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2470 District of Rotary

International (Greece)
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The Sea Gate of the Medieval Town of Rhodes, lighted with the logo END POLIO NOW, February 2012
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
The Governors Salutation ........................................................................................................ 4
UNESCOs World Heritage mission ........................................................................................... 5
The Criteria for Selection .......................................................................................................... 6
World Heritage List Greece ................................................................................................... 7
Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae ...................................................................................... 9
Acropolis, Athens ................................................................................................................... 10
Archaeological Site of Delphi ................................................................................................. 11
Medieval City of Rhodes ......................................................................................................... 12
Meteora ................................................................................................................................... 13
Mount Athos ............................................................................................................................ 14
Paleochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessalonika ................................................... 15
Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus ..................................................................................... 16
Archaeological Site of Mystras ............................................................................................... 17
Archaeological Site of Olympia .............................................................................................. 18
Delos ....................................................................................................................................... 19
Monasteries of Daphni, Hosios Loukas and Nea Moni of Chios ............................................ 20
Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos ...................................................................................... 21
Archaeological Site of Aigai (Vergina) .................................................................................... 22
Archaeological Sites of Mycenae and Tiryns .......................................................................... 23
Historic Centre with the Monastery of Saint John .................................................................. 24
Old Town of Corfu ................................................................................................................... 25
The photographer ................................................................................................................... 26
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Fellow rotarians,
Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today and what we
pass on to future generations. Our cultural and natural heritage are both
irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration. What makes the concept of
World Heritage exceptional is its universal application. World Heritage sites
belong to all the peoples of the world, irrespective of the territory on which
they are located.
The United Nations Educational, Scientifc and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
seeks to encourage the identifcation, protection and preservation of cultural
and natural heritage around the world considered to be of outstanding value
to humanity. This is embodied in an international treaty called the Convention
concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage, adopted
by UNESCO in 1972.
In 1985, Rotary International initiated its most ambitious program, Polio-Plus,
with a view to eliminating polio from the world. In 2012 we are only a short
distance away from achieving this goal. Meanwhile, Rotary International
started the campaign End Polio Now as its fnal strike against the disease.
As Governor 2011 2012 of 2470 RI District, I had in mind, for quite a long
time, to light an outstanding monument in Greece, a monument of a clear
multi-cultural nature, a monument classifed by UNESCO as World Heritage
Monument, that of the Medieval City of Rhodes.
Today, with this publication, I would like to present the outcome of this
initiative and, at the same time, bring you all closer to my country, Greece, by
means of its most characteristic monuments, those classifed by UNESCO as
World Heritage Monuments.
I would also like to express, herein, my best thanks to RC of Rhodes and its
members, for making my most daring dream a most beautiful reality.
Nikolaos Makrygiannis
2470 DG
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UNESCOs World Heritage mission
encourage countries to sign the World Heritage Convention and to ensure the protection of their natural
and cultural heritage;
encourage States Parties to the Convention to nominate sites within their national territory for inclusion
on the World Heritage List;
encourage States Parties to establish management plans and set up reporting systems on the state of
conservation of their World Heritage sites;
help States Parties safeguard World Heritage properties by providing technical assistance and professional
training;
provide emergency assistance for World Heritage sites in immediate danger;
support States Parties public awareness-building activities for World Heritage conservation;
encourage participation of the local population in the preservation of their cultural and natural heritage;
encourage international cooperation in the conservation of our worlds cultural and natural heritage.
