support of the local arts, El Sham will offer a free tappas-style array of both beloved
favorite menu items and some delicious new dishes. So whether El Sham is already
one of your favorite restaurants or you are looking to try something new, come out
and join us for this exciting event.
on the referendum, as resident
William Schoelver, who works at
the polls, pointed out that each of
the 12 districts in the township re-
quires four poll workers at $200 a
day.
Is the plan to fairly allow vot-
ers to make a decision or is it to
confuse them (by combining dis-
tricts)? He asked. If you want to
let it go to a fair vote, youll do it in
May and youll leave the districts
alone. Spend the $20,000 on democ-
racy. Its worth every penny.
Lester had earlier urged the
committee to choose the May 8
date so the referendum would not
interfere with the school board
election in April or the primary
election in June.
The school board election is
entitled to the full attention of the
voters, he told committee mem-
bers. The primary is entitled to
the full attention of the voters and
the referendum is entitled to the
full attention of the voters.
Johnson said voter confusion
should not be an issue, as polling
locations are clearly marked at
the top of ballots.
The school board elections are
not the proper time to have this,
Markulec said. They have
enough issues, and us bringing
this fight to their doorstep is not
appropriate.
Burd, however, felt the school
board election was the best time
to have the referendum, citing the
promptness of the referendum
and the cost savings.
Some may feel that $20,000 is a
drop in the bucket, but it is a great
deal of money. Savings are a sig-
nificant aspect of this, he said.
Township voters, he said, are
intelligent and would be able to
differentiate between the school
Polling locations
marked on ballots
POLLING
Continued from page 1
please see REFERENDUM, page 3
FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
WEIGHT LOSS RESULTS
YOU CAN COUNT ON
Non-surg|ca| we|ght |oss
Safe and effect|ve
Oustom|zed p|ans
800 Bunn Drive, Suite 202, Princeton, NJ 08540
Phone (609) 683-1919 Fax (609) 430-9202
www.princetonweightlosscenter.com
86 East Broad Street
Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100
www.1stconstitution.com
Reach Our Mortgage Center at 888-519-7677.
Community Banking With You In Mind
Lobby & Drive-Up Hours:
Mon-Thu 8:30am-5pm
Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
Whether your goal is to finally build that addition or backyard youve always wanted, or to lower
your monthly payment - we have the solution. Call one of our mortgage loan originators today to find
out how our great rates can help you achieve your goals!
If you have dreams
we have solutions.
board election and the bond issue.
I think they are intelligent
enough to evaluate the issue, and
not make a decision based on a
knee-jerk reaction, he said.
The voters requested that they
get their say-so, Cannon said. I
think trying to figure out whats
in their minds is what got us to
this point in the first place.
The township must publish a
notice at least 55 days before the
special election, ensure mail-in
ballots are available, allow voter
registration up to 21 days before
the vote and publish notice of the
election at least 10 days ahead of
the date.
Seven days before vote is the
last day to apply for mail-in bal-
lots.
The Citizens for Tax Choice
successfully petitioned for the ref-
erendum, garnering 1,700 signa-
tures in 18 days in late December
after the township committee ap-
proved the bond ordinance by a 3-
2 vote on Nov. 28.
Burd, who was township mayor
at that time, said the agreement
with ELSA would cost taxpayers
about $15 per gallon of sewerage
compared with $67 if the existing
plant were upgraded.
Sandom said at the Nov. 28
meeting, however, that the excess
sewerage capacity the township
would be paying for would be
taken by developers and, What
we dont want is to encourage de-
velopment to pay off a debt.
Residents at the Nov. 28 meeting
had expressed concern that the
township committee had not com-
municated that the ordinance
called for a general-obligation
bond, and Sandom voted against
the ordinance for that reason and
the fact that capacity needs were
not entirely determined.
Township attorney Steven
Goodell said at the meeting that
the flow had to be reserved at
ELSA before the scope of the proj-
ects was determined and the
method of user assessment of the
fees.
