Urban Context: Site Location Spitalfields and Banglatown Ward

The London Borough of Tower Hamlets is a London borough to the east of the City of London and north of the River Thames. It is in the eastern part of London and covers much of the traditional East End. The borough has a population of 220,000, which includes one of the highest ethnic minority populations in the capital, consisting mainly of Bangladeshis.

The City: London

The Borough: Tower Hamlets

The Ward: Spitalfields and Banglatown

Throughout the 19th century, the local population increased by an average of 20% every ten years. The building of the docks intensified land use and caused the last marshy areas in the south of the parish to be drained for housing and industry. In the north of the borough employment was principally in weaving, small household industries like boot and furniture. The availability of cheap labour drew in employers.

‘Tower Hamlets occupies a key position within London, with the City to the west and the opportunities offered by an area defined as the East Thames Corridor (stretching from Tower Bridge on both sides of the Thames into Essex and Kent), to the east. The development of Docklands in particular has placed Tower Hamlets at the centre of London’s future, providing new homes and entertainment but perhaps most dramatically of all, a new business centre for the Capital.

Tower Hamlets occupies a position at the centre of improvements to the infrastructure of the capital (covering road and rail). This combined with the continuance of major development opportunities places Tower Hamlets in a key position to shift the direction of development in the capital to the east’. Section 6.1 Tower Hamlets UDP.

Urban Context: Typology
The majority of housing within the ward is Social Housing. This can be a credited to the wards low level of education and employment. There are number of educational facilities in the ward. The area also houses a large number of 3rd level education students due to close proximity to a number of Universities. The majority of the population within the ward are of Islamic faith and there are a number of Mosques within the area most notably the East London mosque on Whitechapel road and on Bricklane in the former Synagogue. Industry within in the area is on the decline with most seeking employment in the city. The City on the boundary of the ward is beginning to encroach into the area. The High streets demise of resent and the decline in industry has enables sites to be opened up for new office building to be erected bringing an influx of city workers to the area. The Ward has a high Level of en employment particularly in the age group 16-25. The ward lies in one of the most impoverished boroughs in the UK there fore income support is very high within the area. Algate East is the main Transport Hub for the area with Algate, Whitechapel stations and a main commuter station Liverpool Street all close by. The are will also benefit from the completion of the Cross Rail Network that is currently under construction and will have a stop at Whitechapel station.
Scale: 1:5000

Historical Analysis: Whitechapel High Street 1843

Historical Analysis Whitechapel High Street 1934

Historical Analysis Whitechapel High Street 2011

Political Analysis: Whitechapel High Street Decline

Political Analysis: Whitechapel High Street Transformation

Buildings Demolished since 1841

Buildings remaining since 1841

New buildings since 1841

Construction sites in 2011

Political Analysis: Conservation Area
‘The Brick Lane and Fournier Street Conservation Area is one of the most important historic areas in London. It was designated in July 1969 as ‘Fournier Street’. It was extended in 1978 and again in 1998, when its name was changed to reflect Brick Lane’s contribution to the character of the area. It was further extended to the west and south west in October 2008 with the inclusion of St Matthews Church, St Anne’s Church and Victoria and Albert Cottages. It is one of the largest in Tower Hamlets, running along Brick Lane from Bethenal Green Road in the north down to Whitechapel in the south. It contains some of the most architecturally and historically significant buildings in the Borough, including the exceptional group of 18th century houses around Fournier Street. They comprise the most important early Georgian quarter in England and include Christ Church Spitalfields, designed by Nicholas Hawksmoor’. Bricklane and Fournier Street Conservation Area, Tower Hamlets
Conservation Area

‘The Whitechapel High Street Conservation Area was Designated in September 1998. It marks the western end of the A11, an ancient route linking the City with Essex and Continental Europe via Harwich.

