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NORTHAMPTON HIGH

SCHOOL

COURSE OFFERINGS

2008-09
NORTHAMPTON HIGH SCHOOL

ADMINISTRATION

BETH SINGER, PRINCIPAL 587-1341


BRYAN LOMBARDI, ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 587-1363
CHARLES KAUFMAN, ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 587-1363
PATTI SAMOLEWICZ, ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 587-1341

WE ENCOURAGE ALL FAMILIES TO BE ACTIVELY INVOLVED IN THEIR STUDENT’S


EDUCATION. THE GUIDANCE OFFICE IS OPEN FROM 7:00 A.M. TO 3:00 P.M.
COUNSELORS MAY BE CONTACTED DIRECTLY AT THE FOLLOWING NUMBERS:

GUIDANCE COUNSELORS

LISANN GIORDANO 587-1351


YAJAIRA FUENTES 587-1352
FRED ITTERLY 587-1349
MAUREEN MOORE 587-1350

SCHOOL ADJUSTMENT COUNSELOR


KATHY GOODWIN-BOYD 587-1372

NHS PRINCIPAL’S OFFICE TELEPHONE 587-1344


GUIDANCE OFFICE TELEPHONE 587-1353
PRINCIPAL’S OFFICE FAX 587-1374
GUIDANCE OFFICE FAX 587-1368
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Mission Statements 3
Principal’s Forward 4
Graduation Requirements 5
Promotion Policies 5
Attendance Requirements 6
Marking System 6
State College Guidelines 7
Course Selection Process 8
Course Change Guidelines 8
Add/Drop 8
4-Year Plans 9-10
Levels of Instruction 11
Special Education 11
Other Options 12-13

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

English 14-19
Fine and Performing Arts Department 50-57
Art 50-53
Music 54-56
Theatre Arts 57
Mathematics 34-38
Science 27-33
Social Studies 20-26
Technology Education Department 45-49
Technology/Engineering 46-48
Family and Consumer Sciences 49
Wellness and PE 58-59
World Language 39-44

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MISSION STATEMENTS

NORTHAMPTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS

The mission of the Northampton Public Schools, in partnership with parents and the Northampton community, is to
ensure high achievement by all students and to enable all students to become life-long learners, critical thinkers and
self-fulfilled and socially responsible individuals who value and contribute to a multicultural and diverse global
society.

Goal 1 To continually increase student achievement toward the goal of having every student literate and
every student numerate.
Goal 2 To provide safe and healthy schools for our students.
Goal 3 To develop in all students a sense of citizenship and their rights and responsibilities as a community
member.
Goal 4 That the district acquire and devotes all its resources, fiscal, physical, and human to accomplish
goals 1 through 3.

NORTHAMPTON HIGH SCHOOL

The fundamental mission of Northampton High School is to ensure that all students continually strive for academic
excellence by providing the opportunities for students to develop intellectually, emotionally, socially and physically
in a safe and supportive learning environment.

Our greatest challenge is to help all students recognize and develop their individual potential as reflective thinkers
who can participate in the larger community as critical, creative thinkers and life-long learners.

We encourage open communication and mutual respect among all who are involved with Northampton High
School. We welcome positive, working relationships with students, families and the community at large.

Northampton High School affirms its commitment to educate all students by providing a quality education which
will prepare them to become informed, literate, socially responsible individuals in a changing, global, technological
society.

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PRINCIPAL’S FORWARD:

The Northampton High School Course Catalogue presents a wide range of courses. It includes essential
information on graduation requirements and educational opportunities offered by the school to challenge all
students and to meet individual needs and goals. It is our intent to emphasize a high level of academic rigor and
provide a meaningful educational experience for every student.

The course selection process is an important one and should not be limited to this publication. Information from
the student’s teachers and guidance counselor is a critical component in making appropriate choices. Student
interest, ability, past performance, and goals for the future are all important factors that need to be considered.

Your careful and thoughtful attention to the course selection process will help us develop an educational program
which best meets the needs of your child, our student.

We will be making decisions regarding teacher assignments, number of course sections and the specific
placement of courses in the master schedule based on student selections. Therefore, we must have accurate
and reliable data. It is often difficult and will at times be impossible to accommodate changes after teaching
assignments; budgeting and scheduling decisions have been made. In these very tight times, this will be
especially the case. Therefore we must limit changes in course selections to those necessary due to
irresolvable conflicts, course cancellations, or failures in pre-requisite courses.

Northampton High School has an excellent educational program taught by a talented and dedicated faculty. This
high school is committed to providing each student with an education in which essential information and skills are
learned, knowledge is explored, and ideas are critically analyzed and evaluated. The school’s commitment to
excellence is not fully met unless you choose the courses that are right for you and strive to learn as much as you
can in these courses.

Looking forward to a challenging, productive year,


Beth Singer
Principal of Northampton High School

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GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Credit Requirements:
30 total credits

Course Requirements:
a. 4 sequential English courses (4 credits minimum)
b. 1 Writing course (1 credit, to be taken in either grade nine or ten)
c. 3 Social Studies courses, one of which must be a U. S. History (3 credits)
d. 3 Mathematics courses (3 credits)
e. 3 Science courses (3 credits)
f. 2 additional courses from the following subject areas: Math, Science, Social Studies,
English, or World Language (2 credits)
g. Wellness I and Wellness II (1 credit)

Passing Scores in MCAS tests required by Massachusetts State Department of Education

Enrollment in an accredited high school for 8 semesters with the final 2 semesters expected at
Northampton High School

PROMOTION POLICIES

7 credits needed for promotion to grade 10


15 credits needed for promotion to grade 11
22 credits needed for promotion to grade 12
30 credits needed to graduate

Students who receive a final grade of D or F in a sequential (pre-requisite) course may not continue in the course
sequence without successfully repeating the course or meeting the required grade through summer school
performance.

A student who has received credit for a course may not receive credit a second time.

Courses which meet daily for 1 semester earn 1 credit


Courses, which meet on alternate days for 1 semester, earn .5 credit
Courses which meet daily for a full year (2 semesters) earn 2 credits
Courses which meet on alternate days for full year (2 semesters) earn 1 credit

A student who has an F average at 10 weeks and continues at that level for the remainder of the semester may not
obtain credit for that subject in summer school.

Course credit is subject to compliance with Attendance Policy.

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ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS

If a student is absent from a .5 credit course more than 5 times or is absent from a 1-credit course more than 9 times
in the semester, credits will be in jeopardy.

A student who loses credit due to attendance will receive a final grade and will not be required to repeat the course
if that grade is passing.

(See Student Handbook for additional information.)

MARKING SYSTEM AND GRADE POINT AVERAGE

Numerical Grade Grade Points


95 – 100(A) 4.0
90 – 94 (A-) 3.7
87 – 89 (B+) 3.3
84 – 86 (B) 3.0
80 – 83 (B-) 2.7
77 – 79 (C+) 2.3
74 – 76 (C) 2.0
70 – 73 (C-) 1.7
60 – 69 (D) 1.0
Below 60(F)** 0

The lowest passing mark is 60. Students receiving a 60, however, are not permitted to continue in the
sequential subjects of Math and Foreign Language.

** Report cards will use the letter F for all numerical averages below 60

Students will receive P for satisfactory work or F for unsatisfactory work in the following courses: (These
grades are not calculated in G.P.A.)

Internship - Peer Tutor - Teacher Assistant - Work Experience - Work Study - Academic Support

G.P.A. is calculated at the conclusion of junior and senior years and at midyear for seniors. There will be no
ranking of students.

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STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES’ ADMISSION STANDARDS

1. Sixteen college preparatory courses are required. Distribution is as follows:

English 4 courses (4 credits)

Mathematics 3 courses (Algebra I and II and Geometry or Trigonometry, of comparable


coursework) (3 credits)

Sciences 3 courses (including 2 courses with laboratory work) (3 credits)

Social Sciences 2 courses (including 1 course in U.S. History) (2 credits)

Foreign Languages 2 courses (in a single language) (2 credits)

Electives 2 courses (from the above subjects or from the Arts & Humanities or Computer
Sciences) (2 credits)

Courses count toward the distribution only if passed.

2. A minimum required G.P.A. earned in college preparatory courses completed at time of application. (3.0
minimum)

3. S.A.T. test score

4. These standards represent minimum requirements; meeting them does not guarantee admission.

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COURSE SELECTION PROCESS

Students select courses in the spring of each year. It is important that they carefully analyze all of the information:
units of credit, requirements, pre-requisites, and scheduled offerings.

Teachers will provide each student with course and level recommendations for the following year. They will
submit their recommendations to guidance counselors, as well.

Guidance counselors will advise students regarding their individual program of study ensuring selections are
consistent with recommendations and graduation requirements.

• Students are required to be fully scheduled. (4 courses per semester)


• Courses may be cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.

COURSE CHANGE GUIDELINES


Course changes may be made if:
- a prerequisite has not been met
- a course was made up in summer school
- an irresolvable conflict exists

No course changes or schedule changes will be made to accommodate teacher preferences.

ADD/DROP PROCESS

Students are offered a one-week period at the beginning of each semester in which they can add and/or drop a
course. After this period students are expected to complete the course they selected. (This does not apply to level
changes recommended by a student’s teacher. These changes may occur throughout the year.) Year long courses
can only be changed in the September add/drop period.

If special circumstances warrant a course change after the 1 week add/drop period, the guidance counselor will
consult with the student, parent, and teachers before determining a course of action.

It is strongly recommended that students, with the help of parents, counselor, and teachers, develop a
four year plan for high school courses. This will help insure the completion of all requirements as well as
guide the selection of electives.

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“A SAMPLE 4 YEAR PLAN”

Semester 1 Grade 9 Semester 2


1 1
English 1 Writing
2 2
Algebra 1A Algebra 1B
3 3
Early Modern World History World Language
4 4
Biology Wellness/.5 credit elective

Semester 1 Grade 10 Semester 2


1 1
English 2 Modern World History
2 2
Chemistry Math
3 3
World Language World Language
4 4
Elective Wellness/.5 credit elective

Semester 1 Grade 11 Semester 2


1 1
English 3 World Language
2 2
Lab Science Math
3 3
U.S. History U.S. History
4 4
Elective or Core Course Elective or Core Course

Semester 1 Grade 12 Semester 2


1 1
English 4 Elective
2 2
Lab or Other Science Math
3 3
World Language Elective or Core Course
4 4
Elective or Core Course Elective or Core Course

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“YOUR 4 YEAR PLAN”

Semester 1 Grade 9 Semester 2


1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

Semester 1 Grade 10 Semester 2


1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

Semester 1 Grade 11 Semester 2


1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

Semester 1 Grade 12 Semester 2


1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

We recommend 3 academic courses and 1 elective each semester.

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LEVELS OF INSTRUCTION

All courses at NHS are designed to be challenging. Honors and Advanced Placement courses are especially
rigorous and fast paced. They are for serious students with scholarly interests and the ability to think abstractly,
conceptualize and solve problems. Students and parents are advised that courses at this level are best chosen by
students who are highly motivated and committed to working hard.

- A final grade of 86 or better in prerequisite courses is suggested


- Summer assignments may be required

Students enrolled in AP courses are required to complete the associated AP exam. Students on Free or
Reduced lunch are exempt from the cost of the exam. Payment for the AP exam is due the 1st week of class in
the guidance office.

College Preparatory
All courses not designated as Honors or AP are College Preparatory and are designed to be challenging.

Applied Courses
Applied courses are for students whose interests; aptitudes and achievement require greater attention to the
development of skills.

Modified Courses
Modified courses are taught by regular educators in their respective academic areas. Individual students in
modified courses are taught in the mainstream, but receive significantly modified curriculum and/or significantly
modified assessment. Special educators, guidance counselors, and other appropriate personnel collaborate with
subject teachers in making modifications. The name of these courses is altered, for example Modified English 3,
Modified U.S. History, etc on the student’s record.

SPECIAL EDUCATION

Students who are experiencing academic difficulties may be considered for support services. Special Education
Regulations expect that “all attempts be made to meet student’s need through regular education program prior to
referring a student for a special education evaluation. Such services should include modification of the curriculum
see Modified Courses), attending after school help sessions, peer tutoring, or a referral to the Staff Support Team in
order to address concerns. In order to receive Special Education Services, a student must have an identified
disability which is impeding his/her academic progress and meet the eligibility criteria of the Massachusetts
Chapter 766 regulations.

DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES Credit 1


Developmental courses are taught by certified Special Educators. The curriculum is specific to student needs
and focuses on functional academic skills. Instruction is individualized and adapted according to the I.E.P.
LEARNING STRATEGIES (9, 10, 11, 12) Credit: .5 or 1

Eligibility for Special Education is required. Direct instruction is provided in academic coursework as well as
remediation where appropriate. Students are also taught strategies to compensate for disabilities, self-advocacy
skills, and disability awareness. Specific instruction is based on instructional goals contained in students’
Individual Education Plans (IEP).
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OTHER OPTIONS
ACADEMIC SUPPORT Credit: .5 or 1

Students are provided with assistance in academic coursework of the general curriculum. Organization and
study skills are also addressed. Approval by the high school principal is required. Grades are Pass/Fail
SMITH COLLEGE
Smith College offers opportunities for advanced education for qualified students.
- Available to juniors or seniors with minimal GPA of 3.4;
- Enrollment is limited to 2 courses per semester;
- Available to students who have exhausted all high school offerings in the academic area of choice;
- Students continuing the study of a foreign language must take a placement test (given at Smith
College on Labor Day);
- Performance, studio art and physical activity classes are NOT open to Northampton High School
students;
- Enrollment is based on availability and permission of instructor and Dean of the College;
- Smith College students have priority over NHS students for entry into classes;
- Students are required to complete the registration process as prescribed by Smith College and
Northampton High School;
- Grades and credits are awarded by Northampton High School based on Smith College reporting;
- Mid-term grades are not reported or recorded for NHS students, who are notified only if they are
performing unsatisfactorily at mid-semester;
- Registration forms are available through the Northampton High School Guidance Office.

HOLYOKE COMMUNITY COLLEGE/ DUAL ENROLLMENT


HCC offers opportunities for juniors and seniors to earn college credit as well as high school credit for courses
taken at HCC
- available to Juniors and Seniors who meet placement standards (placement tests offered at HCC)
- application forms available in NHS Guidance office
- financial support for 1 course per semester will be provided, as available by Northampton Public
Schools

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
Open to Seniors Credits: 2

Seniors wishing to explore a career path prior to leaving high school may initiate an internship in a community
organization. The intent of this option is to provide an opportunity for seniors to be mentored by an experienced
practitioner in an area of interest.

Internships are a double period and earn 2 credits. Attendance will be recorded and journals are required.
Grades are P or F and do not count in G.P.A. calculations.

