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Development framework 2004
Development framework 2004

Development

framework

2004

Development framework 2004

Client:

Elephant & Castle Development Team

London Borough of Southwark

Consultant Team:

Tibbalds Planning

Foster and Partners

& Urban Design Space Syntax JMP Consultants GVA Grimley Roger Tym & Partners Steer Davis Gleave Inventa Partners

Gehl Architects Battle McCarthy Ernst & Young ARUP Rail Estate Ltd Brian Dunlop Consulting Engineers

Councillor Catherine Bowman Executive Member for Regeneration & Economic Development Southwark Council Foreword The

Councillor Catherine Bowman Executive Member for Regeneration & Economic Development Southwark Council

Foreword

The history of Southwark is the history of London. Chaucer’s pilgrims began their journey from the Tabard Inn just off Borough High Street. Shakespeare acted here and Dickens wrote about Southwark’s churches and gaols.

At various times Southwark’s industry has brought wealth and prosperity to its citizens while its theatres and inns have given pleasure to its many visitors. And today its entirely fitting that great institutions like the Globe & the Tate should make their home in our Borough.

Elephant & Castle- the name alone gives rise to tall tales & speculation – has produced its share of scientists (Faraday) & writers (Browning) and stars of the screen. The great Charlie Chaplin himself was born minutes away from the "Piccadilly of the South", as the Elephant was once known.

And now the rest of London is finally catching on to what all of us who live here have always known; Elephant and Castle is a stones’ throw from the centre of the capital. We are ten minutes walk from the Thames and with two tube lines, an overground train station, hundreds of buses, and the promise from the Mayor of a new tram line linking Kings Cross and Peckham, the Elephant could hardly be better connected.

People have talked for years about doing something with Elephant and Castle. Plans have come and gone and the residents have grown rightly sceptical about anything ever changing. This time its different. This time Southwark Council is getting it right.

We’ve done the legwork; we’ve worked with the leaders in urban master planning and design. Most importantly, we’ve talked extensively to the people who live and work in the area and we are confident that we can deliver a scheme that puts them right at the heart of the redevelopment.

So what are we offering?

We plan to create a proper town centre with fabulous buildings, civic spaces, new green spaces, schools and leisure facilities.

We will manage the construction of 5, 200 new homes for residents of the Heygate estate, who are being offered a new Housing Association home in Elephant and Castle or a council flat in Southwark, and for new people who want to come and live in the area.

We want to turn the Walworth Road back into the High Street it once was thereby massively increasing the amount and choice of retail opportunities. This will also bring 5,200 new jobs to Elephant and Castle and will help local people get jobs.

We are going to create a market space that will provide a focal point for shoppers between Borough and East St markets and we’re working with local businesses to make sure that the diversity of goods and services they currently provide won’t be lost to the area.

All these are reasons why 80% of local residents who responded to our survey like the plans and why the scheme has the support of both local and regional government. That’s why we can say with certainty that the project will start to roll out within the year.

We’re ambitious but our ambition is grounded in pragmatism. Deliverability is the key and we are confident that these plans will turn Elephant & Castle into the kind of place people want to be and want to visit.

Castle into the kind of place people want to be and want to visit. Councillor Catherine

Councillor Catherine Bowman

elephant & castle

Contents

Contents introduction one Role and purpose two The illustrative masterplan the development framework t h r
Contents introduction one Role and purpose two The illustrative masterplan the development framework t h r

introduction

one

Role and purpose

two

The illustrative masterplan

the development framework

three

Landuse

four

Movement & access

five

Public realm

six

Built form

seven

Energy, waste & water

implementation & delivery

eight

Implementation & delivery

appendices

one

Public consultation

two

Options & scenarios

three

Retail impact assessment

four

Public realm strategy

five

Environmental analysis

six

Resource flow assessment

seven

Movement & access strategy

eight

Public transport interchange

nine

Triangle Site: Site specific brief

Role and purpose

Role and purpose one elephant & castle
Role and purpose one elephant & castle

one

elephant & castle

Role and purpose

1.1 Introduction & background

The long term and sustainable regeneration of the Elephant & Castle is a crucial component of the London Borough of Southwark’s regeneration strategy as set out in the emerging Southwark Plan. In addition the area forms part of a wider cross- Borough strategy to develop London South Central as an area that will continue to take on more and more of the functions of central London and be a focus for future investment and jobs.

At present the area occupies a powerful but under-exploited position within central London. It benefits from a number of distinct advantages including a supportive national, London and local planning policy context, a central location, excellent transport accessibility and extensive public land ownership.

These factors together create a unique and positive combination of circumstances within which to promote change and create the conditions necessary to stimulate investment, economic development and regeneration.

In view of this situation Southwark Council has decided to prepare Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) for the Elephant & Castle. The SPG, which comprises primarily of an area specific Development Framework, is designed to guide and inform comprehensive change and regeneration. In the absence of such a Framework development would happen in a piecemeal way and the opportunities to realise the economic, environmental, social and urban design benefits which comprehensive regeneration could create could be lost.

1.2 Planning Policy Context

This Development Framework has been prepared in a national, regional and sub- regional planning context that is rapidly changing. The current development plan for the area is The London Borough of Southwark Unitary Development Plan (adopted 1995). In the period since the adoption of this Plan the Mayor has produced his Spatial Development Strategy (SDS), known as the London Plan. It is intended that this document, when adopted will provide the strategic planning context for London and hence the context within which all Unitary Development Plans should be prepared and adopted.

In view of the above the adopted Development Plan is considered to be somewhat out of step with the current emerging London planning policy context. In view of this situation Southwark Council has embarked upon the production of a new Development Plan: The Southwark Plan. It is intended that this new Plan will eventually replace the 1995 Development Plan as the Unitary Development Plan for Southwark.

The replacement Plan has already been the subject of extensive public consultation and it is the Council’s intention to place the Plan on second deposit in March 2004.

In view of the above situation the Development Framework, which forms the content of the SPG, acknowledges the continuing role of the adopted UDP, but has been designed to achieve the joint vision for the Elephant & Castle as contained in the draft London Plan and the emerging Southwark Plan.

The London Plan

The Plan introduces a set of planning policies designed to support the growth of the London economy, strengthen the City’s transport systems and deliver its sustainability agenda.

The Plan identifies two Special Policy Areas (SPAs):

London South Central, an area covering parts of the three boroughs of Southwark, Lambeth and Wandsworth.

The Thames SPA.

Four Opportunity Areas are designated within the London South Central SPA. Two of these areas are in Southwark; London Bridge and the Elephant & Castle. Both areas are identified as being zones where major change is considered possible and desirable to help meet London’s strategic objectives.

In designating the Elephant & Castle opportunity area the Plan states that:

The planning framework for the area around the Elephant & Castle should draw on its good public transport accessibility, closeness to the CAZ and relatively affordable land. This could be a suitable location to meet some of Central London’s

longer-term needs for extra office space and is suitable for tall buildings. Large scale, car based retail development should not be encouraged. The Framework should seek significant new houses and integrate these with a more efficient transport interchange. Environmental and traffic management improvements are crucial to the successful re-development of the southern gateway to Central London (the draft London Plan, 2B.24).

The Plan sets minimum targets for homes and jobs to be achieved up to 2016. For the Elephant & Castle, within an identified area of 23 hectares the specific targets include the provision of 4,200 jobs and 4,200 new homes.

The Southwark Plan

The Southwark Plan sets down how the Council intends to use its planning powers over the next 10 years in order to influence development.

It consists of three separate sections, known as Part 1, Part 2 and Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG). Part 1 describes the Council’s strategic vision, expressed in terms of twelve key objectives for development. It also identifies the major strategic sites, which are included on a Key Diagram.

The twelve key objectives contained within Part one of the Plan are:

• To remove the barriers to employment and improve access to jobs and training opportunities.

• To create the conditions for wealth creation to succeed and increase the number and range of employment opportunities available to the Borough.

• To improve the range and quality of services available in the Borough and ensure that they are easily accessible.

• To reduce poverty, alleviate concentrations of deprivation and increase opportunities.

• To allocate land for education, community and welfare services.

• To ensure that developments improve local areas and address London’s needs through planning agreements.

• To improve amenity and environmental quality.

• To protect and enhance open spaces and areas of historic importance.

• To promote the efficient use of land, high quality developments and mixed uses.

• To provide more high quality housing of all kinds, particularly affordable housing.

• To increase ease of movement by alternative modes of transport to the private car and to reduce congestion in and around Southwark by promoting the development of infrastructure for an efficient public transport, cycling and walking system.

• To reduce congestion and pollution within Southwark by minimising the need to travel through increased densities at transport nodes and by high quality public transport accessibility.

Part 2 expresses these twelve objectives in more detail and in so doing defines the policies that the Council proposes to pursue. A Proposals Map identifies sites that will be safeguarded for specific activities and the areas, which will be supported by special area policies.

The strategic policies of Part 2 are grouped under five thematic headings:

• Tackling poverty and encouraging wealth creation: strengthening enterprise and creating prosperity.

• Life chances: Preserving and creating community assets.

Clean and green: Protecting and improving environmental quality.

Housing: Creating choice and quality housing

• Transport: Improving access and convenience.

The third part of the Plan comprises of Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) which provide detailed information to support the policies listed in Part 2 of the Plan and the objectives listed in part 1. There are two types of SPG: Area SPG for particular key locations and issue based SPG.

As far as the Elephant & Castle is concerned Part 1 of the Plan identifies it as an Opportunity Area. It is one of two areas identified as requiring special policies in the form of the Part 3 area specific SPGs. In addition the Plan states that in the context of the new planning regime, as proposed by draft Planning Policy Statement 12

Central LondonRegeneration corridors Opportunity areas Metropolitan centres Areas for regeneration Green belt Airports Main ports K

Regeneration corridorsCentral London Opportunity areas Metropolitan centres Areas for regeneration Green belt Airports Main ports K ey

Opportunity areasCentral London Regeneration corridors Metropolitan centres Areas for regeneration Green belt Airports Main ports K ey

Metropolitan centresCentral London Regeneration corridors Opportunity areas Areas for regeneration Green belt Airports Main ports K ey

Areas for regenerationcorridors Opportunity areas Metropolitan centres Green belt Airports Main ports K ey connections beyond

Green beltareas Metropolitan centres Areas for regeneration Airports Main ports K ey connections beyond London Channel

Airportsareas Metropolitan centres Areas for regeneration Green belt Main ports K ey connections beyond London Channel

Main portscentres Areas for regeneration Green belt Airports K ey connections beyond London Channel Tunnel rail link

Key connections beyond London ey connections beyond London

Channel Tunnel rail linkbelt Airports Main ports K ey connections beyond London Crossrail 1 Crossrail 2 Figure 1.1: Extract

Crossrail 1K ey connections beyond London Channel Tunnel rail link Crossrail 2 Figure 1.1: Extract from draft

Crossrail 2beyond London Channel Tunnel rail link Crossrail 1 Figure 1.1: Extract from draft London Plan identifying

London Channel Tunnel rail link Crossrail 1 Crossrail 2 Figure 1.1: Extract from draft London Plan

Figure 1.1: Extract from draft London Plan identifying Elephant & Castle as one of six opportunity areas in the Central Area

Legend

TLRN Road

A Road

B Road

East ondon Line Thames Link 2000

Central Activity Zone/London South Central

Urban Density Zone

Suburban Density Zone

Proposals Site

Preferred Improved Housing Areas

Cross River Transit Proposed Route Cross River Transit Consultation Zone

Metropolitan Open Land

Borough Open Land

Other Open Space

Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation

Conservation Area

Archaelogical Zone

Thames Special Policy Area

Air Quality Management Area

Waste Management Site

Strategic Views - Protected Viewing Corridor

Strategic Views - Wider Consultation Zone

Opportunity Areas

Action Area

Local Area

Preferred Office Location

Preferred Industrial Location - Strategic

Preferred Industrial Location - Local Shopping Frontages

Structural Cultural Area

Location - Local Shopping Frontages Structural Cultural Area Figure 1.2 : Extract from the Southwark Plan

Figure 1.2 : Extract from the Southwark Plan Proposal Map

Role and purpose

(PPS12), area specific SPG will serve as action plans for local areas of change.

The Plan anticipates that the Elephant & Castle will undergo major redevelopment in the coming years to take advantage of its important position as a transport interchange on the southern boundary of Central London. It is also identified as one of the main areas for population growth and services to the population, especially higher education.

The vision for the Elephant and Castle as set out in Part one of the Southwark Plan is of:

‘A vibrant, thriving and successful new mixed use town centre, accessible from a highly integrated public transport system establishing a place where people will want to live, to work and to visit for shopping and leisure’

To achieve this vision, Part One of the Plan requires that proposed development at the Elephant and Castle should:

1. Establish and maintain a high quality, vibrant, safe and integrated mix of homes, shops, commerce, leisure, cultural and other public facilities, uses and activities.

2. Provide a significant increase in the number and diversity of new job opportunities, and encourage the development of an enterprise culture and inward investment.

3. Provide for the economic, education, social and cultural needs of a diverse mix of residents; including extended life long learning opportunities.

4. Provide a range of high quality recreation, entertainment, and leisure facilities.

5. Provide a balance and integrated mix of residential accommodation across the full range of private, social, key worker and other affordable housing, with a target ratio within the affordable element of new schemes of 50:50 for social rented and intermediate housing.

6. Give priority to pedestrians, cyclists, and public transport users rather than the private car.

7. Create an improved and highly efficient public transport interchange.

8. Limit and mitigate the effects of traffic, reduce pollution, and provide a minimum level of car parking, consistent with a high density, public transport rich location.

9. Contribute directly to the creation of a lively, safe and attractive public realm comprising streets and spaces with active frontages, high quality landscaping and priority for use by pedestrians, cyclists and public transport users.

10. Enable the Elephant to have its own clear and positive identity which builds on the strengths of the area and reflects its function as a major new destination in London South Central.

11 . Support an integrated network of high quality, safe urban spaces and public routes into the surrounding districts that will draw people into and through the area, encourage activity, and improve its appearance.

12. Maximise and extend ecological diversity in existing and new spaces.

13. Create buildings which are sustainable, well designed and flexible.

14. Indicate the most appropriate locations for tall buildings.

15. Create buildings which deal efficiently and appropriately with waste, water and energy use.

Within the Framework Area the following will be permitted:

• A range of social, educational, health and leisure facilities to serve the existing and new population, comprising a new secondary school, a healthy living centre, leisure centre, new improved health facilities, a library and life long learning centre and new nursery provision.

Up to 1,100 new homes to replace existing Council housing lost as a result of the redevelopment proposals.

Not fewer than 4,200 mixed tenure additional new homes.