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DEMOCRATIC
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TURKMENISTAN
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TUNISIA
URUGUAY
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BENIN
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CAMBODIA
TAJIKISTAN
SURINAME
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PANAMA
BHUTAN
REPUBLIC
OF KOREA
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
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SWAZILAND
DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S
REPUBLIC OF KOREA
BELIZE
RWANDA
BURUNDI
KUWAIT
QATAR
DJIBOUTI
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
EL SALVADOR
JAMAICA
EGYPT
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TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
MAURITIUS
COMOROS
BAHRAIN
CAPE VERDE
PALAU
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BARBADOS
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SYRIAN
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FRANCE
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FINLAND
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NORWAY
BELARUS
ROMANIA
REPUBLIC OF
MOLDOVA
GEORGIA
ARMENIA
CYPRUS
LEBANON
ISRAEL
JORDAN
BULGARIA
AUSTRIA
LATVIA
HUNGARY
IRELAND
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LITHUANIA
CROATIA
ESTONIA
REPUBLIC
CZECH
UNITED
KINGDOM
G R E E C E
SLOVAKIA
PORTUGAL
ALBANIA
SERBIA
BELGIUM
SWITZ.
NETHERLANDS
DENMARK
SLOVENIA
F.Y.R.O.M.
BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA
LUXEMBOURG
ANDORRA MONACO
SAN MARINO
HOLY SEE
MALTA
RUSSIAN
FEDERATION
MONTENEGRO (France)
(Italy)
(Spain)
(Italy)
Our Place World Heritage Collection
N.S. Dept. of Tourism, Culture and Heritage / Walley Hayes
Our Place World Heritage Collection
Meindert Van Dijk
Our Place World Heritage Collection
Sebastien Cailleux / Corbis
UNESCO / Alexandra zu Sayn-Wittgenstein
Cat Holloway
UNESCO / Ron Van Oers
2011 UNESCO Printed October 2011
Worldwide, 104 World Heritage forests
protect more than 76 million hectares
of woodland. This accounts for 1.9
percent of the global forest cover and
about 13 percent of the surface area of
all protected forests on the planet. The World Heritage Sustainable Tourism
Programme helps visitors discover World
Heritage sites while encouraging respect of
the environment and local cultures and
enhancing community livelihoods.
World Heritage sites are inscribed on the
List on the basis of their merits as forming
a significant contribution to the cultural
and natural heritage of the world. Their
outstanding universal value is considered
to go beyond national boundaries and to
be of importance for future generations.
Conserving the diversity of life on Earth is
critical to global human welfare. With the
support of the World Heritage Convention,
the most important biodiversity sites
receive international recognition as well as
technical and financial assistance to deal
with threats such as agricultural encroach-
ment, alien species and poaching.
The Earthen Architecture Conservation
Programme works toward conserving and
revitalizing earthen architecture, which is
threatened by natural disasters and indus-
trialization. Currently, some one hundred
properties on the World Heritage List are
partially or totally built with earth.
The World Heritage Marine Programme
helps countries nominate marine sites and
manage them effectively to ensure that they
will thrive for future generations. There
are currently 45 marine sites on the World
Heritage List.
Cultural heritage refers to monuments,
buildings and sites with historical, aesthetic,
archaeological, scientific, ethnological or
anthropological value. Natural heritage
refers to outstanding physical, biological or
geological features and includes habitats of
threatened species, as well as areas with
scientific, environmental or aesthetic
value. Mixed sites have both cultural
and natural values.
The World Heritage emblem symbolizes
the interdependence of the worlds natural
and cultural diversity. The central square
represents the achievements of human skill
and inspiration, and the circle celebrates
the gifts of nature. The emblem is round,
like the world, a symbol of global protec-
tion for the heritage of all humankind.
rom the vast plains of the Serengeti to historic cities such
as Vienna, Lima and Kyoto; from the prehistoric rock art
on the Iberian Peninsula to the Statue of Liberty; from the
Kasbah of Algiers to the Imperial Palace in Beijing all
of these places, as varied as they are, have one thing in common.
All are World Heritage sites of outstanding cultural or natural
value to humanity and are worthy of protection for future
generations to know and enjoy.
The World Heritage Cities Programme seeks
to protect living historic city centres
and their cultural and architectural her-
itage from threats such as uncontrolled
development or inappropriate construction.
