A

GUIDE TO Weddings
FEBRUARY 2012
A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO

The Paulding County Progress

INVITING INGENUITY

Ultlimate Wedding Planning Checklist

Options abound for flavorful wedding cakes

FAVORABLE FAVORS

Go Online to view this section! www.progressnewspaper.org

Ultimate Wedding Planning Checklist
From Real Simple To plan the perfect celebration, use this comprehensive checklist, with a timeline based on the 16month length of the average U.S. engagement. SIXTEEN TO NINE MONTHS BEFORE Start a wedding folder or binder. Begin leafing through bridal, lifestyle, fashion, gardening, design, and food magazines for inspiration. Work out your budget. Determine how much you have to spend, based on your families’ contributions and your own. Pick your wedding party. As soon as you’re engaged, people will start wondering who’s in. Start the guest list. Make a head count database to use throughout your planning process, with columns for contact info, RSVPs, gifts, and any other relevant information. (Want to keep costs low? It may be brutal, but the best way to do it is to reduce your guest list.) Hire a planner, if desired. A planner will have relationships with – and insights about – vendors. Reserve your date and venues. Decide whether to have separate locations for the ceremony and the reception, factoring in travel time between the two places. Book your officiant. Research photographers, bands, florists, and caterers. Keep their contact information in your binder. Throw an engagement party, if you wish. But remember that your invitees should be on your wedding guest list as well. EIGHT MONTHS BEFORE Hire the photographer and the videographer. No need to talk specifics yet, but be sure that the people you hire are open to doing the shots that you want. Book the entertainment. Attend gigs of potential acts to see how they perform in front of audiences, then reserve your favorite. Meet caterers. If your wedding venue doesn’t offer its own catering service, look for one now and hire the service this month or early next. Purchase a dress. You’ll need to schedule time for at least three fittings. Veil shopping can be postponed for another two to three months. Reserve a block of hotel rooms for out-of-town guests. Pick three hotels at different price points close to the reception venue. Register. Sign up at a minimum of three retailers. Launch a wedding Web site. Create your personal page through a free provider such as weddingchannel.com. Note the date of the wedding, travel information, and accommodations. Then send the link to invitees. SEVEN TO SIX MONTHS BEFORE Select and purchase invitations. Hire a calligrapher, if desired. Addressing cards is timeconsuming, so you need to budget accordingly. Start planning a honeymoon. Make sure that your passports are up-to-date, and schedule doctors’ appointments for any shots you may need. Shop for bridesmaids’ dresses. Allow at least six months for the dresses to be ordered and sized. Meet with the officiant. Map out the ceremony and confirm that you have all the official documents for the wedding (these vary by county and religion). Send save-the-date cards. Reserve structural and electrical necessities. Book portable toilets for outdoor events, extra chairs if you need them, lighting components, and so on. Book a florist. Florists can serve multiple clients on one day, which is why you can wait a little longer to engage one. Plus, at this point, you’ll be firm on what your wedding palette will be. Arrange transportation. Consider limos, minibuses, trolleys, and town cars. (But know that lowto-the-ground limos can make entries and exits dicey if you’re wearing a fitted gown.) Start composing a day-of timeline. Draw up a schedule of the event and slot in each component (the cake-cutting, the first dance). FIVE TO FOUR MONTHS BEFORE Book the rehearsal and rehearsal-dinner venues. Negotiate the cost and the menu. If you’re planning to host a day-after brunch for guests, book that place as well. Check on the wedding invitations. Ask the stationer for samples of the finished invitations and revise them to suit your needs. Select and order the cake. Some bakers require a long lead time. Attend several tastings before committing to any baker. Send your guest list to the host of your shower. Provided you, ahem, know about the shower. Purchase wedding shoes and start dress fittings. Bring the shoes along to your first fitting so the tailor can choose the appropriate length for your gown. Schedule hair and makeup artists. Make a few appointments with local experts to try them out. Snap a photo at each so you can compare results. Choose your music. What should be playing when the wed•See CHECKLIST page 3