Up to 75,000sqm of new retail and leisure uses together with complementary town centre uses to include cultural/entertainment, hotels and public facilities arranged around a new high street extension of the Walworth Road.

• A highly efficient public transport ‘hub’ at the heart of the area to serve the needs of the existing and new development, comprising an improved new northern line station, improved conditions for buses, the accommodation of the tram, a refurbished train station and an improved interchange between the various modes.

The Cross River Transit Program (The London Tram) within a safeguarded route.

Intensification on key sites around the transport nodes that provide exemplary design and transport improvements.

• A network of new and improved open spaces and public places, including a new civic space, town park, market square, and the enhancement of St. Mary’s churchyard.

It is within the context of this strategic vision and the objectives and the policies of Part 1 and Part 2 of the Plan that this Development Framework has been prepared.

Sustainability

Sustainable development aims to create solutions that meet environmental, social and economic objectives in a balanced and holistic way. The principles of sustainable development runs throughout planning policy at the national, regional and local level.

The Southwark Plan and the various associated strategy documents set out to make it quite clear what is meant by sustainable development and how it proposes to achieve it in the context of the following key objectives:

• To achieve sustainable development that balances the needs of the environment, economy and society.

• To enable people to have meaningful opportunities to participate in important decisions that affect their quality of life, their ability to participate in wealth creation and the quality of their environment.

• To improve people’s life chances by achieving the highest quality developments possible with all of the infrastructure required to meet people’s needs within Southwark.

The Development Framework has taken a holistic and integrated approach to the issue of sustainability in order to establish a strategy which will allow for the many diverse needs and issues affecting the area to be balanced and the most sustainable form of development that is possible to be achieved.

It is envisaged that, in the context of the above and where relevant, further Supplementary Planning Guidance will be prepared for the area which will incorporate policy and advice as follows:

• A movement strategy designed to give priority to public transport, pedestrians, cyclists and to minimise the impact of cars on the environment.

• A built form strategy designed to deliver a more, rationale, cohesive and complementary pattern of built development combining mixed use building blocks arranged around a network of high quality new streets and spaces.

• A public realm brief containing specific guidance on the design, layout and future maintenance of the streets and spaces.

An Urban Design Strategy aimed at securing architecture of the highest quality.

An Environmental strategy containing positive measures to mitigate the impact of the development in terms of pollution, resource consumption and CO2 emissions and to encourage designs that maximises the benefits in terms of amenity, greening, microclimate, biodiversity and ecology.

• A strategy for delivery over the next 10-15 year period.

1.3 Consultation

As part of the process of preparing this Development Framework the Council published in June 2003 a consultation document. The document defined the areas/ sites to be addressed by the Development Framework: These comprise:

• A core area of opportunity. An area of some 25 hectares situated at the heart of the Elephant & Castle where it is envisaged that comprehensive change and redevelopment will take place.

Early housing sites. Sites identified as having the potential to accommodate new housing as part of the relocation of the existing residents from the Heygate Estate in the core area of opportunity.

Four regeneration ‘clusters ‘. Focuses for future environmental, streetscape and greenspace improvement works.

The consultation document also introduced a series of strategic principles and guidelines designed to firstly unlock the potential of the area and then guide and inform its future redevelopment and regeneration. Figure 1.3 illustrates a number of the key themes/ principles advanced within the consultation document.

The document was subject to a three-month consultation exercise that comprised extensive media coverage, exhibitions, newsletters, briefings and focus group discussions. The process sought to engage with as many people as possible and involved existing residents, businesses, landowners, developers, statutory and non statutory consultees

Harper Road: Regeneration Cluster South Bank University campus London College of New prime town centre
Harper Road:
Regeneration
Cluster
South Bank
University campus
London
College of
New prime town centre uses focused
on the extension of Walworth Road
and public transport interchange
Printing
New town centre uses (i.e
specialist retail, cultural,
restaurants, galleries) located
within and around the new
,market square
New mixed use residential
hub to the east of town
centre focused around the
New Town park
Rodney Road
Regeneration Cluster
New mixed residential
development focused around an
upgraded St. Mary’s Churchyard
Walworth Road and new
high street extension
St. Mary’s
regeneration Cluster
New cultural/leisure focus on
Walworth Road incorporating
and reusing the Walworth Town
Hall
New mixed use
employment/residential spine
along the railway line
Existing employment uses located
along the railway line to the rear
of Walworth Road existing retail
East Street Market
Protection and enhancement of
Walworth Road/ East Street
Market
Wider Regeneration Area
Core Area of Opportunity
Mixed use town centre focus for area
Shopping Frontages
New mixed use residential
New mixed use employment
New Faraday Museum
New cultural/leisure focus
Active mixed use retail frontages
Other active frontages
South Newington
Regeneration
Market square, focus for specialist retail
activity
Cluster
Housing sites - proposed
Housing sites - requiring further investigation

Figure 1.3 : Key Principles/themes introduced by the Part 1 : Framework for Development :

principles & interim planning guidance (Draft for Consultation June 2003)

Role and purpose

such as the Mayor, Transport for London (Tfl) and The London Development Agency.

The main purpose of the consultation was to obtain feedback in relation to the key themes and principles and as a result to start the process of building a consensus as to needs and priorities and the way forward for the regeneration of the Elephant & Castle.

The Council was extremely encouraged by the levels of response and the fact that some 80% of people expressed their support for the strategy advanced by the consultation document. A full report on this consultation process is contained in Appendix 1.

This consultation exercise together with more detailed technical work undertaken by the Elephant & Castle project team has helped inform the preparation of this detailed Development Framework.

1.4 The role of the Elephant & Castle SPG

The role of the Development Framework is to expand, explain and clarify the strategy and policies of the draft London Plan and the adopted and emerging Southwark Plan. It provides the content for area specific SPG for the Elephant & Castle and in so doing establishes the preferred structure, form and setting out of development in terms of:

Land use quantum, distribution and mix.

Movement and circulation (all modes).

Public realm: open spaces and places.

Siting, bulk and massing of the built form.

It also provides guidance in relation to:

Design quality and character of the built form.

• The character and approach to the treatment of the public realm.

Energy conservation, resource consumption and waste reduction.

Planning obligations.

The process of implementation & delivery.

This SPG, together with the Southwark Plan (Parts 1 and 2 and the subject specific SPG) will provide the basis upon which developers will be expected to prepare and submit proposals for the redevelopment of the area and hence they will act as the key reference documents for the preparation of future planning applications.

1.5 Components of the Elephant & Castle SPG

The Development Framework comprises the following sections:

Introduction & background.

An illustrative masterplan. which establishes the vision, quality and character of development anticipated for the Elephant & Castle.

Development Framework. A set of fourteen plans and supporting statements that explain the various principles in relation to the overall structure, form, setting out, content and operation of the Development Framework:

DF Plan 1a: Land use mix and distribution (Ground floor).

DF Plan 1b: Land use mix and distribution (Upper floors).

DF Plan 1c: Location of Early Housing sites.

DF Plan 2a: Movement & circulation (Vehicular).

DF Plan 2b: Movement & circulation (Pedestrian).

DF Plan 2c: Movement & circulation (Cycle).

DF Plan 2d: Movement & circulation (Public transport).

DF Plan 3a: Servicing & access (at grade).

DF Plan 3b: Car park & servicing (below grade).

DF Plan 4: Public realm: New and upgraded open spaces and places.

DF Plan 5a: Built form: Spatial requirements.

DF Plan 5b: Built form: General building heights.

DF Plan 5c: Tall buildings strategy.

DF Plan 5d: Built form: Development edges.

Implementation & delivery. A set of principles that introduce the proposed strategy in relation to securing the implementation of the project in terms of:

Consultation & involvement.

Securing a development partner.

Use of compulsory powers.

Planning submission requirements.

Development related requirements.

Securing the requirements.

Programme & phasing.

It is envisaged that this part of the Framework will be evolved and developed over time, in consultation with key stakeholders, partners in the project and as more detailed work is undertaken as part of the planning process.

Appendices. The background support documentation that has helped inform the preparation of the Development Framework.

Appendix 1: Public consultation on the part one framework.

Appendix 2: Development Framework options and scenarios.

Appendix 3: Retail impact assessment.

Appendix 4: A public realm strategy.

Appendix 5: Environmental analysis.

Appendix 6: Resource flow assessment

Appendix 7: Movement & access strategy.

Appendix 8: Public transport interchange.

Appendix 9: Triangle Site: Site specific brief.

In addition it is envisaged that further guidance will be produced in due course. This will comprise:

Area Specific Design Guidance.

• Area Based Improvement Strategies for each of the three regeneration clusters situated beyond the Core area of opportunity:

- Harper Road

- Rodney Road

- South Newington

Each strategy will set out the Council’s proposals in relation to the accommodation of new housing development, associated with the rehousing of residents from the Heygate Estate, and the enhancement of the public realm.

In addition to these area based strategies it is envisaged that it may be necessary to produce site specific briefs in relation to certain key sites as they are brought forward for development. within the Framework area (Core and wider regeneration area). Indeed one such brief has already been prepared in response to the submission of a planning application on a site within the wider Regeneration Area, referred to as the ‘Triangle site’. For information purposes this brief is included in Appendix 9.

• Sustainability indicators and targets. It is envisaged that as more detailed work is undertaken in relation to the component parts of the Framework that more site specific sustainability indicators/ targets will be developed in relation to social, economic and environmental issues. These will be incorporated into the document in due course and developers bringing forward applications within the Framework will be expected, through the production of Sustainability Impact Assessments (as required by the Southwark Plan), to ensure that the most sustainable form of development is secured for a particular site.

The Development Framework

The Illustrative Masterplan

Function: A set of plans, illustrations, images and descriptive text to explain the Council’s “vision” for the future regeneration of the Elephant and Castle

Status: Illustrative

Illustrative Masterplan

Illustrative sketches & images

Illustrative Masterplan Illustrative sketches & images Development Framework Plans DF Plan 1a : Land use mix

Development Framework Plans

DF Plan 1a: Land use mix and distribution (Ground floor)

DF Plan 1b: Land use mix and distribution (Upper floors)

DF Plan 1c: Location of early housing sites

DF Plan 2a: Movement & circulation (Vehicular)

DF Plan 2b: Movement & circulation (Pedestrian)

DF Plan 2c: Movement & circulation (Cycle)

DF Plan 2d: Movement & circulation (Public transport)

DF Plan 3a: Servicing & access (at grade)

DF Plan 3b: Car park & servicing (below grade)

DF Plan 4: Public realm: New and upgraded open spaces and place

DF Plan 5a: Built form: Spatial requirements

DF Plan 5b: Built form: General building heights

DF Plan 5c: Built form: Tall buildings strategy

DF Plan 5d: Built form: Development edges

Development Framework Plans (DF Plans)

Function: A set of fourteen plans that establish the overall structure, form and setting out of the core development area

Status: Supplementary Planning Guidance

Development Framework Principles/Guidelines (DFP)

Function: A set of principles, guidelines & diagrams that expand and explain the context and workings of the Development Framework Plans

Status: Supplementary Planning Guidance

Framework Plans Status: Supplementary Planning Guidance T echnical Appendices Function: Guidelines that support the

Technical Appendices

Function: Guidelines that support the main Development Framework Document

Status: Supplementary Planning Guidance

Technical Appendices

Appendix 1: Public consultation on the part one framework.

Appendix 2: Development Framework options and scenarios.

Appendix 3: Retail impact assessment

Appendix 4: A public realm strategy

Appendix 5: Environmental analysis

Appendix 6: Resource flow assessment

Appendix 7: Movement & access strategy

Appendix 8: Public transport interchange

Appendix 9: Triangle Site: Site specific brief.

The Illustrative Masterplan

The Illustrative Masterplan two elephant & castle
The Illustrative Masterplan two elephant & castle

two

elephant & castle

The Illustrative Masterplan

2.1 The development

The consultation exercise and the detailed assessment work undertaken by the Council have together been used to generate an illustrative masterplan for the Framework area (Figure 2.1). The plan establishes a structure for the development in terms of the built form and the arrangement of streets, spaces and places. It also shows how the proposals will relate to and integrate with the existing area.

The Framework provides for approximately 650,000sqm of mixed-use development, arranged around an integrated network of pedestrian orientated streets and spaces, served by a high quality new public transport ‘hub’.

More specifically it provides for:

NEW BUILDINGS/ FACILITIES

• A minimum of 4,200 mixed tenure new homes to be provided in the core area of opportunity and the wider regeneration area.

Up to 1,100 new homes to replace the existing Heygate Estate (in the wider regeneration area).

New shops, restaurants, cafes, leisure, hotel and cultural uses focused around a new and extended Walworth ‘High Street’, a Market Square and a Town Park.

• New commercial employment floorspace (office, workshops, live work).

• A comprehensive range of social, education, health and leisure facilities to serve the needs of the existing and new populations, including:

- A new secondary school (City Academy).

- A healthy living and leisure centre.

- A new library/ life long learning centre.

An Energy Centre to provide energy services.

An energy advice centre to act as a focal point for the distribution of energy advice to local residents and businesses and to serve as an exemplar for the commercial application of new and emerging renewable energy technologies.

NEW/ IMPROVED PUBLIC SPACES

• A new Civic Square at the heart of the development.

• A new High Street extension to Walworth Road.

• A new Market Square.

• A new Town Park.

• A new Square on the Walworth Road - Faraday Square.

Upgrading of St. Mary’ Churchyard.

Upgrading of existing spaces and provision of new play facilities within the defined regeneration clusters in the wider regeneration area.

New signage, street furniture, lighting and public art.

IMPROVEMENTS TO TRANSPORT

• A new Northern Line Station.

Improved access to the Bakerloo Line Station and improved concourse facilities.

An improved rail station and better pedestrian access.

Accommodation of the Cross river transit & City Trams.

New buses and improved bus waiting facilities.

Improved interchange between public transport modes.

• A realigned road network designed to give priority to pedestrians, public transport and cyclists.

• Taxi waiting facilities.

Below ground servicing for new buildings.

• A minimal amount of off street car parking to serve the operational needs of the development.

On street and off street cycle parking.

• A Mobility Centre.

In addition to the above developers will provide affordable housing in line with the requirements of the Framework and training and skills initiatives for local people to access the new jobs that will be created.

St. George’s Road Kennington Lane Kennington Park Road
St. George’s Road
Kennington Lane
Kennington Park Road

figure 2.1 : the illustrative masterplan of the proposed Elephant & Castle.

