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Counselor and consumer examined how juvenile crimes are referred to as "acts of delinquency" and require DJJ to intervene.

Counselor and consumer examined how recent years have seen an increase in serious crime by juveniles. Counselor and consumer examined how this has included more violent acts, such as murder, which are often related to drugs, gangs, or both. Counselor and consumer examined how children between the ages of 7 and 14 were generally thought to be incapable of committing a criminal act, but this belief could be disproved by showing that the youth knew the act was a crime or would cause harm to another and committed it anyway. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. Today, all states set age limits that determine whether a person accused of a crime is treated as an adult or as a juvenile. 2. In most states, young people are considered juveniles until age 18. 3. However, some states set the limit at 16 and 17. 4. In these states could be charged with a crime and handled in the same manner as an adult. 5. In most states, a juvenile charged with a serious crime, such as robbery or murder, can be transferred to criminal court and tried as an adult. Counselor and consumer examined how many youths do not understand the serious legal consequences associated with juvenile crimes. Counselor and consumer examined how common juvenile crimes are shoplifting, underage drinking, vandalism, theft, drug use and gang activity. Counselor and consumer examined how juvenile crimes carry harsh consequences that are determined by law. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. If a child is found guilty of a juvenile crime, they may be placed in a public institution, placed in foster care, placed on house arrest, or placed on probation. 2. Some people believe all juveniles should be tried as adults if they commit certain violent crimes. 3. In most states, a juvenile charged with a serious crime, such as robbery or murder, can be transferred to criminal court and tried as an adult. Counselor and consumer examined active listening. Counselor and consumer examined how active listening intentionally focuses on who you are listening to, whether in a group or one-onone, in order to understand what he or she is saying. Counselor and consumer examined how as the listener, you should then be able to repeat back in your own words what they have said to their satisfaction. This does not mean you agree with the person, but rather understand what they are saying. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. It means maintaining eye contact and nodding as you listen. 2. It is important that you give a speaker signs that they are reaching you and that you are interested. 3. This gives them confidence to keep talking. 4. On the other hand, nodding your head and maintaining eye contact are not enough on their own. 5. To show you are listening, acknowledge that you understand what the person is trying to communicate. 6. This can be achieved through the simple repetition of the point they were making or by rephrasing it. Counselor and consumer examined how your body language speaks volumes about you. Counselor and consumer examined how the need to the way you stand at a social gathering sends a message to other guests. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. If you want to send a warm, welcoming message your body language should reflect that desire. 2. This means standing with others, not off on your own. 3. You dont have to be the center of attention, but if youre part of the action people are more likely to involve you in their conversation. 4. Stand

openly even if you arent comfortable, because you dont have to appear that way. 5. A relaxed, open stance invites other people to enter your space. Counselor and consumer examined relationship building. Counselor and consumer examined how in every aspect of life we are in, whether getting involved in the social activities, building our career path, or socializing with family and friends, we interact with various type of individuals. Counselor and consumer examined the fact that we interact with people everyday means that we are building a relationship with these individuals as we associate ourselves with them in one or the other way. Counselor and consumer examined how that there are some things that good relationships have in common. Counselor and consumer examined how knowing the basic principles of healthy relationships helps keep them meaningful, fulfilling and exciting. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1.Staying involved with others. 2. Getting through conflict. 3. Communicate. 5. Honest, direct communication is a key part of any relationship.

Counselor and consumer examined how a strong, healthy relationship can be one of the best supports in your life. Counselor and consumer examined how good relationships improve your life in all aspects, strengthening your health, your mind and your connections with others as well. Counselor and consumer examined how relationships can also be one of the greatest drains if the relationship is not working. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. Relationships are an investment. 2. The more you put in, the more you get back. 3. Love and relationships take work, commitment, and a willingness to adapt and change through life as a team. 4. Learn about ways to keep a healthy relationship strong, or work on repairing trust and love to ensure a lasting relationship.

Counselor and consumer examined relationship building. Counselor and consumer examined how in every aspect of life we are in, whether getting involved in the social activities, building our career path, or socializing with family and friends, we interact with various type of individuals. Counselor and consumer examined the fact that we interact with people everyday means that we are building a relationship with these individuals as we associate ourselves with them in one or the other way. Counselor and consumer examined how that there are some things that good relationships have in common. Counselor and consumer examined how knowing the basic principles of healthy relationships helps keep them meaningful, fulfilling and exciting. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1.Staying involved with others. 2. Getting through conflict. 3. Communicate. 5. Honest, direct communication is a key part of any relationship.

