quilting

Inspired fabrics and designs await you in
from
of

the house
tula pink!

quilts from the house of

quilts
tula pink is an American textile
designer and quilt maker with a dark sense
of humor buried in a sea of print and pattern.
She plays with images the way a poet plays
with words, turning innocuous traditional
designs into mischievous little critters. Her
love affair with textiles began early, and an

Welcome to the world of cutting-edge fabric designer, Tula Pink, where clever quilts show off
fanciful fabric, and your imagination can be let out to play. Featuring fabrics that you know
and love, Tula offers 20 patterns with her signature flair for design and original style. Between
10 amazing quilts and 10 extra-cool companion projects, you’ll be inspired to play with fabric
like never before.

obsession with sewing soon followed. A few
Step inside to find:

years and ten fabric collections later, design

ø 10 large quilt patterns, perfect for

is her one and only passion. Tula began

buying more. Sixteen years later, she has a
lot of quilts and more fabric than when she
started. Visit Tula online at tulapink.com.

tula says...
“In the following pages I have
compiled a peek behind the curtain,
a small glimpse into The House of
Tula Pink. This is not a house of rules
and regulations but a place where you
can pick and choose when to behave.
sometimes skip dinner altogether.

ø 10 accessory sewing projects, like an

Come on in to Tula’s place
for the ultimate in sewing,
style and fabric innovation!

20 fabric projects to make,use & love

Here we eat our dessert first and

the bedroom or snuggling on the couch.

quilting in an effort to use up her evergrowing stash of fabric so she could justify

quilts from the house of

embroidered lampshade and a fabric
cuckoo clock, to make your everyday
life extraordinary.

So go ahead and put your feet up.
And as long as you’re not doing
anything, you might as well make

ø Tips from Tula on choosing and combining

some stuff.”

fabrics, selecting a quilting motif, and
even sketching your own fabric and
pattern designs.
ø Step-by-step illustrations (hand-drawn

by Tula herself) and super-simple sewing
techniques for successful quilt making.

pink

ISBN-13: 978-1-4402-1818-7
ISBN-10: 1-4402-1818-8
UK £15.99
US $24.99
(Can $25.99)
W1582

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contents

Introduction •

1

7

Techniques and Design | 8

tula’s techniques • 10
Easy Corner Triangles • 10
Half-Square Triangles • 12
Tula’s Totally Tubular
Tube Technique • 14
Fussy-Cutting Method •

15

Scrappy Fusing Technique •
Squaring Up Strips •

16

18

Nesting Seams Method •

19

Binding Method •

20
sketching your
quilt design • 22
fearless fabric
selection • 24
quilting is not
an afterthought • 28
a peek into the
fabric design process • 30

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2

Storytelling Quilts
and Projects | 32
Grand Salon Quilt • 34
project: Shadow Catcher •
Cloudy Days Quilt • 46
project: Shower Curtain •

4

42

Beanstalks Quilt • 98
project: Connect the Dots Shade •

54

Any Which Way Quilt • 108
project: Zigzag Rag Pillow • 112

Dream Weaver Quilt • 70
project: Color Bars Body Pillowcase •

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74

Templates •
Index •

84

Houndstooth Quilt • 88
project: Vortex Euro Shams •

122

Stacks Quilt • 126
project: Studio-To-Go Sketchbook Cover •

Color Block Quilts
and Projects | 68

Fade to Pink Quilt • 78
project: Lollipops Pillow •

104

Shattered Glass Quilt • 116
project: One Eye Open Sleeping Mask •

Fairy Tale Lane Quilt • 58
project: Cuckoo Clock • 64

3

Haiku Quilts
and Projects | 96

132

136

141

Dedication •

142

About the Author •

92

142
Acknowledgments • 143

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introduction

I

am often asked why I shy away from being photographed. The answer is a simple
one—my fabrics and quilts are a far better likeness of me than the shape of my
nose or the distance between my eyes. My studio is my whole world; it’s the
happiest place on earth and sometimes the most tormented, but balance is good,
right? I call it Pinkerville, because it is populated by critters of my own design and
has an almost magical ability to grow into something entirely different when I am
not paying attention. Pinkerville is rarely tidy but always organized according to
some yet unknown system that seems to be based entirely on color-coded piles of
nonsense. Reality does not exist here. There aren’t any neighbors to complain about
the music or the singing or the occasional spontaneous dance numbers. Pinkerville
lies somewhere between “nowhere” and “that other place.” It’s hard to find and easy
to lose, so I generally don’t leave unless I absolutely have to.
Pattern is an obsession. Designing pattern is complex and messy. Over time it
becomes a math problem that I desperately need to solve but that doesn’t have an
answer. I see it everywhere—on the ground, in the sky, the texture of skin, the tread
of a car tire, the crack in a window. I see how I can change it, too—how every shape
can be molded into another shape. It’s like staring at the clouds: if you stare long
enough, you start to see something else entirely. I strive to look past what’s actually
there to see the possibility of what could be.
Designing fabric is entirely different from any other creative field. My vision is
incomplete until someone picks it up and makes something with it. I put the final
destination of my creative vision in the hands of every person who uses my fabric.
This process allows people I have never met to have a hand in my process. It’s the
greatest form of collaboration and one that I ultimately have no control over. With
every new fabric collection I get to see how other people incorporate my work into
their own vision to suit their own personal needs. It’s usually something I never
thought of doing myself. In this way, my designs are constantly being granted a new
life and purpose. There is nothing else like it.
In the following pages I have compiled a peek behind the curtain, a small glimpse
into the House of Tula Pink. Take a look around and make yourself at home. Don’t
worry about picking up after yourself, we have people for that. This is not a house
of rules and regulations but a place where you can pick and choose when to behave.
Here we eat our dessert first and sometimes skip dinner altogether. So go ahead and
put your feet up. And as long as you’re not doing anything, you might as well make
some stuff.