Masterplan to be updated

New Kent Road Rodney Road London Road Rodney Place Walworth Road Heygate Street Newington Butts
New Kent Road
Rodney Road
London Road
Rodney Place
Walworth Road
Heygate Street
Newington Butts
Newington Causeway
CastleandElephant
figure 2.2 : illustrative aerial view of the proposed Elephant & Castle Town Centre 12

figure 2.2 : illustrative aerial view of the proposed Elephant & Castle Town Centre

13

The Illustrative Masterplan

2.2 Character areas

The proposals for the core area of opportunity may be divided into a series of character areas, each of which will possess its own particular function, ambience and scale:

Character area 1: Walworth High Street extension (north & south)

Character area 2: The Civic Square

Character area 3: The railway arches & Market Square

Character area 4: The Town Park

Character area 5: Heygate Boulevard

Character area 6: St Mary’s Churchyard

The anticipated qualities of each of these character areas are set out below.

2 1 3 2 4 6 5 5 1 1. Walworth High Street extension (north
2
1
3
2
4
6
5
5
1
1. Walworth High Street extension (north & south)
2. The Civic Square
3. The railway arches & Market Square
4. The Town Park
5. Heygate Boulevard
6. St Mary’s Churchyard

figure 2.3 : the character areas

The Illustrative Masterplan

Walworth road – High Street Extension.

The Walworth Road together with the community it serves is today severed from the heart of the Elephant and Castle. From Heygate Street northwards inactive and missing frontages put a stop to pedestrian movement. This together with the barriers formed by the railway viaduct and the Elephant and Castle shopping centre fail to draw people northwards.

The proposed linear extension of the Walworth Road forming a continuous High Street through to what is today the northern roundabout will provide a focus for new town centre activity. It is intended that this street will become the focus for the area providing a direct connection between the existing Walworth Road and the historic heart of the Elephant and Castle.

Walworth High Street (North).

This will become the heart of the new Elephant and Castle Town centre. A high rise, high-density development focused on the Walworth High Street. Located to the north of the railway viaduct the High Street in this area will be pedestrianised forming a unique and safe people focused environment. The high street will be similar in scale to that of Regents Street and will be animated by shops and leisure facilities. The traffic free environment will encourage the functions at the edges to spill out increasing the volume and diversity of street usage. This street will accommodate retail pavilions, cafes, seating areas and temporary markets together with areas for exhibiting art and space dedicated for street entertainers. This together with the introduction of trees and subtle landscaping will help bridge the gap between the two edges.

New modern and innovative buildings will form edges to the high street. These buildings will have a high degree of transparency at ground floor level reducing the barriers between internal and external space. Above distinctive, contrasting and architecturally rich facades will enliven the street scene and give a strong sense of place.

Two landmark tall buildings will form the beginnings of what is to be the focus of a cluster of high rise development. The two buildings will straddle the High Street reinforcing the importance of the Walworth Road as well as signalling the Elephant and Castle on the London skyline. They will be the tallest buildings in the area and will accommodate new housing that will enjoy some of the most dramatic views of London.

The two landmark and streamlined buildings push through a lightweight glazed roof structure, which covers and connects the two sides of the High Street. The roof will provide protection from any adverse wind effects and will also create a dramatic cover to the street space.

1
1

Walworth High Street (Middle).

Moving south through the open railway viaduct the vehicle free pedestrian space ends and the High Street widens to accommodate the new trams and the various bus routes that run through the area. The car is still not welcome at this point being diverted off the Walworth Road at Heygate Street.

This part of the High Street will act as an area of transition mediating between the large scale town centre development to the north of the railway viaduct and the smaller scale Walworth Road buildings currently to the south of Heygate Street. The scale and density of the building plots will reduce as one moves south. A continuous and active street frontage will draw people through and fill what is currently a gap along the street edge. The new buildings will at ground and first floor house new shops, cafes, restaurants and leisure facilities with residential and commercial use above. It is envisaged that the buildings will also provide the opportunity to accommodate existing businesses that will need to be relocated as a result of the removal of the existing Elephant and Castle shopping centre.

Walworth High Street (South).

From Heygate Street southwards the Walworth Road remains a fully accessible vehicular street. The Town Hall to the east will be converted to a new museum referred to as "The Discovery Centre" which will focus on science and education. To the north of the new museum a new space to be known as "Faraday Square" will provide an area for public gathering. Around the square there will be a new Healthy Living Centre, new shops, cafes and the Faraday Museum, all of which will open onto and animate the space. The Faraday Memorial which currently occupies a part of the northern roundabout may be moved into "Faraday Square" making a direct connection with the new "Faraday Museum". The "Faraday Square" will mark the transition between the existing Walworth Road and the High Street extension to the north and therefore will act as an important gateway into the new development area.

The railway viaduct forms the western boundary to the new and existing High Street. It is envisaged that the existing railway arches and the buildings facing the railway will become a focus for new commercial activity comprising offices, workshops and live work accommodation.

New and improved east / west pedestrian priority links will provide access from the existing residential areas situated either side of the Walworth Road.

priority links will provide access from the existing residential areas situated either side of the Walworth
figure 2.4 : illustrative sketch of Walworth High Street 17

figure 2.4 : illustrative sketch of Walworth High Street

figure 2.4 : illustrative sketch of Walworth High Street 17
figure 2.4 : illustrative sketch of Walworth High Street 17
figure 2.4 : illustrative sketch of Walworth High Street 17

The Illustrative Masterplan

2
2

The Civic Square.

This new civic space will be located at the historic heart of the Elephant and Castle at the point currently occupied by the heavily trafficked northern roundabout. All major radial routes passing into and through the area will converge on this space. It will also be the focus for the public transport system where bus, train and underground systems meet. It will be the most prominent point of arrival and departure where visitors will be given their first and last impression of the area.

The Framework will allow for the reorganisation and reorientation of the existing road network which in turn will allow for the creation of a significant new space at the termination of the new and extended Walworth Road.

Due to its scale and location the new Civic Square will not only be a new square for the Elephant and Castle but also a new square for London. The buildings surrounding the square will form a space similar in size to that of Trafalgar Square and therefore in scale with grand world city space. Its treatment will reflect its status and role as a major new public transport hub. It will be an open space with a strong circular geometry defined by trees, which will help to reinforce the square as a point of convergence and strengthen its identity. Structures will be limited within the square itself with an emphasis on openness, transparency and connection.

The Civic Square will act as a collector for tall buildings. It is around this space that future tall structure will be encouraged. The two tall residential towers to the south of the Civic Square will help to reinforce its significance and add to the primacy of the place.

The existing pedestrian underpasses will be removed and replaced with a series of new surface crossing points that will allow pedestrians to pass from the surrounding areas into the new space at grade, thus increasing the accessibility to and integration of the space into the surrounding areas.

The existing tube stations will be upgraded and modified allowing passengers to access both the Northern and Bakerloo Lines from the Civic Square. In addition a new tram stop will be provided on the western side of the new space.

Lines from the Civic Square. In addition a new tram stop will be provided on the
figure 2.5 : illustrative sketch of the Civic Square 19

figure 2.5 : illustrative sketch of the Civic Square

figure 2.5 : illustrative sketch of the Civic Square 19
figure 2.5 : illustrative sketch of the Civic Square 19
figure 2.5 : illustrative sketch of the Civic Square 19

The Illustrative Masterplan

The Illustrative Masterplan figure 2.6 : illustrative sketch of the railway station concourse 3 The Railway

figure 2.6 : illustrative sketch of the railway station concourse

3
3

The Railway Viaduct and the Market Square.

The Railway Viaduct.

The railway viaduct is the most significant barrier running through the middle of the core area of opportunity. It runs north / south separating the east side from the west with ten metre high brick wall. Access to the elevated station platforms and the quality of the station environment is very poor and needs to be completely redesigned. Like the Elephant and Castle Road and shopping centre to the west the railway viaduct needs to be breached for the regeneration of the area to succeed.

The demolition of the existing station building and brick infill walls to the viaduct arches will dramatically improve the station environment and establish strong east / west permeability. Some of the arches may be used for commercial opportunities such as shops or cafes. Platform access via lifts and escalators will bring passengers directly from ground floor level up into a new glazed station concourse, which will have dramatic views north to St. Paul’s Cathedral. The new roof will link into the roof over the Walworth High Street to the east and will connect with the new Market Square to the west.

The Market Square.

Having opened the arches to the railway viaduct and removed them as a barrier the new Market Square will act as a destination to the east drawing people through into a new and unique space. The railway provides animation to one edge of the square both at high level with a steady flow of trains and at low level with people moving through the arches between the Walworth High Street and the new square.

The Market Square will have two character areas. The central part of the square will provide space to accommodate an open market during the day and can be used for public gatherings to view cinema and theatre in the evening. The edges will accommodate restaurants, cafes and speciality shops and will have a high degree of transparency and permeability. The edges will become blurred with internal uses being allowed to spill out into the square adding to the level of animation. The character of the area will possess qualities similar to that of Covent Garden and Borough Market and will provide a contrast to that of the main High Street shopping area. The Market Square will act as the meeting place for all within the Town Centre.

Above the restaurants and shops to three sides of the Market Square there will be residential space. The new homes will help animate the square with balconies and courtyard spaces. The blocks will be of a height sufficient to provide enclosure to the square whilst still allowing the sun to penetrate the space. The scale will be smaller and more intimate than that of the more grand city scale development comprising the northern end of the Walworth High Street.

Streets and lanes will feed into the square encouraging movement and integration of the square into the surrounding areas. The Market Square therefore does not only become a destination but also a place on a route to somewhere else. This will increase the variety, diversity and richness of the area.

but also a place on a route to somewhere else. This will increase the variety, diversity
figure 2.7 : illustrative sketch of the market square 21

figure 2.7 : illustrative sketch of the market square

figure 2.7 : illustrative sketch of the market square 21
figure 2.7 : illustrative sketch of the market square 21
figure 2.7 : illustrative sketch of the market square 21

The Illustrative Masterplan

4
4

The Town Park.

Moving further east beyond the Market Square the environment will become quieter and less public. On the site of the current Heygate Estate a new Town Park will become the focus to a new residential quarter. A publicly accessible contemporary green space contrasts with the harder character of the Market Square and Walworth High Street. This contrast adds to the diversity of urban spaces created within the development area.

The space is formed in the long established London tradition of green spaces surrounded by housing. The relationship between the park and the buildings that surround it is perhaps a little different though. Rather than a hard straight edge distinguishing clearly the boundary between park and structure, the edges have been blurred reflecting the philosophy set out for the High Street and Market Square. Fingers of green space form private landscaped courtyards between "U" shaped building blocks bringing the park right into the development plots. By the same token pavilions have broken away from the building plots and have been set into the parkland in order to reinforce the notion of blurred and more organic edges. They provide retail and café opportunities and access to potential uses including car parking, leisure/ sports facilities located below the park.

A one way road for the exclusive use of residents helps to further animate the Town Park. The road will provide access to basement car parking areas and will provide

street side parking for disabled, car club users, loading and motorcycles

traffic has the advantage of adding a further layer of movement to a space, which might otherwise become inactive during certain times of the day. This will also give added benefits for security.

The buildings surrounding the park are stepped in an east / west direction from a high point adjacent to the Market Square down to a low point at Rodney Road. In addition the buildings rise in a north / south direction from a low point next to the park up to a high point along the New Kent Road and Heygate Street edges. Terraces are produced with landscaped gardens, which are accessed from the individual homes. The stepping delivers environmental benefit including a greater level of sunlight penetration into the park and surrounding buildings.

Vehicular

benefit including a greater level of sunlight penetration into the park and surrounding buildings. Vehicular 22
figure 2.8 : illustrative sketch of the Town Park 23

figure 2.8 : illustrative sketch of the Town Park

figure 2.8 : illustrative sketch of the Town Park 23
figure 2.8 : illustrative sketch of the Town Park 23
figure 2.8 : illustrative sketch of the Town Park 23

The Illustrative Masterplan

5
5

Heygate Boulevard.

Heygate Street will be remodelled to provide a dramatic tree lined street, which will incorporate cars, buses, cycle tracks, generous pavements and space for the new CRT tram. Cars will be managed so that they do not dominate the streetscape. This will help empower public transport modes to serve the community better. Pedestrians and cycle users will also be given priority in order that they can be encouraged.

The 40-metre wide boulevard will allow for the buses and trams to run within their own public transport only zone located in the centre of the street. Along key desire lines new, wide and direct pedestrian crossings will allow safe and convenient movement across the street. The pavement zone will accommodate a segregated cycle track. The pavement to the north will be wider than the one to the south reflecting its south facing aspect. This will also allow space for cafes and shops to pour out into the street, adding to the animation and activity of the street scene.

As Heygate Street will become a wider and more generous street it will demand strong edges characterised by strong urban architecture. Building heights between 6 and 8 storeys will provide an appropriate scale against the width of the boulevard. Active frontages at ground floor will house shops, cafes, offices, service businesses such as estate agents, public amenities such as a library as well as dentists and doctors surgery. These will be located along the northern edge of Heygate Street. The southern edge will also have mixed uses but will additionally incorporate housing at ground floor. Upper levels to both sides of Heygate Street are to be for residential use with roof gardens behind in sloping terraces.

levels to both sides of Heygate Street are to be for r esidential use with roof
figure 2.9 : illustrative sketch of Heygate Street 25

figure 2.9 : illustrative sketch of Heygate Street

figure 2.9 : illustrative sketch of Heygate Street 25
figure 2.9 : illustrative sketch of Heygate Street 25
figure 2.9 : illustrative sketch of Heygate Street 25

The Illustrative Masterplan

6
6

St. Mary’s Churchyard.

A historically significant space, which as its name suggests was once the burial

ground for St. Mary’s Church. The church has gone but the graves still exist within a mounded and grass covered space dominated by mature and semi mature trees. The

churchyard is one of two green spaces within the Development Framework area-the Town Park to the east being the other. It is different in character to the Town Park being more informal and less structured.

The space is enclosed to the south by The London Park Hotel and to the north by the council owned leisure centre. Both buildings have seen better days and will be earmarked for demolition within the Development Framework. The third edge is open against Newington Butts giving the space great transparency from the road.

The site of the London Park Hotel has a challenging context. Its relationship to the churchyard will encourage the development of a significance building, which would act as a backdrop to the space. To the south the site must deal with small-scale housing and respect the context of low-rise living. Balancing the two sides will determine the scale of the new development. An active ground floor with shops and cafes will give animation to the south side of the churchyard. Above this there will be residential use. The site will mark the transition between the existing development and the new development within the core.

To the north the leisure centre site is earmarked for a new City Academy school. It will serve the existing and new population of the Elephant and Castle and illustrates the Council’s commitment to improving the standards of education for children within the Development Framework area. The current leisure facility will move to a site adjacent to the new Faraday Square on the Walworth Road.