Referendum petitioned
REFERENDUM
Continued from page 2
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012
in designing a website with HTML
in creating animation with Anim, GIF, and FLASH
in programming and building robots
in game creation
in learning programming languages
in investigations by Search for Extra Terrestrial
Intelligence
Contact: evalkaplan@cs.com or phone: 609/730/0746
Camp location: Can Do Fitness Center, Princeton Forrestal Village, Princeton NJ
Size is limited to 12 campers per week. Ages 7-15+
Engaging, age appropriate, individually customized experiences each weekly session:
in computer and circuit board construction
with a computer technician
in digital music and movie-making
in computer graphics
in engineering
in interactive software and websites
and more
HIGH TECH HIGH FUN HIGH CREATIVITY HIGH LEARNING
www.computersandkids.com
IN OUR
30TH YEAR!
Projects featured at science fair
The Toll Gate School cafeteria
was simmering with science on
Feb. 10.
During the inaugural science
fair, 60 Toll Gate scientists dis-
played 44 unique experiments ei-
ther with a partner or solo.
As a requirement to partici-
pate, all students conducted an
experiment that followed the Sci-
entific Method.
Co-chairwomen Francie Mc-
Manimon and Jen Tracy were
thrilled and inspired by the dedi-
cation of Toll Gators from kinder-
garten through fifth-grade.
There was a great variety of
creative and impressive science
projects, including Crystal Crisis,
Popcorn Madness, Playing in the
Rain, Fun Food for Squirrels,
Electrifying Juiciness.
The PTOs Nancy and Simon
Archibald, Trish Delehey, Kathy
Frederich, Dodie Hamblin, Lee
Herman, Xenia and Paul Morin,
Cindy Persichilli and Maryann
and Michael Swiatocha, all par-
ents of former Toll Gators who
served as project evaluators,
shared their time and expertise to make the science fair a positive experience for the students.
Special to The Sun
Clair Curillo and Anna Cappucci stand by to present their Volcanos
are a Blast project.
FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
Shoppes at Pennington 21 Rt 31 North, Suite 7B Pennington (609) 730-1211
COLOR, CUT AND
BLOWDRY
$80
Expires 2/29/12.
Must present at time of service.
Except Jodi.
FOIL HIGHLIGHTS
25%
OFF
Expires 2/29/12.
Must present at time of service.
In a Relaxed Atmosphere
for Men, Women and Children
Established 1998
MEMBER, AMERICAN MONTESSORI SOCIETY
|K00KM8 I0K
|hIhI8 - 5 YIK 0IP8
Math Language Skills Art Foreign Language Gym
SUMMER CAMPS
Weekly/Daily Schedule Water Play Minisports
Special Events Academic Enrichment
Kindergarten Program Soccer and more!
Montgomery (609) 252-9696 www.NHMontessori.org
Route 518, Skillman - 1/2 mile from Route 206
Minutes from Hopewell, Pennington and Princeton
Wendy Scloiland VMD Debbie Ellioii, DVM
Professional Tree Care & Arborist Services
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
Servicing Your Community For Over 20 Years
609-730-8199
www.arborbarbertree.com
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
A portion of
our proceeds
are donated
to animal
rescue!
Certified Arborist
Corrective Pruning
Tree Removal
Cabling & Bracing
Stump Grinding
Cat Rescue
TRUSTED FOR MORE
THAN 18 YEARS
1784 North Olden Ave., Ewing NJ 609-895-1950
5628 Rt 38, Pennsauken NJ 856-661-1818
911 White Horse Pike, Oaklyn NJ 856-854-1272
115 South Horse Pike, Ste. D, Bellmawr NJ 856-933-3300
NEED CASH RIGHT AWAY?
Bring in this ad and get an extra
$25 for any transaction over $100!
With this coupon. Not valid with other offers
or prior transactions. Offer expires 3/7/12.
