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The Louvre Museum

The Musée du Louvre (French pronunciation) – in English, the Louvre Museum or simply the Louvre – is one of the world's largest museums, the most visited art museum in the world and a historic monument. A central landmark of Paris, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the 1st district. Nearly 35,000 objects from prehistory to the 19th century are exhibited over an area of 60,600 m ² (square meters). The museum is housed in the Louvre Palace which began as a fortress built in the late 12th century under Philip II. Remnants of the fortress are visible in the basement of the museum. The building was extended many times to form the present Louvre Palace. The museum opened on 10 August 1793 with an exhibition of 537 paintings, the majority of the works being royal and confiscated church property. Because of structural problems with the building, the museum was closed in 1796 until 1801. The size of the collection increased under Napoleon and the museum was renamed the Musée Napoléon. After the defeat of Napoléon at Waterloo, many works seized by his armies were returned to their original owners. Collections The Musée du Louvre contains more than 380,000 objects and displays 35,000 works of art in eight curatorial departments. → Egyptian antiquities -The department, comprising over 50,000 pieces, includes artifacts from the Nile civilizations which date from 4000 BC to the 4th century. The collection, among the world's largest, overviews Egyptian life. → Near Eastern antiquities - Near Eastern antiquities, the second newest department, dates from 1881 and presents an overview of early Near Eastern civilization and "first settlements", before the arrival of Islam. The department is divided into three geographic areas: the Levant, Mesopotamia, and Persia (Iran) . → Greek, Etruscan, and Roman - The Greek, Etruscan, and Roman department displays pieces from the Mediterranean Basin dating from the Neolithic to the 6th century. The collection spans from the Cycladic period to the decline of the Roman Empire. This department is one of the museum's oldest; it began with appropriated royal art, some of which was acquired under Francis I . Initially, the collection focused on marble sculptures, such as the Venus de Milo. → Islamic art - The Islamic art collection, the museum's newest, spans "thirteen centuries and three continents". These exhibits, comprising ceramics, glass, metalware, wood, ivory, carpet, textiles, and miniatures, include more than 5,000 works and 1,000 shards.

000 works from the 13th century to 1848 and is managed by 12 curators who oversee the collection's display. . Painting .000 drawings.The painting collection has more than 6. 3.000 illustrated books. and more than 1200 are Northern European. and 5. Nearly two-thirds are by French artists.Sculpture . Prints and drawings -Includes 40.000 prints.The sculpture department comprises work created before 1850.The Objects d'art collection spans from the Middle Ages to the mid-19th century. Decorative arts .