The boundaries of the Conservation Area follow the historic footprints of buildings set on long, narrow plots, some amalgamated in two’s and three’s, but always presenting a narrow street frontage in relation to their depth. More contemporary buildings, set on plots with a far wider street frontage, interrupt the fine grain of the historic fabric and have been omitted from the Conservation Area. The area contains individually significant buildings and collectively the surviving prewar townscape is of historic and architectural importance, worthy of preservation and enhancement’. Whitechapel High Street Conservation Area, Tower Hamlets

Economic Analysis: Social/Private Development
The majority of housing within the ward is Social Housing. This can be a credited to the wards low level of education and employment. There are number of educational facilities in the ward. The area also houses a large number of 3rd level education students due to close proximity to a number of Universities. The majority of the population within the ward are of Islamic faith and there are a number of Mosques within the area most notably the East London mosque on Whitechapel road and on Bricklane in the former Synagogue. Industry within in the area is on the decline with most seeking employment in the city. The City on the boundary of the ward is beginning to encroach into the area. The High streets demise of resent and the decline in industry has enables sites to be opened up for new office building to be erected bringing an influx of city workers to the area. The Ward has a high Level of en employment particularly in the age group 16-25. The ward lies in one of the most impoverished boroughs in the UK there fore income support is very high within the area. Algate East is the main Transport Hub for the area with Algate, Whitechapel stations and a main commuter station Liverpool Street all close by. The are will also benefit from the completion of the Cross Rail Network that is currently under construction and will have a stop at Whitechapel station.

Social/ Private Housing

Public Green space including the refurbished Altab Ali Park and the new Braham St Park

Commercial/Office Development

Retail

The Site: 64-68 Whitechapel High Street Context

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Site in context Scale: 1:10000

Site Location Scale: 1:1000

The Site Is Accessed from Whitechapel High Street and Whitechurch Passage,although presently only no:65 and 67 have dual access 64/65a, 66 and 68 are accessed solely from the High Street.

The Site: 64-68 Whitechapel High Street Approach
The Site acts as the gateway buildings from the city as you enter Whitechapel they are also framed by the exit of the tube Station and are the first visual visitors have of the high street. This block has been present since the 1870’s but a lot of its elements were lost during the blitz, and decades of refurbishments and alterations. The Project Will focus on Building 64-68 of the block as these are the building that were focus upon under Works began on 64 to 68 Whitechapel High Street in February 2010. Building owners were engaged through the process and designs for shop-fronts and colours for signage were agreed in accordance with the Conservation Area guidance. Andrew Hargreaves, Historic Areas Advisor for English Heritage, said: “The completion of the repair and restoration works to the exterior of this group of late 19th century Conservation Area buildings marks an exciting stage in the High Street 2012 initiative and an invaluable investment in local heritage.” He also states by doing this it is creating “a world class high street of which London can be proud and which will be admired by the world during the 2012 Games.” The resonance of his last statement “admired by the world”, conjures questions for exploration whether or not the work and the initiatives set out by the high street 2012 agenda has any relationship with those that mater, the local population that live and work on this street and what the legacy if any will be for them after 2012.

Approach From Algate East tube station

c1880

c1914

2009

The Site Context 2009

Existing Elevations Scale: 1:200

Existing Elevations c2009

The Site: Facade Analysis

Proposed Elevations Scale: 1:200 (Juliian Harrap Architects Design Drawing Authors own)

The Project seeked to return Street elevation, fronting on Whitechapel High street, back its appearance at the turn of 20th century.

the to to the

The high street 2012 initiative set about restoring it back to its 1870’s face. The work carried out by Julian Harrap Architects set about rebuilding the entire façade but replacing the outer leaf of brick with a similar tile of London stock brick construction with elaborate stone cornice at second floor level and stone render window surrounds. The corner of the block was further delineated by a pediment door surround and a mirrored pediment at roof level, further enriched by ball finials.

The Site: Analysis
To get an understanding of the Facade and intense level of detailing was done in order to give gravitas to the project.

The Site: Building Analysis

Site - Long Section

Site - Cross Section

The original Building were most likely in single ownership with the shop owner and his family living above. The present use is as shown.

Existing space typology Retail Offices Residential

The Site: Design Constraints

Listed Facade: As the Facade was listed in 2009 one constraint was that nothing can permeate the front elevation.

Third Party Wall: A service of notice of new party wall will have to be issued to neighbouring building owners. Party structures a notice will have to be issued 2 months before work commences.