Club collecting bikes
for fundraiser
Har Sinai Temple in Hopewell
is collecting bikes of all kinds,
conditions and sizes for the Boys
& Girls Club of Trentons bike ex-
change.
All of the donated bikes will be
repaired and sold at reasonable
prices by the Boys & Girls Club.
Just bring them to the Temple,
2421 Pennington Road, at Denow
Road West, until Feb. 24 from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. and again on Feb. 26
from 9 a.m. to noon.
No drop-offs will be allowed on
Feb. 25.
All proceeds from the sale
of the donated bikes will go to
supporting after-school and
career development programs
for the Boys & Girls Club of Tren-
ton, which serves more than
1,000 underprivileged children
weekly.
Since its inception in 2009, the
club has collected more than 4,500
bikes, serving the needy and
keeping added debris from local
landfills.
The collection is the latest in
an ongoing series of programs
that Har Sinai sponsors to benefit
the community.
For more information, contact
the temple at (609) 730-8100.
Area author to
host book talk
The Hopewell Borough
Library, as part of its Wednesday
Night Out series, will be
presenting a free talk by local
writer, Scott Mulhern, the
author of the recently published
Seventeen Steps to the Edge:
Haikus from Heaven Haikus
from Hell, on March 7 at 7 p.m. in
the Railroad Station at Railroad
Place.
Mulhern has lived in Hopewell
for more than 16 years with his
wife, Susan, and their three dogs.
He was a professional actor for
more than 20 years, and has two
grown daughters.
The library's Wednesday Night
Out talk series is held at 7 p.m. on
the first Wednesday of each
month at the Hopewell Train Sta-
tion, and is free and open to the
public.
Check the library website
redlibrary.org for upcoming
speakers and library-sponsored
events.
BRIEFS
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call (609) 751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
T
oday marks a special day at
Elauwit Media, publisher of
The Sun newspapers. We wel-
come West Windsor and Robbinsville
to our family.
These two additions bring our num-
ber of newspapers to 15.
We serve the communities of Had-
donfield, Moorestown, Cherry Hill
East, Marlton, Medford, Voorhees,
Washington Township, Shamong, Mt.
Laurel and Tabernacle in South Jer-
sey.
Now, in Central Jersey, we serve
Lawrence, Montgomery, Hopewell,
West Windsor and Robbinsville.
Most importantly, wed like to thank
everyone for the support we have re-
ceived over the years.
We started with one newspaper, in
Haddonfield, in 2004. Our goal always
has been to provide our readers and
advertisers with the best service possi-
ble. We strive every week to bring you
local news that is important to you.
From coverage of local meetings and
events to features on interesting peo-
ple and activities, we want you to look
forward to receiving your Sun in the
mail every week.
But the true measure of success has
been the involvement of the communi-
ties in their local Suns. We ask our
readers to send us news they want to
share with their friends and neigh-
bors. When students achieve greatness
in the classroom or on the playing
field or when civic groups work to
raise money for a good cause, we want
to hear about it and then tell every-
one else about it.
Weve managed to grow rapidly dur-
ing one of the most difficult economic
times in our nations history and
during a time that has been especially
difficult for many newspapers.
We want to continue to grow. And to
do that, we know we have to publish
newspapers that reflect the values and
priorities of the communities they
serve.
We thank you for your continued
support.
Two new family members
Today, we welcome West Windsor and Robbinsville to the Sun family
Welcome home
Today we want to welcome two new
communities to The Sun family and
thank everyone who has helped us
continue to grow over the years.
police report
The following items were taken from re-
ports on file with the Hopewell Police De-
partment:
A 49-year-old Lambertville man was ar-
rested and charged with possession of co-
caine and drug paraphernalia and posses-
sion of a controlled-dangerous substance
in a vehicle on Feb. 3 at 4:27 p.m.