In parallel with redevelopment of these two sites the potential exists to significantly

improve the quality of the park and its animation through the introduction of new uses and activities. In addition the potential exists to create a strong east/ west

green link between St. Mary’s churchyard and the proposed Town Park.

The above descriptions and supporting illustrations present the overall vision that is anticipated for the various parts of the Elephant & Castle’s regeneration.

It is anticipated that development of this scale and complexity will be delivered by a number of different developers and their architects over a period of some 10-15 years.

For these reasons the Council considers that it is essential that there is an overall strategy to guide future development towards an overall coherent structure and to manage environmental quality over time.

The next sections provide this guidance. Sections 3 to 7 comprise the Development Framework for the core area of opportunity, as identified within the London Plan and the Southwark Plan. As already stated it comprises a set of Development Framework Plans (DFPs), supported by written guidelines, which together establish the strategic requirements for the overall development concept/ vision.

These plans and associated guidelines are based on the principles established by the Southwark Plan, as noted in section one above. They set the basic structure for the area, whilst at the same time encouraging and allowing for individual design expression.

figure 2.10 : illustrative sketch of St. Mary’s Churchyard overlooked by the new school building

figure 2.10 : illustrative sketch of St. Mary’s Churchyard overlooked by the new school building

figure 2.10 : illustrative sketch of St. Mary’s Churchyard overlooked by the new school building 27
figure 2.10 : illustrative sketch of St. Mary’s Churchyard overlooked by the new school building 27
figure 2.10 : illustrative sketch of St. Mary’s Churchyard overlooked by the new school building 27
Landuse three elephant & castle

Landuse

Landuse three elephant & castle

three

elephant & castle

Landuse

3.1 land use mix

The key relevant land use principles, supported by the Southwark Plan’s policies, are:

1. Establish and maintain a high quality, vibrant, safe and integrated mix of homes, shops, commerce, leisure, cultural and other public facilities, uses and activities.

2. Provide a significant increase in the number and diversity of new job opportunities, and encourage the development of an enterprise culture and inward investment.

3. Provide for the economic, education, social and cultural needs of a diverse mix of residents; including extended life long learning opportunities.

4. Provide a range of high quality recreation, entertainment, and leisure facilities.

5. Provide a balance and integrated mix of residential accommodation across the full range of private, social, key worker and other affordable housing, with a target ratio within the affordable element of new schemes of 50:50 for social rented and intermediate housing.

Development Framework Plan (DFP) 1a and 1b: A vibrant and integrated mix of new uses and activities.

The Council requires that the core area of opportunity is developed to create a new mixed-use town centre to provide for the needs for everyday and higher-order services for the residents of the Elephant & Castle and for the wider catchment of Southwark. The immediate priority is to rectify existing deficiencies in provision. These new facilities should be easily accessible on foot and by cycle for those in the Elephant & Castle area and by public transport for those in other parts of London.

In addition the Council wishes to capitalise on the new town centre’s excellent public transport accessibility, its proximity to key attractions in Central London generally and the south bank of the Thames in particular. These provide for the opportunity to create a new Central London destination for visitors from further afield and abroad to venues & facilities for cultural, retail, educational, leisure and entertainment activities.

As well as providing for a dual-purpose town centre serving both local and Borough-wide needs, and acting as a new cultural, educational, leisure focus within Central London, the core area of opportunity must also provide for the quantitative & qualitative leaps needed to meet the essential housing, employment, training, recreational and social infrastructure needs of existing and future residents & businesses. These need to be accommodated both within the new town centre and the areas around it (the core and wider regeneration area).

The Council requires that the mix of uses to be developed and sustained in the Framework area shall be at its most intense and varied in the new town-centre core. This will be focussed upon and relate to the proposed "high-street" of Walworth Road and its northward extension to the new Civic Square. Along and adjacent to the "high-street" a mix of all the following town centre uses will be encouraged:

Retail (Use Class A1)

Financial and professional services (Use Class A2)

Restaurants, cafes and bars (Use Class A3)

Other commercial leisure uses

Cultural and entertainment uses

Education and training uses

Community and civic uses

Other employment generating uses including offices and light industry (Use Class B1(a) (b) & (c))

• Hotels (Use Class C1)

Residential (Use Class C3)

The scale of deficiency of A1, A2 and A3 uses within Southwark requires a very substantial provision of these uses across ground and first floor levels in the new town centre. However it is not intended that these should be over-dominant and exclude other town centre uses which provide different services, facilities and attractions and which contribute to variety and vitality. Provision should also specifically be made to accommodate uses and activities that contribute

to variety and vitality. Provision should also specifically be made to accommodate uses and activities that
to variety and vitality. Provision should also specifically be made to accommodate uses and activities that
to variety and vitality. Provision should also specifically be made to accommodate uses and activities that
to variety and vitality. Provision should also specifically be made to accommodate uses and activities that

1. Healthy Living Centre

2. Library

3. Energy Centre

4. City Academy

High Street retail/mixed useLiving Centre 2. Library 3. Energy Centre 4. City Academy (ground and first floors) Active ground

(ground and first floors)

Active ground floor uses will beHigh Street retail/mixed use (ground and first floors) encouraged Mixed commercial/employment Residential Cultural

encouraged

Mixed commercial/employmentfirst floors) Active ground floor uses will be encouraged Residential Cultural Local facilities Public Transport Off

Residentialfloor uses will be encouraged Mixed commercial/employment Cultural Local facilities Public Transport Off street car

Culturalwill be encouraged Mixed commercial/employment Residential Local facilities Public Transport Off street car

Local facilitiesencouraged Mixed commercial/employment Residential Cultural Public Transport Off street car parking/access Semi Private

Public Transportcommercial/employment Residential Cultural Local facilities Off street car parking/access Semi Private Courtyards 3.

Off street car parking/accessResidential Cultural Local facilities Public Transport Semi Private Courtyards 3. Energy Centre 4. City Academy

Semi Private Courtyardsfacilities Public Transport Off street car parking/access 3. Energy Centre 4. City Academy Predominantly residential/

3. Energy Centre

4. City Academy

Predominantly residential/Semi Private Courtyards 3. Energy Centre 4. City Academy livework. Cultural Uses Local facilities Semi

livework.

Cultural UsesCentre 4. City Academy Predominantly residential/ livework. Local facilities Semi Private/Private Courtyards Mixed uses

Local facilitiesAcademy Predominantly residential/ livework. Cultural Uses Semi Private/Private Courtyards Mixed uses within the

Semi Private/Private Courtyardsresidential/ livework. Cultural Uses Local facilities Mixed uses within the railway arches New entrance to the

Mixed uses within the railway arches New entrance to the northern line station 4 2
Mixed uses within the
railway arches
New entrance to
the northern line
station
4
2
St. Mary’s
Churchyard
3
1
High Street retail
located along
Walworth Road
Faraday Memorial -
potential to relocate to the
new Faraday Square
Mixed uses within
the railway
arches
Existing Town Hall building
converted to Faraday
Science Museum
Mixed employment
uses located along
railway to the south

figure 3.1 : Development Framework Plan 1a - Ground floor land uses

4 3
4
3

figure 3.2 : Development Framework Plan 1b - Upper floor land uses

Landuse

to establishing Elephant & Castle as a new cultural/education/ entertainment/creative business

focus in London. It is also vitally important that the town centre core contains a substantial amount of residential accommodation, as well as employment uses, above retail, leisure and other high-street uses.

Away from the high-street town centre spine the balance of uses is expected to change to reflect the predominantly residential character of existing and new regeneration clusters, and the specific constraints and opportunities that can support other non-residential uses.

The proposed broad disposition of land-uses is indicated on DF PLans 1a and 1b. For each specific land use the following principles shall apply:

DFP 1a & 1b: Retail/ Leisure

Work undertaken by Roger Tym & Partners (RTP) as part of a Borough-wide retail capacity study has demonstrated that there is considerable leakage of comparison expenditure from the local catchment area to the West End and other nearby centres. If allowed to continue it is considered that this outflow of expenditure will erode the vitality and viability of the Borough’s existing centres, continuing a downward spiral of decline.

In order to redress this problem and create a more sustainable pattern of shopping RTP have

concluded that some 96,000sq meters gross of comparison goods retail will be required in the Borough, as a whole over the plan period of the Southwark Plan. They have also indicated that such retail will need to be of a type and quality that will boost the overall attractiveness of the Borough as a retail destination.

The Elephant & Castle, as a result of its central location, accessibility by public transport and proximity to a large residential population is considered to be well placed to take advantage of this untapped Borough wide potential.

In view of this situation the Council has decided to promote a strategy for the accommodation

of new retail/ leisure activity which is based on a traditional High Street model. In developing

its ideas the Council has been mindful of a number of factors, including:

The GLA’s hierarchy of retail centres and Elephant and Castle’s designated Metropolitan Centre status.

GLA/TfL’s objection to the location of large scale, car based retail at the Elephant and Castle.

The Council’s own objectives in relation to the retention and reinforcement of the Walworth Road as the focus for the area.

The Framework objective to introduce new development that successfully integrates with and relates to the existing structure, character and grain of the area.

In

the light of the above the Council proposes a linear High Street to provide the new town

centre focus for the area. In pursuit of this High Street model it is proposed that the existing Walworth Road will be extended through the arches of the railway viaduct into a new Civic Square, focussed on the existing northern roundabout.

A group of mixed-use urban blocks will be introduced along the length of this new ‘High

Street’ extension. These buildings will provide the focus for new high quality town centre uses.

Activity and interest will be generated through the horizontal/ vertical subdivision of individual building plots. The ground and first floor of each building shall, as a minimum, be reserved for active town centre uses and functions such as retail/leisure/cultural uses, that will contribute

to the vitality of the street scene.

To the east of the railway viaduct a new Market Square is proposed. It is envisaged that this space, together with the railway arches themselves, will become the focus for more local and specialist retail activity, cafes, restaurants and an open/ semi enclosed permanent market.

This area should become a destination in its own right, a meeting place at the heart of the town centre. It is also considered that the introduction of new commercial leisure uses such as

a cinema/theatre/music venue/performance space would be appropriate in the vicinity of the new Market Square. The square is also intended to be a suitable venue for outdoor and evening events.

Further east it is envisaged that the development will become more residential in character.

However, new retail/ leisure/restaurant/cultural uses will be encouraged within the lower floors

of

buildings fronting onto the public realm of streets & spaces. Such uses should be allowed

to

spill out into the surrounding public realm in order to help animate and activate the streets

and spaces that comprise this part of the development.

public realm in order to help animate and activate the streets and spaces that comprise this
public realm in order to help animate and activate the streets and spaces that comprise this
public realm in order to help animate and activate the streets and spaces that comprise this
public realm in order to help animate and activate the streets and spaces that comprise this

In terms of the quantum of new retail/ leisure activity the Council considers, based on the Borough wide retail capacity and subsequent impact assessments undertaken by RTP (Appendix 3) and a detailed assessment of the physical capacity of the core area, that the potential exists to accommodate around 75,000 sqm gross of mixed town centre uses within the core area, 63,500sqm gross of which will be new and 11,500sqm of which will replace existing retail as a result of the removal of the existing shopping centre.

In addition to this retail floorspace the town centre will also accommodate a range of non-residential floorspace. Such uses will include a new secondary school, a library, a leisure/healthy living centre, commercial (offices, live-work, workshops), theatres, cinemas, and other cultural uses.

In order to determine the final quantum/mix of the town centre uses the Council will expect the developer/developers of the retail element of the core area to undertake and submit a retail impact assessment as part of any planning application process.

DFP 1a & 1b: The horizontal and vertical subdivision of uses within individual buildings and plots.

Within individual buildings and plots the vertical and horizontal subdivision of uses will be encouraged with uses at ground floor providing activity and animation visible from the street. All new buildings should contribute to the interest and vitality of the street.

At ground and first floors building frontages facing onto the public street should be rich in detail and stimulating to walk by during the day and night. Entrances to upper floor uses should be accessed directly from the street.

DFP 1a & 1b: Employment

The creation of new jobs for local people will form a key part of the redevelopment strategy. The London Plan makes provision for a minimum of 4,200 new jobs. In pursuit of this minimum target and the local objective of ensuring the fullest possible participation by and benefit for local residents the Council will seek to build on the area’s existing strengths, in terms of:

Education: The area supports a ‘cluster’ of education establishments, including the London Institute and London South Bank University. In addition Camberwell College of Art is situated just south of the Framework area. Each of these establishments undertakes a range of activities/ courses, some of which have a national and even international reputation i.e. fashion, art/ design, media, green building technology.

As part of the regeneration proposals considerable scope exists to forge new and improve existing links between these education establishments and the business sector and as a result promote the creation of new specialist business activity. Such links might include training, product innovation and development, research, joint marketing and joint working.

As far as education is concerned increased specialisation is on the immediate horizon for local secondary schools. The impending programme of investment in secondary education will seek to encourage existing schools to develop specialisms. Such developments will offer valuable pathways into local specialist sectors and contribute to the development of a highly skilled and motivated local workforce. This will be sit within a context of increased collaboration between schools and Higher and Further Education institutions.

In view of the above the Council sees the education sector as key partners and stakeholders in the redevelopment process.

Retail/ leisure: Existing shopping centre. The new development will accommodate a significant amount of new retail/ leisure/ cultural activity which will create a large and varied number of new jobs.

The proposals will, however result in the loss of the existing enclosed shopping centre located to the east of Elephant Road. The centre supports a number of existing businesses and hence local employment. As part of the redevelopment proposals the Council will want to ensure that, where appropriate this existing

employment is retained within the Framework area. Thus as part of any future proposal to redevelop the shopping centre the Council will expect prospective developers to include a strategy to deal with the retention of these existing businesses and jobs. The sorts of measures that should be explored by such a strategy should include:

The active transfer of existing jobs into new businesses created as part of the new town centre.

The provision of information support and tailored training to allow existing businesses and employees to take advantage of new business activity.

• The transfer of viable businesses into new accommodation as part of the new extended Walworth Road and/ or the transfer of existing businesses into vacant accommodation within the Walworth Road.

The provision of subsidised/rent free accommodation to enable new/ small businesses to establish themselves within the new town centre.

Retail/ leisure: Existing Walworth Road/ East Street Market. These areas will have a key role to play in the future of the Elephant & Castle. The area specific SPG for Walworth Road sets out the Council’s commitment to ensuring that the existing roles and functions of these areas are reinforced and enhanced.

Specific proposals for include:

The retention of existing retail, except where the loss would be in favour of an appropriate leisure use.

The introduction of measures to improve access to the centre through the provision of improved public transport, cycling and walking opportunities.