Counselor and consumer examined what is a computer. Counselor and consumer examined how a computer is an electronic device that manipulates information or "data." Counselor and

consumer examined it has the ability to store, retrieve, and process data. Counselor and consumer examined you can use a computer to type documents, send email, surf the Internet, handle spreadsheets, accounting, database management, presentations, games, and more. Counselor and consumer examined all types of computers consist of two basic parts: hardware and software. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. Hardware is any part of your computer that has a physical structure, such as the computer monitor or keyboard. 2. If you can touch it, it is hardware. 3. Software is any set of instructions that tells the hardware what to do. 4. It is what guides the hardware and tells it how to accomplish each task. 5. Anything you buy for your computer can be classified as either hardware or software. 6. Once you learn more about these items, computers are actually very straightforward. Difference between computers. Counselor and consumer examined there are many types of computers, but personal computers such as desktop and laptop computers are probably the two typed of computers that you think of first. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. Many people use desktop computers, or desktops as they are often referred to, at work, home, school, or the library. 2. They can be small, medium, or large in style, and usually sit on a desk. 3. The term desktop actually refers to the casing, or the tower. 4. Once you add a monitor, mouse, and a keyboard, you have what is typically known as a desktop computer. 5. The second type of computer that you may be familiar with is a laptop computer or laptops as they are often referred to. Laptops are battery or AC-powered personal computers that can be easily carried and used in a variety of locations. Counselor and consumer examined computer workstation and servers. Counselor and consumer examined how you may hear someone refer to a computer as a workstation or a server, especially at work. Counselor and consumer examined how these two items are different from desktop computers. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. Workstations are similar to desktop computers, but are more powerful and are usually connected to a network. 2. Servers are specialized computers that store and deliver, or serve up, information to other computers on a network. 3. There are many different types of servers such as file servers, database servers, and web servers. 4. For example, employees at a company might store all the business documents on a file server so that they can share files and access then from any computer on the network. 5. When you use your browser to click a link, a web server delivers the page you requested on the Internet, the biggest network in the world.

Staying involved with each other. Some relationships get stuck in peaceful coexistence, but without truly relating to each other and working together. While it may seem stable on the surface, lack of involvement and communication increases distance. When you need to talk about something important, the connection and understanding may no longer be there. Getting through conflict. Some couples talk things out quietly, while others may raise their voices and passionately disagree. The key in a strong relationship, through, is not to be fearful of conflict. You need to be safe to express things that bother you without fear of retaliation, and be able to resolve conflict without humiliation, degradation or insisting on being right.

 

Keeping outside relationships and interests alive. No one person can meet all of our needs, and expecting too much from someone can put a lot of unhealthy pressure on a relationship. Having friends and outside interests not only strengthens your social network, but brings new insights and stimulation to the relationship, too. Communicating. Honest, direct communication is a key part of any relationship. When both people feel comfortable expressing their needs, fears and desires, trust and bonds are strengthened. Critical to communication are nonverbal cuesbody language like eye contact, leaning forward or away, or touching someones arm.

Family therapy, also referred to as couple and family therapy, family systems therapy, and family counseling, is a branch of psychotherapy that works with families and couples in intimate relationships to nurture change and development. It tends to view change in terms of the systems of interaction between family members. It emphasizes family relationships as an important factor in psychological health.

A corporate trainer is a specialized skill development position in a corporation where the goal is to help improve the "soft skills" or "people skills" of the workers in the corporation.

take a second to think what youre body language is saying to others. Are you standing against a wall? If so, youre saying: Please dont notice me, I wish I werent here. Are your arms folded against your chest? If so, youre saying: Stay away from me, Im not going to tell you a thing about myself and dont want anyone new entering my life.

Juvenile courts have jurisdiction over children in three basic kinds of situations: (1) when they are accused of conduct that would be a crime by an adult; (2) when parents or guardians abuse or neglect them or when they are in need; and, (3) when they violate rules that apply only to juveniles, called status offenses. Status offenses include unapproved absence

Counselor and consumer examined how recent years have seen an increase in serious crime by juveniles. Counselor and consumer examined how this has included more violent acts, such as murder, which are often related to drugs, gangs, or both. Counselor and consumer examined how consequently, there has been a movement in congress and in a number of states to further reduce the age at which juveniles can be tried as adults. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. Some people believe all juveniles should be tried as adults if they commit certain violent crimes. 2. In most states, a juvenile charged with a serious crime, such as robbery or murder, can be transferred to criminal court and tried as an adult. 3. As a result of a get-tough attitude involving juvenile crime, many states have revised their juvenile codes to make it easier to transfer youthful offenders to adult court.