Police say they observed a Chevy Silver-
ado strike a curbed median along Penning-
ton Road and weave in and out of the
southbound lanes An officer stopped the
car on Interstate 95 and spoke with the
driver. Further investigation found the
driver in possession of plastic bags con-
taining cocaine and various drug para-
phernalia. He was placed under arrest and
transported to police headquarters for pro-
cessing. He additionally was charged with
reckless driving, driving while suspended,
failure to exhibit documents and failure to
wear a seatbelt.
He later was released and this case will
be forwarded to the Mercer County Prose-
cutors Office for review.
A 38-year-old Trenton woman was ar-
rested and charged with drunken driving,
drunken driving with a minor in the vehi-
cle, reckless driving, failure to wear a seat-
belt, a child-restraint violation and driving
with a revoked license after being
pulled over Feb. 4 at 12:54 a.m. along Pen-
nington Road. Police said an officer ob-
served a Ford Expedition weaving in and
out of the southbound lanes, stopped the
car and spoke with the driver. Further in-
vestigation revealed the driver had an out-
standing warrant for her arrest out of
Trenton.
She was placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters for process-
ing. Further investigation found her to be
under the influence of alcohol. The woman
was later released to an acquaintance and
her case will be heard in municipal court.
Two passengers in the car a 51-year-old
man and a 34-year-old woman were ob-
served not wearing seatbelts and issued
summonses, and were also found to have
outstanding arrest warrants. They were
both placed under arrest and transported
to police headquarters for processing. The
man later was released on his own recogni-
zance on the outstanding warrant out of
Trenton. The woman was later released
after posting bail on the outstanding war-
rant out of Flemington Borough. The
seatbelt charges will be heard in
municipal court.
A 39-year-old Pennsylvania man was
charged with drunken driving on Feb. 9
after police responded to Route 31 on a re-
port of an erratic driver in a Ford pickup
truck at 3:34 p.m. Police say they stopped
the truck, and the officer detected an odor
of alcohol on his breath. After performing
field sobriety tests the driver was placed
under arrest and transported to police
headquarters for processing.
He also was charged with refusal to sub-
mit to a breath test, reckless driving, fail-
ure to maintain lane and failure to exhibit
credentials. He later was released to a rela-
tive and this case will be heard in munici-
pal court.
A 68-year-old Lambertville man was un-
injured in a one-car crash on Feb. 11 at 8:05
a.m. on Route 546. Police said the man was
driving a Subaru Forester, when lost con-
trol of the car after hitting a patch of ice.
The mans car left the roadway, went up an
embankment, and rolled over onto its roof.
A 50-year-old female passenger in the car
suffered a minor arm injury, which was
treated on scene by the Pennington First
please see POLICE, page 8
geles from 1997 to 2002.
This is actually a very fun
character, he said of Mario. He
gets to provide everything. He
stirs the pot most of the time, and
thats a lot of fun.
Grows first play at the theater
was The Bakers Wife in
1994, and he is performing in
his 11th Off Broadstreet produc-
tion.
I grew up singing and acting,
the North Brunswick native said,
adding that the atmosphere at the
theater drew him home in a
sense.
This is like my second fami-
ly, he said. I always look for-
ward to working with Bob and
Julie, and I look forward to those
phone calls from them. This is a
great theater to work in and the
shows are always top-notch.
The Thicks founded the the-
atre in 1984.
Bob is an experienced per-
former with degrees in music
and a strong opera background,
and Julie is a former
gymnast/dancer who holds an
economics degree. Bob does most
of the directing, and Julie chore-
ographs the musicals.
Most of the productions, Julie
said, are the result of about 16 or
17 rehearsals, about half of
which are off-book, meaning the
actors have no scripts to refer to
and at that point are expected to
have memorized their lines.
The Game of Love and
Chance is the theaters
220th production, which always
is accompanied with desserts,
fresh fruit and warm coffee or
tea. There is a no-sugar-added
option for those on a restricted
diet.
The couple originally wanted
to open as a dinner theater, but
lacking the funds, they decided to
establish a dessert theater.