The Small Islands Programme focuses on
preserving heritage on the islands of the
Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic, Pacific
and Indian oceans.
Key
Number indicates site order by year of inscription
within each country.
See country index on back side of map for site listings.
Only States Parties to the World Heritage Convention
are labeled on this map.
United Nations (UN) country boundaries shown
as of October 2011
http://whc.unesco.org
http://www.nationalgeographic.com
Cultural property
Natural property
Mixed property (cultural and natural)
Transnational property
Property currently inscribed on the
List of World Heritage in Danger
A
1
1
1
1
The designations employed and the presentation
of material on this map do not imply the expres-
sion of any opinion whatsoever on the part of
UNESCO and National Geographic Society con-
cerning the legal status of any country, territory,
city or area or of its authorities, or concerning
the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.
Dotted line represents approximately the Line of
Control in Jammu and Kashmir agreed upon by
India and Pakistan. The final status of Jammu
and Kashmir has not yet been agreed upon by
the parties.
Final boundary between the Republic of Sudan
and the Republic of South Sudan has not yet
been determined.
EXTRACTS
parts of the cultural or natural heritage are of out-
standing interest and therefore need to be preserved as
part of the world heritage of humankind as a whole.
[with] the magnitude and gravity of the new dan-
gers threatening[the worlds heritage], it is incum-
bent on the international community as a whole to
participate in the protection of the cultural and natural
heritage of outstanding universal value
An Intergovernmental Committee for the Protection
of the Cultural and Natural Heritage of Outstanding
Universal Value, called the World Heritage
Committee, isestablished within UNESCO.
... the Committee shall establish under the title
of World Heritage List, a list of the properties
forming part of the cultural heritage and natural
heritage... which it considers as having outstanding
universal value...
Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage, adopted by the
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, at its General Conference, Paris, 16 November 1972.
Cold War history is preserved in military installations at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall
Islands. United States nuclear testing from 1946 to 1958 devastated most of the
areas coral reefs. Scientists are now studying the re-emergence of the marine
ecosystem.
The Thatta necropolis in Pakistan consists of clusters of tombs and monuments erected
between the 14th and 18th centuries. Intricate carvings and blue glazed tiles decorate
a number of the sandstone and brick buildings, providing a unique example of blended
architectural features from Iran, India and Central Asia.
Ecuadors Sangay National Park, mainly uninhabited, encompasses glacial mountain peaks, low-lying
rainforests, and more than 300 lakes. The parks rugged terrain, located near the meeting point of two
tectonic plates, includes two 5,000-meter active volcanoes.
A unique kind of medina (Islamic city), the Kasbah of Algiers stands
in one of the finest coastal sites on the Mediterranean. It has been
inhabited from at least the 6th century BC when a Phoenician trading
post was established. Several styles of traditional houses, palaces, ham-
mams, mosques and souks have been preserved.
At least 500 fish species and about 200 coral species live in Kiribatis
Phoenix Islands Protected Area in the mid Pacific. Remote and vast
covering more than 400,000 square kilometers the unexplored deep
waters hold submerged volcanoes and reefs almost untouched by humans.
Since the 17th century, the Dutch have depended on state-of-the-art engineering to
reclaim their land from the sea. The worlds largest steam-powered pumping station is the
Woudagemaal, built in 1920 and still able to drain 4 million litres of water per minute.
Each gateway to Madagascars Royal Hill of Ambohimanga was
once sealed with a massive circular stone to control access to
the hill. The sites royal city, its burial grounds with royal tombs,
and several sacred places still attract pilgrims today.
The reduced scale of the maps and the cartographic
projections have resulted in approximate locations
of some properties.
Land cover data:
Tom Patterson, US National Park Service
Text: Shelley Sperry
Design and production by National Geographic Maps
Albers Conic Equal-Area Projection
0 mi 400
0 km 400
Powerful tides in Canadas Bay of Fundy wash away layers of rock at
Joggins Fossil Cliffs to reveal a geological record more than 300 mil-
lion years old. The Coal Age rainforest supported some 200 species
here, including the worlds first reptiles.