unspoken rules. Counselor and consumer examined how Logical consequences are a way to help fix problems that result from children's words and actions when they break or forget rules. Counselor and consumer examined how They help children regain self-control, reflect on their mistakes, and make amends for them. Counselor and consumer examined how logical consequences should be respectful of the child, relevant to the situation, and reasonable in scale. Counselor emphasized to consumer: 1. Forgive your minor slip-ups. 2. He will make mistakes. 3. He need to be able to go back and try again. 4. When you can, give yourself a minute to take a break or at least a deep breath. 5. Remember to ask for the support you need from other teachers, and to offer your support to them.:

Counselor and consumer examined how they usually exist in unspoken and unwritten format because they form a part of the logical argument or course of action implied by tacit assumptions. Counselor emphasized to consumer that examples involving unspoken rules include: 1. unwritten and unofficial organizational hierarchies. 2. organizational culture, and 3. acceptable behavioral norms governing interactions between organizational members. 4. Even though we are not always aware of them, these rules underpin how we make sense of and navigate in our social world. 5. These rules may seem uninteresting and irrelevant to many but to the extent that these unspoken rule are universally followed within a user population, it can be profitably incorporated into

accepting fault. Counselor and consumer examined how things do go wrong sometimes and there are times when it's somebody else's fault. Counselor and consumer examined how there are times when you know you are at fault for the problem and the mature and responsible thing to do is stand up and own up to the mistake, accept the consequences, and be part of the solution to the problem resulting from your mistake. Counselor emphasized to consumer to: 1. Step up and

confess as soon as you realize what went wrong. 2. Waiting to see how things shake out is a bad idea. 3. As soon as a situation starts going south, step up and point out where the problem started - with you, yourself. 4. The sooner the problem is identified, the sooner a resolution is possible, and that minimizes consequences.

understanding interpersonal relationships. Counselor and consumer examined how to understand what a relationship is, how to bring one about, how to enhance one, and why relationships are diminished and lost, one must understand the power of a persons needs. Counselor and consumer examined how t he most important things in the world, to us, are the things we believe that we need (needs affect opinions, attitudes, and viewpoints). Counselor and consumer examined how the key to good interpersonal relationships is simple once you understand the role
that needs play in making a relationship weak, moderate, average, or strong. Counselor emphasized that: 1. When two people have strong needs and each fills the others needs, there is a powerful interpersonal relationship. 2. When two people have weak needs and each fills the others needs, there is a mild relationship. 3. When either person has strong needs and those needs are not being filled, there is a poor relationship. 4. When either has weak needs and those needs are not being filled, there is a mild relationship, but one leaning more to the negative side than the positive. 5. When a weak need is not being filled, there isnt much caring either way.

not complaining.

or complain about a person.

Counselor and consumer examined how theres no faster way create resentment toward you than to criticize Counselor and consumer examined how instead of telling people theyre doing something wrong,

consider asking them questions to try to find out why they do what they do. Counselor emphasized: 1. Offer them an alternative in a way that comes across as trying to help. 2. Show them how doing things the way you would like them done can benefit them or lead to reward.3. If you would like someone to do something or act in a certain way, try to figure out how what you want might benefit him or her. 4. Once you know those issues, you can then work with the person to help solve them. 5. If you start appreciating the good things others are doing, they are much more likely to give you more good things to appreciate. Just make sure your appreciation is genuine. People will pick up on it if youre just feeding them a line, in which case

improving verbalization skills. Counselor and consumer examined how good verbalization skills are skills that facilitate people to
communicate effectively with one another. Counselor and consumer examined how there are mainly three types of communication skills, expressive skills, listening skills and skills for managing the overall process of communication and the basic fundamental of all these types of communication is emotional skills. Counselor emphasized to consumer that: 1. Expressive skills are required to convey message to others through words, facial expressions and body language. 2. Listening skills are skills that are used to obtain messages or information from others. 3. These help to clearly understand what a person feels and thinks about you or understand the other person closely. 4. Skills for managing the overall process of communication help to recognize the required

5. Watch how the other person responds with facial expressions and body language as you speak. 6. Let him respond verbally to what you said. 7. You may agree to disagree.
information and develop a strong hold on the existing rules of communication and interaction.

Counselor and consumer examined how disagreeing with someone is not just "disagreeing with their point of view, or the information they are sharing. Counselor and consumer examined how disagreeing can communicate I am right, you are

Look at the person and address them by their name.2. Stand about an arm's length away. 3. Look pleasant, even though this takes effort on your part. 4. Actively listen to their point of view. 5. Demonstrate your comprehension by restating what they said.6. Share your point of view using polite language. "I understand how you feel, but let me share how I see things."7. Give reasons why you disagree. 8. Use specific facts.

wrong. Counselor emphasized to consumer to: 1.