A year after opening, we
polled our audiences to see if
they would still come if we were
a dinner theater, Julie said.
They agreed, but said the pric-
ing would limit their attendance
to a few times a year and not
every show so we happily be-
came known as The Dessert The-
atre, Off Broadstreet Dessert
Theatre or New Jerseys Original
Dessert Theatre.
She said she is in the process of
sampling potential new sweets of-
ferings, something she calls my
favorite part of the job.
The theater has presented pro-
ductions ranging from Death of
A Salesman to such comedies as
Lend Me A Tenor, and musicals
from Chicago and Guys and
Dolls to such lesser-known mu-
sicals as Soup De Jour.
The theatre has repeated only
a handful of productions over the
years, Julie said, explaining that
a show is not repeated if it has
been run within the past 10 years.
We are lucky to have some of
the most faithful and loyal series
subscribers, she said. They will
be very open in their likes and
dislikes, and that honesty has
helped us to stay in tune with our
audiences.
The theater sometimes invites
audiences, including those who
may not have the means to pur-
chase a ticket, to dress rehearsals
just so the actors can get com-
fortable working in front of peo-
ple.
She credited the longtime suc-
cess of the theater, making her
hard work and that of her hus-
band pay off, to the passionate
actors that perform in our shows,
the dedicated subscribers and
people who buy single tickets,
and the small close-knit town of
Hopewell.
The latest comedy will run
weekends until March 23. Friday
and Saturday evenings, doors
open at 7 p.m. for dessert with an
8 p.m. curtain time. Sunday mati-
nees feature 1:30 p.m. dessert
with 2:30 p.m. curtain.
Admission Friday and Sunday
is $29.50, Saturday is $31.50.
There is a senior citizens-dis-
count ticket of $27 for Sunday
matinees.
All prices include dessert,
show and NJ sales tax.
For reservations, contact the
Off-Broadstreet Theatre at P.O.
Box 359, 5 South Greenwood Ave.,
Hopewell, call (609) 466-2766, or
log on to www.off-
broadstreet.com.
FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
the
PICCADILLY
200 nassau street
princeton, n.j.
609-924-5196
SPRING 2012
Patterns and New
Styles are in stock!
Sale on
Newly Retired
Patterns
Microfiber
Handbags - DuffIes
Accessories
BEST IN STOCK
Largest Selection!
D E S I G N S
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
zaco reiiiicroi rob - reiiiicroi, iJ
rioie coo) vov-+=oe - www.wiLsoi==Le.co:
RobertA.Wilson,ManagerNJ Lic.No.2520 R.AsherWilson,Director,NJLic.No.3823
All tickets include dessert and show
ALL
Continued from page 1
Special to The Sun
Melissa Rittman and Katie Munley rehearse a scene from The Game
of Love and Chance, now playing weekends through March 23 at the
Off Broadstreet Theatre in Hopewell.
WEDNESDAY
February 22
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5 years. 11
a.m. at Hopewell Branch Library.
Siblings welcome. These story times
introduce children to the best age-
appropriate stories. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities are
part of the program. Parental super-
vision required.
THURSDAY
February 23
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Planning
Board meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the Munic-
ipal Auditorium. For more informa-
tion visit hopewelltwp.org.
College Admissions Panel: 7 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Valley Central High
School cafeteria. Admissions direc-
tors from several colleges will dis-
cuss the admission process.
Designed for parents of 11th grade
students.
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5 years. 11
a.m. at Hopewell Branch Library.
Siblings welcome. These story times
introduce children to the best age-
appropriate stories. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities are
part of the program. Parental super-
vision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library. Singing, dancing and
rhymes. Through structured group
activities, play with musical instru-
ments, puppets, parachutes and
more.
FRIDAY
February 24
FOR CHILDREN
Open Play Time: 11 a.m. to noon at
Hopewell Branch Library. Open play
time in the childrens activity room.
Adult supervision required.