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TEACHER ASSISTANT GUIDELINES FOR ALL DEPARTMENTS

TEACHER ASSISTANT Credit: .5 or 1


• Seniors
• Has successfully taken the course in which the student wishes to TA
• Recommended by the teacher who instructed the student in that course
• Department chair’s permission required.
• Grades are P/F and are not calculated in GPA.

ADMINISTRATIVE RESPONSIBILITIES: The TA will be limited to handling non-confidential student materials.


• Verify attendance
• Collect attendance
• Collect homework and/or class work assignments
• Pass back assignments
• Check off or keep track of non-graded assignments or materials
• Have limited photocopying responsibilities

ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITIES:
• Assist in instruction of the class and materials
• Peer tutoring
• Peer note taking
• Update current curriculum and worksheets
• Creating new worksheets and materials to be used
• Research of topics to covered in the curriculum
• Preparation of project or activity materials

WORK STUDY Credit: .5 or 1


Offered to Grades 10, 11, 12

Work Study credits may be awarded to students who have a part-time job (at least 10 hours per week) outside of the
school. Students must register with their guidance counselor and submit weekly time sheets from their employer.

PEER TUTOR Credit: .5 or 1


Offered to Grades 11, 12

Students will earn credits for tutoring younger students in specific course work. Grades are P or F and are not
calculated in G.P.A.

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ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
PHILOSOPHY

The English Department seeks to empower all learners as thinkers and communicators. In the words of the English
Language Arts Frameworks we "recognize that facility with language, which includes knowing how to read and
write effectively, is vital to success and empowers learners in many ways." We encourage all students to become
thinkers and communicators as advocated in the Massachusetts Common Core of Learning.

Lifelong learners engage in constructing and conveying meaning by accessing, analyzing,


evaluating, and applying knowledge and experiences for a variety of purposes, audiences, and
situations.

The English faculty recognizes that writing is not only social and interactive, but also private and personal.
Therefore, we offer writing instruction which respects and nurtures the development of our learners' voices. Since
we acknowledge that effective writing instruction integrates language processes and skill instruction, we create
writing opportunities and assignments which address a variety of purposes, audiences, and situations.
Through our literature instruction we seek to open new worlds to learners by introducing them to literature
representing many genres, time periods and cultures. The English Department believes in the power of literature to
expand perspectives and develop appreciation for others, and toward that end, we provide our learners with a rich
variety of literary works.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

Students at Northampton High School will be expected to do the following with increasing sophistication,
refinement, and independence as they progress through the English Curriculum:

1. develop personal strategies to read, write, speak, listen, view and present;
2. understand and use language conventions required by a variety of purposes, audiences, and situations;
3. respond critically to a variety of written, oral, and visual tests;
4. engage productively in discussions as listeners and speakers;
5. initiate, sustain, and take responsibility for their own learning.

HOMEWORK
It should be expected that there will be something to do for English class every night. This may involve reading,
writing or rewriting, preparing for quizzes or tests, or even working on monthly book reports, independent critical
papers, or term papers. The department sees also a great deal of difference between an assignment that is merely
finished and one this is done thoroughly and carefully, and that the latter case may involve more time and effort
than the former. The student must assume that there will be English homework for 30 minutes to an hour each
night and that quality work and independent assignments will often take more time.
Summer Reading
All students are expected to read over the summer.

Summer reading lists will be attached to June report cards and will also be available in the guidance office or from
individual English teachers. Students enrolled in AP English courses are to complete specific reading assignments;
these assignments will be available in the guidance office and from individual English teachers.

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ENGLISH COURSES

0131 WRITING Credit: 1


Writing is a graduation requirement for all students. Writing may be taken any semester during the Freshmen or Sophomore
year. Students will study, read and write a variety of essays to include persuasive, expository, compare/contrast, etc.
In the context of their writing, students will practice important grammar and usage skills and learn how to use word
processors, dictionaries, thesauruses, and handbooks. Writing will be understood as a process which involves: using strategies
to generate and organize ideas; drafting; giving and receiving feedback; rethinking and revising; editing and proofreading; and
engaging in evaluation, publication, and performance or display. Students will maintain their writing in a folder which will
serve as a collection of material from which they can draw further inspiration, and from which they will ultimately select
pieces to create a portfolio. The portfolio process includes the element of students' reflecting on their own writing.
H0100 HONORS ENGLISH 1 Credit: 1
Honors English 1 rigorously explores the “classic” literary cannon as students consider the defining characteristic of great
literature, how it is that individuals are motivated to write it, and the plethora of responses concerning this controversial
collection of literary masterpieces. Thematic study, including multi-cultural literature about family, rites of passage, and
social justice, connects with essay development, literary analysis, formal research, and creative unit projects. Literary
selections include: Homer’s Greek epic poem, The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet; Dickens’
Great Expectations, Goldings’s The Lord of the Flies, Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird, and Wiesel’s Night as well as a vast
number of poems, short stories, and essays.
Honors English 1 is designed for highly capable students eager to work at an accelerated pace of scholarly endeavor. A strong
interest in reading and writing is presupposed as students are expected to read 30-40 pages and write 3-4 pages nightly. More
importantly, students learn the art and language of literary analysis and write formal essays through a demanding series of
revisions. Additional assignments include: informal responses, journal entries, poems, assorted fiction, and individual and
group oral presentations. Students are evaluated through a series of quizzes and tests, literary essays, vocabulary assignments,
and active participation in class discussions and small-group activities. Additionally, three extensive formal research projects
in MLA format and several informal research assignments are required throughout the semester. All students keep their work
in a portfolio and participate in a self-evaluation process at the end of each term. Finally, this course requires students to
access a wide variety of research sites, both in and outside of school, in order to accomplish the demands of selected
assignments.
0111 ENGLISH 1 Credit: 1
English 1 explores the “classic” literary cannon as students consider the defining characteristics of great literature, how it is
that individuals are motivated to write it, and the plethora of response concerning this controversial collection of literary
masterpieces. Thematic student, including multi-cultural literature about family, rites of passage, and social justice, connects
with essay development, literary analysis, formal research, and creative unit projects. Literary selections include: Homer’s
epic poem The Odyssey, Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet; Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, or Golding’s Lord of
the Flies, and Weisel’s Night, as well as a thematically related poems, essays, and short stories.

Students are expected to read 20-25 pages and write 2-3 pages nightly. Most importantly, students learn the art and language
of literary analysis and write formal essays through a demanding series of revisions. Additional assignments include: informal
responses, journal entries, poems, assorted fiction, and individual and group oral presentations. Students are evaluated through
a series of quizzes and tests, literary essays, vocabulary assignments, and active participation in class discussions and small-
group activities. Additionally, one to two extensive formal research projects in MLS format and several informal research
assignments are required throughout the semester. All students keep their work in a portfolio and participate in a self-
evaluation process at the end of each term. Finally, this course requires students to access a wide variety of research sites,
both in and outside of school, in order to accomplish the demands of selected assignments.

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H0200 HONORS ENGLISH 2 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: English 1

Honors English 2 explores and celebrates the great, diverse, and ever-evolving American literary tradition from
the 19th century to the present day. We read, discuss, and write about novels, short stories, drama, and poetry
by a wide range of writers, including important Latino, Asian American, and African American authors. We
begin the semester with such writers as Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter), Thoreau (Walden, Civil Disobedience),
Poe (selected short stories and poems), Twain (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), and works by several
19th-century women writers; we look closely at the transition from the heavily European-influenced works of
the 19th and early 20th century to the literature that then emerged as stylistically modern and uniquely
American; we study the literature that has come out of the individual experience of immigration, racial and
economic struggle, and war; and we examine the American literary tradition as it thrives today through a study
of major, living writers. Within this framework, we also study The Crucible (Arthur Miller), Uncle Tom's
Children (Richard Wright), and The Bluest Eye (Toni Morrison) among other recent and contemporary works.
Our foremost goal is to advance student analytic and writing skills and, thus, better prepare students to take on
challenging college study. With this aim in mind, students should be prepared for a rigorous course of study that
includes extensive readings in American fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry, demanding class discussion of
those readings, and challenging assignments that engage students in focused analysis through formal writing
and presentation. Although it is mostly student reading and writing that will be assessed, engaged class
participation, group work, and a variety of other forms of speaking and listening will also be required and
critical to student success. Therefore, this honors-level course is designed for those whose ability and
motivation are of the highest caliber, and only those with confidence in their existing reading and writing skills
and an eagerness to work hard to take those skills to a higher level should enroll.

0211 ENGLISH 2 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: English 1

English 2 explores and celebrates the great, diverse, and ever-evolving body of work we call Literature of the
Americas. We read, discuss, and write about novels, short stories, drama, and poetry by a wide range of writers-
-including important Latino, Asian American, and African American authors--starting with shorter works and
gradually taking on longer, more difficult readings. In our class discussions, we ask and try to answer some
central questions: What is American literature and what makes it uniquely American? Is there an American
national identity, and how may we describe or characterize it? What roles can individuals play on the larger
stage of America's present and future? In our efforts to answer these questions, we study the literature that has
come out of our experience of defining a young nation, immigration, racial and economic struggle, war, and the
never-ending challenge of navigating through society's norms and expectations. Required longer texts include
The Crucible (Arthur Miller), Of Mice and Men (John Steinbeck), Uncle Tom's Children (Richard Wright), The
Color Purple (Alice Walker), and Into the Wild (John Krakhauer), among other literary works. Our foremost
goal is to help students develop and improve their analytic and writing skills. With this aim in mind, students
should be prepared to read assigned pages every night, to participate eagerly and substantively in class
discussions, to work independently and cooperatively in small groups, and to write regularly throughout the
semester. All of these will be required and critical to student success.

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AP0300 ADVANCED PLACEMENT LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION (JUNIOR ENGLISH) Credit: 1
Prerequisite: English 2
As a college level course, the expectation is that students will attend every class for the full period. Students
planning to take college courses off site should plan their schedules accordingly. Students are required to
take the AP Language and Composition Exam. Exam fees will be waived for students on Free and Reduced
lunch.

Advanced Placement Junior English is an intensive course in non-fiction reading and writing. Using The
Norton Reader as a text (in addition to outside reading and summer reading selections), students will read,
discuss, and write in a variety of modes of non-fiction, from analysis and argument through narrative and
description. Students taking this course should have solid skills in writing as the central aim is to develop
sophisticated skills in writing, reading, and thinking about analytical, expository, persuasive, and other forms of
non-fiction. This portion of the course prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Language and
Composition exam, which is a requirement for all students taking this course.
At times, the study of non-fiction is enhanced by the inclusion of works of fiction. The aim of this inclusion is
that students gain an understanding of the relationship between literature, language, culture, and history.
Summer reading and writing assignments are required.

0311 ENGLISH 3 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: English 2

English 3 is a course focused around the over-arching theme of “power” and its various manifestations –
personal, social, physical, political, and spiritual. Throughout the semester, students will be asked to practice
and apply intensive reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. The four rhetorical forms taught at all grade
levels – narrative, descriptive, persuasive, and comparison-contrast -- will be further practiced in the junior
year, as will the writing of the research paper. In addition, English 3 will focus more specifically on literary
analysis of point-of-view, the use of imagery and symbolism to develop themes, and style and structure of
various literary genres. Students will write four to five major essays over the course of a semester, as well as
multiple shorter papers and creative pieces, and will keep an active portfolio of these writings. Their work will
also be assessed through a variety of projects, presentations, quizzes, and tests.

Texts for the course range from more traditional works to more contemporary ones, and cover a vast array of
time, place, and genre. Core readings include (but are not limited to): Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,
Macbeth, Nickel and Dimed, Death of a Salesman, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Kite Runner, Krik?
Krak!, Mountains Beyond Mountains, 1984 or other dystopian novels, and various non-fiction selections on
contemporary issues. Students should generally expect a minimum of 45-60 minutes of homework per night,
and will be expected to actively participate in class. Our study of literature, writing and vocabulary will also be
used to practice for the SAT Test, and considerable emphasis will be placed on preparation for college.

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AP0400 ADVANCED PLACEMENT LITERATURE & COMPOSITION (SENIOR ENGLISH) Credit: 1
Prerequisite: English 3
As a college level course, the expectation is that students will attend every class for the full period. Students
planning to take college courses off site should plan their schedules accordingly. Students are required to
take the AP English Literature & Composition exam. Exam fees will be waived for students on Free and
Reduced lunch.

Advanced Placement Senior English offers a demanding course of study to students interested in refining their
writing skills and in reading provocative and challenging literary selections. The course is divided into three
major themes: the psychological, the sociological, and the power of love. In addition to writing several major
papers each quarter, students will perform weekly writing exercises aimed at improving overall verbal facility
and at correcting persistent syntactical and organizational problems.

Students will read from an eclectic group of literary works which includes Siddhartha, The Oedipus Cycle, The
Sound of Waves, The Metamorphosis, The Stranger, Women of the Silk, Things Fall Apart, Cry the Beloved
Country, The Handmaid’s Tale, Hamlet, and Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead, as well as related non-fiction
commentaries and criticisms. Summer reading and writing assignments are required.
0411 ENGLISH 4 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: English 3

English 4 introduces the students to great works of world literature. Featured works may include: Chekov's The
Cherry Orchard, Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Sophocles' The Oedipus Cycle,
Shakespeare's Hamlet or King Lear, Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Silone's Bread and Wine, Argueta’s One Day of Life,
Hesse's Siddhartha, Silko's Ceremony, Shaffer's Equus, Mishima's The Sound of Waves, as well as numerous short
stories and poems. Works of these authors of many nations will emphasize the universality of certain key themes
as well as the particularities of the literatures of other cultures. Regular writing and language study are integral
elements of the course. Students will be expected to produce major papers and projects.

ENGLISH ELECTIVES

ELECTIVE COURSES DO NOT FULFILL THE ENGLISH REQUIREMENT, BUT DO FULFILL GRADUATION CREDITS.

0338 CREATIVE WRITING Credit: .5


This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
Priority to Juniors and Seniors

Students will create polished works of fiction, poetry, and other forms. Some pieces are teacher-assigned drama, and some are
self-chosen; multiple revisions are expected. Students regularly engage in writing exercises designed to stimulate imagination
and develop skills. Class members must be willing to learn how to share some of their work, receive feedback, and critique
others' work in a non-threatening, yet constructive workshop process. Selected readings are a required part of the course:
these will consist primarily in short stories, poems, plays, and writers writing about writing. Students should be aware that the
course is highly structured and rigorous, and that it is fun and rewarding for hard-working writers, who will enjoy an
opportunity to experiment with personal expression, storytelling, language, form, and style.

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0358 JOURNALISM Credit: 1
This is a yearlong course meeting on alternate days
Priority to Juniors and Seniors
This is a combination workshop and academic course. In addition to studying journalism as an academic discipline, students
in this course will learn to write reviews, editorials, straight news, features, and advertising copy and will publish regular
editions of The Devils Advocate. The "text" for the course is the contemporary print and electronic media. We will study the
way newspapers; magazines, television, radio, and the Internet shape our perceptions of the world. In addition we will look
closely at First Amendment issues, libel, professional conduct and ethics, the handling of controversial stories, and the role of
a free press in a democracy.