2 - Paulding County Progress February 22, 2012

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February 22, 2012 Paulding County Progress -3

n

Checklist
fitting. Finalize the order of the ceremony and the reception. Print menu cards, if you like, as well as programs. No need to go to a printer, if that’s not in your budget: You can easily create these on your computer. Purchase the rings. This will give you time for resizing and engraving. Send your event schedule to the vendors. Giving them a first draft now allows ample time for tweaks and feedback. TWO MONTHS BEFORE Touch base again with all the vendors. Make sure any questions you or they had on your first draft have been answered. Meet with the photographer. Discuss specific shots, and walk through the locations to note spots that appeal to you. Review the playlist with the band or deejay. Though you probably won’t be able to dictate every single song played, you should come prepared with a wish list. Send out the invitations. The rule of thumb: Mail invitations six to eight weeks before the ceremony, setting the RSVP cutoff at three weeks after the postmark date. Submit a newspaper wedding announcement. If you’re planning to include a photograph, check the publication’s Web site: Some have strict rules about how the photo should look. Enjoy a bachelorette party. Arranging a night out with your girlfriends generally falls to the maid of honor. But if she hasn’t mentioned one to you by now, feel free to ask – for scheduling purposes, of course! – if a celebration is in the works. ONE MONTH BEFORE Enter RSVPs into your guestlist database. Phone people who have not yet responded. Get your marriage license. The process can take up to six days, but it’s good to give yourself some leeway. If you are changing your name, order several copies. Mail the rehearsal-dinner invitations. Visit the dressmaker for (with luck!) your last dress fitting. For peace of mind, you may want to schedule a fitting the week of your wedding. You can always cancel the appointment if you try on the dress then and it fits perfectly. Stock the bar. Now that you have a firm head count you can order accordingly. Send out as many final payments as you can. Confirm times for hair and makeup and all vendors. E-mail and print directions for drivers of transport vehicles. This gives the chauffeurs ample time to navigate a route. Assign seating. Draw out table shapes on a layout of the room to help plan place settings. Write the names of female guests on pink sticky notes and the names of male guests on blue sticky notes so you can move people about without resketching the entire setting. Purchase bridesmaids’ gifts. You’ll present them at the rehearsal dinner. Write vows, if necessary. Get your hair cut and colored, if desired. WEEK OF THE WEDDING Reconfirm arrival times with vendors. Delegate small wedding-day tasks. Choose someone to bustle your dress, someone to carry your things, someone to be in charge of gifts (especially the enveloped sort), someone to hand out tips, and someone to be the point person for each vendor. Send a timeline to the bridal party. Include every member’s contact information, along with the point people you’ve asked to deal with the vendors, if problems arise. Pick up your dress. Or make arrangements for a delivery. Check in one last time with the photographer. Supply him or her with a list of moments you want captured on film. Set aside checks for the vendors. And put tips in envelopes to be handed out at the event. Book a spa treatment. Make an appointment for a manicure and a pedicure the day before the wedding. (You might want to get a stress-relieving massage, too.) Send the final guest list to the caterer and all venues hosting your wedding-related events. Typically, companies close their lists 72 hours in advance. Break in your shoes. Assemble and distribute the welcome baskets. Pack for your honeymoon.

Continued from Page 2
ding party is announced? During dinner? To kick off the dancing? Keep a running list of what you want – and do not want – played. THREE MONTHS BEFORE Finalize the menu and flowers. You’ll want to wait until now to see what will be available, since food and flowers are affected by season. Choose and reserve tuxedos. Decide on a date that works for everyone to visit the store. Select a tuxedo that is reflective of both the groom and the tone of the wedding. Order favors, if desired. Some safe bets: monogrammed cookies or a treat that represents your city or region. If you’re planning to have welcome baskets for out-oftown guests, plan those now too. Make a list of the people giving toasts. Which loved ones would you like to have speak at the reception? Ask them now. Finalize the readings. Determine what you would like to have read at the ceremony – and whom you wish to do the readings. Purchase your undergarments. And schedule your second

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4 - Paulding County Progress February 22, 2012