The fortress town of Cartagena was founded in 1533 on the coast of
Colombia. Magnificent colonial stone churches, palaces and gardens
still testify to the wealth that flowed through the port in the form of
silver, gold and slaves.
The OUR PLACE World Heritage pho-
tobank is developed in partnership
with the UNESCO World Heritage
Centre. The OUR PLACE team
has now photographed more
than 350 World Heritage
sites in over 85 countries.
Visit: www.ourplace
worldheritage.com
Title photo: Committee for External Relations of
Saint-Petersburg
Saint Petersburg was the vision of Russian Tsar Peter the Great, who
began building his new capital along the Neva River in 1703.
Recruiting Europes greatest architects and an army of forced labor,
Peter erected a carefully planned city of ornate palaces, parks,
and monumental squares in just two decades. Today some
400 bridges cross its network of shimmering canals.
Robinson Projection
SCALE 1:43,720,000
0 mi 1000
0 km 1000
Commission of the
Russian Federation for UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientifc and Cultural Organization
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To be included on the World Heritage List, sites must be of outstanding universal value and meet at least one out
of ten selection criteria. These criteria are explained in the Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the
World Heritage Convention which, besides the text of the Convention, is the main working tool on World Heritage.
The criteria are regularly revised by the Committee to refect the evolution of the World Heritage concept itself.
Until the end of 2004, World Heritage sites were selected on the basis of six cultural and four natural criteria. With
the adoption of the revised Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention, only
one set of ten criteria exists.
The Criteria for Selection
Cultural criteria Natural criteria
Operational Guidelines 2002 (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv)
Operational Guidelines 2005 (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) (viii) (ix) (vii) (x)
Selection criteria:
i. to represent a masterpiece of human creative genius;
ii. to exhibit an important interchange of human values, over a span of time or within a cultural area of the
world, on developments in architecture or technology, monumental arts, town-planning or landscape design;
iii. to bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a civilization which is living
or which has disappeared;
iv. to be an outstanding example of a type of building, architectural or technological ensemble or landscape
which illustrates (a) signifcant stage(s) in human history;
v. to be an outstanding example of a traditional human settlement, land-use, or sea-use which is
representative of a culture (or cultures), or human interaction with the environment especially when it has become
vulnerable under the impact of irreversible change;
vi. to be directly or tangibly associated with events or living traditions, with ideas, or with beliefs, with artistic
and literary works of outstanding universal signifcance. (The Committee considers that this criterion should
preferably be used in conjunction with other criteria);
vii. to contain superlative natural phenomena or areas of exceptional natural beauty and aesthetic
importance;
viii. to be outstanding examples representing major stages of earths history, including the record of
life, signifcant on-going geological processes in the development of landforms, or signifcant geomorphic or
physiographic features;
ix. to be outstanding examples representing signifcant on-going ecological and biological processes in the
evolution and development of terrestrial, fresh water, coastal and marine ecosystems and communities of plants
and animals;
x. to contain the most important and signifcant natural habitats for in-situ conservation of biological
diversity, including those containing threatened species of outstanding universal value from the point of view of
science or conservation.
The protection, management, authenticity and integrity of properties are also important considerations.
Since 1992 signifcant interactions between people and the natural environment have been recognized as cultural
landscapes.
- 7 -
World Heritage List
Greece
- 8 -
- 9 -
Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae
Prefectures of Messenia, Arcadia, and Ilia in the Western Peloponnese
N37 26 5.928 E21 53 48.984
Date of Inscription: 1986
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iii)
This famous temple to the god of healing and the sun was built towards the middle of the 5th century
B.C. in the lonely heights of the Arcadian mountains. The temple, which has the oldest Corinthian capital
yet found, combines the Archaic style and the serenity of the Doric style with some daring architectural
features.