0351 JOURNALISM 2 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Journalism
An advanced course for selected students who will be the senior editors and writers of the Devil’s Advocate. Enrollment
is by teacher invitation only.

0361 HUMANITIES Credit: 1


Juniors and Seniors only (Offered odd years)

This course focuses on central concepts, historical development and fundamental nature of philosophy, architecture,
music, religion and art. Concepts from such disciplines are integrated with contemporary American Culture. Our
objective will be to uncover the cultural memory of Western and non-European civilizations through exposure to
literature, philosophy, religion, history and the arts. Our focus will be on issues in the humanities from ancient
history up to today. As we move through these studies, in a process of discovery, you will be challenged to develop
a critical imagination that will help you to formulate you own understanding and appreciation of what it means to
be human. Some of the essential questions that will be addressed include: What does it mean to be human? What
is Art? What does it mean to be civilized? What is the relationship between art, thought, belief and history?

H0370 HONORS TWENTIETH CENTURY IRISH LITERATURE


Credit: 1
Juniors and Seniors (Offered even years)

Ireland, remarkably for a relatively small country, produced the greatest poet (W. B. Yeats), the greatest
novelist (James Joyce), and the greatest playwright (Samuel Beckett) to write in English during the 20th
century. Whatever one’s response to this claim, it is undeniable that Ireland has a rich literary tradition that--
except for works by these three authors and, perhaps, a few others--is too much neglected. The aim of this
course is to explore that tradition and its legacy, which is very much alive today. Although our context will
always be Ireland’s historical and ongoing struggle for survival, independence, prosperity, and a sense of
cultural and national identity, our constant guide will be the literature itself, for what it teaches us, not only
about the Irish but about the world, art, and life. In addition to selections from Yeats, Joyce, and Beckett, we
will read from a list including but not limited to works by dramatists J. M. Synge, Sean O’Casey, Brian Friel,
and Marina Carr; poets Patrick Kavanaugh, Michael Longley, Eavan Boland, Paul Muldoon, Seamus Heaney,
Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Sinéad Morrissey, and Ciatríona O’Reilly; and fiction writers Sean O’Faolain, Frank
O’Connor, Edna O’Brien, Liam O’Flaherty, and Roddy Doyle. This is a rigorous course, as reading, writing,
and class discussion will be extensive and challenging.

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SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
PHILOSOPHY
In the general education of all students, the place and importance of history and social studies cannot be denied.
The reasons are many, but none is more important to a democratic society than this: knowledge of history is the
essential condition of political intelligence. Without history a society shares no common memory of where it has
been, what its basic values are, or what decisions of the past account for present circumstances. Without history
and knowledge in the social sciences, no sensible inquiry into the political, social, or moral issues in society can
take place. Without this knowledge, the informed, discriminating citizenship essential to effective participation in
the democratic process and the fulfillment of national ideals cannot be achieved.
A social studies education opens to students opportunities to develop a comprehensive understanding of the world
and its many cultures and ways of life different from their own. With a sound background in the social sciences,
students may gain an appreciation of the world's many peoples and of their shared humanity and common
problems. Students may acquire the habit of seeing matters through the eyes of others and in doing so come to
realize that they can better understand themselves. This will enable them to contribute to the fulfillment of the
nation's democratic ideals. Rooted in history, civics, and geography, and integrating concepts from anthropology,
economics, psychology, sociology, and the humanities, a social sciences education empowers students to become
active and responsible participants in a diverse society in an increasingly interdependent world.

The social science curriculum will include experiences that provide for the study of:
1. culture and cultural diversity;
2. ways human beings view themselves in and over time;
3. people, places, and environments;
4. individual development and identity;
5. interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions;
6. how people create and change structures of power, authority, and governance;
7. how people organize for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services;
8. relationships among science, technology, and society;
9. global connections and interdependence;
10. the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic.
As part of an ongoing city-wide curriculum development program, exciting changes have come to Northampton
High School’s social studies program. The social studies department is pleased to offer a greater emphasis in our
World History courses on contemporary Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa, in addition to the already
extensive coverage of Asia and Europe. The World History courses have been designed to provide a solid
foundation of key concepts and ideas that will continue to be developed in the United States History course. United
States History will now cover from the nation’s founding in the 18th century to the present, not only to best prepare
students for the MCAS, but also to provide students with a more complete view of United States history.

It is strongly recommended that students take Early Modern World History as freshmen, Modern World History as
sophomores, United States History as juniors, with senior year left for our extensive elective program. Both the
classes of 2011 and 2012 should take Early Modern World History during the 2008-09 school year. The class
of 2011 will take Modern World History beginning in the 2009-10 school year.

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1211 EARLY MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 1
Open to Freshmen and Sophomores

Early Modern History traces the development of several non-western and western cultures from the Renaissance
to the dawn of the 20th Century and World War One. Politics and government, geography, the arts, philosophy,
religion, economics, and social structures are investigated so that students gain an understanding about the
contributions and legacies of the past that influence the present.

All students will take notes, analyze documents, actively participate in class discussion and group work, and
complete a semester-long research project. A special emphasis is placed on the development of writing, study,
and test-taking skills. Daily homework assignments include text readings, essay and historical fiction writing,
and note taking.

1311 MODERN WORLD HISTORY Credit: 1


Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
(Offered beginning in 2009-2010)

World History 3 continues to develop the themes and skills introduced in World History 2 and focuses on the
major developments and trends in both the Western and non-Western world during the 20th and 21st centuries.
Students are encouraged to recognize and analyze patterns in history that impact the present.

Major assignments include a variety of writing activities, objective and essay exams, individual and group
presentations, and a semester-long research project.

The second part of the course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of themes in American
history from 1877 to the present. In broad terms, these themes include the development of, and changes in, and
industrial society, foreign policy in the 20th century, the changing role of government in American life, and
social and economic issues, concerns, and changes in modern America.

Students will be required to analyze and interpret information including primary source material, statistical data,
and map and pictorial information in their consideration of events in American history. Students will be
required to write essays, demonstrate mastery of objective tests, participate in discussions, and make oral
presentations. All students will be required to organize and write a research paper which reflects historical
investigation including an interpretation, analysis, and evaluation of data.

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1301 UNITED STATES HISTORY (C. 1750 – present) Credits: 2
Open to Juniors and Seniors
This is a yearlong course meeting every day.
In the first part of this course, students will explore the origins and development from the colonial period
through 1876. Specifically, the students will examine the American Revolution, the Constitution, the
Jeffersonian and Jacksonian Eras, Westward Expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Students will focus
on the political, economic, and social development of the nation as it evolved from a colonial possession to the
dominant nation in the western hemisphere.
The second part of the course will provide students with a comprehensive understanding of themes in American
history from 1877 to the present. In broad terms, these themes include the development of, and changes in, and
industrial society, foreign policy in the 20th century, the changing role of government in American life, and
social and economic issues, concerns, and changes in modern America.
Students will be required to analyze and interpret information including primary source material, statistical data,
and map and pictorial information in their consideration of events in American history. Students will be
required to write essays, demonstrate mastery of objective tests, participate in discussions, and make oral
presentations. All students will be required to organize and write a research paper which reflects historical
investigation including an interpretation, analysis, and evaluation of data.
AP1300 ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. HISTORY Credits: 2
Open to Juniors and Seniors
This is a yearlong course meeting every day. As a college level course, the expectation is that students will
attend every class for the full period. Students planning to take college courses off site should plan their
schedules accordingly. Students are required to take the AP U.S. History exam. Exam fees will be waived
for students on Free and Reduced lunch.

This is a yearlong course and will deal with the entire breadth of U.S. History from the pre-Columbian era through
the present. Specifically, the course will focus on the colonial period, the American Revolution, the Jeffersonian &
Jacksonian eras, Civil War & Reconstruction, Populism & Progressivism, the New Deal, and international and
domestic changes in the post-World War II era.
The advanced placement course is designed to give students grounding in the chronology of American History and
in major interpretive questions that derive from the study of selected themes. The approach used is to conduct a
survey course in which a textbook, with supplementary readings in the form of documents, essays or books on
special themes, provides chronological and thematic coverage.

Students will analyze, interpret and discuss sources, including documentary material, maps, statistical tables and
pictorial and graphic evidence of historical events. They will also take notes from both printed material and
lectures, write essay examinations, a research paper, and take objective tests. Finally, students will develop clarity
and precision of expression and the ability to cite sources and credit the phrases and ideas of others.

Homework expectations for this course include: reading, chapter essays, book reviews and research assignments.
There will be assigned and graded summer work.

Text: American History, by Brinkley, Current, Freidel, Williams

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SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

AP1320 AP MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY Credits: 2


Priority to Juniors and Seniors
This is a yearlong course meeting every day. As a college level course, the expectation is that students will
attend every class for the full period. Students planning to take college courses off site should plan their
schedules accordingly. Students are required to take the AP Modern European History exam. Exam fees
will be waived for students on Free and Reduced lunch.

AP Modern European History focuses on three broad themes in the history of Europe from 1450 to the present:
political and diplomatic; intellectual and cultural; and, social and economic. Students will be encouraged to
appreciate these themes as interrelated rather than discrete and to view the past as an access to the present. The
students' ability to discuss and write about these themes with clarity, precision of expression, and attribution of
sources is also a course goal. Students will be expected to have strong reading and writing skills, a general
knowledge of world events, and an enthusiasm for the study of history.

Students will analyze, interpret, and discuss such evidence of historical events as primary sources, documents,
maps, pictures, and statistics. They will be expected to take notes from print material and lectures, to write essays,
complete a research project, and to take objective tests. Occasional oral presentations will be required as well as one
or two book reviews which will be selected from a prepared list provided by the instructor.

Text: History of the Modern World by Palmer

1281 BLACK STUDIES Credit: 1


Priority to Seniors

To W.E.B. DuBois, a problem that has troubled America for the greater part of three centuries has been “the
problem of the color bar.” He might have said that America is divided along color lines and that this difference has
contributed to a pattern of prejudice and discrimination throughout America’s history. Today, it is widely
recognized that the problems that separate people are the result of ignorance concerning differences and distinctions
among them. When people learn to understand and appreciate that diversity in human affairs is to be expected, and
is desirable, then the problems, particularly the problem related to color, will play much less of a role in shaping
history.

The contribution of blacks to American history is significant and this course will focus on elements of black history
and culture. Slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, and the Civil Rights movement will be studied. Written material
will be selected from a wide variety of black authors, poets, and reformers including: Maya Angelou, James
Baldwin, Arna Bontemps, Countee Cullen, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Ralph
Ellison, Langston Hughes, LeRoi Jones, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Toni Morrison, Jean Toomer, Booker T.
Washington, and Alice Walker.

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1331 ECONOMICS Credit: 1

Economics in its broadest sense is the study of society’s production and distribution of goods and services. It
focuses on why and how we choose to use our scarce resources the way that we do and the consequences of these
choices. Economists usually study the choices of individuals and businesses separately from these choices put
together as a nation. Microeconomics is the study of individual consumers and businesses; macroeconomics is
the study of the economy as a whole. This course will explore both micro and macroeconomic concepts, as well as
examine the historical contributions of important economists.

Given that this course provides a broad overview of economics, the pace of the class will move quickly. On
average, student will cover one textbook chapter per week. Students are expected to have adequate math skills (at
least successful completion of Algebra 1), some basic knowledge of U.S. History and current events, and good
analytical skills. Objective and essay tests, quizzes, and problem sets will comprise a major part of students’
grades. Students are expected to actively participate in class discussions and will occasionally make oral and visual
presentations. Major projects will include (but are not limited to) a Stock Market Simulation and research about a
current economic issue.

Text: J.A. Economics, edited by Gerson Antell et al, Junior Achievement Inc., 2004

AP1390 ADVANCED PLACEMENT MICROECONOMICS Credit: 1


Prerequisites: Successful completion of U.S. History and Algebra 2
Priority to Juniors and Seniors
This is a semester 2 course meeting every day. As a college level course, the expectation is that students
will attend every class for the full period. Students planning to take college courses off site should plan
their schedules accordingly. Students are required to take the AP Microeconomics exam. Exam fees will
be waived for students on Free and Reduced lunch.

The purpose of AP Microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics
that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger
economic system. This course places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets, and
includes the study of factor markets and the role of the government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in
the American economy. AP Microeconomics is a course designed for the college bound student who desires to
work independently at a rapid pace. Students are expected to have strong analytical and quantitative skills.

Text: Economics by McConnell and Brue

1341 SOCIOLOGY Credit: 1


Priority to Seniors

This course is designed to familiarize students with culture and cultural diversity. The curriculum covers five
major themes: society and culture; social organization and structure; social institutions; social change; and,
collective behavior and social problems. With knowledge in these themes they will study various social
interaction and organization of groups of people living in different places in the world. Assignments will come
from the text, library resources, newspapers, periodicals, and video documentaries. Students will write
extensively, prepare a research paper, prepare and present individual and group presentations, and participate in
class activities.

Text: Sociology, Understanding Society, Rose, Glazer and Glazer


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1411 PSYCHOLOGY Credit: 1
Priority to Seniors
Psychology is the study of individual human behavior. This course will introduce the student to the various theories that
have developed within the discipline. The essence of human behavior has always intrigued mankind and various
researchers have dedicated themselves to uncovering theories and ideas concerning mankind’s rationality. Focus will be
put on an understanding of personality development from a psychoanalytical, humanistic, behavioral, and trait point of
view, discussing the theorists who are the foundation of each of these approaches.
This course will also offer the student a new experience in a seminar classroom atmosphere. Discussions on nearly
every contemporary behavior pattern will be the focal point of this semester course. Students will have the opportunity
to voice their opinions on behavior patterns from infancy to death!
Students will be required to do the assigned reading from the textbook and to complete written assignments. Outside
reading is also a requirement.
Text: Understanding Psychology
1228 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Credit: .5
This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
Why study government? Simply put, because it matters. Government impacts all of our lives every single day. Voter
percentages are down. Voter apathy is up … and our nation is realizing that young people who understand our
government system are more apt to become actively involved in it.
To describe, analyze and explain the system of American government on the national, state and local levels is the basic
purpose of this course. It considers the organization of our government; the ways people control it, its multiple functions
and the ways in which it operates. Students will discover that while the basic structure of our government has remained
the same, many of its other characteristics continually change to meet the needs of a growing, modern nation. They will
also see how other governments compare to ours through a study of their political and economic systems.
Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to take active roles in a government which is of the people, by
the people and for the people. They will know that then CAN make a difference.
Evaluation by: Objective and subjective tests and quizzes
Analytical papers on government issues
Oral presentation
Text: Magruder’s American Government
1238 AMERICAN CIVIL WAR Credit: .5
This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that students have successfully completed United States History.
As a turning point of the 19th century American history, the Civil War altered the shape, focus and direction of the
American political, social, military and cultural landscape. This course will explore the causes, events and results of the
American Civil War. This course will also provide a detailed look at the battles, leaders and weapons/technology not
possible in a typical survey course.