How the royal wedding influenced the latest trends
bon, lace has become one of the hottest trends this year. “Designers at all price points have debuted collections featuring full frothy skirts, wildflowers and lace used in both traditional and modern ways,” says Kate Campbell, department chair of Fashion & Retail Management at The Art Institute of Tampa, a branch of Miami International University of Art & Design. “This particular trend parallels the more feminine, elegant trends we see in fashion everywhere – including more fitted and ladylike styles reminiscent of Grace Kelly and Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy.” While not for everyone, the use of color in wedding gowns has been growing in popularity. Rich and vibrant, or more subdued, color in bridal wear is everywhere. Some brides choose soft pastel colors, such as blush, rose or skin-tone. Others opt to wear vibrant hues of lavender, green and deep pink. Less bold brides are more likely to use hints of accent color on sashes, bows, embroidery, hems, necklines or beading. “The bride who chooses to add color to her dress is fashion forward and confident - it’s not for the faint of heart,” says Amber Chatelain, lead faculty for the Fashion & Retail Management program at The Art Institute of Tennessee - Nashville, a branch of The Art Institute of Atlanta. Another interesting new trend in bridal wear is short gowns, especially for brides choosing destination and beach weddings. While they may be short in length, these dresses are not short on style. Some offer sophisticated laces, chic feathers or multilayered organza mini-skirts. Soft sleeves are enjoying a comeback. Designers have debuted soft, romantic sleeves, including traditional cap sleeves in florals and tulle, modern silhouettes using vinLace-trimmed bridal gowns are one of the year’s hottest tage elements, sequin fringe and flutter sleeves, and trends, thanks in part to last spring’s royal wedding. Other romantic off-the-shoulder versions. trends include color, soft sleeves and eco-friendly materials. “The softness and elegance of the sleeves in bridal wear (ARA) – Although the latest Brides American Wedding Study shows the average cost of a wedding in 2010 was $26,501 – a decrease of 5 percent from 2009 – weddings continue to be big business. But many couples are opting to cut the guest list instead of big ticket items like wedding gowns. In fact, the average wedding gown cost $1,289 in 2010, a 20 percent increase over 2009, according to the study. This is no surprise to the millions who were glued to their television sets this past April during the most talked about wedding since the 1981 royal wedding of Lady Diana to Prince Charles. Many brides are now emulating the elegant lace gown worn by Catherine Middleton, now the Duchess of Cambridge. In addition to beautiful lace, the newest trends in wedding gowns include color, soft sleeves, short hemlines and ecofriendly materials. Whether it is Chantilly, Alencon, duchesse, guipure, or ribmirrors today’s general fashion trends, where designers are highlighting the elegance and beauty of the female form in very soft ways,” says Charlene Parsons, who heads the fashion programs at Miami International University of Art & Design. Eco-friendly options have also increased in popularity. “There are now numerous eco-friendly designers whose sole business is to create wedding dresses made with earthfriendly fabrics and materials, using techniques that are in harmony with the earth,” says Crystal Shamblee, department chair of Fashion Design for The Art Institute of Philadelphia. Secondhand and vintage wedding dresses are another ecofriendly choice. Whatever fashion trends a bride chooses, one that will never go out of style is a gown that fits well, is figure flattering and makes the bride feel like she’s the most beautiful woman in the world on her big day. To learn more about The Art Institutes visit www.artinstitutes.edu.

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Brides – and grooms-to-be – hope and pray their wedding day will go off without a hitch. After a year or more of planning and writing checks for so many things, couples hope that it all comes together in the end. For most it does. Others may need a little help keeping things on track. Although the idea is to hope for the best, being prepared for a few obstacles along the way can ensure the day goes smoothly. Many couples find it wise to pack an emergency kit, stocked with items to make repairs or handle tie ups with ease. Brides and grooms can use this checklist to compile a wedding day kit that meets their needs and customize with any specialty items: • needle and thread in white, black and the color of bridesmaid gowns • extra pairs of pantyhose • pain reliever pills • antacid • quick-clean detergent stick • bandages • powder • deodorant • double-sided tape • black buttons • tampons • mints/gum • makeup for touch-ups • extra cash • slippers or a change of shoes • umbrellas • hairspray • hair pins • names and phone numbers of all wedding vendors • static cling spray • hair dryer • contact lens solution/eye drops • nail file • nail clipper • straws (to sip drinks without ruining lipstick) • safety pins • black socks • earring backs