- 10 -
Acropolis, Athens
Prefecture and Region of Attica
N37 58 15.132 E23 43 34.248
Date of Inscription: 1987
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(vi)
The Acropolis of Athens and its monuments are universal symbols of the classical spirit and civilization and form
the greatest architectural and artistic complex bequeathed by Greek Antiquity to the world. In the second half of
the ffh century bc, Athens, following the victory against the Persians and the establishment of democracy, took
a leading position amongst the other city-states of the ancient world. In the age that followed, as thought and
art fourished, an exceptional group of artists put into efect the ambitious plans of Athenian statesman Pericles
and, under the inspired guidance of the sculptor Pheidias, transformed the rocky hill into a unique monument of
thought and the arts. The most important monuments were built during that time: the Parthenon, built by Ictinus,
the Erechtheon, the Propylaea, the monumental entrance to the Acropolis, designed by Mnesicles and the small
temple Athena Nike.
- 11 -
Archaeological Site of Delphi
Prefecture of Phokis, Region of Central Greece
N38 28 53.364 E22 29 46.212
Date of Inscription: 1987
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(vi)
The pan-Hellenic sanctuary of Delphi, where the oracle of Apollo spoke, was the site of the omphalos,
the navel of the world. Blending harmoniously with the superb landscape and charged with sacred
meaning, Delphi in the 6th century B.C. was indeed the religious centre and symbol of unity of the ancient
Greek world.
- 12 -
Medieval City of Rhodes
Prefecture of Dodecanese, Region of the South Aegean
N36 26 49.992 E28 13 40.008
Date of Inscription: 1988
Criteria: (ii)(iv)(v)
The Order of St. John of Jerusalem occupied Rhodes from 1309 to 1523 and set about transforming the city
into a stronghold. It subsequently came under Turkish and Italian rule. With the Palace of the Grand Masters,
the Great Hospital and the Street of the Knights, the Upper Town is one of the most beautiful urban ensembles
of the Gothic period. In the Lower Town, Gothic architecture coexists with mosques, public baths and other
buildings dating from the Ottoman period.
- 13 -
Meteora
Prefecture of Trikala, Region of Thessaly
N39 43 0.012 E21 37 59.988
Date of Inscription: 1988
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iv)(v)(vii)
In a region of almost inaccessible sandstone peaks, monks settled on these columns of the sky from the
11th century onwards. Twenty-four of these monasteries were built, despite incredible difculties, at the time
of the great revival of the eremetic ideal in the 15th century. Their 16th-century frescoes mark a key stage in
the development of post-Byzantine painting.
- 14 -
Mount Athos
Autonomous Monastic State of the Holy Mountain
N40 16 0.012 E24 13 0.012
Date of Inscription: 1988
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iv)(v)(vi)(vii)
An Orthodox spiritual centre since 1054, Mount Athos has enjoyed an autonomous statute since Byzantine
times. The Holy Mountain, which is forbidden to women and children, is also a recognized artistic site. The
layout of the monasteries (about 20 of which are presently inhabited by some 1,400 monks) had an infuence
as far afeld as Russia, and its school of painting infuenced the history of Orthodox art.
- 15 -
Paleochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessalonika
Prefecture of Thessaloniki, Region of Central Macedonia
N40 38 17.988 E22 57 54
Date of Inscription: 1988
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iv)
Founded in 315 B.C., the provincial capital and sea port of Thessalonika was one of the frst bases for the
spread of Christianity. Among its Christian monuments are fne churches, some built on the Greek cross plan
and others on the three-nave basilica plan. Constructed over a long period, from the 4th to the 15th century,
they constitute a diachronic typological series, which had considerable infuence in the Byzantine world. The
mosaics of the rotunda, St. Demetrius and St. David are among the great masterpieces of early Christian
art.