Learning materials include documentary and feature films, primary and secondary readings, guest speakers (if
possible), and actual memorabilia from the era. Course work includes essays, tests and quizzes, individual and
group work, and book reviews on outside readings.
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1248 HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST & GENOCIDE Credit: .5
This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
Priority to Seniors
This course is designed to educate students about and sensitize them to the history and events surrounding the most
documented episode of genocide in Western history.
The history of Germany in the first half of the century and of the growth and policies of the Nazi Party will be examined
as well as the events surrounding the Holocaust itself. Both printed and visual materials will be used, some of which
will be graphic in content. Guest speakers may be utilized. Students will be expected to make oral presentations, write
essays and reaction papers, and prepare a final project.
Text: Understanding The Holocaust

1258 CLASSICAL HISTORY Credit: .5


This is a semester course meeting on alternate days

Classical History surveys the development of ancient Greece and Rome. Students examine the needs, institutions, ideas,
innovations, and material accomplishments of peoples who have impacted western civilization. The arts, government,
law, religion, philosophy, economics, and social structures are investigated in such a way so that students understand and
appreciate the contributions of the ancient civilizations of Greece and Rome.
All students are required to analyze documents, take notes, and actively participate in class discussions and group
projects. Homework assignments include text readings, essays, and historical fiction writing, and note taking.
Requirements: Students are expected to work independently and complete a formal Research Project. Students will also
complete several individual and group projects. Tests include a substantial essay component.
1278 CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL & POLITICAL ISSUES Credit: .5
This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
This course is designed to examine national and international political issues presented by the rapid and dramatic
changes taking place in today’s world. Recent events and their causes and effects will be examined with a special
emphasis on relevant political system, leadership and policies. Both written work and oral presentations will be expected
of students, including a final project on one of the major issues studied during the semester.
Text: Taking Sides: Clashing View on Political Issues by George McKenna
1518 WORLD WAR II Credit: .5
This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that students have successfully completed either Early Modern World
History, History of the Holocaust, or United States History.
As a defining event of the 20th century, World War II fundamentally altered the international and domestic political,
military, social and cultural, and economic landscapes of nations around the globe. This course will explore the
underlying causes, events, and results of World War II in a level of detail not possible in a typical World or U.S. History
survey course.
Learning materials will include a text, films, primary and secondary source readings, and guest speakers. Course
work will include, but is not limited to short essays, tests, and individual and group projects.
Text: The Second World War by R.A.C. Parker
26
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
PHILOSOPHY

All participating citizens in a democratic society should be scientifically literate. With the increasing role of
technology in all elements of our society it is important that everyone have an understanding of the nature of
science, how it works, and what it can and cannot do.

Our science curriculum is designed to encourage the student to become involved not only with the laws and
theories of the various branches of science but also with the practical aspects of these sciences. The science
teachers hope to make students aware of technological developments so that as adults they will have the
background to make intelligent and responsible decisions.

Through stimulation of the thought process we hope to develop in the students at least a lifetime appreciation of
science if not the incentive to take an active role in the future expansion of this knowledge.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

1. To provide opportunities for all students to attain academic excellence in the science courses they
are studying.
2. To help students develop an appreciation of naturally occurring phenomena and the implications of
these for their own use.
3. To acquaint students with scientific methods, experimental techniques, and instrumentation used in
science and industry.
4. To direct students toward a realization of the importance of conserving and maintaining the
environment.
5. To encourage the continuing study of science.

Based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System
the following course sequences are recommended:

9th grade, Biology


10th grade, Biology, Chemistry, Engineering for Future
11th grade, Chemistry, Physics, AP Chemistry, Engineering for Future
12th grade, Anatomy, Astronomy, AP Biology, Chemistry, Physics, AP Physics

27
BIOLOGY COURSES

2151 BIOLOGY Credit: 1

In this course, students will study the structures of the cell and their functions, Mendelian genetics with an
introduction to molecular genetics, evolution, matter and energy transfers in biological systems and topics in human
biology. The concepts will be examined through reading assignments, lectures, laboratory investigations, modeling,
and interactive investigations. A number of laboratory methods and graphing skills are integrated in the activities.
Homework assignments will include readings and some writing assignments on a regular basis. Student will
conduct and report on research done in class and at home.

Text: Modern Biology, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston

AP2250 ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY Credits: 2


Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry
Priority to Juniors and Seniors
This is a yearlong course meeting every day. As a college level course, the expectation is that students will
attend every class for the full period. Students planning to take college courses off site should plan their
schedules accordingly. Students are required to take the AP Biology exam. Exam fees will be waived for
students on Free and Reduced lunch.

The AP Biology course is a yearlong course designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college level course
for biology majors. The major themes of the course include cell structures and functions, cellular energetics,
Mendelian and molecular genetics, evolution, comparisons of structural, physiological, and behavioral adaptations
across the kingdoms of organisms, and ecology. Extensive reading assignments from the text and other sources are
required, as well as completion of the 12 required AP laboratory exercises.

Text: Biology, 6th edition (Campbell)- Benjamin Cummings 2002

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY A & B


Human Anatomy and Physiology is offered for two semesters. A student can take one or both of these courses in
any order. Part A includes tissue, skin, bones and muscle. Part B includes immune system, digestive system and
respiratory system. Students should choose based on interest.

2241A HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY A - SUPPORT AND PROTECTION Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Biology
Priority to Juniors and Seniors

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore biology via the study of the human organism. Content
includes the study of histology, the integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems. Emphasis is placed on preparing
students for study skills needed for future studies, including frequent reading and outlining assignments and regular
quizzes. Labs and dissections are integrated into the program, including the dissection of a fetal pig. Students will
learn how to write a formal college level lab report. Integration of current developments in medicine is included in
class discussions and as a basis for projects. Students interested in medicine or health careers are encouraged to
take this course. Human Anatomy and Physiology-Balance and Maintenance does not need to be taken along with
this course but is an optional continuation of this study.

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2241B HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY B - BALANCE AND MAINTENANCE Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Biology
Priority to Juniors and Seniors

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore biology via the study of the human organism. Content
includes the study of the digestive, cardiovascular, excretory, respiratory, immune, and reproductive systems.
Emphasis is placed on preparing students for study skills needed for future studies, including nightly reading and
outlining assignments and daily quizzes. Labs and dissections are integrated into the program, including the
dissection of a sheep's heart and eye. Students will receive experience and tutoring on how to prepare for a college
level laboratory practical exam. Integration of current developments in medicine is included in class discussions
and as a basis for projects. Students interested in medicine or health careers are encouraged to take this course.
Human Anatomy and Physiology-Support and Protection does not need to be taken along with this course but is an
optional continuation of this study.

2261 APPLIED ANATOMY Credit:1


Priority to Juniors and Seniors

This course is designed to provide information about the human body, its systems and functions. The human body
is studied in both health and disease. Topics include the skeletal system, muscular system, circulatory system, and
reproductive system. Many activities and projects are integrated into the program. Labs will include dissections
and microscope work. This course is designed to provide knowledge about the human body for personal use or for
students interested in allied health careers.

Text: Human Biology and Health, Maton.

CHEMISTRY COURSES

H2100 HONORS CHEMISTRY Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Algebra 1

Honors Chemistry is a rigorous introductory laboratory course designed for students who are looking to be
challenged. Emphasis is placed on scientific process, problem solving, and developing different types of models
to explain observed phenomenon and for purpose of extrapolation and interpolation. Topics covered in this
course include properties of matter, atomic structure, nomenclature, measurements and error analysis, the mole,
chemical reactions and conservation of mass, potential and kinetic energy, phase and chemical changes,
exothermic and endothermic changes, gas laws, heat content and heat transfer, chemical kinetics,
thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, molarity and solubility, chemical equilibrium, and acid base chemistry.
Honors chemistry requires strong skills in mathematics, English, and science. Laboratory experiments,
activities, and demonstrations are an integral part of the course and are designed to reinforce the material
presented and discussed in class. Homework: Daily reading in text and related material, laboratory assessment,
and problem solving as well as some project work.

Text: “World of Chemistry”, Zumdahl, Zumdahl, and DeCoste, MaDougal Litell, First Edition, 2006

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2111 CHEMISTRY Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Biology, Algebra 1
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
Chemistry is a course designed to enable the student to develop a better understanding of the world around them.
The course follows a careful development of chemistry concepts, while commonly observed phenomenons are used
to show the relevance of these concepts. Students will develop an understanding of atoms and molecules, the
periodic table, the principles of atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, chemical formulas and molecular structure,
molecular mixing and water, chemical reactions, and acids and bases. Laboratory experiments, activities, and
demonstrations are an integral part of the course and are designed to reinforce the material presented and discussed
in class.
Homework: Daily reading assignments and guided questions or problems, laboratory questions, and project work.
Text: Conceptual Chemistry, by John Suchocki, Pearson, Second Edition, 2004

2121 APPLIED CHEMISTRY Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Biology
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
This is an inquiry-based course for students who wish to discover and explore the chemistry behind everyday
occurrences and common materials. Experiments, activities and demonstrations are an integral part of this program
and are usually performed nearly every day. Students will study properties and measurement of matter, solids,
liquids and gases, physical and chemical changes, elements and the periodic table, carbon chemistry, chemical
reactions, atoms and bonding, acids, bases and solutions and material science. The daily activities will help to
demonstrate the utility of using the scientific method in everyday life situations. The purpose of this course is to
provide students with an opportunity to enhance their problem solving skills and to develop analytical and decision
making skills while engaging them in laboratory methods and procedures. Student evaluations will be based on in-
class laboratory work, written tests, homework, class participation and other assessment instruments. Regular daily
attendance is critical for success. Homework: Daily guided reading assignments in their textbooks with
response. Various projects will be assigned.

Two texts from the Prentice Hall Science Explorer Series: Molecular Structure and Chemical Interactions, 2000.

2131 KITCHEN CHEMISTRY (offered odd years) Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Chemistry

This course is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to the chemistry that occurs in the
kitchen. Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest
practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical
principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes. This course is designed to look at cooking
from a scientific basis. There will be edible experiments to look at the science behind how it all works. We will
examine chemical, biochemical, biological, microbiological, and physical principles. We will consider
guacamole, salsa and quesadillas, chocolate, pancakes, bread, jams and jellies, meringue, ice cream and more.

Selected Readings from: McGee, Harold. On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. New
York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 1997. ISBN: 0684843285 Hillman, Howard. The New Kitchen Science, New
York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2003. ISBN: 061824963X Various online sources.

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AP2130 ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY Credits: 2
Prerequisite: Chemistry and Algebra 2
This is a yearlong course meeting every day; offered even years
As a college level course, the expectation is that students will attend every class for the full period. Students
planning to take college courses off site should plan their schedules accordingly. Students are required to take
the AP Chemistry exam. Exam fees will be waived for students on Free and Reduced lunch.

Advanced Placement Chemistry is a yearlong rigorous laboratory course designed to be equivalent to a first-year
college inorganic chemistry course for chemistry majors. This course follows the Advanced Placement Chemistry
curriculum prepared by the College Board. Topics covered in this course include matter and measurement, atoms,
molecules and ions, stoichiometry, aqueous reaction, thermochemistry, electronic structure, periodicity, chemical
bonding and molecular geometry, gases, intermolecular forces, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases,
thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. It is strongly recommended that the
student has successfully completed an Algebra 2 course. Lab work will be done on a regular basis and the lab
assessment will prepare the students for the lab question #5 the AP exam. Homework: Daily reading assignments
and problem solving.

Summer Text: “Chemistry”, Stephen Zumdahl, Heath, Third Edition, 1993


Text: “Chemistry, The Central Science”, Brown & LeMay, Prentice-Hall, Ninth Edition, 2004

2231 FORENSIC SCIENCE – CRIMINOLOGY Credit: 1


Priority to Seniors

Forensic science involves applications of scientific and mathematical concepts and skills in the solution of crimes.
This course will be taught with hands-on techniques applied to case studies and crime scene simulations.
Applications of biology (genetics, cell biology and entymology), chemistry (chromatography, spectrum analysis and
chemical reactivity) and physics (force and trajectory) will be included. Techniques learned will include approach to
the crime scene, careful observation, ballistics, fiber and hair analysis, fingerprinting, DNA analysis, handwriting
analysis, blood spatter analysis, time of death estimation, blood typing and forgery identification. Outside reading,
research and film analysis will be required.

Text. Crimianlistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science by Richard Saferstein, 8th edition, Pearson/Prentiss Hall
NH 2004

2361 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Credit: 1


Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry
Priority to Seniors

This course is designed for students who wish to investigate and understand the relationship of organisms to their
environments. Topics to be covered include the study of water (watersheds, water chemistry, water quality
sampling), air (global warming, acid rain, indoor air quality), resource management (energy, solid and hazardous
waste, land use) population biology and basic toxicology. The focus of the course will range from the local to the
global, with special emphasis on current issues involving human interactions with the environment, such as
pollution, recycling and sustainability. Students will develop skills in laboratory and field techniques, data collection,
interpretation and analysis, critical thinking and writing. The course will include daily reading assignments,
laboratory exercises, case studies, research, writing assignments, and field trips.

Text: Environmental Science (Holt)

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PHYSICS COURSES
2301 APPLIED PHYSICS Credit: 1

Applied Physics is an activity and inquiry-based course for students who wish to discover and explore the physics
behind everyday occurrences. Students will engage in a variety of problem solving and investigation activities, all
developed to help them learn topics such as Linear Motion, Circular Motion, Newton’s Laws, and Work and
Energy. Experiments are an integral part of this class and are usually performed several times a week. Student
evaluations will be based on laboratory work, written examinations and other assessment instruments. Students
will be expected to do homework every night including daily reading assignments and experiment write-ups.

2310A HONORS MECHANICAL PHYSICS Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Algebra 2 (Pre Calculus strongly recommended)
Priority to Juniors and Seniors

This course will provide the student with classical mechanical concepts including the following topics:
Introduction to measurement, vector analysis, rectilinear and circular motion in one and two dimensions, work
and energy, oscillatory motion and universal gravitation. This class prepares students for college and college
level sciences. The course requires daily homework along with laboratory investigations and write-ups. A
variety of assessment options will be utilized. A student who takes Honors Mechanical Physics followed by
Honors Wave Physics will be prepared to take the SAT II in Physics and/or the AP Physics B exam.

Text: Physics, Douglas C. Giancoli

2310B HONORS WAVE PHYSICS Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Algebra 2 (Pre Calculus strongly recommended)
Priority to Juniors and Seniors

This course will explore current theories on wave phenomena including the following topics: Basic wave
motion, sound, light and optics, electricity and magnetism, solids, fluids, gasses, thermo-dynamics, relativity
and quantum mechanics. This class prepares students for college and college level sciences. The course
requires daily homework along with laboratory investigations and write-ups. A variety of assessment options
will be utilized. Students may select Honors Mechanical Physics or Honors Wave Physics; however, it is
strongly recommended that Mechanical Physics be taken first. A student who takes Honors Mechanical Physics
followed by Honors Wave Physics will be prepared to take the SAT II in Physics and/or the AP Physics B
exam.