Unique touches for your reception
Over the course of their lifetimes, many people will be wedding guests on several occasions. During the height of wedding season, weddings can run into one another, as the format and the festivities are similar at various ceremonies. Couples interested in setting their nuptials apart may want to enhance the wedding reception with a few unique ideas. Who hasn’t attended a wedding that seems formulaic? The couple enters, they do their spotlight dance, there’s food, a bouquet toss and then the cake cutting. Guests may actually be able to predict what’s coming next. While it is often customary and easy to follow tradition, that doesn’t mean you cannot buck with tradition and offer a few creative ideas to make your event stand out. Here are several ideas you can introduce into your wedding to add something special to the reception. • Skip the big entrance. Those who were kind enough to attend the ceremony have already been introduced to the newly minted happy couple. Instead of spending the cocktail hour in the isolation of the wedding suite, mingle with your guests from start to finish. So much time is spent posing for pictures or being out of touch with guests, the cocktail hour can be a great time to sit and chat. Being with guests during the cocktail hour means you don’t have to make that big entrance from behind closed doors. Guests will have all eyes on you when you step on the dance floor for your first dance together. • Dance to an upbeat number. Guests are expecting a slow, sappy tune. What they may not expect is an upbeat song that shows you are willing to have a little fun. If you haven’t mastered the waltz but enjoy a little quick step now and again, feel free to choose a tune that shows your excitement and love for each other. • Encourage couples to dance together. It’s often customary for the bridal party to join the bride and groom on the dance floor midway through the first dance. However, that leaves spouses or significant others waiting in the wings while their dates tango with groomsmen or bridesmaids. Instead, don’t have assigned partners. Rather, encourage your bridal party members to dance with whomever they choose. • Swap the garter/bouquet toss for something more meaningful. If you’re part of a couple who feels the garter and bouquet toss has become trite, there are other ways to create special moments in your celebration – ones that don’t single out the singletons who haven’t yet found their special someones. Use this time to present a small gift or token of your affection to someone on the guest list who has served as a mentor or source of inspiration. • Choose one special component as an extra goodie for guests. Some couples feel the more they offer, the better guests will view their wedding. Spending more money doesn’t necessarily mean guests will have a better time. If you want to go above and beyond the ordinary, find one thing that you absolutely love and offer that at the party. It could be a flambé presentation, a chocolate or candy bar, a carving station with your all-time favorite food (even if that’s PB&J), or a carnival-inspired automatic photo booth. • Hire a live performer. Although it’s hard to beat the performance quality of your wedding song being performed by the original artist, unless you’re cousins with Celine Dion, chances are she won’t be available to sing “My Heart Will Go On” at your reception. However, a live band adds a certain level of excitement that a disk jockey may not be able to provide. Those who are adding a cultural or ethnic component to their wedding may want to hire a dance troupe or another type of performer, like a bagpiper, as an added measure of entertainment for guests. • Let them eat ... cookies? Some people just don’t like cake. Therefore, why should a couple have to cut a seven-tiered white confection? Towers of different types of treats can be created from just about anything and serve as the perfect backdrop for that classic cake-cutting photo. A pyramid of

February 22, 2012 Paulding County Progress - 5

cream puffs, stacks of brownies, a cookie castle, or cereal-cake concoctions can work. Some bakeries will decorate a “dummy” styrofoam cake, and then you can serve apple pie a la mode, if you desire. • Stage a costume switch. Let’s face it, dancing all night in a long gown takes some stamina. As the bride, have a more comfortable cocktail dress available to switch into for the latter part of the reception. It will also add some variety to your wedding photos.

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6 - Paulding County Progress February 22, 2012