The diversification of the range of uses and services i.e. the introduction of new housing, student housing, employment related uses.

The promotion of residential uses above shops.

The reuse of vacant premises and conversion to leisure, commercial and employment uses.

The introduction of measures to enhance the operation of East Street Market.

The encouragement of an evening and/ or late night economy.

The promotion of the area around the Old Town Hall as an area suitable for the location of new leisure/ cultural uses such as The Southwark Discovery Centre, a new leisure centre, a new library and a Healthy Living centre.

The introduction of measures to improve the quality and safety of the pedestrian environment.

The introduction of measures to reduce the impact of vehicles on the Walworth Road.

Further detailed guidance for the above is set out in the Walworth Road/ East Street Market SPG.

Cultural: Southwark has already witnessed the regeneration impact that major new cultural activity can have on a particular area. Tate Modern in its first year of operation attracted over 5 million visitors to North Southwark and as a result has stimulated a range of new business activity and uses.

The Council considers that a key part of establishing a new image and identity for the Framework area will involve the attraction of new cultural activity that builds upon and compliments the already well established portfolio of City wide attractions in Southwark (the Tate, Southwark Cathedral, the Imperial War Museum, Borough Market, the Ministry of Sound).

In view of this emphasis the Council proposes as part of the redevelopment process to explore the potential for new uses that will include:

• A new arts/cultural facility of national significance.

• A new performance space.

• A theatre.

Southwark Discovery Centre within the existing Town Hall on Walworth Road.

Landuse

It is anticipated that the funding and delivery of these facilities will be derived from Section 106 contributions, attached to any planning permissions granted within the Framework area and through contributions from sources including SRB, LDA, land sales and lottery funding (see section 8).

In addition it will be necessary to manage the process of change and transformation. The area will experience significant reconstruction works and large areas will be demolished and may remain vacant for temporary periods. In view of this situation and as part of the process of generating a new image and identity for the Elephant & Castle, the Council will actively seek to manage the transition through the introduction of temporary uses and the staging of events, including:

The use of public art and temporary exhibitions/ installations.

The use of temporary lighting/ video/ advertising.

The introduction of advance landscape planting/ greening of the area.

• Temporary/ short term use of buildings and land i.e. for artists, exhibitions, events, markets, concerts.

Creative industries. The London Plan identifies the creative industries sector as one of the fastest growing sectors of the London economy, and notes that Southwark is home to an emerging cluster of this dynamic business sector. The GLA report ‘Creativity London’s Core Business’, identifies Southwark as the Borough with the 5th highest number of creative industry employees. This sector is particularly well represented in the area immediately to the north of the core area of opportunity. The Council considers that the potential exists to expand this sector and as part of this process to promote stronger links with the education sector in terms of fashion, arts and design, and will actively sponsor proposals to encourage investment from these sectors.

Railway arches. The railway viaduct runs north/south through the centre of the regeneration area. The arches associated with this viaduct provide an excellent opportunity to accommodate a rich and diverse mix of smaller/ start up business activity. For this reason a mixed use employment zone or spine is identified for the area associated with the railway viaduct. Within this zone, which includes parts of the town centre buildings fronting Walworth Road, the Council will encourage new business activity providing new flexible, low cost commercial office, live-work and workshop space suitable for small start-up business activity.

Many of the existing buildings included within the mixed use employment zone or spine are already in employment use. As a result, the Council will seek to protect the employment potential of these sites and hence proposals advanced within this zone and other similar sites adjacent to the railway viaduct will be expected to:

Demonstrate no net loss of Class B employment floorspace. An exception to this may be justified where it can be demonstrated that substantial employment can be provided by a use class other than Class B. i.e. retail, hotels, leisure, cultural etc.

• Protect the railway arches and their ability to accommodate existing and new low cost employment generating activity.

In addition developers of these sites will be expected to work with the Council in securing the relocation of key existing businesses, if necessary, and to contribute to training initiatives identified as part of this Framework (section 8).

DFP 1a & 1b: Improving the skills base and job readiness of the local population.

Improving the skills base of the local population, new job creation and removing the barriers to employment forms a key part of the regeneration strategy for the Framework area.

The developers of sites within the core area of opportunity and the wider regeneration area will be expected to deliver, contribute towards and participate in initiatives aimed at improving the local education and employment potential of the area.

Such initiatives will be defined and prioritised as part of any future Planning Application/ Environmental Impact process. Work undertaken to date suggests the following measures:

The provision of new short term managed workspace for new starts and small businesses.

• A concentration of new and well-designed small business activity in the Walworth Road area.

The development of a combined teaching and small business workshop facility.

The provision of improved school facilities.

The provision of tailored training and information to support existing and new businesses.

The provision of affordable childcare, nursery provision and after school clubs.

Local construction agreements.

Links to and increased funding of existing programmes and initiatives aimed at preparing local people for employment and lifelong learning opportunities.

Planning agreements to target training and employment opportunities created by new development for local people.

In consultation with bodies including the LDA, the London Skills Commission and the Social Exclusion Unit, the Council proposes to evolve a series of development related employment/ training/ enterprise initiatives that will form part of the eventual implementation and delivery framework for the area (see section 8).

It is envisaged that private sector match funding/participation in the delivery of appropriate employment/ training initiatives will be obtained via Section 106 agreements attached to any planning permissions granted within the regeneration area (core area of opportunity and wider regeneration area).

The benefits sought will be assessed at the appropriate time in relation to the development proposals put forward (see section 8).

DFP 1a & 1b: Social infrastructure.

The new development will introduce significant numbers of new people into the area. This increase in population will generate increased demand for new and improved social, community and leisure facilities and services.

As part of the redevelopment process the Council will seek to secure social and community benefits that will include:

The construction of a new replacement leisure centre (including swimming pool).

• The construction of a new healthy living centre.

The delivery of health provision such as dentists, health visitors, district nurses, practice nurses, opticians, pharmacists and community mental health services to cater for the needs of existing and new populations.

The construction of a new library

Support for additional school places and new education facilities, including the construction of a new urban secondary school (City Academy) and early years facilities.

The promotion of links between secondary schools and the Further/ Higher Education sectors in order to increase participation of local residents in FE and HE training places.

Funding for community safety initiatives/ projects as a result of the new development.

The precise level/ type of benefits that will be sought from developers will be related to the needs and demands generated by any redevelopment scheme and, as required by Circular 1/97, the viability of providing them.

The benefits sought will be assessed at the appropriate time in relation to the development proposals put forward (see section 8).

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Landuse

DFP 1c: Housing

Relocation of Heygate residents.

The Heygate Estate occupies a key area within the core area of opportunity. It is proposed that as part of the redevelopment process that the buildings will be demolished and the existing housing will be re-provided on key sites around the Elephant & Castle.

As part of the Framework process a number of alternative sites have been considered. This information was presented to the Executive on 11 February 2003. As a result a list of key sites and locations have been confirmed as having the potential to deliver new housing development to accommodate the residents transferred from the Heygate Estate (DF plan 1c: Location of early housing sites).

The majority of these sites are included within the three new regeneration areas or clusters beyond the core area of opportunity that have been identified as part of the Framework process, namely:

Harper Road.

Rodney Road.

South Newington.

It is envisaged that the new housing proposed within each of these areas or clusters will be brought forward in the context of area based improvement strategies. It is anticipated that each strategy will comprise a series of environmental projects and initiatives that will be designed to tackle issues including:

Safety and security.

Lighting.

Quality of the public/ private realm.

• Traffic management and car parking.

Quality of existing open space.

The provision of new and the upgrading of existing facilities to meet the needs of existing and new residents.

These area based improvement strategies will be developed in consultation with residents during the course of 2004. The various projects and initiatives identified will then be costed and prioritised. Implementation will take place as and when funds become available as part of the implementation programme associated with the decant of residents from the Heygate Estate.

New housing within the core.

The Framework has the potential to deliver up to 4,200 new housing units in the period to 2018 (core area of opportunity and wider regeneration area). It is anticipated that the majority of these units will be accommodated within new high quality, mixed use apartment blocks of varied size and tenure and will cater for a range of potential housing requirements.

In delivering this housing emphasis will be given to the creation of truly sustainable mixed used neighbourhoods of the highest quality. In this regard the new housing will be expected to:

Embrace, as appropriate the concept of Lifetime Homes, which can adapt to changing personal needs and circumstances.

Deliver a broad range and mix of housing types, size and tenure, including an element of affordable housing.

Demonstrate exemplar standards in terms of energy efficient building design

• Take on board the Council’s ambitions in terms of waste minimisation and water conservation.

Use sustainable and durable construction materials.

• Promote travel by modes other than the car.

Deliver the highest quality of both architectural and urban design.

Deliver a safe, high quality and diverse public realm.

Ensure high standard of residential amenity in terms of sunlight/ daylight penetration, provision of outdoor amenity space, appropriate mitigation against adverse environmental/ pollution effects.

Contribute towards the delivery of the social and community infrastructure required to support the new and existing population.

On appropriate sites allow for mixed use development

Affordable Housing

In accordance with the London Plan, Policy 4.4 of the Southwark Plan states that the Council will endeavour to secure 50% of all new dwellings as affordable housing. It is however accepted that there is currently considerable imbalance in favour of social housing at the Elephant and Castle and hence it may be appropriate to reduce the London Plan target of 50% affordable housing in preference to the provision of more intermediate housing than might otherwise be considered appropriate in other locations in London. It is also acknowledged that the large infrastructure investment required at the Elephant and Castle may necessitate the redirection of S.106 contributions away from housing and into transport and other public realm works. In view of this situation the precise levels of affordable housing to be provided as part of any redevelopment proposal will thus be subject to negotiation on a site by site basis.

Refurbishment of existing Council stock.

The Council considers that it is essential that the regeneration process is as comprehensive as possible. As part of the process it is therefore considered important that the existing Council stock should also benefit from future investment & improvement. As a first step in the process the Council proposes to undertake a stock condition survey & option appraisal in order to identify the investment requirements of each Estate within the wider regeneration area. Based on the findings of these surveys the Council will then carry out consultation with tenants and leaseholders with a view to agreeing investment priorities over the next 10-15 year period.

Relevant policies of the Southwark Plan apply as follows (see UDP Part 2):

Retail/ Leisure

Policy 1.8

Location of retail provision.

Policy 1.9

Change of use and new development within town centres.

Policy 1.10

Change of use within protected shopping frontages.

Policy 1.11

Protecting the range of services available.

Policy 1.12

Superstores and major retail development.

Policy 1.13

Arts, culture & tourism uses.

Policy 1.14

Hotels and visitor accommodation.

Employment

Policy 1.1

Access to employment opportunities.

Policy 1.5

Mixed use developments on employment sites.

Policy 1.6

Small business units.

Policy 1.7

Live-Work units.

Improving the skills base and job readiness

Policy 1.1

Policy 1.6

Social infrastructure

Access to employment opportunities.

Small business units.

Policy 2.1

Enhancement of community facilities.

Policy 2.2

Provision of community facilities.

Policy 2.3

Enhancement of educational establishments.

Policy 2.4

Provision of new educational establishments.

Housing

Policy 4.1

Location and density of residential development.

Policy 4.2

Quality of residential accommodation.

Policy 4.3

Mix of dwellings.

Policy 4.4

Affordable housing.

Policy 4.5

Wheelchair affordable housing.

Policy 4.6

Loss of residential accommodation.

Policy 4.7

Non self-contained housing for identified user groups.

Early housing sites

1

Prospect House

4

Wansey Street*

6

New Kent Road

9

Brandon Street

11 a

Wadding Street/Stead Street

11 b

Rodney Road

13a

Dickens Square

13c

Harper Road (LBS offices)

13d

Harper Road

15

Pocock Street/Surrey Row

16

Library Street

17

Leroy Street

19a

Newington South (front of Hanworth House)

23

Townsend Street

24

Manciple Street

25

Chatham Street

26

Welsford Street

27

Royal Road

Private Sites

(sites providing 30% affordable)

A Braganza Street

B London Park Hotel

C Castle House

D Newington Causeway

E Steadman Street

* planning application already submitted

CDF boundaryE Steadman Street * planning application already submitted Core area of opportunity Early Housing sites Other

Core area of opportunityStreet * planning application already submitted CDF boundary Early Housing sites Other private sites Rodney Road

Early Housing sitesalready submitted CDF boundary Core area of opportunity Other private sites Rodney Road Regeneration Cluster Harper

Other private sitesCDF boundary Core area of opportunity Early Housing sites Rodney Road Regeneration Cluster Harper Road Regeneration

Rodney Road Regenerationarea of opportunity Early Housing sites Other private sites Cluster Harper Road Regeneration Cluster South Newington

Cluster

Harper Road Regeneration Clustersites Other private sites Rodney Road Regeneration Cluster South Newington Regeneration Cluster 15 24 16 Harper

South Newington RegenerationRoad Regeneration Cluster Harper Road Regeneration Cluster Cluster 15 24 16 Harper Road: 13c Regeneration D

Cluster

15 24 16 Harper Road: 13c Regeneration D Cluster St. George’s Road 13a London Road
15
24
16
Harper Road:
13c
Regeneration
D
Cluster
St. George’s Road
13a
London Road
13d
1
6
17
New Kent Road
25
C
B
Rodney Road
Regeneration Cluster
23
4 9
11a&b
E
Newington Causeway
Kennington Park Road
A 27 South Newington Regeneration Cluster 19a Kennington Park Road
A
27
South Newington
Regeneration Cluster
19a
Kennington Park Road
Old Kent Road 26
Old Kent Road
26

Figure 3.3 : Development Framework Plan 1c: Location of early housing sites

Movement & circulation

Movement & circulation four elephant & castle
Movement & circulation four elephant & castle

four

elephant & castle

Movement & circulation

4.1 Movement & circulation

Regeneration proposals offer a unique opportunity to illustrate how good urban design and excellent transport infrastructure can work together to achieve the benefits of sustainable development.

Detailed transport proposals have been developed for the area and are described in Appendices seven and eight. They are underpinned by the following key principles:

6. To give priority to pedestrians, cyclists, and public transport users rather than the private car.

7. To create an improved and highly efficient public transport interchange.

8. To limit and mitigate the effects of traffic, reduce pollution, and provide a minimum level of car parking, consistent with a high density, public transport rich location.

DF Plans 2a, 2b and 2c identify the Council’s strategic proposals in relation to circulation and movement within the Framework Area (core area of opportunity and wider regeneration area) in terms of:

The reorganisation of the strategic highway network.

Route hierarchy.

Junctions that will require improvement.

Location of surface pedestrian crossing points.

• Pedestrian/ cycle priority routes and zones.

Cycle routes.