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half-square triangles
1 Start with two contrasting fabric squares at the size
indicated in the pattern.

2 Drawn a diagonal line from corner to corner on
the wrong side of the lighter-colored fabric square.

3 Place the squares right sides together.
4 Draw a 1⁄4" (6mm) line on either side of the center
line or use a 1⁄4" (6mm) foot as a guide. Sew 1⁄4" (6mm)
on either side of the center line.

5 Use a rotary cutter and ruler to cut along the
drawn center line to create two half-square triangles.
6 Press the seams open. Done!

tula says...
Piecing is often discussed in terms of easy and
hard. The reality is that there are only so many
ways to sew a couple pieces of fabric together, and
none of it takes a college degree to accomplish. I
like to look at piecing, not in terms of difficulty,
but in terms of time. Sure, triangles don’t go
together as quickly as squares, but with a trick
or two they can become effortless. Appliqué is not
any “harder” than machine piecing but it does
take more time. The point is this: given enough
time and a tip or two, you can make anything you
can dream up.

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5

tula says...
Make sure that all of the fusible is covered
with fabric before pressing, or you will ruin
your iron. You can also use a pressing sheet in
between your iron and the fusible to protect

6

your iron.

The scrappy fusing technique is used for the A N Y W H I C H W AY Q U I LT (page 108).

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M o n o c h r o m at i c

Analogous

Derives from the words mono meaning single and
chroma meaning color—single color. If you are
focusing on a single color, the shape in each design
will become the focus. You will want to have a range
of prints both in personality and scale. Choose
large, loose prints and smaller, structured prints.
Also evaluate the color itself. If your color is blue,
do you have light and dark blues? Do you include
aquas and navy blues as well?

This is similar to the monochromatic color scheme
but branches out to include its neighbors. Think
of a rainbow—one color bleeds into the next,
yellow into green, green into blue. These colors
are analogous to each other, meaning they are
neighbors on the color wheel.

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Meet the sexiest little shower curtain ever!
Strategically placed peek-a-boo raindrops
won’t let the water out but will keep the
secrets in.

FINISHED CURTAIN SIZE:
72" × 72" 182.9cm × 182.9cm

m at e r i a l s :

Assorted fabrics: 4 fabrics, 1 1⁄ 8 yard (1m) each;
Cotton or laminate will work; if using laminate,
you will not need a liner.

Lightweight sheet plastic: 1 yard (0.9m)

Sleeve fabric: 5⁄ 8 yard (0.6m)

Coordinating thread

Pinking shears

Shower curtain liner

Template (found on page 138)

Optional: (10) 1 9⁄16 " (4cm) grommets

cutting:

From each of the assorted fabrics, cut:

(2) 19" × 37" (48.3cm × 94cm) rectangles

From sheet plastic, cut:

16 raindrops using the Raindrop template
(page 138)

From sleeve fabric, cut:

(2) 9" × WOF (22.9cm × WOF) strips

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projects
and

color block quilts
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figure 3

The Quilting
Because this quilt was more about the fabric choices than
the piecing, we chose to quilt with an all-over pattern that
accomplishes the same goal as the fabric. We began with a
large free-motion floral design that transitions in scale at
the same rate as the purple transitions to pink. The floral
design starts out large at one corner and slowly shrinks as
it cascades across the quilt and finishes with small florals at
the other end. This simple transition takes a generic overall
quilting design and makes it relate to the quilt top.

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Vortex Euro Shams

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figure C

figure d

stitch diagram

107
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All seams are 1⁄4" (6mm) unless otherwise noted.

5 Cut on the drawn line to create two pinwheel
quadrants (Figure 4).

building the pinwheels

6 Press seams open.

1 Choose a pair of dark 31⁄4" × 31⁄4" (8.3cm ×

7 Repeat steps 3 through 6 for the second pair
of squares.

8.3cm)
squares and a pair of light 31⁄4" × 31⁄4" (8.3cm × 8.3cm)
squares (Figure 1).