Text: Physics, Douglas C. Giancoli

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AP2300 ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS Credits: 2
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Calculus
This is a yearlong course meeting every day; offered odd years
As a college level course, the expectation is that students will attend every class for the full period.
Students planning to take college courses off site should plan their schedules accordingly. Students are
required to take the AP Physics exam. Exam fees will be waived for students on Free and Reduced lunch.

This year-long course will include the following topics: Introduction to measurement and units, one-dimensional to
three-dimensional vector analysis, Galilean and Newtonian principles applied to rectilinear and rotary motion, work
and energy, momentum. In the second semester the following topics will be explored: Conductors, capacitors,
dielectrics, electrostatics, electric currents, magnetic fields, and electromagnetism. Laboratory investigations and
write-ups, including technical writing, are an essential part of the course. Content will focus around topics stressed
in the AP (C) exam.

Text: Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Raymond A. Serway.

2401 ASTRONOMY Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Algebra 2

An introductory course in Astronomy, including, the history of science, Newton’s laws, Kepler’s laws, the behavior
of light, the origin of the solar system, galaxy, and universe and visual and radio astronomy. The first part of the
course will focus on the mathematical models of the universe, followed by an investigation and experience in
science writing. We will wrap up the course by taking our own data and making observations on our own about
the universe. Class projects include a research paper and a full scientific study in astronomy. This class will
emphasize topics of current interest in astronomy. We will not only cover what astronomers have discovered, but
also HOW astronomers make their discoveries.

6411 ENGINEERING THE FUTURE: DESIGNING THE WORLD OF THE 21ST CENTURY Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Technical Drawing, Design, Engineering: Highly Recommended

Engineering the Future is a lab-based course utilizing the CAD and Project Labs. Students will learn about the
role of engineers in society as they design, build and test prototypes associated with the following technologies:
Engineering Design and Manufacturing, Fluid and Thermal Systems, Electricity and Communication and
Constructions and Integrated Systems. Through practical real world connections, students will have an
opportunity to see how science, mathematics, and technology are part of our every day world, and why it is
important for every citizen to be technologically and scientifically literate. Students will gain a greater
understanding of our designed world and the wide variety of career paths that a person might take in designing,
engineering and the various technologies of the 21st century.

This course does qualify towards the Science requirement of 3 Science courses.

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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT
PHILOSOPHY
We believe that Mathematics is essential for all students. The Mathematics curriculum endeavors to create a
learning environment that provides equal opportunities to empower all students to become mathematically literate
in order to survive, as well as to succeed and prosper as productive members of a technological society.
The Mathematics curriculum is focused on the classroom as a mathematical community where the students are
individually and cooperatively engaged in exploring, conjecturing, thinking and making connections between
mathematics, other disciplines, and real-life situations.
Students should follow the Math Sequence Chart to plan their math curriculum for the coming year.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
1. To promote an appreciation and value for mathematics
2. To develop confidence in the student's own ability
3. To encourage the student to communicate mathematically
4. To provide experiences for the student to learn to reason
mathematically and think logically
5. To challenge the student to become a mathematical
problem solver
A version of the TI-83 calculator is required for all following courses. As students will need to personalize
their calculators, it is strongly recommended that they purchase their own TI-83. If this is not affordable, the
school will lend one for use. Please call the principal’s office to arrange for a loaner.

In order to complete curricular demands and maximize success with the state evaluation in mathematics (MCAS), it
is recommended that students should complete Geometry by the end of 10th grade.
3191 ALGEBRA 1A Credit: 1
Completion of Algebra 1A and Algebra 1B is the equivalent of Algebra 1, distributed over two semesters. This
slower pace provides students more time to master concepts and skills.
The Algebra 1A course challenges students to reach a higher level of mathematics through explorations and
connections. Students will explore the patterns and graphs of linear functions through investigations and data
analysis, integrating these concepts with real-world applications to promote critical thinking. Content includes the
real number system and its properties integrated with algebraic presentation and manipulation. Linear functions and
inequalities, systems of linear equations and inequalities, probabilities and statistics are also studied. Homework is
assigned daily.
Text: Algebra 1 Larson, Boswell, Kanold, Stiff

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3201 ALGEBRA 1B Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Algebra 1A
The Algebra 1B course continues the study of patterns in mathematics. Algebra 1A focuses on linear relationships;
Algebra 1B explores situations that are not linear. These include quadratic equations, exponential growth and
decay, polynomials and rational equations. Homework is assigned daily.
Text: Algebra 1 Larson, Boswell, Kanold, Stiff
3131 GEOMETRY Credit: 1
This course is designed to help students understand the basic structure of geometry and to develop powers of spatial
visualization, while building knowledge of the relationships among geometric elements. Topics covered are basic
undefined terms, definitions, methods of reasoning, angle relations, perpendicular lines, parallel lines and planes,
vectors, transformations, congruent triangles, similar polygons and circles, angles and arc of circles, and areas of
polygons and circles. Volumes will be covered as time permits. Homework is assigned daily.
Text: Geometry by Larson, Boswell, Kanold, Stiff
H3130 HONORS GEOMETRY Credit: 1
Honors Geometry is a rigorous course designed to challenge those students who are highly motivated and have demonstrated
exceptional mathematical achievement. Honors Geometry is a fast-paced course that demands mastery of Algebra I in
exploring and applying the concepts of geometry. An important aspect of this course is the development of the deductive
reasoning process through the study of geometric proofs. Accelerated Geometry integrates algebra with geometry using
coordinates and transformations to study all types of polygons, three dimensional figures, areas, surface areas, volumes,
coordinate geometry, congruence, similarity, circles, inductive and deductive reasoning, vectors, and trigonometry. Individual
and group projects, investigations and explorations are expected. Homework is assigned daily. Summer work may be
required.

Text: Geometry by Larson, Boswell, Kanold, Stiff


3221 ALGEBRA 2 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry
Topics covered are the real number system, functions and relations, linear equations and inequalities, systems of linear
equations and inequalities, quadratic functions, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions. Graphing calculators are used
in the exploration of the graphs of the various functions. The focus of the course is on problem solving and the application of
the skills to real-life situations. Homework is assigned daily.
Text: Algebra 2 by Larson, Boswell, Kanold, Stiff

H3230 HONORS ALGEBRA 2 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Algebra 1, Geometry
Honors Algebra II is a rigorous course designed to challenge those students who have demonstrated exceptional achievement
in Algebra and Geometry. The focus of the course is on applications. The course follows the format of Algebra II with in-
depth study of the behavior and graphs of polynomial functions, systems of equations, rational algebraic expressions,
logarithms, sequences and series, and additional topics as time permits. Graphing calculators are used in the exploration and
investigation of the graphs of various functions. Summer work may be required.
Text: Algebra 2 by Larson, Boswell, Kanold, Stiff

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3341 TRIGONOMETRY Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Algebra 2

Trigonometry is a two part course that includes a review of major topics in Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra 2
in preparation for Pre Calculus followed by an in depth study of the trigonometric functions. Topics covered in
the first part of the course will also help students in preparation for the SAT as well. Trigonometry topics will
include right and non-right triangle relationships and graphing of the trigonometric functions. This course is
recommended for students who wish to continue in the math sequence but are not yet prepared for the rigor of
Pre Calculus. Homework is assigned daily.

3361 INTRODUCTORY STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Algebra 2

This course will benefit students who plan to major in mathematics, business education, psychology, science or
economics. Topics covered are the fundamental ideas of probability, frequency distributions, the handling of
numerical data sets, random variables, sampling, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Homework is
assigned daily.

3311 PRE-CALCULUS Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Algebra 2

Pre-Calculus is a foundation course for higher mathematics and is designed to prepare students for entry into
Calculus. Success in Pre-Calculus will require a strong background in the preparatory courses and both conceptual
and technical proficiency. Topics of study include rational functions, polynomial functions, polynomial
inequalities, and properties of functions, exponential functions, and trigonometry.

Text: Advanced Mathematics by Richard Brown

H3310 HONORS PRECALCULUS Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Algebra 2

Honors Pre-calculus is a rigorous course designed for the students who have demonstrated exceptional achievement
in their previous mathematics courses. This course is the preparation for AP Calculus. The major focus of the
course is an in-depth study of trigonometry. Additional topics include polynomial functions, polynomial
inequalities, properties of functions, arithmetic sequences and series, limits. Summer work may be required.

Text: Advanced Mathematics by Richard Brown

3411 CALCULUS Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

In the course of Calculus, the students will learn the concepts of differentiation and integration from the
perspectives of the graphical, numerical and algebraic representations. The course will be project-oriented. It takes
a hands-on approach and investigates real problems using real world applications.

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AP3410 AP CALCULUS Credits: 2
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus (Honors Pre-Calculus preferred)
This is a yearlong course meeting every day. As a college level course, the expectation is that students will
attend every class for the full period. Students planning to take college courses off site should plan their
schedules accordingly. Students are required to take the AP Calculus exam. Exam fees will be waived for
students on Free and Reduced lunch.

This course is designed for students who are interested in majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. Topics
covered are functions, limits, derivatives, applications involving derivatives and integration, methods of integration,
applications of integration and transcended functions. Summer work is required.

Text: Calculus 6th ed. by Roland Larson, Robert Hostetler and Bruce Edwards

3321 COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 Credit: 1


Computer Science 1 introduces object oriented concepts without too much syntax. This approach makes
abstract concepts more concrete for the beginner. The programming environment used is Alice which is freely
provided by Carnegie Mellon University. Problems solved involve animating three-dimensional objects in an
on-screen virtual world. Essentially, programming in Alice is similar to the work done by animators for
computer-generated movies or by programmers for video games. Part 2 of Computer Science 1 introduces Java,
where the object oriented concepts introduced in Alice are revisited. Java is the language offered in
introductory computer science courses at the college level. Topics covered include an overview of data types,
input/output, classes, and control structures.
3331 COMPUTER SCIENCE 2 Credit: 1
Computer Science 2 is a continuation of Computer Science 1. Java, the language used in this course is the
language offered in introductory computer science courses at the college level. Topics covered include an in-
depth study of data types, input/output, classes, and control structures, arrays as well as reading and writing to
files. A Java project is a requirement at the conclusion of the course. Computer Science 2 emphasizes style,
documentation, problem analysis, algorithms and completion of a more complex problem set.

3351 PERSONAL FINANCE Credit: 1

Personal Finance is a course concerned with attaining personal economic health. Various issues that will be
covered in the context of this course include setting priorities, budgeting, banking, investments, the FICO score,
consumer credit, the concept of good and bad debt, taxes, identity theft and scams, loans, and retirement
planning. Students will learn about different aspects of personal finance in a computer driven virtual
neighborhood setting, managing a virtual stock portfolio, reading from internet resources, taking online quizzes
to check for understanding, and other projects.

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3328 TRANSITIONS IN SCIENTIFIC THOUGHT Credit: .5
Priority to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
Semester course meeting alternate days
“The significant problems we have cannot be solved at the same level of thinking with which we created them”.
Albert Einstein
“Transitions” proposes to examine the levels of thinking utilized in the past to bring an understanding of the
present. “Transitions” will also develop an awareness of the level of thinking necessary for the future. This
interdisciplinary course will emphasize the relationship that the level of scientific thinking has with the social fabric
of a given historical period. Readings, notes, discussion, oral presentations, research projects, and testing will be
used to develop concrete, experiential awareness of underlying mindsets used in critical thinking. This course will
explore the environmental, social and technological impact of the three principal scientific paradigms found in the
dominant Western tradition, (prehistory to the middle ages, Renaissance/Enlightenment to the twentieth century,
and the Post-modern) as well as exploring the scientific/medical thought of other cultural tradition, especially
Chinese and Tibetan. “Transitions” is an interdisciplinary course.

2508C MOVING TO BALANCE Credit: .5


Semester course meeting alternate days
One of the principal goals of “Moving to Balance” is to produce an increased sense of relaxation and vitality,
and an improved balance of body, emotions and mind. These changes will be experienced as a reduction in
stress, emotional calm and a more positive self-image. This positive self-esteem will be enhanced by the
observation that the process of change is a direct result of the student’s own effort and achievement, thus giving
the student an increased feeling of personal responsibility. An additional goal is the generation of states of
relaxed concentration and attention that are a natural result of doing this type of work. Although each of these
goals is valuable in its own right, the approach of self-awareness and the refinement of the instrument of
learning (the psyche of the student) will be of benefit to any other discipline.

38
DEPARTMENT OF WORLD LANGUAGE
PHILOSOPHY

Through the study of classical and modern languages and cultures, students are able to broaden their understanding
of the world around them and gain a valuable perspective on their own language and culture by comparison. While
we recognize the importance of such goals, we also value two other aspects of language and culture study; first, it's
personally rewarding to learn another language, and second, it promotes awareness of our own pluralistic
community. While our language program develops all four communicative skills as well as cultural aspects,
emphasis is placed on oral proficiency.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
World Languages:
1. To help each student attain an acceptable degree of proficiency in the skills of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing with particular emphasis on speaking.
2. To enhance student appreciation and awareness of the history, literature and culture which
corresponds to the language being studied.

Latin:
1. To help each student develop a strong foundation in grammar, vocabulary and translation techniques.
2. To enhance the student's knowledge of the historical and cultural backgrounds of the Greeks and Romans.

WORLD LANGUAGES CORE CONCEPT

When we learn more than one language, we open doors to new ways of thinking and doing, believing and
communicating, and through the process we learn more about ourselves. The World Languages discipline is about
making connections.

Department Policy on Assignments:


Students are expected to prepare assignments on a daily basis. AP and Honor courses often require special projects,
research papers, or oral presentations.

Statement on Oral Production/Proficiency:


Since oral proficiency is a primary goal of the World Language program, a portion of the student's overall
evaluation will be based on the quality and quantity of their oral production. Students will be expected to use the
language as a means of communication in the classroom on a daily basis in formal (e.g. structured classroom
activities, responding to questions, oral presentations) as well as in informal situations (e.g. asking for paper,
permission, addressing other students or the teacher).

Sequence of Classes:
The World Language and Latin offerings at Northampton High School consist of a series of courses. Students with
no previous background in a language should sign up for Spanish, French, or Latin 1. Those who had two years of
middle school French or Spanish should sign up for French or Spanish 2. Those who had two years of middle
school Latin should sign up for Latin 3. High school students with a background in language should take the next
course in the series after the most recent course they’ve taken. If you have questions about which course is
appropriate for you, see your Guidance Counselor at the middle school or your Guidance Counselor at the high
school.