Conservation Area: A listed building application form will have to be submitted in conjunction with the planning application and additional fees paid. Other factors to be considered will are legal aspects eg Easement of Support, access to neighbouring land act , access to Services eg drainage etc.

London Underground: Will have to be consulted with regards to site hoarding,access and basement construction. It is likely this entrance will be closed during construction.

Delivery: Because of the close proximity to the high street a strategy for delivery of construction material will need to be addressed.

The Site: Solar Study
Sun study
Spring: March 9.00am Autumn: October 9.00am

The angle of the sun in London on June 21st, is 520

Spring: March 12.00pm

Autumn: October 12.00pm

The angle of the Sun in London on Dec 21st, is 150 Spring: March 3.00pm Autumn: October 3.00pm

Sun Path Diagram for 520 North

The Client: High Street 2012

‘High Street 2012 is an ambitious project

to improve and celebrate one of London’s great high streets. This ribbon of London life is both everyday and remarkable. It is historic and modern, and constantly evolving. The project aims to reconnect places and communities, making this high street a place Londoners can share with the world during the Olympics and beyond. The high street connects the City to Stratford and is part of the Olympic and Paralympic marathon route. While it runs through some of the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods in the capital and is dominated by heavy traffic, it also passes through some of the most culturally diverse and historically rich areas of London, with a wonderful range of existing buildings, streets, markets, waterways and many parks and green routes. We want to build on the strengths of this street,transform perceptions of the area, encourage positive change and stimulate investment’. High Street 2012 It’s fitting that there will be a wonderful, vibrant avenue leading to London’s 2012 legacy in the east of the city’. Boris Johnson, Mayor of London

The Client
High Street 2012 Initiatives Repair, improve and reinstate historic buildings to celebrate the street’s heritage and create a better sense of place. Create a ‘green thread’ by enhancing clusters and clumps of green along the street, from green spaces and tree planting To green walls and roofs. Support community gardening projects to contribute to greening the street. Involve local communities in High Street 2012 through a range of projects, some with physical outcomes and others which Have a social focus. Light up the High Street to bring it to life. Working with artists and designers, develop lighting for the high street’s carriageways and pavements, and create special lighting for key spaces and destinations such as parks, markets and historic buildings. Improve surfaces for pedestrians using materials which complement local character and features. Create a new cycle way with bikes to hire along parts of the route. Transform way finding by complementing signage with more subtle and intuitive Interventions that use existing features of the streetscape to provide a sense of direction and point to places of interest both obvious and hidden. De clutter the street by removing unused signage, railings and furniture to make it more attractive and easier to navigate.

High Street 2012: Project Initiates
Green thread: The refurbishment of Altab Ali Park and the creation of Braham Street Park, are all part of high street 2012’s green thread initiative. The aim is not to create a green formal boulevard but the creation of green break out spaces from “waste” land. A procurement process was followed with East and Muf architects respectively being name preferred bidders. Altab Ali Park Altab Ali Park is a formerly known as St. Mary’s Park it is the site of the old 14th Century white chapel. The park was re-named Altab Ali Park in 1998[5] in memory of Altab Ali, a 25-year-old Bangladeshi clothing worker, who was murdered on 4 May 1978 in Adler Street. Muf’s approach to the Park is respectful of the history and community. They held a community archaeological dig that unearthed remnants of the past that they utilised in various installations. Muf’s design seeks to create an inviting community space achieved through additional gateways and routes through with a strong emphasis on the past. Braham Street Park East’s adopted approach for Braham Street was to take a more minimalistic approach for what was an actual street. The landscaping is sparse and uninviting and bears no physical and visual connection to the high street and essentially still retains its original use as a route through. The park looks unfinished and one question’s where the money was spent when you look at the quality of materials used. East refused to give comment. Whitechapel Market: Is a vibrant market selling wares from fruit and veg, clothing and household goods. It is a prominent feature in the community having a deep history from its origin as a Haymarket. The market has a strong resonance both socially and economically for the local people and yet it has not escaped the eye of the high street 2012 authority. Presently the market comprises of pitches measuring 13ft x 10ft with parking for the traders vans. Under the review of the high street 2012 framework works will be carried out to unify the market with new lighting and stalls.
Altab Ali Park

As the market is operated by more than 60 stall holders one would think a long period of consultation and debate about the changes had been undertaken. Although speaking with Muhammad operating from his pitch 002 for the last 22 years no consultation has ever taking place to discuss the changes being enforced upon them stating; “No, nobody here knows, only people here know one day before.” He went on to say that under the new de-cluttered design pitch sizes are being reduced to 10ft x 7ft and an additional monthly rate increase from £198 to £270. So indirectly they will be paying for the work being undertaken.