- 16 -
Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus
Prefecture of Argolis, Region of the Peloponnesos
N37 40 0 E23 7 0
Date of Inscription: 1988
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(vi)
In a small valley in the Peloponnesus, the shrine of Asklepios, the god of medicine, developed out of a much
earlier cult of Apollo (Maleatas), during the 6th century BC at the latest, as the ofcial cult of the city state
of Epidaurus. Its principal monuments, particularly the temple of Asklepios, the Tholos and the Theatre -
considered one of the purest masterpieces of Greek architecture date from the 4th century. The vast site,
with its temples and hospital buildings devoted to its healing gods, provides valuable insight into the healing
cults of Greek and Roman times.
- 17 -
Archaeological Site of Mystras
Prefecture of Laconia, Region of the Peloponnesos
N37 4 50.016 E22 22 0.012
Date of Inscription: 1989
Criteria: (ii)(iii)(iv)
Mystras, the wonder of the Morea, was built as an amphitheatre around the fortress erected in 1249 by the
prince of Achaia, William of Villehardouin. Reconquered by the Byzantines, then occupied by the Turks and
the Venetians, the city was abandoned in 1832, leaving only the breathtaking medieval ruins, standing in a
beautiful landscape.
- 18 -
Archaeological Site of Olympia
Prefecture of Ilia, Region of West Greece in the Western Peloponnese
N37 38 60 E21 40 0
Date of Inscription: 1989
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(vi)
The site of Olympia, in a valley in the Peloponnesus, has been inhabited since prehistoric times. In the 10th
century B.C., Olympia became a centre for the worship of Zeus. The Altis the sanctuary to the gods has
one of the highest concentrations of masterpieces from the ancient Greek world. In addition to temples, there
are the remains of all the sports structures erected for the Olympic Games, which were held in Olympia every
four years beginning in 776 B.C.
- 19 -
Delos
Prefecture of Cyclades, Region of the South Aegean
N37 23 60 E25 16 0.012
Date of Inscription: 1990
Criteria: (ii)(iii)(iv)(vi)
According to Greek mythology, Apollo was born on this tiny island in the Cyclades archipelago. Apollos
sanctuary attracted pilgrims from all over Greece and Delos was a prosperous trading port. The island bears
traces of the succeeding civilizations in the Aegean world, from the 3rd millennium B.C. to the palaeochristian
era. The archaeological site is exceptionally extensive and rich and conveys the image of a great cosmopolitan
Mediterranean port.
- 20 -
Monasteries of Daphnion, Hosios Loukas and Nea Moni of Chios
Regions of Attica, Central Greece, North Aegean
N38 23 60 E22 45 0
Date of Inscription: 1990
Criteria: (i)(iv)
Although geographically distant from each other, these three monasteries (the frst is in Attica, near Athens,
the second in Phocida near Delphi, and the third on an island in the Aegean Sea, near Asia Minor) belong
to the same typological series and share the same aesthetic characteristics. The churches are built on a
cross-in-square plan with a large dome supported by squinches defning an octagonal space. In the 11th and
12th centuries they were decorated with superb marble works as well as mosaics on a gold background, all
characteristic of the second golden age of Byzantine art.
- 21 -
Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos
Prefecture of Samos, Region of the North Aegean
N37 41 26.988 E26 56 35.988
Date of Inscription: 1992
Criteria: (ii)(iii)
Many civilizations have inhabited this small Aegean island, near Asia Minor, since the 3rd millennium
B.C. The remains of Pythagoreion, an ancient fortifed port with Greek and Roman monuments and a
spectacular tunnel-aqueduct, as well as the Heraion, temple of the Samian Hera, can still be seen.