The key elements of the sustainable transport strategy for the area may be summarised as follows:

DFP 2a, 2b & 2c: Measures and initiatives to limit negative traffic impacts.

Elephant & Castle serves as a major focus for inter Borough traffic movements. The strategic roads that pass into and through the area carry large volumes of traffic. The impact on the environment is significant in terms of creating problems of noise, air pollution, severance, safety and visual impact.

The redevelopment proposals provide the opportunity to reorganise the road system, reprioritise movement and introduce measures to ensure the efficient management of the high volumes of traffic.

Based on a rigorous assessment of pedestrian movement patterns within the area and an assessment of the volumes of traffic using the system the Council proposes:

• To close Walworth Road between Heygate Street and the Southern roundabout to general car traffic.

• To remove the southern roundabout.

• To close of part of the northern roundabout connecting New Kent Road and the Elephant & Castle Road.

• To close London Road to general traffic and the establishment of a public transport corridor, useable by cyclists.

• To introduce measures to increase pedestrian/ cycle priority and comfort on Heygate Street, Elephant & Castle Road, New Kent Road and the northern roundabout.

• To remove all pedestrian underpasses and provide high quality at grade crossings.

• To upgrade key junctions and introduce new high quality straight pedestrian crossing facilities.

• To introduce additional crossings to reflect key pedestrian desire lines.

Developers will be expected to work with the Council and Tfl to secure the phased delivery of this preferred highway strategy.

Inner Ring Road (and CCZ boundary)Congestion Charge Zone W alworth Road - High Street Heygate Street - Boulevard Other key

Congestion Charge ZoneInner Ring Road (and CCZ boundary) W alworth Road - High Street Heygate Street - Boulevard

Walworth Road - High Street alworth Road - High Street

Heygate Street - BoulevardCongestion Charge Zone W alworth Road - High Street Other key approaches Public transport only Residential

Other key approachesZone W alworth Road - High Street Heygate Street - Boulevard Public transport only Residential access

Public transport onlyHigh Street Heygate Street - Boulevard Other key approaches Residential access road & cycle street Underground

Residential access road & cycle street Underground service/car park access (ramp) street
Residential access road & cycle street Underground service/car park access (ramp) Underground service/car park access (ramp)

Key junction improvements ey junction improvements

service/car park access (ramp) K ey junction improvements figure 4.1 : Development Framework Plan 2a -

figure 4.1 : Development Framework Plan 2a - Movement and Circulation (Vehicular)

Key approachesFramework Plan 2a - Movement and Circulation (Vehicular) Other approaches Pedestrian/cycle crossing points Key

Other approaches2a - Movement and Circulation (Vehicular) Key approaches Pedestrian/cycle crossing points Key pedestrian routes Other

Pedestrian/cycle crossing pointsand Circulation (Vehicular) Key approaches Other approaches Key pedestrian routes Other pedestrian routes Pedestrian

Key pedestrian routesapproaches Other approaches Pedestrian/cycle crossing points Other pedestrian routes Pedestrian priority zone within the

Other pedestrian routesPedestrian/cycle crossing points Key pedestrian routes Pedestrian priority zone within the core figure 4.2 :

Pedestrian priority zone within the core the core

pedestrian routes Pedestrian priority zone within the core figure 4.2 : Development Framework Plan 2b- Movement

figure 4.2 : Development Framework Plan 2b- Movement and Circulation (Pedestrian)

Existing cycle routesFramework Plan 2b- Movement and Circulation (Pedestrian) Proposed cycle routes Existing partly completed cycle

Proposed cycle routesMovement and Circulation (Pedestrian) Existing cycle routes Existing partly completed cycle routes Cycle routes

Existing partly completed cycle routes Cycle routes proposed as part of the DF routes
Existing partly completed cycle routes Cycle routes proposed as part of the DF Cycle routes proposed as part of the DF

Pedestrian/cycle crossing pointscycle routes Cycle routes proposed as part of the DF Cycle/pedestrian priority area Centralised cycle parking

Cycle/pedestrian priority areaproposed as part of the DF Pedestrian/cycle crossing points Centralised cycle parking facility figure 4.3 :

Centralised cycle parking facilitycrossing points Cycle/pedestrian priority area figure 4.3 : Development Framework Plan 2c - Movement and

priority area Centralised cycle parking facility figure 4.3 : Development Framework Plan 2c - Movement and

figure 4.3 : Development Framework Plan 2c - Movement and Circulation (Cycle)

Movement & circulation

DFP 2a: Greening the trafficked streets

The reorganisation of the strategic highway network will create the opportunity to introduce measures that will significantly improve the environment of the strategic road network.

Such improvement works will focus on:

The key strategic approach roads of Newington Causeway, Southwark Bridge Road, St. George’s Road, London Road, Kennington Lane, Kennington Park Road.

Existing Walworth Road.

Elephant & Castle Road.

Heygate Boulevard.

Guidelines in relation to the minimum spatial requirements for each of the key routes that form part of the highway network of the area are described in Figures 4.4 to 4.7.

Environmental improvement works associated with the reorganisation of these routes will include:

• Pavement widening.

The introduction of segregated cycle lanes.

The introduction of street trees.

The provision of facilities necessary to accommodate the bus and/ or the Trams.

The provision of new high quality straight pedestrian crossing points, and the removal of underpasses.

The rationalisation and removal of unnecessary street clutter.

The introduction of new high quality street furniture i.e. signage, seating and lighting.

The use of a simple palette of high quality and durable paving materials.

The introduction of public art.

Further guidance in relation to the design approach the Council intends to adopt in relation to the improvement of each of the above routes is included within Public Realm strategy attached under Appendix 4.

DFP 2a: Key junction improvements

In line with the proposals to alter the strategic highway network there will be a requirement to undertake improvements to the key junctions, in order to maximise the safety of all road users – pedestrians and cyclists in particular.

The extent of these improvements are outlined under Appendix 7. Developers will be expected as part of any Travel Assessment(s) to work with the Council and Tfl in relation to confirming the extent and design of improvements and securing subsequent implementation.

proposed development existing buildings pavement with bus shelters at bus stops bus lane bus lane
proposed
development
existing
buildings
pavement with
bus shelters at
bus stops
bus lane
bus lane
private space
in front of
buildings
4.5m
4.0m
3.7m
1.4
5.2m
4.0m
5.0m
front of buildings 4.5m 4.0m 3.7m 1.4 5.2m 4.0m 5.0m figure 4.4 : URBAN STREET -
front of buildings 4.5m 4.0m 3.7m 1.4 5.2m 4.0m 5.0m figure 4.4 : URBAN STREET -

figure 4.4 : URBAN STREET - proposed section and images of New Kent Road - the Inner Ring Road

proposed proposed development development wide pavement forming principle footpath road and bus lane cycleway
proposed
proposed
development
development
wide pavement
forming principle
footpath
road and
bus lane
cycleway
8.0m
4.0m
1.4
4.4m
1.4
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6.0m
proposed tabernacle development new tree planting wide bus Lane introduced Footpath tram Lane tram Lane
proposed
tabernacle
development
new tree
planting
wide
bus Lane
introduced
Footpath
tram Lane
tram Lane
4.2m
3.6m
3.9m
3.9m
0.8
3.0m
7.5m
2.65m
7.0m
Lane 4.2m 3.6m 3.9m 3.9m 0.8 3.0m 7.5m 2.65m 7.0m figure 4.5 : HIGH STREET -
Lane 4.2m 3.6m 3.9m 3.9m 0.8 3.0m 7.5m 2.65m 7.0m figure 4.5 : HIGH STREET -

figure 4.5 : HIGH STREET - proposed section and images of Walworth Road (at Faraday Square)

section and images of Walworth Road (at Faraday Square) figure 4.6 : URBAN STREET - proposed
section and images of Walworth Road (at Faraday Square) figure 4.6 : URBAN STREET - proposed

figure 4.6 : URBAN STREET - proposed section and images of Elephant & Castle Road (at the Tabernacle)

proposed development proposed development shared bus and tram Lanes road and cycleway road and cycleway
proposed
development
proposed
development
shared bus
and tram
Lanes
road and
cycleway
road and
cycleway
6.0m
1.8m
3.5m
6.5m
3.5m
3.5m
6.5m
3.5m
1.8m
3.3m
6.0m 1.8m 3.5m 6.5m 3.5m 3.5m 6.5m 3.5m 1.8m 3.3m figure 4.7 : BOULEVARD - proposed
6.0m 1.8m 3.5m 6.5m 3.5m 3.5m 6.5m 3.5m 1.8m 3.3m figure 4.7 : BOULEVARD - proposed

figure 4.7 : BOULEVARD - proposed section and images of Heygate Street

Movement & circulation

DFP 2b: A high quality pedestrian environment

Walking and cycling will comprise the prime means of intra-area movement within the Framework area. In view of this situation there is a need to establish a high quality walking environment that is easy to use and understand, that is well designed, is attractive, safe and well integrated into the surrounding area.

DF Plan 2c (Figure 4.9) identifies the network of pedestrian priority links proposed for the core area. The figure also identifies the location of new and improved surface crossing points. These proposals have been defined through analysis undertaken by Space Syntax. They represent what is considered by the Council to be the most appropriate strategy in terms of linking key destinations and ensuring the effective integration of the core area of opportunity into the strategic and area wide movement network.

In terms of quality and treatment the pedestrian priority network will be expected:

• To respond to the needs of diverse user groups, including children, the elderly and mobility impaired.

• To provide wide, straight and well defined crossings.

• To be overlooked by appropriately scaled buildings.

• To be safe, well lit and animated by well detailed, interesting and open building facades at ground level.

• To incorporate interest and diversity in terms of use, character and function of each route within the hierarchy.

• To have a strong local identity that defines the Elephant & Castle.

• To provide clear definition between car, pedestrian, cycle where appropriate.

• To provide protection against unpleasant climatic extremes i.e. rain/ cold/wind/ heat and glare.

• To use high quality street furniture, lighting and materials.

Further detail in respect of the treatment of the public realm is contained under Appendix 4. Developers advancing proposals within the Framework area will be expected to take on board and develop the guidelines contained within this appendix.

DFP 2c: Facilitating cycling

Cycling offers great potential for sustainable transport. It is healthy and offers a larger catchment area than walking and can reduce demand on other modes of transport.

The Framework proposes:

The implementation of a comprehensive and integrated network of dedicated cycle routes, safe crossings and cycle priority measures.

Comprehensive signing of routes and destinations.

The provision of cycle parking in prominent, secure and accessible locations throughout the development.

The provision of bike & ride facilities at all public transport stations throughout the development to facilitate easy interchange of cycling with public transport.

The provision of a ‘cycle station’ for between 1,000 to 1,500 bikes at the heart of the public transport ‘hub’ i.e. in the vicinity of the railway arches associated with the railway station.

The provision of protected and secure cycle parking within residential, retail, commercial development:

- 1 space per residential unit, plus 1 space per 10 units for visitors.

- 1 space per 250 sqm of retail use and B1 use.

- 1 space per 500 sqm for B2-B8 use.

The provision of shower/ changing/ storage facilities for employees within commercial buildings.

The introduction of bike hire schemes such as City Bike.

The delivery of a high quality network of cycleways and cycle related facilities will be obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section 8).

obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section
obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section
obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section
obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section
obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section
obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section
obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section
obtained via direct development and/ or Section 106 contributions and other public sector funding sources (Section

Key approaches ey approaches

Other approachesK ey approaches P edestrian/cycle crossing points K ey pedestrian routes Other pedestrian routes P edestrian

Pedestrian/cycle crossing points edestrian/cycle crossing points

Key pedestrian routes ey pedestrian routes

Other pedestrian routesP edestrian/cycle crossing points K ey pedestrian routes P edestrian priority zone within the core Existing

Pedestrian priority zone within edestrian priority zone within

the core

Existing designated cycle routespedestrian routes P edestrian priority zone within the core Existing proposed cycle routes Existing partly completed

Existing proposed cycle routeszone within the core Existing designated cycle routes Existing partly completed cycle r outes Cycle routes

Existing partly completed cycledesignated cycle routes Existing proposed cycle routes r outes Cycle routes proposed as part of the

routes

Cycle routes proposed as part ofcycle routes Existing partly completed cycle r outes the DF P edestrian/cycle crossing points Cycle/pedestrian

the DF

Pedestrian/cycle crossing points edestrian/cycle crossing points

Cycle/pedestrian priority areaproposed as part of the DF P edestrian/cycle crossing points Centralised cycle parking facility from from

Centralised cycle parking facilitycrossing points Cycle/pedestrian priority area from from London Bridge Waterloo from from residential

from from London Bridge Waterloo from from residential areas to the north Westminster from Tower
from
from London Bridge
Waterloo
from
from residential
areas to the
north
Westminster
from Tower
from residential
areas to the
west
Bridge
from
Peckham
from
Clapham
from
residential
areas to the
south
from
Camberwell

figure 4.8 : Development Framework Plan 2b - Pedestrian movement

4.8 : Development Framework Plan 2b - Pedestrian movement figure 4.9 : Development Framework Plan 2c

figure 4.9 : Development Framework Plan 2c - Cycle movement

Movement & circulation

4.2 Accommodating public transport

Elephant & Castle is one of London’s most important public transport hubs with some 13 million passengers using it each year.

The TfL’s Interchange Plan classifies the interchange at the Elephant & Castle as a category B interchange which means it is included under “other major central London interchanges”. It is the highest priority interchange in category B.

Improving such key interchanges via new integration initiatives is identified as being vital in the Mayor’s Transport Strategy (July 2001) and is one of the Mayor’s top ten key transport priorities.

Improvements to the public transport system serving the Elephant & Castle are already planned. Thameslink 2000 will improve the existing rail services. More frequent buses will serve the area and plans are being formulated for the introduction of two tram services through the Elephant & Castle.

The area is designated as a Transport Development Area (TDA). As a result of this designation considerable scope exists to enhance the quality of existing transport facilities, increase the levels of integration and enhance pedestrian access to and between each mode of public transport.

In view of this situation the Framework transport strategy makes provision for the following:

DFP 2d: The establishment of a high quality transport ‘hub’ at the heart of the core area of opportunity.

Ease of pedestrian access to and the provision of high quality interchange between the various public transport modes at the heart of the area forms one of the key ‘drivers’ of the transport strategy.

As part of the process of formulating its ideas the Council has reviewed the existing situation in terms of:

The numbers and proportion of passengers interchanging between modes at the Elephant & Castle.

The numbers and proportion of passengers arriving at the Elephant & Castle and passing into the surrounding area.

The quality and convenience of interchange between modes.