Wedding registry do’s and don’ts
probably will, too.” Don’t: Reference your registry info on any stationery, such as your save the date or invitation. You can, however, include the URL for your wedding Web site, which should contain the details of where you’re registered, on those printed materials. “It’s perfectly acceptable to tell someone where you’re registered if they ask what kind of gift you’d like, but mentioning gifts in any way on your invitations is in very poor taste,” says Sue Fox, author of Etiquette for Dummies. Do: Request nontraditional items if they reflect you as a couple. “I have friends who registered at REI; their list included a tent and a canoe, which was perfectly acceptable because they’re outdoor enthusiasts,” says Fox. Wine registries for budding oenophiles and honeymoon registries, where guests can, say, pay for your breakfast in bed while you’re in Fiji, are becoming increasingly popular. Don’t: Eliminate all time-honored items. There are limits: Feelings are still very mixed on items such as gadgets and electronics, which don’t fit the old-fashioned criteria as nest-building necessities. “It’s tough to justify something that will be outdated in two years,” notes Bailey. (Note: Any personal items, such as beauty products or clothing, are strictly off-limits.) To avoid ruffling any feathers, throw in at least a handful of traditional items to appease the old-school types who simply won’t be satisfied attending unless it’s with a blender in hand. Do: Wait to use the presents that arrive before the wedding. “Heaven forbid, should the event not take place for whatever reason, the rule of thumb is that all the gifts must be returned,” says Post. Lightly scratched service for 12, anyone? Don’t: Ask for money outright. If cash is what you’re after, the only polite choice is to not register anywhere and pray that your guests get the message. Family and friends – not you and your betrothed – can delicately spread the word. “They should use euphemisms for money like, ‘I know they would love help with a contribution toward the home they’re hoping to buy,’” says Post. Just brace yourself for some unwanted salad tongs amid the checks you’ll receive. Do: Write thoughtful, prompt thank-you notes; emails and calls don’t count. Within six weeks of receiving the gift, write a note that references the specific object and how or why you will enjoy using it. Adds Fox, “Once you start receiving gifts, keep a log noting what you received, from whom, when – plus the date that you sent out the note. It’ll ensure that nothing gets overlooked.” It also makes for a handy reference tool the next time you’re scheduled to see Aunt Tilda and can’t remember if she got you the gravy boat or the juicer.

From Real Simple Do: Set up your registry early. “From the moment you announce your engagement, friends and family will want to send gifts,” says Karena Bullock Bailey, a New York City-based wedding and special events planner. Don’t: Register at just one location. Two to three is ideal, such as a high-end store, an inexpensive retailer and a specialty store. If possible, at least one of them should have a brick and mortar store in the areas where many of your guests live. Just because you dig the convenience of the web doesn’t mean that Nana feels the same. “The in-store option definitely makes certain guests more comfortable,” confirms Anna Post, author of Do I Have to Wear White? (Collins, $15). Do: Register for a wide range of gifts at various price points. People prefer choosing from a large selection: If you have, say, 100 invited guests, you’ll need a minimum of 125 registry items. Registering at one kitchen store, one home goods store, and one department store should cover all the bases. “About a third of your items should be under $50, a third from $50-$150, and the rest $150 and up,” says Bailey. As for the high end? Know your audience: “For one couple, having gifts that max out at $200 would be too much; for another, it’s $1,000-plus,” says Post. “If you’re questioning whether it’s appropriate, others

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February 22, 2012 Paulding County Progress -7