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4111 SPANISH 1 Credit: 1

Spanish 1 provides an introduction to the language and culture of the Spanish-speaking world for the student
beginning language study at the high school. Students gain command of the language by focusing their study on
those words, structures, and expressions needed for basic communication. The materials used serve to
strengthen the skills of speaking, listening, writing, and understanding. An awareness of Spanish culture is also
developed throughout the semester. Students work primarily with the present tense when talking about topics
such as school, family, sports, hobbies, themselves, others, greetings, and courtesy expressions. The course
incorporates the “5 Cs” of the National Standards: Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and
Communities.

Students are expected to prepare written assignments on a daily basis. In addition, an appropriate amount of
study time to master basic concepts and vocabulary is expected and required every night. The themes presented
in this course will serve as the foundation for reports and special assignments.

Text: Exprésate 1

4121 SPANISH 2 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Final Grade of 70 in Spanish 1

Spanish 2 expands the cultural themes and grammar of Spanish 1. The activities of the program encourage a
high level of active student participation. Students will be able to converse about such topics as their
likes/dislikes, their food preferences, their daily routines, their health, their opinions, and their leisure time
activities. They will learn to express plans, and to talk about the past. These classes are conducted primarily in
Spanish with much emphasis placed on student oral proficiency activities. This course continues to incorporate
and expand the “5 Cs” of the National Standards: Communications, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and
Communities.

Text: Exprésate 1

4131 SPANISH 3 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Final Grade of 70 in Spanish 2

The Spanish 3 course builds upon knowledge gained in Spanish 1 and 2 and increases expectations for the
students’ assimilation of the “5 Cs” of the National Standards: Communications, Cultures, Connections,
Comparisons, and Communities. The activities of the program continue to encourage active student
participation. Students will be introduced to more complex verb structures while focusing on a more grammar
driven content. These classes are conducted primarily in Spanish with great emphasis placed on student oral
proficiency activities. Students will report past events and describe circumstances surrounding those past
events. Students will talk about preferences, likes/dislikes, plans for the future, food, clothing, shopping, and
traveling.

Students are expected to prepare assignments on a daily basis. An appropriate amount of study time to master
basic concepts and vocabulary is expected and required every night.

Text: Exprésate 2

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H4140 HONORS SPANISH 4 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 in Spanish 3

The Spanish 4 Honors course is proficiency based with emphasis on all language skills including oral
communication, listening, reading, and writing, as well as the integration of these skills. The course is intended
to prepare students for the AP Spanish Language Course. A knowledge and understanding of the Spanish
speaking world through the study of its language, geography, civilization, culture, and literature is promoted.

This course emphasizes the use of Spanish for active communication. Students will be required to express ideas
orally with accuracy and fluency, compose expository passages, comprehend formal and informal spoken
Spanish, and acquire a broader vocabulary while improving their command of grammatical structures.
Particular emphasis is placed on speaking and writing through student oral proficiency activities. This is a
rigorous course designed to challenge highly motivated language students. Due to the more challenging creative
component of this course, students will not only be preparing daily written assignments but will be preparing
and presenting more complex cultural topics which will be the foundation for extended written research topics
and presentations. Additional study time per night will be devoted to mastering grammar concepts and
vocabulary.

Text: Spanish Three Years and Aventuras Literarias

AP4160 AP SPANISH LANGUAGE Credit: 2


Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 is Honors Spanish 4
This is a yearlong course meeting every day.
As a college level course, the expectation is that students will attend every class for the full period.
Students planning to take college courses off site should plan their schedules accordingly. Students are
required to take the AP Spanish exam. Exam fees will be waived for students on Free and Reduced
lunch.

This course is designed to meet the demands and expectations of the AP program. The main objective of the AP
Spanish Language course is to develop students’ communication skills in Spanish. Emphasis is placed on
conversation and composition. The fundamental goal is for students to achieve a high level of ability in all four
skills (listening, reading, speaking and writing). This is a rigorous course designed to challenge highly motivated
language students. Students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous academic curriculum should
consider this course. Students will be expected to be well prepared, have a high level of motivation and interest and
sufficient time to prepare out of class reading and writing assignments. Students who select this course should
have a strong knowledge of the language and should have obtained a highly competent proficiency in listening,
speaking, reading, and writing. Students will be required to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency,
compose expository passages and comprehend formal and informal spoken Spanish. Active discussion of authentic
written texts, such as newspaper and magazine articles, literary selections, and other nontechnical writings will
expand students’ vocabulary and cultural awareness and strengthen reading abilities. Students will be required to
participate in daily, spontaneous discussions and conversations. Students will prepare written assignments on a
daily basis. In addition an appropriate amount of reading will be assigned. A final project will be at the discretion
of the teacher.

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4211 FRENCH 1 Credit: 1
This course provides an introduction to the language within the context of the contemporary French-speaking world
and its culture for those students beginning language study at the High School level. Students learn the
pronunciation, vocabulary, and basic language structure of French. Intensive practice in spoken language prepares
students for study of the written aspects of language. Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills will be
developed through situated conversations, readings, and frequent writing assignments. Students will be able to use
the present tense to discuss topics such as friends and family, school, time, the calendar, weather, foods and drinks,
favorite activities, and common objects. Thematic topics throughout the semester focus on the cultures of France
and other Francophone nations. Class is conducted primarily in French and students are expected to use French
whenever possible. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in French 2 in the semester immediately
following completion of French 1.
Text: Discovering French: Bleu

4221 FRENCH 2 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 in French 1
This course will focus on the further development of language study through speaking, listening, reading and
writing at a higher level of comprehension with increasing emphasis on oral production and proficiency. Classes
are conducted primarily in French. Situational contexts provide students with the opportunity to use the language
in a functional manner. Students will develop their communication skills with the use of the present, and past
tenses through role-playing and staged conversations.
Text: Discovering French Bleu (second half)

4231 FRENCH 3 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 in French 2

The objective of this course is to increase students' oral proficiency while continuing to develop writing and reading
skills. Considerable time is spent working on conversation skills and reading French-language texts. Students
learn to discuss weekend activities, foods, shows and events, sports, healthy living, opinions, daily routines, and
events that happened in the past. Special projects focus on the Francophone world outside of France and the
creation of a French-language website. Class is conducted exclusively in French and students are required to speak
only French in class.
Text: Discovering French: Blanc
Supplementary materials: Images; Panorama; Tintin
4240 HONORS FRENCH 4 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 in French 3
In French 4, students round out their knowledge of the fundamentals of the French language. The proper use of the
past, present, future, and conditional tenses is emphasized, as well as extensive practice in the subjunctive mood.
Additional grammar topics are reviewed and elaborated upon as the need arises. Oral proficiency and written
expression are the course’s primary goals. Thematic units include clothing, travel, cars and driving, helping around
the house, two versions of La Belle et la Bete, African oral histories, and the classic book Le Petit Prince. Class is
conducted exclusively in French and students are required to speak only French in class.

Texts: Discovering French Blanc and Rouge; Le Petit Prince; Images


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H4250 HONORS FRENCH 5 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 in French 4 This course is offered in even years.

French 5 focuses on the in-depth exploration and analysis of French-language literature. Through thoughtful reading and
discussion of challenging texts from many times and places, students enhance their understanding of the cultures of
France and the Francophone world. With the theme “childhood and adolescence” as a starting point, student engage
with a variety of texts and media to come to an understanding of what it means to grow up in France and other
Francophone nations. Reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills continue to be developed through daily practice,
weekly essays and quizzes, and frequent oral presentations. Texts include Petit Nicolas (excerpts), La Fontaine’s Fables,
Le Bourgeios Gentilhomme by Moliere and Moderato Cantabile by Duras. Music and video selections reflecting the
theme of childhood and adolescence enrich the class experience. Students should expect to do extensive reading and
writing outside of class. Grammar and vocabulary instruction are provided based on students’ needs. Class is conducted
exclusively in French and students are required to speak only French in class.
Texts: Discovering French Rouge, Romans et Contes, Fables, Le Bourgeois/Gentilhomme, Moderato Cantabile, Poetry
collections
AP4260 AP FRENCH LANGUAGE This is a second semester course offered in odd years. Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 in Honors French 5
As a college level course, the expectation is that students will attend every class for the full period. Students
planning to take college courses off site should plan their schedules accordingly. Students are required to take the
AP French exam. Exam fees will be waived for students on Free and Reduced lunch.

The main objective of the AP French Language course is to extend students’ communication skills in French.
Students develop “the ability to understand spoken French in various contexts; a French vocabulary sufficiently
ample for reading newspaper and magazine articles, literary texts, and other nontechnical writings without
dependence on a dictionary; and the ability to express themselves coherently, resourcefully, and with reasonable
fluency and accuracy in both written and spoken French” (College Board AP French Language Course Description,
2006-7). This is a rigorous course designed to challenge highly motivated language students. Weekly readings,
compositions, and listening activities are complemented by a French-only classroom environment. Completion of
extensive out-of-class reading and writing assignments is required. Grammar and vocabulary instruction are
provided based on students’ needs and the demands of the AP exam.
4411 LATIN 1 Credit: 1
Latin 1 is a beginning language course designed as an introduction to the ancient Romans and their language. Emphasis
is placed on acquiring the skills needed to read elementary Latin texts. The influence of Roman civilization on modern
society is examined through a study of Roman mythology, culture, history and archaeology. In addition, students
expand their English vocabularies through a study of Latin root words.
Text: Ecce Romani, Book 1
4421 LATIN 2 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Final grade of 70 in Latin 1
In Latin 2, students review the basic language principles studied in Latin 1 and master language skills not studied
previously. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the skills needed to read intermediate Latin texts. Further study of
Roman civilization and culture through an examination of adapted readings in Latin, increases the students'
awareness of the debt of western civilization to ancient Greece and Rome. Students continue to develop their
English vocabulary through a study of Latin roots. Text: Ecce Romani, books 1 & 2

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4431 LATIN 3 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: 70 in Latin 2

In Latin 3, students continue the development of language skills needed to master advanced Latin texts. Grammatical
emphasis is placed on the passive voice, comparison of adjectives, participles, and pronouns. Cultural units emphasize
daily life in ancient Rome, with a look at Roman dining habits, the hazards of city life, and education. Students examine
the influence of Latin on the English language and on the Romance languages.

Text: Ecce Romani, book 2

H4440 HONORS LATIN 4 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: 70 in Latin 3

In Latin 4, students complete their study of Latin grammar by examining the forms and uses of the subjunctive, and
indirect statements. Cultural units include an examination of Roman entertainment, including the Circus and the
arena, along with Roman weddings and funerals. Students continue to expand their English vocabularies by
studying the derivation of Latin root words.

Texts: Ecce Romani, book 2; Love and Betrayal – A Catullus Render (Prentice Hall)

H4450 HONORS LATIN 5: OVID Credit: 1


Prerequisite: 70 in Latin 4
This is a semester course offered in odd years

Latin 5 is an upper level course of those students who have acquired a facility with the language and an appreciation
of it. The course pursues an in-depth reading and analysis of selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, with an
emphasis on the stories of Daphne and Apollo, Pyramus and Thisbe, Orpheus and Eurydice, and Pygmalion.
Emphasis is placed on developing fluency in reading and expertise in literary analysis. The thorough review of Latin
grammatical principles is continued. Note: Latin Ovid and Latin Vergil are both advanced courses of similar level of
achievement. One may be taken before or after the other.

Text: Love and Transformation: An Ovid Reader, by Richard A. LaFleur Review and Test Preparation Guide, by
Sally Davis

H4460 HONORS LATIN 5: VIRGIL Credit: 1


Prerequisite: 70 in Latin 4
This is a semester course offered in even years

Latin 5 is an upper level course for those students who have acquired a facility with the language and an appreciation
of it. The course pursues an in-depth reading and analysis of Vergil’s Aeneid, with emphasis on the love story of
Dido and Aeneas. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency in reading and expertise in literary analysis. The
thorough review of Latin grammatical principles is continued. Note: Honors Latin Virgil and Ovid are both
advanced courses of similar level of achievement. One may be taken before or after the other.

Text: A Song of War – Readings from Vergil’s Aeneid. (LaFleur and McKay 2004)

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TECHHNOLOGY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
TECHNOLOGY/ENGINEERING
PHILOSOPHY

Technology and engineering expand our capabilities to understand the world and control the natural and human-made
environment. Engineering is a practice based on inquiry. The result of the engineering method, which is usually a system or
process, is called technology. The disciplines of technology, engineering and science are linked inextricably but different.
Science tries to understand the natural world, while engineering tries to solve practical problems through the development of
technologies. Engineering uses the explanations and concepts developed through science and mathematics to create
technology.

Students are introduced to the world of engineering and technology by active, hands-on exploration of products and systems.
The focus is on technologies that have made significant contributions to humankind. These areas include systems of
transportation, manufacturing, bioengineering, construction and communication. In addition, students will be exposed to areas
such as automation, robotics, computer systems, multimedia, architecture and planning, bio-related technology, invention and
innovation.

Students are experienced users of technology. They have natural curiosity about how things work and are natural engineers,
inventors and builders. The courses offered by the Technology/Engineering Department at Northampton High School will
allow students to
- Pursue engineering questions and technological solutions that emphasize creative and critical thinking,
problem solving, decision-making, and research.
- Acquire basic skills in the safe use of hand/power tools and machines
- Integrate knowledge acquired through mathematics and science curricula and understand the links to
engineering.
- Conceptualize problems, design prototypes and construct solutions with the appropriate tools.
- Learn communication techniques in drafting (CAD), design and electronic media and the skills to become
media literate.
- Presentation and teamwork skills to develop technological solutions to engineering problems.

The course offerings will


- Engage students who are interested in expanding their studies in the area of engineering and technology at the
four and two year college level.
- Engage students who are interested in pursuing further training and careers in technology fields.
- Appeal to students who will not necessarily follow a technical career, but desire to increase their knowledge
in areas of technology and develop lifelong interests and understanding in the many areas from which the
courses are developed.

HOMEWORK INFORMATION FOR TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION COURSES

The courses offered to students in the Technology Education curriculum are for the most part project-based learning,
emphasizing process and problem solving utilizing the Technology Education facilities of the school. The homework element
of the courses will vary with the instructor and curriculum. Emphasis is placed on hands-on learning during class time. Most
courses require planning, research and various readings associated with the course. Because of the rapid changes in the world
of technology the department strives to have all required readings in addition to text assignments be as current as possible.

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6161 VIDEO/AUDIO PRODUCTION 1 Credit: 1

This is an introductory course in the study of video, audio, and multi-media technology. Students will have hands-
on experience using digital video cameras and digital video edition software. Basic concepts of media literacy
provide a framework for critical thinking about student productions. Students will gain experience in effective
communication and the skillful use of video technology as they work individually, in small teams or as a whole
class. They will produce a sequence of videos of increasing complexity, from still images set to music, through
animation, an interview, a news or feature story, an advertisement and a public service announcement, a drama or
comedy and a documentary. They will master scriptwriting, interviewing kills, basic lighting, shooting, acting for
the camera and editing. Student will be encouraged to produce their videos for NCTV, Northampton’s Community
Access TV, which is now located in our school. Students will also be encouraged to participate in other NCTB
productions, such as coverage of local government meetings and events.