Doing laundry. Counselor and consumer examined how to do laundry, first sort your dirty clothes, making separate piles for whites, bright colors and darks. Counselor emphasized to consumer to: 1. if you mix whites with colors in the wash, the colors may bleed onto and ruin your whites. 2. Separate clothes that tend to produce lint (towels, sweatshirts, chenille and flannel) from clothes that tend to attract lint (corduroy, velvets and permanent-press clothes). 3. As you sort, close zippers to prevent snagging, and empty pockets (you don't want soggy shreds of facial tissue all over your clothes!). 4. Pre-treat heavy stains with laundry detergent or stain remover, heeding instructions on the product label. 5.Use the measuring cap of the detergent bottle or the cup found in detergent boxes to measure out the right amount of laundry soap according to the manufacturer's instructions. 6. Add your clothes, close the lid and let the machine do its dirty work. 7. Washing takes approximately 45 minutes Food Preparation Tips. Counselor and consumer examined how the germs in raw meats can be lethal, and fruits and vegetables 1. Pre-heat
the oven for ten minutes before cooking. 2. To prevent food from sticking, heat the frying pan, then add oil. 3. You can tell if a pan is hot enough for cooking by getting your fingers wet and flicking them at the inside of the pan.4. Never cut beef, poultry or pork on a wooden cutting board. 5. The germs in raw meats can be lethal, and fruits and vegetables cut on the same board later will pick up these germs since wood is porous. 6. Use a separate cutting board for meats, and make it hard plastic. 7. Bleach will probably kill all of the germs, but why allow chlorine to get into your food? 8. Never reuse marinades that have come in contact with raw meat, chicken or fish. 9. Putting cooked food back into the raw marinade will contaminate the food. Even the fork that moved meat when raw must not be used for the cooked meat.

is all that is needed when it comes to keeping your home clean.Kitchen:1. Set/Clear Table 2. Wash Dishes/Load Dishwasher 3. Clean and/or Organize Counter/Stove Top, Drawers, Cupboards, Fridge/Freezer, Sink and Microwave. Bathrooms: 4. Clean Shower/Tub, Toilets, Sinks/Counters, Mirrors Drawers/Cupboards. Bedrooms: Make bed Pick up/put away clothes, Tidy closet, Clean off dresser/work desk. Living room: 5. Pick up books and toys 6. Organize bookshelves. 7. Clean/Dust Top Surfaces (computer workspace, tables, etc.)
Household chores checklist. A simple and easy to use household chores checklist

Never use an aluminum bowl for marinating. The bowl will be damaged, and your food will be discolored.

Freezing your grater for a few minutes first and cheese won't stick to it.

Put mixer beaters into hot water for a few minutes to heat them before creaming shortening.

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Pour the soap into your washer or its detergent dispenser. Add liquid fabric softener, if desired, according to the product instructions.

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Choose the water temperature for the wash cycle:hot, warm or cold; save on energy and opt for a cold rinse cycle for any load. Consult the labels on your clothes, your washing machine's instruction manual or the detergent container for recommendations on washing temperature. In general, use cold water to protect colors and darks from bleeding or fading, and to avoid shrinkage. Use warm or hot water for durable fabrics like cotton (make sure they're preshrunk), and to ensure that your whites stay white.

Start the washer before adding clothes, if you have time, to allow the detergent to dissolve in the water. The regular cycle suffices for most laundry, but use the gentle cycle for sheer or delicate fabrics. Adjust the water level to the size of your load.

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If you need to add bleach, allow the machine to run for a few minutes to mix the detergent and water, then add about a cup of bleach to the washer or the bleach dispenser.

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7. Watch how the other person responds with facial expressions and body language as you speak. 8. Let him respond verbally to what you said. 9. You may agree to disagree. 10. Thank the person with a handshake. our face-to-face interactions with other people are governed by a complex set of rules, of which we are mostly unaware. Counselor and consumer examined how for decades now, social scientists have been unraveling the threads of face-to-face interaction, investigating everything from descriptions of body posture used to indicate interest in starting a conversation, to eye gaze dynamics used to convey liking or disliking, to the myriad ways that language can convey attitude, social status, relationship status and affective state. Counselor emphasized that: 1. Even though we are not always aware of them, these rules underpin how we make sense of and navigate in our social world. 2. These rules may seem uninteresting and irrelevant to many but to the extent that these unspoken rule are universally followed within a user population, it can be profitably incorporated into a pro social interface in order to make the interface more natural. and intuitive to use.