Best honeymoon weather by wedding month
From The Weather Channel Is choosing a honeymoon spot making you dizzy? There are a number of ways to narrow down your choices, depending on whether beautiful weather, cost, or sightseeing is your first priority. Great weather and optimal sightseeing opportunities – as well as high room rates and more crowds (reserve early!) – often go hand in hand during a destination’s high season. (Low season is when seasonal businesses – restaurants and island ferries, for example – shut down and attractions may close for renovations.) If high season perks are what you seek for your once-in-a-lifetime honeymoon, we’ll tell you where to go to find the best weather or, if you have your heart set on a specific place, what to expect during that month. Knot Note: A destination’s high – or busy – season usually coincides with an area’s best weather, but it can also determined solely by demand. High season in Hawaii and the Caribbean, where the weather doesn’t change that dramatically, runs from January to April simply because people from colder climes flock to their sunny beaches to flee the winter chill. Conversely, Disney World is packed in the summer despite the searing heat because kids are out of school. WEATHER BY DATE A month-by-month guide to the best weather where and when, excerpted from Lucy Hone’s The Good Honeymoon Guide (Trail Blazer Publications). Get more details about a destination’s year-round weather from a travel guidebook or by calling its tourism board (find phone numbers and/or Web sites at www.towd.com). Just before you go, be sure to check the forecast to help you pack. Knot Note: Remember that this is a guide to when different destinations traditionally experience the most ideal weather of the year. The months immediately preceding and succeeding a destination’s prime time are often called “shoulder” seasons, and usually have good weather as well. Other destinations, such as the Caribbean and Hawaii, are temperate year-round, but particularly incredible at the times listed below. January and February Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Bali, Belize, Brazil, Canada (ski destinations), Caribbean, Central and South Africa, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Maldives, Mexico, Morocco, New Zealand, the Florida Keys, U.S. (ski destinations) March Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Belize, Canada (ski destinations), Brazil, Caribbean, Central and South Africa, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Egypt, French Polynesia, Hawaii, Maldives, Mexico, Morocco, the Florida Keys, U.S. (ski destinations, Southeast, Southwest) April Argentina, Bahamas, Belize, Brazil, Canada, Caribbean, Central and South Africa, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Egypt, French Polynesia, Hawaii, Italy, Maldives, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Spain, the Florida Keys, U.S. May Belize, Bermuda, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Caribbean, Central and South Africa, Czech Republic, Fiji, France, French Polynesia, Greece, Hawaii, Ireland, Italy, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Seychelles, Spain, Thailand, the Florida Keys, U.S. June Bermuda, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Central and South Africa, Czech Republic, Fiji, France, French Polynesia, Greece, Hawaii, Ireland, Italy, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Seychelles, Spain, Thailand, U.S. (Alaska, Northeast) July and August Bermuda, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Central and South Africa, Czech Republic, Fiji, France, French Polynesia, Ireland, Kenya, Madagascar, Malaysia, Seychelles, Thailand, U.S. (Alaska, Northeast) September Australia, Bermuda, Brazil, Britain, Canada, Central and South Africa, Czech Republic, Fiji, France, French Polynesia, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Seychelles, Spain, Thailand, U.S. October Australia, Bali, Belize, Bermuda, Brazil, Canada, Central and South Africa, Egypt, Fiji, French Polynesia, Hawaii, Italy, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, Seychelles, Spain, U.S. November Australia, Bahamas, Bali, Belize, Brazil, Canada (ski destinations), Central and South Africa, Egypt, French Polynesia, Hawaii, Mauritius, Mexico, Morocco, New Zealand, Seychelles, Spain, U.S.(ski destinations, Southeast, Southwest) December Argentina, Australia, Bahamas, Bali, Belize, Brazil, Canada (ski destinations), Caribbean, Central and South Africa, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Morocco, New Zealand, the Florida Keys, U.S. (ski destinations)

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8 - Paulding County Progress February 22, 2012

Options abound for flavorful wedding cakes
A tiered wedding cake is often a fitting conclusion to a wedding reception. Today’s brides and grooms are experimenting with cake flavors and designs so their cake is a unique representation of their persona as a couple. It’s no longer necessary to stick with a white cake with buttercream frosting for your wedding day. Think about exploring other flavor and filling combinations that will tempt the guests’ taste buds. For those who can’t settle on just one flavor, how about having a different flavor for each layer? Couples getting married in the fall may want to think about a spice cake that evokes the feelings of sipping a mug of spiced cider. Cream cheese frosting is often a pairing with spice cake, or think about a layer of caramel that will make it taste like you’re enjoying a candied Halloween apple. A hummingbird cake may fit the bill for a spring wedding. This is made with mashed bananas, pineapples and chopped pecans. This cake is perfect when paired with cream cheese frosting. Yellow or white cake are universal favorites for weddings. Some pizzazz can be added through the use of creative fillings. Consider something citrusy and summery for a summer wedding. Raspberry preserves or lemon curd are tart and sweet. For a tropical flair, mangoes or passion fruit can be mixed with touches of coconut. A winter wedding can be accented with rich flavors, like a decadent chocolate cake filled with chocolate ganache and black cherries – in a black forest style. Those toasting to the good life may want an almond cake enhanced with some fine liqueur and simple chocolate buttercream. Couples should sit down with their baker and sample a number of flavor combinations to determine a recipe that works for them. Pastry companies also may be able to develop a cake that encompasses a couple’s favorite flavors or symbolizes a special moment in their lives. A Boston Cream Pieinspired cake may liven up the wedding of a couple who became engaged in Boston. Maybe a cannoli cream filled cake will usher in memories of a trip to Italy. Kids at heart can enjoy candy confection cakes filled with gooey chocolate, nuts and marshmallows. Whatever the case, couples can use their cake as a centerpiece that wows the senses of taste as well as vision. Consider displaying this culinary masterpiece on a table with the seating cards placed around it so that it can be enjoyed the entire night.

Wedding cakes can be an array of shapes, sizes and flavors.

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