6261 VIDEO/AUDIO PRODUCTION 2 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Video/Audio 1

Students will continue to build on the skills and techniques learned in Video/Audio 1. Students will produce a
sequence of productions, especially focused on coverage of local events in the city, at the high school and at other
Northampton Public Schools. These productions will be broadcast on NCTB, Northampton’s Community Access
TV. The class will also create their own animations, music videos, movies and documentaries, also for broadcast
on NCTV. Students will also be encouraged to participate in other NCTV productions, such as coverage of local
government meetings and events.

6111 TECHNICAL DRAWING, DESIGN, ENGINEERING Credit: 1

This course will focus on the following skills and activities allowing students to actively take on the roles of
draftsmen, engineers, model makers and inventors:
Graphic Communication: Using visual material to relate ideas. Students will be actively involved in the
following skills and applications:
• Technical Drawing: Producing drawings both board and CAD that contain all the information needed by
individuals for converting an idea into reality. These drawings will include dimensions, material
specifications and notes.
• Technical Sketching/rendering: Communicating ideas combining technical and artistic elements
Design and Engineering: Engineering and Industrial Design with a focus on problem solving using the Design
Process and communication of ideas with technical drawings, sketches and renderings.
Models and Prototypes: Construction of models and prototypes out of balsa wood, paper, clay, plastic, foam
board to communicate ideas and evaluate solutions.
Technological World: Growth in technological literacy with a focus on technology past, present and future

Text: Basic Technical Drawing, Spencer, Dygdon

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6211 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Technical Drawing, Design, Engineering

Students will prepare a complete set of drawings for a residential dwelling of their own design. In the process,
students will come away with a well-rounded understanding of both home design and construction as they
experience all the factors of design that must be considered when designing a home. Instruction includes the
efficient use of space in room planning, interior design solutions and how they are related to exterior design. The
basic methods of residential foundation, floor, wall, and roof construction will be covered along with information
about mechanical and electrical systems, active and passive solar systems, and health and safety factors to consider
in the design process. Related topics will include real estate, financing the design, model making, architects and
famous structures past and present.

Text: Architecture, Residential Drawing and Design, Kicklighter

6311 ADVANCE DRAWING/DESIGN/ENGINEERING Credit : 1


Prerequisite: Architectural Design or permission of instructor

Advance Drawing/Design/Engineering will consist of directed activities related to the fields of architecture,
industrial design, and engineering selected by the student and approved by the instructor. A semester plan will
be created by the student and instructor that will include goals and objectives related to technical
drawings/blueprints, models, prototypes, research and projects that will serve as the student’s curriculum for the
semester.

Text: Architecture, Residential Drawing and Design, Kicklighter

6411 ENGINEERING THE FUTURE: DESIGNING THE WORLD OF THE 21ST CENTURY Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Technical Drawing, Design, Engineering; highly recommended

Engineering the Future is a lab-based course utilizing the CAD and Project Labs. Students will learn about the
role of engineers in society as they design, build and test prototypes associated with the following technologies:
Engineering Design and Manufacturing, Fluid and Thermal Systems, Electricity and Communication and
Constructions and Integrated Systems. Through practical real world connections, students will have an
opportunity to see how science, mathematics, and technology are part of our every day world, and why it is
important for every citizen to be technologically and scientifically literate. Students will gain a greater
understanding of our designed world and the wide variety of career paths that a person might take in designing,
engineering and the various technologies of the 21st century.

This course does qualify towards the Science requirement of 3 Science courses.

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6458 MEDIA LITERACY Credit: .5

This course will provide students with two areas of study, an in-depth examination of our media world and the
theory and skills to produce a show to air on NCTV. Through discussion, group viewing, reading, writing, role-
playing and other activities students will gain knowledge about the complex role of mass media in our lives.
Students will be actively involved in analysis and evaluation of topics of popular culture and mass media
including: television, film, advertising, print, music and the Internet.Students will also learn about the economic
forces and public policies that influence our everyday media experience. The television production component
of this course will be co-taught with the staff of NCTV in the NCTV studio at NHS. Students will focus on the
basic skills needed to produce a program to be broadcast on NCTV. Principles of camera operation,
composition, script writing, lighting, remote shooting, directing and the various other aspects of studio
television production will be studied and practiced. Teamwork will be emphasized with the class goal of
broadcasting a media themed program.

Text: Television Production, Philip Harris, Various readings from media literacy/television literacy related
articles

6468 PHOTOGRAPHY Credit: .5


This is a semester course meeting on alternate days

This course offers an introduction to the history and technology of photography. Students will sharpen their critical
thinking about photography by learning how it has both reflected and influenced our culture for the last hundred
years, and how it is used today to persuade and to sell. Students will become familiar with the work of well-known
photographers, and the contexts in which they worked. Students will also learn to compose good photos, to shoot
with both digital and 35 mm single lens reflex cameras and to use photo-editing software. Assessment will include
critiques in class, quizzes, preparing work for exhibitions and a final project.

Text: London and Upton Photography

5131 TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT Credits: 1


Prerequisite: Permission of the District’s Systems’ Engineer/Specialist

This is a course for students who wish to learn about the technical intricacies of a computer’s operations as well as
Novell and Microsoft based networking. Students involved in this course will be expected from time to time to
assist in diagnosing and performing repairs on malfunctioning computers and will be expected to help out teachers
and staff members unfamiliar with computer applications such as Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Excel.

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TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
PHILOSOPHY

In technology education students are prepared to be active participants in controlling their future. Family and
Consumer Sciences offerings are designed to meet this same objective. We strive to give students the knowledge,
tools and skills to increase their potential, to solve practical problems, and modify their world.

While many of our offerings use age-old skills, their value cannot be denied. In combination with technological
issues relating to Family and Consumer Sciences, our courses provide an avenue for creativity, decision-making,
and problem-solving skills. These skills are necessary for the home as well as the work place.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

1. To enable students to make as many connections as possible with other academic areas, eg, science,
math, psychology and sociology, geography, and health. Family and Consumer Sciences often
provide practical applications for theory learned elsewhere.
2. To offer experiences which enhance self-esteem.
3. To develop an awareness and appreciation of the process that must occur to arrive at a product.
4. To help support family structure that will provide positive values needed by all members of our
global community.

6421 COOKING, CULTURES, TRAVEL Credit: 1

This course offers students the opportunity to expand their cooking skills. Students will learn about different
cultures and the foods they eat. Cooperative groups will search the web for relevant information about a specific
segment of a country. Each group will pick recipes from their country, compile a grocery list, budget, shop and
cook the recipes that they have chosen in an industrial style cooking lab.

Students will then plan a vacation to the assigned country. In this unit the students will learn about travel,
hotels, meals, budgeting, geography, climate, prime attractions and transportation. The students will share their
findings with the class.

6471 CHILD DEVELOPMENT (Infant, Toddler, Adolescent) Credit: 1

Students taking this course will learn about relationships, prenatal care, the birth of a child, and the stages of
development from infancy through adolescence. We will focus on who we are as individuals and how we can
help ourselves and others. We will discuss many aspects of how to make good decisions and learn how to put
them to good use.

This course is designed for males and females. Whether you plan on pursing a degree in childcare or you plan
on becoming a parent, this course will guide you into making valuable choices as adults.

Participation in the high school Head Start program will give you the opportunity to utilize the skills that you
have learned.

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FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT
PHILOSOPHY
The Fine and Performing Arts faculty believes in the importance of being sensitive to the needs of each individual
student and of encouraging each student to strive for excellence in accomplishment. We endeavor to provide an
atmosphere, which encourages exploration and creativity.
Visual arts education trains students to perceive and shape the visual, spatial, and aesthetic characteristics of the
world around them. Visual arts include the traditional “fine arts” of drawing, painting, photography, printmaking,
and sculpture; the design fields including industrial, ceramic, textile, furniture, and graphic design; and architecture,
landscape design and urban, regional, and rural planning. Visual arts is a continuously evolving field that also
explores the expressive potential of technologies such as film, holography, video, and other electronic forms of
image-making.
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
1. To develop visual awareness, creativity and personal expression through art.
2. To develop insights in the critical, appreciative and historical aspects of art.
3. To develop skills in selective art media through exploration and practice.

FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT


ART

7118 FOUNDATIONS IN ART Credit: .5


This is a semester course offered on alternate days
This prerequisite art course provides students with an introduction to the visual language of art and the
fundamentals in drawing and 2-D & 3D design principles they will need for all future work in the visual arts.
Students will learn how and why compositional skills, line quality, value, form and space are important in drawings
by working from observation. The 2-D design problems will involve creating balanced works of art through a
variety of means. Contrast, pattern, repetition and unity are just some of the principles that will be explored
through the use of mixed media and collage. Investigations in 3-D design principles such as form, space, scale, and
texture will involve working with wire, cardboard and possibly other materials. Units of study in color theory and
perspective will also be included in the class. There will be vocabulary quizzes, art appreciation exercises and
critiques.
7131 DRAWING AND PAINTING 1 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Foundations in Art 1
Students will record and interpret what they see by drawing from observation. They will learn the fundamentals of
drawing by working from subject matter such as the figure, still life, landscape, and from their imaginations.
Materials such as pencil, charcoal, conte crayon, oil and chalk pastel, colored pencil, pen and ink and ink wash will
be explored.
Color theory and how it relates to painting will be studied and applied in the form of color studies and in paintings.
Students will work with watercolor, gouache, and acrylic paint. Mixed media will be explored and the students will
paint on paper, Masonite, canvas board, and stretched canvas. Students will work in a monochromatic painting as
well as in a Fauvist, Impressionist and Cubist style. The history of painting will be discussed through slide
presentations and videos. The students may be expected to present a written and/or oral report on an artist or art
movement. There will be individual and class critiques, homework and quizzes.

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7141 DRAWING AND PAINTING 2 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting 1
Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors
This is a semester course offered in even years

Drawing and Painting 2 students will develop their interpretive drawing and painting skills through a variety of
exercises. Rather that focusing solely on recording what they see, students will be encouraged to explore more
expressive means of working. Assignments are designed so the student engages in the creative process to discover
new ways of solving visual problems as they relate to drawing and painting. Students will learn to work more
abstractly, referencing many different sources.

Graphite, charcoal, oil and chalk pastels, conte crayon, mixed media, collage, watercolor and acrylic paint are some
of the materials that will be used in this class. Students will be assigned homework and there will be vocabulary
quizzes and class critiques. Students may be expected to complete written exercises based on an artist or art
movement.

7151 CERAMICS Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Foundations in Art 1

The first half of the semester will cover basic hand building techniques (pinch, coil, and slab) as well as use of
under glazes, glazes, and other surface treatments. Working time on the potter’s wheels will be shared as students
learn the throwing basics before progressing to more elaborate forms. The second half of the semester includes
more advanced techniques to provide the student with a broader range of creative possibilities. Students will be
encouraged to work in a sculptural manner as well as to create functional pottery. There will be critiques, quizzes
and homework.

7161 PRINTMAKING AND BOOK ARTS Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Foundations in Art 1
This is a semester course offered in even years

This course combines two complimentary art forms, printmaking and books. The history and various methods of
printmaking such as the relief print (including lino & collagraph), intaglio (including etching and drypoint),
monoprint, and possibly lithography will be explored.

Students will learn the anatomy of the book and the traditional and non-traditional methods of adhesive and non-
adhesive binding for soft and hardcover books. Some of the styles covered will be pamphlet, single and multiple
signatures, as well as various fold books. The class will cover methods of making decorative paper such as
marbling and paste papers, which will be used, for covers, end papers and pages. Students will incorporate their
prints and possibly text into some of the books and use other sources such as art history, music, poetry and nature to
inspire the design and construction of the books. This course will include critiques, vocabulary, and possibly field
trips.

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7171 THREE – DIMENSIONAL DESIGN AND SCULPTURE Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Foundations of Art 1
This is a semester course offered in odd years
Three-dimensional design students will apply the elements and principles learned in Foundations of Art 1 to the
area of the third dimension-sculpture. There will be a concentration in sculptural design and techniques. These
will include the methods of modeling, casting, carving, and assembling materials into three-dimensional figures and
forms. We will work with paper, cardboard, papier-mache, wood, wire, plaster, wax, clay and concrete. Students
will create one collaborative piece. The work of contemporary sculptors as well as the history and development of
sculpture in various cultures will be examined. Students will be required to do one oral presentation and participate
in critiques.
7231 GRAPHIC DESIGN Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Foundations in Art 1
This is a semester course offered in odd years
Who creates the covers of those Music CDs? Who comes up with the new Nike ad? Who designs the logos for your favorite
teams and the pages of the magazines you read? Everything we own and everything we see, unless it is a part of our natural
environment, has been designed by someone. The packages we buy products in, the advertisements that sell these products
and services have all been created by Graphic Designers.
What makes a good design? How do designers come up with new and interesting ideas? This class explores the uses of
typography and color theory as well as the principles of good design as they are applied to visual communication. Some of
the projects may include package design, print advertising, CD covers and logo design. Students will use computers
(Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator and Quark) as well as traditional art materials. Students will participate in critiques
and will have homework assignments on a regular basis.

H7340 HONORS ART 1 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Foundations in Art 1, Drawing and Painting 1
Open to Juniors and Seniors
This is a semester 1 course
Honors Art 1 is a course designed for the serious art student who plans to continue with his/her education in the
visual arts beyond high school. This course will assist students in preparing a beginning portfolio of artwork that
they will need when applying as an art major to any art school or art department in a college/university. Students
who wish to minor in art or continue with their art studies in some capacity will find the Honors Art courses better
prepare them for those experiences.
Students will work in and outside of class to complete the necessary drawings, paintings and mixed media work
from observation. The fundamental of drawing, 2-D and 3-D design are emphasized as they are the foundation
from which all artists learn to organize visual information and therefore communicate and express their ideas.
Students will increase their knowledge and understanding of the creative process through a variety of structured
visual problems and exploration with a variety of materials. Art appreciation, careers in the arts, monthly journal
assignments, written papers, quizzes and critiques are also part of the course.
Art school admission representatives visit this class every year to present information, meet with students and to
conduct portfolios reviews. There is a summer assignment for the course. It is expected that the student will
complete work outside of class. Students will visit the Smith College Museum of Art and attend other field trips.