An important factor that has influenced the Council’s approach to the creation of a new high quality transport hub is the fact that of the total numbers of passengers using the Elephant & Castle, some 50% interchange between modes and the remainder pass into the surrounding areas.

This fact has been extremely important in terms of defining how the transport ‘hub’ should operate. It is the Council’s view that public transport at the Elephant & Castle cannot function in the same way as a more traditional and accepted model of a public transport interchange. It is the Council’s view that the many complex movements that comprise transport movement and interchange must be woven into the fabric of the place rather than confined within a ‘box’ or a series of below ground structures, comprising tunnels and links.

The Council propose to create a place of interchange and arrival at the ‘heart’ of the area. This place will comprise a series of pedestrian orientated linked spaces and places which are attractive, distinctive and safe. The various public transport facilities will be integrated into these spaces and places.

The key elements of the proposed strategy are shown on DFP 2b (Figure 4.10). In evolving this strategy the Council has sought and will continue to seek through the detailed design stages:

• To provide sufficient capacity to accommodate both interchange and terminating passengers.

• To ensure the integration and connection of public transport facilities into the surrounding area.

• To minimise walking distances between modes.

• To provide high quality and direct, at grade access to and between modes.

• To minimise changes in level and direction.

• To ensure access for all.

• To design for 24-hour security.

• To cater for waiting passengers in terms of safety, provision of information, passenger comfort and provision of appropriate weather protection.

The delivery of these improvements will form a key part of the redevelopment proposals and hence the Council recognise the importance of ensuring that such improvements are viable within the context of the redevelopment proposals.

In view of this situation the Council will continue to work with Tfl and the GLA to secure the delivery of a high quality and deliverable public transport ‘hub’ at the Elephant & Castle.

Specific proposals in relation to the treatment of each mode may be described as follows:

DFP 2d: Rail Service Improvements

The mainline rail station serves Thameslink and Southeast Trains. Thameslink trains run from Brighton to Bedford, whilst Southeastern Trains operate throughout south east London and Kent.

The main infrastructure proposals potentially affecting Elephant & Castle mainline station are the Thameslink 2000 proposals. Should this scheme go ahead it is proposed that the platforms will be lengthened at the station, enabling it to accommodate longer trains and thus carry more passengers. This combined with reduced vehicle headways and improved signalling is expected to increase capacity by over 50%

The existing Station, including the ticket hall and the platforms areas are unattractive and in need of refurbishment. The station platforms are located some 10meters above street level and are accessed via two sets of stairs. Pedestrian access to bus and tube from the rail station is inadequate, comprising a poor quality and indirect system of subways and links.

As part of the regeneration proposals for the core area the Council will work with developers, the Strategic Rail Authority, network operators and Tfl to secure a viable set of improvements that will include:

The provision of new access points, comprising escalators, lifts and stairs in order to increase the movement capacity of the station and improve interchange with the tube, bus and taxi.

Improved station facilities including the provision of enhanced waiting, ticketing and information facilities.

DFP 2d: Tube (LUL)

Elephant & Castle is served by the Bakerloo and Northern lines. Access to the Northern Line is provided via a station situated to the south-east corner of the roundabout. The Bakerloo line station is situated to the north of the northern roundabout.

Both stations suffer from a number of qualitative and capacity constraints including:

Limited access for the mobility impaired,

• Passenger congestion, principally in the interchange passageways.

• Poor quality interchange between the two stations, via an underground passageway.

• Poor quality and inadequate subway system between the Bakerloo station and the Elephant & Castle shopping centre.

The severance of the Bakerloo station from the area due to the presence of the northern roundabout.

As part of the preparation of this Development Framework existing and future entry/ exit volumes for the Northern and Bakerloo Line stations have been quantified based upon the land use mix and level of development proposed by the Framework (Appendix 8).

Bus priority routes Public Transport only links Proposed Cross River Transit - Tram route Proposed
Bus priority routes
Public Transport only links
Proposed Cross River Transit -
Tram route
Proposed City Tram route
Proposed Bus Stops
Proposed Tram Stops
Entrances to train station
Enhanced entrances to Bakerloo
& Northern Stations
Bus terminating and layover
facility

figure 4.10 : Development Framework Plan 2d - Movement and Circulation (Public transport)

Movement & circulation

As a result of this assessment it is concluded that whilst the Bakerloo Line will operate within capacity in the future, there will be problems with the Northern Line Station.

These problems relate primarily to the capacity of the existing lifts. Based on LUL guidelines, it is estimated that the existing lifts will need to be replaced by a bank of three escalators in order to provide sufficient entry/ exit capacity to the station.

The replacement of these lifts with escalators will also have significant knock-on effects for the overall design of the Northern Line station requiring reconstruction at both ticket hall and underground levels.

Appendix 8 provides an outline station specification for a new Northern Line Station based on LUL guidelines and the predicted volumes of passenger traffic.

In addition to these essential works it is considered that the following qualitative improvements will be required:

The provision of direct pedestrian access from the Civic Square into the two underground stations.

Enhanced entrances to the Bakerloo line station and improved concourse facilities.

The removal of the subway connections to the Bakerloo line.

• Provision of a new passageway link between the Bakerloo and Northern Line. Unlike the existing passageway, this new passageway should be straight throughout its length, thus avoiding blind corners.

The replacement of the sub-station situated in the centre of the northern roundabout with a new below ground facility.

The Council will, as part of the redevelopment proposals work with the developers of the core area of opportunity, LUL, Metrolink, Tfl and the GLA to identify a feasible and viable set of proposals that will significantly enhance the quality of service at the Elephant & Castle.

DFP 2d: Integrating the Tram.

The new tram services (Cross River Transit –CRT & City Tram) are intended to add an intermediate mode choice between the bus and Underground travel.

The trams will pass through the area and will provide an important new public transport connection linking Kings Cross to Waterloo and providing a new link through to Peckham and Stockwell.

The Council see the Tram proposals as performing a key element in the regeneration of both the Framework area and Southwark as a whole in terms of both connecting the core with the areas to the south west and south east of the Elephant & Castle and reinforcing the areas’ public transport links with central London.

In view of this potential the Tram will need to be fully integrated into the redevelopment. It is recognised that one or both of the trams may be introduced before the regeneration project is complete, and hence appropriate provision needs to be made at each stage of the redevelopment to allow the Tram, its tracks, overhead system and stops, to be integrated successfully into the road network and urban spaces.

The Framework establishes a preferred route for the Tram and identifies convenient locations for stops DFP 2b (Figure 4.10), comprising:

London Road (public transport only)

The northern roundabout (stop 1)

Elephant & Castle Road.

• Walworth Road extension (public transport only)

Heygate Street (stop 2).

Rodney Road (stop 3).

It is understood that the majority of the Tram route alignment will be contained within the existing road network and will be segregated from vehicular traffic. In view of this situation sufficient space has been allocated within each of the strategic route proposals to accommodate the Tram and its associated infrastructure.

DFP 2d: Bus service extensions and improvements.

The provision of a bus service that is reliable, frequent and easy to use is a key objective of the Council. As a result of the development a further increase in bus use can be expected. In addition alignment changes might be required as a result of the Tram.

Framework proposals include:

The provision of a bus only link between the Elephant and Castle and the junction of Heygate Street and the Walworth Road.

The designation of London Road as a public transport only corridor.

The introduction of appropriate new bus priority measures on the strategic road network.

The provision of bus stops and waiting facilities in the vicinity of the main rail interchange on New Kent Road to facilitate an easy exchange between the different modes.

The provision of new/ improved bus stop/ waiting facilities along Elephant & Castle Road, Newington Causeway, Rodney Place and Walworth Road in order to improve linkages between different routes and modes and to facilitate easy interchange with short distances between routes.

The introduction of a bus waiting/layover facility and potential refuelling station (for alternative fuels), situated in the southern part of the core area, in the vicinity of the railway line.

The provision of safe, clearly signed and direct walking routes to bus stops from homes and work places.

The provision of two to three boarding bays reserved for the setting down/ picking up of coach passengers. A possible location might be within London Road, close to the underground and local bus service stops.

As part of the redevelopment proposals the Council will continue to work with London Buses and Tfl to improve the level of access, service and increase passenger accessibility and comfort.

DFP 2d: Taxis at the interchange.

Taxis are an important part of the integrated transport strategy and are established as a significant mode of travel in South London.

In the context of car-reduced residential and car-free retail/ commercial development, as envisaged by the Framework it is likely that the demand for taxis will increase. In view of this situation the Framework makes provision for taxi pick- up and drop-facilities on New Kent Road in the vicinity of the railway viaduct, on the access street within the residential district to the east of the railway viaduct, London Road and Heygate Street.

It is anticipated that further potential stops will be identified as part of the detailed development proposals.

In addition it is considered that the potential exists to introduce Rickshaws/ Pedicabs. Several companies operate in London offering noiseless and pollution free methods of transportation and hence the opportunity to introduce a central rickshaw stand within the core area as an integrated part of the main interchange should be explored as part of the process the redevelopment process.

2.95m min clear width to platform Bollards demark tram lanes 5% maximum gradient to ramp
2.95m min clear width to
platform
Bollards
demark tram
lanes
5% maximum
gradient to ramp
45m platform
0.3 0.6 0.3 DKE = 2.95m DKE = 2.95m 0.45 0.45 6.2m
0.3
0.6
0.3
DKE = 2.95m
DKE = 2.95m
0.45
0.45
6.2m

figure 4.11 and 4.12 : dimensions required for tram route and at tram stops

proposed proposed development development bus shelter at bus stop wide wide pedestrian pedestrian bus and
proposed
proposed
development
development
bus shelter
at bus stop
wide
wide
pedestrian
pedestrian
bus and
pavement
pavement
tram Lanes
8.0m
4.1m
2.65m 0.6
2.65m
4.0m
8.0m
tram Lanes 8.0m 4.1m 2.65m 0.6 2.65m 4.0m 8.0m figure 4.13 : PUBLIC TRANSPORT ONLY ROUTE
tram Lanes 8.0m 4.1m 2.65m 0.6 2.65m 4.0m 8.0m figure 4.13 : PUBLIC TRANSPORT ONLY ROUTE
tram Lanes 8.0m 4.1m 2.65m 0.6 2.65m 4.0m 8.0m figure 4.13 : PUBLIC TRANSPORT ONLY ROUTE
tram Lanes 8.0m 4.1m 2.65m 0.6 2.65m 4.0m 8.0m figure 4.13 : PUBLIC TRANSPORT ONLY ROUTE
tram Lanes 8.0m 4.1m 2.65m 0.6 2.65m 4.0m 8.0m figure 4.13 : PUBLIC TRANSPORT ONLY ROUTE

figure 4.13 : PUBLIC TRANSPORT ONLY ROUTE - proposed section through Walworth High Street (north of Heygate)

potential new building existing bus / building segregated cycle track tram lanes varies 4.5m 2.65m
potential
new
building
existing
bus /
building
segregated
cycle track
tram lanes
varies
4.5m
2.65m
0.6
2.65m
4.5m
3.0m

figure 4.14 : PUBLIC TRANSPORT ONLY ROUTE - proposed section through London Road

Proposed new development to the south of the Civic Square existing Bakerloo line entrance to
Proposed new
development to the south
of the Civic Square
existing Bakerloo line
entrance to the north
of the proposed Civic
Square
Inner Ring Road to the
north of the Civic
Square
Tube entrance directly
onto the Civic Square
and facing the
underground entrance for
the Northern Line
Proposed Civic Square
(gateway space to new
town centre and
provides access to
surrounding bus stops
and tram stop)
Tube entrance
directly onto the
Civic Square
existing lift access
retained
existing lift replaced
new link under road to provide
direct access from tube station to
Civic Square
with a bank of three
escalators

figure 4.15 : Pedestrian access to tubes from the new Civic Square

Movement & circulation

4.3 Car ownership, car parking and servicing

A key objective of the Council is to reduce the reliance on the car and encourage movement by other more sustainable modes.

The capacity of the street network and in particular the Inner Ring Road is already constrained. Current levels of car traffic are reduced as a consequence of the Congestion Charge. However to accommodate the development aspirations of the Framework this reduction needs to be consolidated and the generation of car traffic by the development limited.

In view of the above, limiting the level of on-site parking provision is seen as key to

reducing congestion and to achieving a sustainable transport solution. It is therefore

proposed to adopt a highly restrictive car parking strategy for the development within the core area of opportunity.

DFP 3a & 3b: Car parking

In pursuit of this strategy of restraint the Council proposes to impose the following

car parking standards within the Framework area (core and wider regeneration area):

Core area of opportunity:

Residential: A maximum of 0.25 spaces per residential unit. (The Council will want to keep the quantum of car parking to a minimum through the introduction of car clubs and car sharing schemes).

Retail/ Leisure/ Cultural: Car parking will be limited to essential user (disabled) and operational needs only.

Offices: Car parking will be limited to essential user (disabled) and operational needs only.

Light industry: Car parking will be limited to essential user (disabled) and operational needs only.

Wider Regeneration Area.

Residential: Southwark Plan standards will apply.

Retail/ Leisure/ Cultural: Southwark Plan standards will apply.

Offices: Southwark Plan standards will apply.

Light industry: Southwark Plan standards will apply.

Mobility Centre in the Civic Square

In view of the emphasis that is being given in the transport strategy to alternatives to the car it will be necessary to inform people of the mode choice and travel options. In particular special attention will need to be given to the cycling and car club proposals as they are almost unused and unknown in this country at the present time.

As part of the transport proposals it is considered that it would be appropriate to establish a mobility centre at a central point within the development i.e. within the Civic Square. It is envisaged that this centre will bring together a wide range of services including personal journey planning, ticket purchase, car-club operation and parking management. In terms of accessing information it should be possible to either speak to someone in person at the centre, or make contact via the internet or by telephone.

DFP 3a & 3b: City Logistics. servicing & deliveries.

The environmental impact of services and delivery vehicles should be minimised via the adoption of measures including:

The largest freight deliveries to the core retail area organised via an integrated below ground system comprising a central service bay located under the Market Square and a system of tunnels and tugs that will deliver goods to individual buildings/ occupiers (DFP 3b). This system envisages controlled access from the New Kent Road.

In the remainder of the core area servicing will take place off road and within the curtilage of new buildings. Service vehicles should not conflict with pedestrian routes.

The incorporation of appropriate off site refuse facilities.

The preparation and adoption of a Delivery and Service Management Plan for the core retail/ residential area which will show how the impact of service vehicles will be minimised and alternative modes encouraged (see appendix 7).

The detail of the proposed transport strategy will be developed in consultation with prospective developers as part of any Transport Assessment(s) submitted in support of planning applications within the core area.

DFP 3a & 3b: Off-street parking.