Whitechapel Market new Pitch Size

The new markets also does not allow for the traders to park their van thus not enabling them to store additional stock. With this and the smaller pitch sizes this will have an economic effect and detrimental to the traders longevity in the market.

Building Context Design Strategy Concept

The concept is to have a range of plug in units arranged around a ramp that climbs through the building. The Ramp and the external new shell have structural implications. They help without the need for buttressing the front facade in keeping it upright. The Restored facade acts merely as a wrap for the building the public face the internal spaces will be in complete contrast to the external appearance. The concept Behind the design is to create a form with multiple functions. Taking inspiration from Cedric Prices’ Fun Palace the building I want to achieve is a multi- function community hub.

Plug in Units

Plug in Units

Vertical Circulation

Building Context Precedent Studies The Ramp

BMW Museum

Mercedes Museum - UN Studio

Guggenehim Museum New York

Building Context Precedent Studies Pop up Retail Spaces

Building Context: Design Analysis Concept

Building Context: Design Analysis Area Schedule

Building Context: Design Analysis Level -01 GA Plan Scale 1:100

7. 8.

6.

4. 5. 3.

2.

9. 10. 11.

12.

13.

16.

14. 17. 15.

Void Above

1.

Key: 1. Exhibition Space 2. Stair/Lift Core 3. Male W/C 4. Disabled W/C 5. Female W/C 6. Admin Office 7. Tea/Coffee Area 8. Manager Office 9. Staff Change 10. Cleaners Store 11. Kitchen 12. Prep Area 13. Dry Store 14. Staff Room 15. Cold Store 16. Riser/Dummy Waiter 17. Service Lift

Building Context: Design Analysis Level 00 GA Plan Scale 1:100

2.

2.

1.

4.

3.

5. Void

7..

6.

Key: 1. Reception 2. Retail Pitches 3. Cafe 4. Stair/Lift Core 5. Ramp 6 Service Lift 7. Riser

Building Context: Design Analysis Level 01 GA Plan Scale 1:100

1. Void

1.

1.

1.

2.

1. 1. 5. 4. Void

1. 3.

Key: 1. Retail Pitches 2. Stair/ Lift Core 3. Service Lift 4. Riser 5. Ramp

Building Context: Design Analysis Level 02 GA Plan Scale 1:100

1.

1.

1.

1.

2.

1. 1. 1. Void 1. 4. 3.

5. Key: 1. Retail Pitches 2. Stair/ Lift Core 3. Service Lift 4. Riser 5. Ramp

Building Context: Design Analysis Level 03 GA Plan Scale 1:100

2. 1.

3. Void

6.

4.

5.

Key: 1. Stair/ Lift Core 2. Exterior Terrace 3. Bar/ Restaurant 4. Riser/ Dum Waiter 5. Service Lift 6. Ramp

Building Context: Design Analysis Cross Section AA

Scale 1:100

Building Context: Design Detail Axonometric Details

Handrail Scale 1:50

Ramp Floor junction Scale 1:50

Building Context: Design Detail Building Strategy

Vertical Circulation

Retail Pitches

Energy Strategy

Building Context: Design Analysis Proposed Street Elevation

The aim of the design is to retain the existing urban scale and the relationship to adjoining buildings within the block. The Top floor is set back so as not to disrupt the Restored Facade.

Building Context: Design Analysis Proposed Street Elevation

From the opposite side of the road the new top floor does not impose on the urban scale. The new Stair core to the front is the only modern element but it is offset by the adjoining modern addition. The facade has been continued round to even the top floor off allowing for expansion on the third floor.

Building Context: Design Analysis Internal Views