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H7360 HONORS ART 2 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Honors Art 1
Open to Juniors and Seniors
This is a semester 2 course

This course builds on the skills, knowledge and visual experiences of Honors Art 1. It will provide the student with
more sophisticated work for their portfolios in the form of a visually coherent thematic series.
Students will address advanced visual problems in art history and color theory, will be assigned monthly journal
assignments and written papers, and will present information and participate in critiques. Emphasis is on
developing a personal vision and voice as a young artist. Students will keep a visual journal, critique, write papers,
give presentations, attend field trips and exhibit their work in the school and community.
H7370 HONORS ART 3 Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Honors Art 2
Open to Seniors
This is a semester 1 course

Honors Art 3 challenges the student to create their strongest portfolio for the college admissions process. Students
are encouraged to attend National Portfolio days during the fall semester to received feedback from the schools
they are interested in applying to. With that information, students will work in and out of class to fine tune their
portfolios. They will continue to work thematically on a Concentration Series and focus more on the content of the
work.

Students are expected to push and stretch themselves artistically and to take more risks as they explore the creative
process and investigate their own ideas. Students will have journal review twice a semester, will research and
compare the role of the artist in contemporary society with that of ancient cultures in the form of a written paper
and oral presentation.

H7380 HONORS ART 4 Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Honors Art 3
Open to Seniors
This is a semester 2 course

This course is designed to bring the student to their maximum artistic potential. Students will continue to work
thematically and take responsibility for their artistic choices. They will continue to write about and discuss their
work in critiques and in written papers. Students will, in addition, be exploring an advanced problem in art history
as it relates to their work. They will also be required to complete a collaborative project with another student, and
have journal reviews twice a semester.

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FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT
MUSIC

Music is a unifying force in civilizations throughout the world. Music gives order to sounds and silence, and
communicates through melody, harmony, rhythm, and movement. Music education trains the student to use the
human voice and a variety of instruments in individual and ensemble performances. Music includes forms such as
folk, popular, band, and orchestral music, gospel music and oratorio, jazz, opera, and musical theatre.

PHILOSOPHY

The Music Department of Northampton High School is designed to provide opportunities for all students to learn
through the musical process. The program focuses on the student's ability to perceive and react to the expressive
elements of music. It deepens the student's sense of creativity and nurtures openness to cultural values and the
contributions of others. The experiences and understandings inherent in this music program enable students to live
and communicate as responsible members of our society.

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

1. To develop music skills through a varied and sequential program that will result in student's ability to
understand the basic fundamentals of music.

2. To provide experiences that enable students to perceive the expressive elements of music thereby helping
them develop insights into the nature of human feelings.

3. To provide instrumental and choral experiences in different settings that are structured for various levels of
student abilities.

4. To improve school climate by involving students in music experiences that develop positive attitudes and
enhance self-esteem.

5. To provide service to our community through musical performance at civic functions; and to take advantage
of the many cultural resources available in our community.

6. To develop within the student an intelligent and appreciative approach to listening; and to encourage
participation in and recognition of a wide range of musical styles and forms.

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INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

7931 JAZZ WORKSHOP


This is semester 2 course Credit: 1
Prerequisite: Ability to read music

Read about, listen to, and perform Jazz of various styles in this class. Learn more about Jazz theory and
improvisation and practice these skills with other members of the class.

7951 MUSIC THEORY Credit: 1

Learn how music is constructed, how scales and chords are formed, the relationship between major and minor keys
and more about melody, harmony and chord progressions. Some musical background and ability to read music is
necessary but you do not need to read fluently to take this course. This course is most relevant to students who
already play a musical instrument.

7961A BAND Credits:.5,1


This is Semester 1 and Semester 2 course

Explore a wide variety of band literature in a challenging and supportive atmosphere. Emphasis will be place on
improving ensemble skills such as balance and blend, good intonation and rhythmic accuracy. Individual practice
is required outside of daily rehearsals and students will take occasional quizzes to track their progress. Band will
perform several times throughout the year and attend a festival each spring. Concert Band begins at the start of
November and lasts throughout the year.

Marching Band is one component of the overall program that takes place primarily in the fall and lasts until mid
November. Here you will learn to maneuver and play, develop great leadership skills, find a strong sense of
community, and contribute to the school community in a fun and positive way. We will perform at football games
and several parades throughout the year. No previous experience is necessary but you must be enrolled in band to
participate. Band students will also attend Band Camp one week prior to the start of school. Band camp allows students to
brush up on their playing, learn how to march, and spend time with upper classmen prior to the start of school.

All students, including those requesting band for second semester only, are encouraged to attend band camp.

SCHEDULING BAND

The goal of the band program is to create an opportunity for students to grow musically in a challenging and
supportive atmosphere. Because the study of a musical instrument demands a high level of continuity of
instruction, and the overall success of the band program depends to some extent on this continuity, students are
encouraged to sign up for band in the following ways as scheduling allows.

Best Option: The student participates in band every day for the entire year.
Better Option: The student participates in band everyday in the fall and every other day in the spring
Good Option: The student participates in band every other day for the entire year
If all else fails to work: The student participates in band any way that fits into their schedule.

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7961 HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC Credit: 1

Explore the roots and history of jazz, classical and popular music through reading, listening, and watching videos.
The goal of the class is to expand your musical tastes and to learn more about the music you already know. Learn
to hear form and design in music, distinguish between musical styles and time periods, and see how music reflects
our life and our history. Three projects are required in addition to occasional homework, listening and written
quizzes

7998 CHAMBER MUSIC Credit:.5


This is a semester 1 course offered on alternate days

This class is open to string players, pianists, double reeds, and other wind players with the permission of the
instructor. Improve your playing and ensemble skills through the study of chamber music. We will read a variety
of literature and do a performance at the semester’s end. Students are encouraged to join with other musicians with
whom they would like to rehearse although this is not a requirement for participation in the course.

VOCAL MUSIC

7941 CHORUS Credit: .5/1


This is a semester 1 and semester 2 course meeting every day or “A” days

This singing group requires no previous experience, but a strong desire to sing. The “NHS Chorus” will perform
locally each semester. Emphasis will be placed on singing a wide variety of music and learning to blend voices
within the group. Basic vocal technique and musical literacy are integral parts of this class. This course is excellent
preparation for the other auditioned ensembles.

7978 A CAPELLA ENSEMBLE “The Northamptones” Credit: 1


Prerequisite: Audition
This is a full year course meeting on alternate days

This class is for highly motivated vocal students who read music well enough to learn their part and who have taken
at least one full year of Chorus at NHS. The A Capella group will study and perform a wide range of vocal A
Capella repertoire. Music covered will include popular tunes (as heard by many college A Capella groups) and jazz
arrangements. Students are also encouraged to write their own arrangements for the group. The A Capella group is
a performance ensemble and will perform regularly throughout the academic year. Those who sign up must be able
to attend many after school concerts and competitions.

7978B CHAMBER CHOIR Credit:1


Prerequisite: Audition
This is a full year course meeting on alternate days

This class is for highly motivated singers only who have hopefully taken a least 1 year of chorus. The ability to
read music is essential to this ensemble. The Chamber Choir will study and perform a wide range of advanced
choral literature. Students are expected to learn their part outside of class and attend several after school
concerts and festivals.

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FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT
THEATRE
Theatre is an art form concerned with the representation of people in time and space, their actions and the consequences of
their actions. Theatre education expands the ability to understand others and communicate through language and action,
and provides a unique opportunity for integrating the arts, linking dance, music, and visual arts elements in performance
and production. Theatre includes acting, improvisation, storytelling, mime, playmaking and playwriting, directing,
management, design and technical theatre, and related arts such as puppetry, film, and video.
PHILOSOPHY
The Theater Department seeks to engage all interested students, regardless of their previous theater experience. We strive
to help talented and experienced students further their ambition and to nurture students new to the performing arts. We
endeavor at all times to provide a respectful, disciplined environment in which students may freely explore theater, help
newer students along the way, and reach their own fullest potential.

7401 FILM Credit: 1


Priority to Juniors and Seniors

For over a century, people have been going to the movies, drawn by the mysterious fascination of seeing lifelike
images flash across the screen in a darkened room. They go to be entertained, to share experiences with friends
and family, to immerse themselves in a good story. But how is the story being told to them? What invisible
designs are knitting the narrative together behind the movie's seductive surface of color and sound? What is the
magic that molds 600 to 800 individual camera shots into an effortless flow of images which unfold before us
so convincingly that we lose ourselves in the story, awakening as if from a dream as the lights finally come up
and the credits roll?

The Narrative Film class examines the development of film as a story-telling medium since its birth on the eve
of the 20th Century. The course focuses primarily on what became known as "the classical Hollywood narrative
style": how it evolved, how it came to dominate the film industry for nearly half a century, and how its
established conventions later came to be stretched, twisted, and turned inside-out by bold, innovative directors
in the decades following the Second World War.

Students will read excerpts from the course textbook American Cinema, and view and discuss 25–30 feature-
length films which will supplement and illustrate the themes and ideas of the reading. In addition to
mainstream American films, a variety of innovative short films and full-length foreign films will be shown as
counterpoint to the central subject matter. There will be a series of quizzes on the reading, as well as several
team projects designed to explore narrative structure, storyboarding, and film dissection.

7408 INTRODUCTION TO THEATER Credit: .5


This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
What makes theater “theater”? What forms has it taken over the ages? How are plays produced today? Using the
textbook Theater, the Lively Art, this course will examine a variety of cultural and historical theatrical genres; acquaint
students with the basics of acting and improvisation techniques; and introduce them to the components of modern
theatrical production. Students will read and discuss several plays, attend and evaluate local performances, and act in
scenes in the classroom.

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7508 ACTING AND DIRECTING WORKSHOP Credit: .5
This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
How does a director handle actors? What should actors provide the director? Emphasis will be on understanding their
complementary roles within the context of creating theater. Using textbooks such as Directing for the Stage, Students will
work in groups to solve directing problems, learning to both give and receive constructive feedback and direction. In
addition students will learn to plan a production schedule, coordinate a creative team, and work collaboratively to create a
finished piece of theater. Students will also study advanced theater games and acting exercises.
7608 STAGECRAFT Credit: .5
This is a semester course meeting on alternate days

This is a practical course in set, lighting and costume design and construction, with opportunities for the motivated student to
specialize in such areas as sound engineering and multimedia production. Students will work from textbooks such as
Stagecraft, a Handbook, learning about the history of theatrical design and construction, how to interpret and make scale
drawings, and how to research and create basic set, lighting and costume designs. In addition, students will work on actual sets,
lighting and costumes for school productions. NOTE: THIS COURSE WILL REQUIRE WORK OUTSIDE OF SCHOOL
HOURS. Students will be required to put in a minimum of 10 hours of set, lighting, sound or costume work in production
conditions, at night or on weekends. Students must make sure that their schedules will permit them to do this work.

7701/7708 PERFORMANCE Credit: 1,.5


This is a semester course meeting every day and alternate days

This course is the core-acting course for the department. All students will be introduced to components of modern acting
training: theater games, scene-study technique and auditioning techniques. All students will read Michael Shurtleff’s Audition
and discuss in class. All students will read an autobiography or memoir of an actor, director or other notable theatrical figure,
and report on it to the class. All students will also see and critique local theatrical productions. In addition, every day students
will study voice, speech and advanced acting skills. All students will select, rehearse and perform scenes or short plays as a
final project. Note: in the future, variations of this course will be offered, such as “Shakespeare Workshop”, or “on-camera
acting techniques”.
WELLNESS EDUCATION
PHILOSOPHY

The Wellness Curriculum at Northampton High School is an integral part of each student’s education. The
curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skill foundation for personal wellness.
Students with this understanding are encouraged to achieve better health and take responsibility for their own
wellness. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

Wellness is a state of complete physical, mental and social well being, and not merely the absence of disease or
infirmity. To help students understand this, each student will:

1. Comprehend the importance of wellness and disease prevention as part of a healthy life style.
2. Students will analyze the influence of culture, media, technology, and other influencing factors on
wellness and health.
3. Students will learn and practice communication and teamwork skills that will help them create a sense of
community and trust.
4. Students will understand and learn how to make healthy decisions that will help create a healthy
lifestyle.
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5. Students will learn and be able to engage in a wide range of physical activities and understand that
physical activity is important and accessible for everyone throughout the life cycle
6. Students will review the risks of substance abuse and other risky behaviors and develop skills to help
them make healthy decisions based on clear understanding of consequences
7. Students will add to their understanding of how the human body works and how physical activity,
healthy eating, and emotional health impact their abilities in all areas

WELLNESS

2508A WELLNESS 1 Credit: .5


This is a semester course meeting on alternate days
The Northampton High School Wellness Curriculum is designed to emphasize each student’s responsibility for
his or her own health and well being. The curriculum is based on the six-dimension model of wellness:
Physical, Social, Emotional, Occupational, Spiritual, and Intellectual. Courses integrate Health and Physical
Education concepts, providing students with the skills, knowledge and behaviors needed to attain a healthy
balance in their lives.
Unit 1: Adventure Challenge activities and Initiative problems:
In this unit we will explore group dynamics and the art of working as an effective team to solve problems and tackle
challenges. We will cover the topics of leadership, communication, problem solving, and conflict resolution. The class
will be conducted outdoors and on the ropes course elements in the gym. We will go on two field trips during this unit
if allowable to take the challenge even further.

Unit 2: Health Assessment and Lifelong Fitness Activities:


In this unit we will take advantage of the latest fitness assessment technology to explore student fitness levels. This
personalized goal based system will be used to help students develop their own health and fitness goals. We will also
incorporate the use of heart rate monitors, pedometers and other tools to help students gain a better understanding of
their personal energy balance. Students will also participate in an array of fitness activities that can be pursued
throughout life. This unit will be closely connected to unit 3.
Unit 3: Eating Well / Nutrition/ Substance Abuse/ Sexuality:
In this unit we will further explore energy balance and the close connection food has to our personal health.
Through interactive activities we will learn the ins and outs of good nutrition and how to incorporate good
food choices into our daily routine. We will also explore substance abuse and sexuality throughout this unit.

Unit 4: First Aid and CPR/AED instruction:


In this unit students will learn first aid and CPR/ AED and will become certified through the American Red
Cross. We will do hands on activities and practice scenarios to make the experience more realistic and
useful.

2508B WELLNESS 2 Credit: .5


This is a semester course meeting on alternate days

Review of Wellness components


• 6 dimensions of wellness
• Life issues and coping

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Substance abuse prevention
• Understanding substance abuse
• Consequences of use
• Peer pressure
• Short and long term effects
• Building resiliency
Critical and Contemporary Health Issues:
• Disease prevention
Media Literacy
• Building safe and healthy relationships
• Human sexuality
• Violence Prevention
• Conflict Resolution
• Wellness and Physical Performance

Physical Activity for life:


• Muscular Fitness Activities
• Cardio respiratory Fitness Activities
• Individual, Team and life-long Activities

9108 PHYSICAL EDUCATION Credit: .5


This is a semester course meeting on alternate days

This elective course offers physical activities that provide students with the opportunities to develop efficient movement
patterns and learn concepts of body awareness, space, and effort. The development of body systems that operate
efficiently and the application of interpersonal skills to solve problems, which will provide the basis for students to
become capable, fit adults. We will engage in a variety of physical activity through games, sports, exercise, and
movement.

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