- 22 -
Archaeological Site of Aigai (Vergina)
Prefecture of Imathia, Region of Central Macedonia
N40 28 17.004 E22 19 5.988
Date of Inscription: 1996
Criteria: (i)(iii)
The city of Aigai, the ancient frst capital of the Kingdom of Macedonia, was discovered in the 19th century near
Vergina, in northern Greece. The most important remains are the monumental palace, lavishly decorated with
mosaics and painted stuccoes, and the burial ground with more than 300 tumuli, some of which date from the
11th century B.C. One of the royal tombs in the Great Tumulus is identifed as that of Philip II, who conquered
all the Greek cities, paving the way for his son Alexander and the expansion of the Hellenistic world.
- 23 -
Archaeological Sites of Mycenae and Tiryns
Prefecture of Argolis, Region of the Peloponnesos
N37 43 60 E22 45 0
Date of Inscription: 1999
Criteria: (i)(ii)(iii)(iv)(vi)
The archaeological sites of Mycenae and Tiryns are the imposing ruins of the two greatest cities of the
Mycenaean civilization, which dominated the eastern Mediterranean world from the 15th to the 12th century
B.C. and played a vital role in the development of classical Greek culture. These two cities are indissolubly
linked to the Homeric epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey, which have infuenced European art and literature for
more than three millennia.
- 24 -
Historic Centre with the Monastery of Saint John
Prefecture of Dodecanese, Region of the South Aegean
N37 17 60 E26 33 0
Date of Inscription: 1999
Criteria: (iii)(iv)(vi)
The small island of Patmos in the Dodecanese is reputed to be where St. John the Theologian wrote both his
Gospel and the Apocalypse. A monastery dedicated to the beloved disciple was founded there in the late
10th century and it has been a place of pilgrimage and Greek Orthodox learning ever since. The fne monastic
complex dominates the island. The old settlement of Chora, associated with it, contains many religious and
secular buildings.
- 25 -
Old Town of Corfu
Ionian Islands, Corfu Prefecture
N39 37 26.189 E19 55 39
Date of Inscription: 2007
Criteria: (iv)
The Old Town of Corfu, on the Island of Corfu of the western coasts of Albania and Greece, is located in a
strategic position at the entrance of the Adriatic Sea, and has its roots in the 8th century BC. The three forts
of the town, designed by renowned Venetian engineers, were used for four centuries to defend the maritime
trading interests of the Republic of Venice against the Ottoman Empire. In the course of time, the forts were
repaired and partly rebuilt several times, more recently under British rule in the 19th century. The mainly
neoclassical housing stock of the Old Town is partly from the Venetian period, partly of later construction,
notably the 19th century. As a fortifed Mediterranean port, Corfus urban and port ensemble is notable for its
high level of integrity and authenticity.
- 26 -
The photographer
Nikos Kasseris was born in Rhodes, Greece, in 1951. He graduated
from the University of Economics in Piraeus. Since 1980, using Rhodes
as his base, he has been active in various felds of applied photography
as well as in the publication of books on fne-art photography. In 1978
he established the Photographic Workshop of the Municipality of
Rhodes, where he was a lecturer for several years until 1990. Nikos
Kasseris photographic work has been widely shown in both individual
and group exhibitions, and his Multi-Vision presentations have been
shown in Rhodes, Athens and other major Greek and European cities,
as well as in two tours in the USA, in 1996 and 1997, where he was
invited by various Universities and the Greek Community. To date, he
has published seven high-quality editions, and he has participated in
three others.
For his contribution to photography and fne-art publishing, Nikos was
honoured by the Academy of Athens in 1996.
- 27 -
February 2010:
End Polio Now is projected onto the Lake Marathon Dam overlooking the historic Marathon
Memorial Battlefeld in Greece (490 A.C.).
Text compiled by:
Nikos Makrygiannis (RC of Halandri)
Translated and Edited by:
Constantina Episcopopoulou (RC of Nea Smyrni)
Art Director:
Kalliopi Xenopoulou (RC of Hermoupolis)
2470 RID Publication
Rotary Year 2011-12