8 Sew the four quadrants together to form the

2 Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the

pinwheel (Figure 5).

wrong sides of both light squares (Figure 2).

9 Trim the pinwheel to a 51⁄2" × 51⁄2" (14cm ×

3 Place one light and one dark square right sides

14cm)

square.

together.

10 Repeat steps 1 through 9 to make a total of

4 Stitch 1⁄4" (6mm) seam on either side of the drawn

twenty pinwheels.

line (Figure 3).

figure 1

figure 2

figure 3

figure 4

figure 5

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131
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Studio-To-Go Sketchbook Cover

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D e d i c at i o n

The house of Tula Pink was built on a foundation of support, gentle pushing and an
occasional well-placed elbow. I would barely be able to get out of bed without the support
of a few people who never fail to tell me when I am out of line, off my rocker or just plain
losing it. First and foremost to my mom, who may have thrown my crayons out when I
was a kid, but who knew as well as I did that those walls needed a little color. To Cameron
McLean, the only person who can tell me I’m wrong and get away with it. To my dad,
who builds every crazy thing I come up with. To Grace, who always listens even when
she has no idea what I’m talking about. To Marilyn Foti, who always helps me in a pinch.
To Angela Walters, who no longer needs me to speak full sentences to understand what
I want. These things do not go unnoticed. Thanks for putting up with me.
Special thanks to The Quilt Shoppe in Stewartsville, Missouri, for providing the
fabrics, notions and support to make this book happen.

A b o u t t h e Au t h o r

Tula Pink is an American textile designer and
quilt maker with a dark sense of humor buried
in a sea of print and pattern. She plays with
images the way a poet plays with words, turning
innocuous traditional designs into mischievous
little critters. Whether it’s a head of hair teased
into a pirate ship or a damask molded into a frog,
Ms. Pink can wrangle any shape into her own
candy-colored fantasy of creature delights.
Tula’s love affair with textiles began early,
and an obsession with sewing soon followed. It
was apparent to everyone but Tula that she would
eventually be designing the fabric herself. A few
years and ten fabric collections later, design is
her one and only passion. Tula began quilting
in an effort to use up her ever-growing stash of
fabric so she could justify buying more. Sixteen
years later, she has a lot of quilts and more fabric
than when she started.
After a lifetime of city living, Tula Pink now
lives on a farm somewhere between nowhere and
that other place. She can’t even find it on a map
so she rarely leaves for fear of getting lost. Tula
spends her days drawing, sewing and battling
nature as it desperately tries to break through
every crevice of her old farmhouse.

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quilting

Inspired fabrics and designs await you in
from
of

the house
tula pink!

quilts from the house of

quilts
tula pink is an American textile
designer and quilt maker with a dark sense
of humor buried in a sea of print and pattern.
She plays with images the way a poet plays
with words, turning innocuous traditional
designs into mischievous little critters. Her
love affair with textiles began early, and an

Welcome to the world of cutting-edge fabric designer, Tula Pink, where clever quilts show off
fanciful fabric, and your imagination can be let out to play. Featuring fabrics that you know
and love, Tula offers 20 patterns with her signature flair for design and original style. Between
10 amazing quilts and 10 extra-cool companion projects, you’ll be inspired to play with fabric
like never before.

obsession with sewing soon followed. A few
Step inside to find:

years and ten fabric collections later, design

ø 10 large quilt patterns, perfect for

is her one and only passion. Tula began

buying more. Sixteen years later, she has a
lot of quilts and more fabric than when she
started. Visit Tula online at tulapink.com.

tula says...
“In the following pages I have
compiled a peek behind the curtain,
a small glimpse into The House of
Tula Pink. This is not a house of rules
and regulations but a place where you
can pick and choose when to behave.
sometimes skip dinner altogether.

ø 10 accessory sewing projects, like an

Come on in to Tula’s place
for the ultimate in sewing,
style and fabric innovation!

20 fabric projects to make,use & love

Here we eat our dessert first and

the bedroom or snuggling on the couch.

quilting in an effort to use up her evergrowing stash of fabric so she could justify

quilts from the house of

embroidered lampshade and a fabric
cuckoo clock, to make your everyday
life extraordinary.

So go ahead and put your feet up.
And as long as you’re not doing
anything, you might as well make

ø Tips from Tula on choosing and combining

some stuff.”

fabrics, selecting a quilting motif, and
even sketching your own fabric and
pattern designs.
ø Step-by-step illustrations (hand-drawn

by Tula herself) and super-simple sewing
techniques for successful quilt making.

pink

ISBN-13: 978-1-4402-1818-7
ISBN-10: 1-4402-1818-8
UK £15.99
US $24.99
(Can $25.99)
W1582

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11/11/11 2:32 PM