Relevant policies of the Southwark Plan apply as follows:

All parking within the Core area of opportunity will be off street and, unless specific limitations dictate otherwise, shall be contained within basement/ semi-basement car parks. Entrances to these car parks shall be located on the more secondary streets as shown on DF Plans 3a and 3b (Figures 4.16 and 4.17) and the impact of such access points on the public realm should be minimised through the introduction of appropriate design measures.

Policy 5.1:

Locating development. Transport Assessments. Walking and cycling Public transport improvements. Transport Development Areas. Car parking. Parking standards for the mobility impaired.

Policy 5.2:

Policy 5.3:

Policy 5.4:

Policy 5.5:

 

Policy 5.6 :

Policy 5.7:

DFP 3b: Disabled car parking

Development proposals should include an appropriate level of car parking/ car based access for disabled people in accordance with Council Standards contained within the Southwark Plan.

DFP 3b: Integration of car clubs

The integration of an area based car rental service or car club will be encouraged as part of the redevelopment proposals.

To be effective such a facility should be integrated into the development at an early stage and should be designed to provide an efficient, convenient and cost effective alternative to owning a car (see Appendix 7).

should be designed to provide an efficient, convenient and cost effective alternative to owning a car
should be designed to provide an efficient, convenient and cost effective alternative to owning a car

Vehicle access and service routes (at grade)Off-street car parking Shared service and car park access ramp Routes to car park (below

Off-street car parkingVehicle access and service routes (at grade) Shared service and car park access ramp Routes to

Shared service and car park access rampaccess and service routes (at grade) Off-street car parking Routes to car park (below grade) Central

Routes to car park (below grade)car parking Shared service and car park access ramp Central Service Zone (below grade) Tug route

Central Service Zone (below grade)and car park access ramp Routes to car park (below grade) Tug route (below grade) Car

Tug route (below grade)to car park (below grade) Central Service Zone (below grade) Car parking areas (below grade) figure

Car parking areas (below grade)Central Service Zone (below grade) Tug route (below grade) figure 4.16 : Development Framework Plan 3a

Tug route (below grade) Car parking areas (below grade) figure 4.16 : Development Framework Plan 3a

figure 4.16 : Development Framework Plan 3a - Service and access at grade

Development Framework Plan 3a - Service and access at grade figure 4.17 : Development Framework Plan

figure 4.17 : Development Framework Plan 3b - Car parking and servicing (below grade)

Public realm five elephant & castle

Public realm

Public realm five elephant & castle

five

elephant & castle

Public realm

5.1 Public realm: open spaces and places

This section provides a description of the Council’s proposals in relation to the treatment and character of the public realm in the core area of opportunity. This is key to the consideration of the identity of the Elephant & Castle.

In addition, it is proposed that Area Based Improvement Strategies will be prepared for the three Regeneration Clusters (DFP1c) in the wider regeneration area in early 2004. These will contain a series of proposals and initiatives aimed at the enhancement of open spaces and the public realm associated with the rehousing of residents of the Heygate Estate.

Key principles relating to the public realm are:

9. Contribute directly to the creation of a lively, safe and attractive public realm comprising streets and spaces with active frontages, high quality landscaping and priority for use by pedestrians, cyclists and public transport users.

10. Enable the Elephant to have its own clear and positive identity which builds on the strengths of the area and reflects its function as a major new destination in London South Central.

11. Support an integrated network of high quality, safe urban spaces and public routes into the surrounding districts that will draw people into and through the area, encourage activity, and improve its appearance.

12.Maximise and extend ecological diversity in existing and new spaces.

DFP 4: New spaces and places

The Framework (core area of opportunity) proposes a hierarchy of six key spaces; three urban squares, one pedestrian street and two parks (one new and one existing) (DFP 4, Figure 5.2).

Each of these spaces is located at a key nodal point within the movement system and has a specific role and function to play within the Framework area:

The Civic Square. A City space or new World Square, located at the historic intersection of the key radial transport routes. It will be highly visible and will provide a major point of arrival and departure for public transport.

• Walworth High Street extension. The key pedestrian shopping street. A busy commercial street that will support the most significant shops and town centre activities.

The Market Square. A district space serving the more specialist shopping needs of the resident and business populations. Situated to the east of the railway viaduct it will support a new market and a range of smaller more specialist shops, cafes and restaurants. It will be a place to pause and spend time.

St. Mary’s Churchyard. An informal historic greenspace that contains a large number of mature trees. It will provide a setting for a new City Academy and major new residential development. It will also provide an opportunity to introduce new recreation and leisure uses and activities to serve the new and existing populations.

The Town Park. A neighbourhood greenspace enclosed by predominantly residential development. It will support a range of informal and formal facilities to meet the social and recreational needs of the surrounding populations.

• Walworth Square/Faraday Square. A local square on the Walworth Road, connected to the proposed Faraday Museum and proposed new leisure/healthy living Centre. It will provide an exhibition space and a location for more localised activity and meeting - a meeting point on the Walworth Road.

The scale, quality, design treatment of each of these spaces will reflect their intended function. Further guidance in relation to the treatment of each space is provided below.

56

1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4

figure 5.1 - scale relationships of the proposed spaces 1. the Civic Square and Trafalgar Square 2. the Market Square and Somerset House 3. Walworth Square and Soho Square 4. Walworth Road Extension and Regent Street

City-scale identity (Civic Square) Pedestrianised High Street District identity (Market Square) District identity (St.
City-scale identity (Civic Square)
Pedestrianised High Street
District identity (Market Square)
District identity (St. Mary’s
Churchyard)
Local identity (Faraday Square)
Local identity (Town Park)
Railway arches

figure 5.2 : Development Framework Plan 4 - Public Realm: New and upgraded spaces and places

Public realm

bakerloo line entrance inner ring road is a major source of pollution and noise key
bakerloo line
entrance
inner ring road
is a major
source of
pollution and
noise
key crossing
points across
inner ring road
sunny zone to
north of the
space
transition zone to
protect space
from noise and
pollution
central pedestrian
clear space for
movement and
occasional events
activity zone around
edge (possibility for
kiosks)
new strong
edge to square
tram stop
new strong
edge to square
London college
of Printing
buildings
northern line
entrance
london road
retail uses
walworth road
edgeactive

figure 5.3 : strategy diagram for the Civic Square

figure 5.3 : strategy diagram for the Civic Square figure 5.4 : a flexible space capable
figure 5.3 : strategy diagram for the Civic Square figure 5.4 : a flexible space capable
figure 5.3 : strategy diagram for the Civic Square figure 5.4 : a flexible space capable

figure 5.4 : a flexible space capable of supporting a range of events and activities

space capable of supporting a range of events and activities figure 5.5 : precedent examples Civic
space capable of supporting a range of events and activities figure 5.5 : precedent examples Civic
space capable of supporting a range of events and activities figure 5.5 : precedent examples Civic
space capable of supporting a range of events and activities figure 5.5 : precedent examples Civic

figure 5.5 : precedent examples

Civic Square

Identity:

• A new World Square for London.

• A key point of arrival and departure by public transport.

• A point of orientation.

• A busy and well used space which people will pass into and through, a meeting place and a place that will become a focus for events.

Key issues to be addressed:

High volumes of traffic and hence noise and pollution.

Segregation and severance of the space from surrounding areas.

• Pedestrian access via a series of poor quality subways.

• Poor definition and enclosure provided by existing buildings.

Lack of animation and enclosure from the surrounding buildings.

Underground access points segregated from the main space.

Orbital cycle facilities to divert cyclists from the core area.

Design guidelines (figure 5.3):

Scale:

• A space similar in scale to Trafalgar Square.

Edges, enclosure, containment:

Reorientation of road network to both define a strong geometric shape to the space and reduce the land take of the highway network.

The use of tree planting, paving, structures and buildings within the space to reinforce the geometry of the space and provide an appropriate level of enclosure and ‘containment’ to the space.

Pedestrian access:

• Removal of subways and the introduction of wide pedestrian footpaths along the edge of the space and wide pedestrian crossings on key desire lines.

Functions:

The main function of the space is to access public transport services. It should be possible to access both the tram and the two tube stations directly from the new Civic Square.

Animation and activity should be provided through the introduction of a series of small pavilions located around the edge of the space, containing such uses as flower shops, newspapers, coffee takeaway.

The two buildings proposed for the top of the Walworth Road extension should establish a strong edge to the space. The ground/ first floor facades should be transparent, accommodate new commercial activity and should open directly onto the space.

The space should be able to adapt to support a range of events and activities such as a skating ring in winter, temporary exhibitions, gatherings and demonstrations.

Landscape:

It is suggested that the square might have a slight concave surface to exaggerate the circular form of the space and to raise the pedestrian slightly above the traffic and hence enhance the visibility across the square.

• The tram stop should be located at the edge of the space to allow the centre of the space to be used for other purposes and people activities.

The entrances to the tubes should have a unique and distinct identity within the space.

The adverse effects of noise and pollution from traffic should be minimised through the introduction of measures that might include walls of running water, bands of tree planting and/ or acoustic shelters.

Further guidelines in relation to materials, lighting and street furniture are provided in the public realm strategy (Appendix 4).

Walworth High Street extension (north)

Identity:

The most important street/link through the area.

• A busy new commercial street, that with Walworth Road south will provide the focus for town centre activity.

• A generous pedestrian tree lined boulevard, enclosed by new buildings comprising double height commercial floorspace with residential/ office above.

Design guidelines (figure 5.6):

Scale:

Regent Street without the cars.

Functions:

• Pedestrian walking, sitting, eating and browsing.

• A designated cycle lane.

• A formal line of street trees to bring down the scale of the buildings.

Active facades – a minimum of 15 entrances per 100 meters.

• Pavilion buildings, temporary stalls within the central space to accommodate smaller scale retail activity.

Landscape:

Use of material to differentiate between zones i.e. cycle lane, central walking zone and browsing zone.

Use of robust, hard-wearing materials that are easy to clean.

Further guidelines in relation to materials, lighting and street furniture are provided by the public realm strategy (Appendix 4)

new retail and active uses at ground floor activities from inside buildings can spill out
new retail and active
uses at ground floor
activities from inside
buildings can spill
out into space
stalls and kiosks can
bring activity to
within the space
tree planting
within street
clear pedestrian
movement zone at
either side of street
next to retail edges
street furniture
and benches
beneath trees
cycle
lane
2.5m
3.25m
1.5m
2.0m
3.25m
3.25m
2.0m
1.5m
3.25m
2.5m

figure 5.6 : section through Walworth High Street (pedestrianised)

5.6 : section through Walworth High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.7 : plan of Walworth High Street

figure 5.7 : plan of Walworth High Street (pedestrianised)

High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.7 : plan of Walworth High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.8 : precedent
High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.7 : plan of Walworth High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.8 : precedent

figure 5.8 : precedent examples

High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.7 : plan of Walworth High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.8 : precedent
High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.7 : plan of Walworth High Street (pedestrianised) figure 5.8 : precedent

Public realm

retail/active uses active uses within railway arches south facing edge for outdoor sitting and eating
retail/active uses
active uses
within railway
arches
south facing
edge for outdoor
sitting and
eating
central zone for
activity
access to square
through the
railway arches
retail/active uses
retail/active uses

figure 5.9 : strategy diagram for the Market Square

uses figure 5.9 : strategy diagram for the Market Square figure 5.10 : a multi-functional space
uses figure 5.9 : strategy diagram for the Market Square figure 5.10 : a multi-functional space
uses figure 5.9 : strategy diagram for the Market Square figure 5.10 : a multi-functional space

figure 5.10 : a multi-functional space

for the Market Square figure 5.10 : a multi-functional space figure 5.11 : precedent examples New
for the Market Square figure 5.10 : a multi-functional space figure 5.11 : precedent examples New
for the Market Square figure 5.10 : a multi-functional space figure 5.11 : precedent examples New
for the Market Square figure 5.10 : a multi-functional space figure 5.11 : precedent examples New

figure 5.11 : precedent examples

New Market Square

Identity:

• A tightly defined space enclosed by the railway viaduct and by a variety of distinct new mixed use buildings.

• A district wide destination at the centre of the development. All pedestrian routes feed into the space.

• A highly active space supporting a vibrant mix of uses and activities.

• A place for more local/ specialist shopping and a place where people can linger, sit in comfort, eat, drink and watch the world go by.

Key issues to be addressed:

Opening up the railway viaduct to allow people to flow into the space from the areas to the west of the railway viaduct.

• Provision of improved access to the station at the upper level.

• Provision of appropriate protection from noise generated by the railway.

Design guidelines:

Scale:

Similar in scale to the central piazza at Somerset House.

Functions:

• A multi functional space capable of accommodating an outdoor market , a concert and or performance space within its central zone.

The potential to introduce some kind of active element such as a water feature when the market is not in use.

Outdoor cafes and restaurants along the south and south western facing facades

• A diverse range of commercial activities within the ground and first floors of buildings enclosing the spaces. No blank facades.

The introduction of new commercial activity into a number of the arches.

Benches and seating to provide a secondary edge and boundary to the market zone localised in the centre of the space.

Landscape:

Guidelines in relation to materials, lighting and street furniture are provided in the public realm strategy (Appendix 4).

St. Mary’s Churchyard

Identity:

• Key gateway into the development from the south and west.

• A mature landscape well overlooked by new development.

An historic parkland setting.

• A place for informal/ formal recreation/ sport activity.

Issues to be addressed:

Introduction of measures to protect the space from the adverse impacts of traffic on Newington Butts.

Design guidelines:

Functions:

The space will provide a setting for a new urban school (City Academy) and a major new residential development (on the site of the former London Park Hotel).

Active uses to be introduced into the ground floor of the new residential building (i.e. new leisure uses including a gym, new health facilities, retail, cafe etc).

Informal and formal recreation activity.

Major pedestrian/cycle route through the park.

Landscape:

The creation of a new entrance onto Elephant & Castle Road.

The reinstatement of the boundary to the park comprising replacement railings.

The establishment of hard landscaped and well-lit pathways immediately adjacent to the school and the new residential development.

The introduction of a new ‘edge’ to the park which could comprise a series of steps and paving zone. This will provide an area of seating where it will be possible to overlook sports activities taking place within the Park. (Figure 5.13).

The introduction of a series of pavilions on the northern edge of the park to accommodate new commercial activity such as a nursery, cafe and sports activities and to act as a meeting point within the Park.

Retention of existing Plane trees and carrying out essential arboricultural works.

Selective removal of less desirable trees to open up the centre of the space and reduce shading.

Introduction of new lighting and special effect lighting at gateways and on footpaths.

Introduction of bulb planting to produce colour in Spring.