SATURDAY
February 25
FOR ALL
Family Story Time: All ages wel-
come. 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library. Enjoy stories,
rhymes and a craft for children and
their families. Online registration
required.
MONDAY
February 27
FOR ALL
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library. Bring a yoga mat or
large towel. Registration mandatory.
Call (609) 737-2610 or email ktay-
loro@mcl.org.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch Library. Learn this
ancient art to promote good health
and relaxation. No registration nec-
essary.
FOR CHILDREN
Kids Open Craft: All ages welcome.
4 to 5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library. Special craft will be snow-
globes. Adult supervision required.
TUESDAY
February 28
FOR ALL
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library. Bring a yoga mat or
large towel. Registration mandatory.
Call (609) 737-2610 or email ktay-
loro@mcl.org.
New Jersey Writers Society Sup-
port Group: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch Library. All are
welcome to attend and enjoy the
challenges of becoming better writ-
ers, defeating writers block and
perfecting the craft. No registration
necessary.
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5 years. 2
p.m. at Hopewell Branch Library.
Siblings welcome. These story times
introduce children to the best age-
appropriate stories. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities are
part of the program. Parental super-
vision required.
Baby Time with Miss Kelley: Ages
birth to 2. 11 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library. Fun-filled program designed
for very young children. Learn new
ways to interact. Enjoy music and
movement. Adult supervision
required.
calendar PAGE 8 FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event. Send information by mail to: Calendar,
The Hopewell Sun, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J.
08542. Or by email: calendar@hopewellsun.com. Or you can sub-
mit a calendar listing through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
BLACKWELL MEMORIAL HOME
Continuos Family Service since 1881
Elizabeth Blackwell Davis,
Director/Manager NJ Lic. #2475
21 North Main Street
Pennington, NJ
609-737-2900
Handicapped Accessible
Police
reports
Aid Squad.
A 32-year-old Hopewell man
was uninjured in a one-car
crash at the Mount Rose inter-
section on Feb. 11 at 8:18 p.m.
Police say the man was driving
a GMC Sierra when he attempt-
ed to make a left turn on to
Cherry Valley Road from Carter
Road. His car slid off of the
snow-covered roadway and into
a tree, causing damage to the
front and undercarriage of the
car.
A 49-year-old Doylestown, Pa.,
woman was uninjured in a one-
car crash along Route 546 on
Feb. 11. Police say the woman
was driving a Ford Mustang at
10:32 p.m., when she slid off the
snow-covered road and struck a
tree, causing damage to the
front of the car.
A 23-year-old Beaver Springs,
Pa., man was charged with
drunken driving after being
pulled over on West Broad
Street on Feb. 11 at 1:09 a.m. Po-
lice say an officer stopped the
car after observing it traveling
at 40 mph in a 30 mph zone dur-
ing a light snowstorm. The offi-
cer spoke with the driver, who
had the odor of alcohol on his
breath. After performing field
sobriety tests, the driver was
placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters
for processing. He also was
charged with reckless driving
and speeding. He later was re-
leased to an acquaintance and
his case will be heard in munici-
pal court.
POLICE
Continued from page 6
Send us your Hopewell news
Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
People you trust... trust Coit
50
%
Off
50
%
Off 50
%
Off


See our video demonstration on www.coit.com
Professional Air Duct Cleaning
or Dryer Vent Cleaning
Carpet & Upholstery
Tile & Grout Cleaning
Drapes, Blinds, Window
Coverings & Area Rug Cleaning
Reduce air contaminants and make your home smell fresh while reducing allergy aggrava-
tion pollutants such as mold, mildew, fungi, dust, pet hair and the particulate pollutants left
by dust mites. NADCA certified. Minimum charge & fuel charge may apply. Exp. 3/3/12.
COITS powerful carpet cleaning equipment removes ground in dirt to help extend life.
