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Rachael Patten English 1102-093 How Does It Feel to Be a Problem Moustafa Bayoumi's profile of seven Brooklyn-based Arab-Americans and their diverse experiences living in a post-9-11 America is not only interesting and insightful, but refreshing too. At a time when it seems like everyone but Arab-Americans is being given the opportunity to speak on behalf of the community, Bayoumi goes straight to the source and allows ArabAmerican youth to explain who they are and what they're experiencing for themselves. The book's only shortcoming is that it doesn't fully represent the Arab-American community. Though the majority of Arab-Americans are Christian, Bayoumi only shares the story of one. In the preface of his book, Bayoumi states his reasoning: "...Arab-American Muslims are at the eye of today's storms. They are forced to reconcile particular American foreign policies that affect their countries of origin with the idea that their faith poses an existential threat to Western civilization." Though Bayoumi's assertion is correct, his reason for choosing to focus more on Arab-American Muslims than Arab-American Christians is far from convincing. Arab-American Christians must also reconcile certain American policies (both foreign and domestic) with their love and dedication to both their ancestral homelands and new homeland. They also face the same social and political backlash associated with being an Arab or Muslim in a post-9-11 America. Arab-American Christians find themselves in an even more precarious position in that they're often forced to serve as a bridge between their ArabAmerican Muslim brethren and non-Arab/Muslim Americans. In many cases, Arab-American Christians have even taken a leading role in educating non-Arab/Muslim Americans about Islam. While those that do may feel a sense of duty to serve as their brother's keeper, most also recognize that popular misconceptions about Muslims also affect them. After all, few - if any - Arab-American Christians haven't been touched by the racial profiling, discrimination and violence directed towards Muslim-looking people since 9-11. In this sense, Arab-American Christians are direct stakeholders in how non-Arab/Muslim Americans treat Muslims in America. Bayoumi makes an attempt to address these issues in his story of Sami - an ArabAmerican Christian who "must navigate the minefield of associations the public has of Arabs as well as the expectations that Muslim Arab Americans have of him as an Arab-American soldier." Sadly, Sami's account is less relatable to Arab-American Christians as are the six other stories of Arab-American Muslims - as he doesn't even self-identify as being an Arab-American. In Bayoumi's defense, he never asserts that the stories he shares in this book represent all, or even most, Arab-Americans. His decision to present a more rounded picture of the post 9-11 Arab-American Muslim experience over that of Arab-American Christians renders his book more useful to readers wanting to understand what it feels like to be young and an ArabMuslim in America - not what it's like "Being Young and Arab in America."