We are certified to comply with all major carpetmanufacturers cleaning specifications,
including stain resistant carpets. Minimumcharge & fuel charge may apply. Exp. 3/3/12.
This exclusive treatment will remove dust, smoke, pollen, odors and soil, yet guaran-
tees that your draperies will return with parallel pleats, even hems and no shrinkage!
Minimum charge & fuel charge may apply. Exp. 3/3/12.
COIT provides full-service cleaning for your
home - all backed by our unique, industry-leading
guarantees. We strive to make things hassle-free by
providing convenient, on-time appointments. And we
guard against surprises by providing a free written
estimate prior to any service.
Serving All of South Jersey
Same Day Service Available!
856-566-0700
5
0
%
O
F
F

5
0
%
O
F
F

ALL CLEAN
IN
G SERVICES
ALL CLEAN
IN
G SERVICES
CHOOSE FROM: Carpet Upholstery
Area Rug Drapes and Blinds Hardwood Floors
Air Ducts Tile & Grout Cleaning
Your Home Cleaning Experts.
Cleaning Services
L
A
S
T
W
E
E
K
!
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
FEBRUARY 22-28, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
Dog Boarding
EIectricaI Services
SDK SERVICES
Let us do your homework.
Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
Soffitt Fascia
Rotten Wood
Door Installation
Painting
Kitchens
Fully Insured Licensed
609-200-4043
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
SNOW REMOVAL
Home Improvement
Wanted To Buy
Roofing
Firewood
Tree Service
SoIar
Has your high water alarm
gone off recently?
J WHALEN & SON
PUMP SERVICE
Sewage and Sump Pumps
Installed and Repaired
Call 609-737-2722
Pump Services
FIREWOOD
Delivered Dumped
All 14-18 inches long
Split Aged Full Cord
SALE $195
Call: 908-359-3000
Professional Tree Care & Arborist Services
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
Servicing Your Community For Over 20 Years
609-730-8199
www.arborbarbertree.com
A portion of
our proceeds
are donated
to animal
rescue!
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
Certified Arborist
Corrective Pruning
Tree Removal
Cabling & Bracing
Stump Grinding
Cat Rescue
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
Certified Arborist
Corrective Pruning
Tree Removal
Cabling & Bracing
Stump Grinding
Cat Rescue
Please call 856-552-0250
for details.
www.TestTech.com/iRepair
TestTech Pays
CASH for iPhones!
Why hassle with Gift cards or
Store Credit?
Test Tech will purchase your
used iPhone.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler

Forget what youve heard


about SOLAR energy!
We will subsidize your installation.
20+ years FREE electricity
Your bldg immediately worth more than you pay
System is free and clear in less than 3 years!
Pay once, 30% of typical prices
Stew Lindenberger - US Solargy 609 - 977 - 8849
StewartL@ussolargy.com
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
2012 VCLVC S601S
Lease for
36 Month
$ *
CONQUEST CASH
CUk NLIGn8CknCCD VCLVC DLALLkS
Closer Than You Think!
*Acquisition fee $695. No security deposit required. Available to qualified customers. Stock #12359. All prices
with tax, tags, registration and documentation fees additional. 36 month, 10,000 mile lease. Expires 2/29/12.
**MSRP $32,175. Total due at signing $3,293. Visit retailer for details.
Volvo builds the cars, we build relationships.
VCLVC CI kINCL1CN
2931 U.S. 1 South
Lawrencev|||e, NI 08648
(609) 882-0600
8kIDGLWA1Lk VCLVC
1028 U.S. 22 Last
Somerv|||e, NI
(908) S26-7700
VCLVC CI LDISCN
842 U.S. 1 North
Ld|son, NI
(732) 248-0S00
VCLVCCCUN1k.CCM

Cwn one of Lhese and


SAVL 51,000
Acura, Audl, 8MW, lnnlu, Lexus,
Mercedes, Ponda, nlssan, 1oyoLa or vW
2
0
1
2
Vo|vo S60