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Jupplement :mber rne

Coods of the 'orld


I M
BOOKS
cemo to the Jubscriber
This Supplement is a bonus, sent to you
with the current FOODS OF THE WORLD vol
ume as a way of bringing you several things:
An article on rice and rice-cooking meth
ods, a subject that will be dealt with, though
in less detail, in several volumes.
A recipe for French bread. (French families
don't bake bread at home, but a number of
readers of The Cooking of Provincal France
want to try.)
Several recipes from the France volume
and The Cooking of Italy.
A number of suggested menus based on
recipes in the French and Italian volumes,
The Cooking of Scandinavia and The Cooking of
Vienna's Empire.
A condensed shopping guide to some U.S.
stores that fll mail orders for certain specialty
foods and utensils.
The Supplement is printed in the same page
size as the Kitchen Guide, and you may want
to keep it handy with the Guide. The recipe
pages may be clipped for insertion in your
Recipe Booklets.
-The Editors
Cover by Walter Daran; photograph on page 3 by Fred Lyon from
Rapho Guillumette; all other illustrations by Matthew Greene.
Jupplement mber rne
BY THE EDITORS OF TIME-LIFE BOOKS
Gontents
A Primer on Rice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Menu Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
An American Approach to French Bread . . . . . . . . . . 12
Tomato-Cheese Pie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Casserole-Roasted Chicken with Vegetables ...... 17
Cheese Pie ( Crostata di Ricotta) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Rabbit Stewed in White Wine Sauce ................ 21
A Shopper's Guide to Foods and Utensils ......... 22
Coods o the 'orld
TIME-LIFE BOOKS. NEW YORK
196 Time Inc. All rihts reserved. Published simultaneously in Canada. Revised 1974.
r Primer on Ce-rmerica: Ne
g
lected :od
In half the world it is rice that keeps body
and soul together-but not in America. In
some Asian countries people eat 400 pounds
of rice a year, and some eat not much else;
in the U.S. the annual per capita consump
tion is only seven pounds. Despite valiant
eforts by the Rice Council and rice proces
sors, Americans are simply too busy eating
everything else. Yet rice is good, rice is in
teresting, rice is important in the cuisines
of China, Japan, India, the Middle East,
Spain and latin America, and rice will ap
pear repeatedly in Fooos OF THE WoRLD
volumes on these and other regions. It ap
pears in this Supplement as the subject of
a short course that you can keep for ref
erence in all your future cooking.
Rice around the World
like all the staple cereals of the world
wheat, barley, maize, rye, millet-rice (the
grass whose latin name is oryza sativa} grew
wild long before men learned to cultivate
it. Nobody knows whether it was frst tamed
in India or in China, but it was feeding peo
ple in both those regions 5,000 years ago.
Eventually the "rice bowl economy " be
came a way of life throughout the Orient.
It feeds families and livestock, it is used as
fertilizer and to make wine and other brews.
Rice, or the lack of it, has been the cause
of wars, uprisings and famines.
From the Orient, seed rice journeyed by
ship and caravan over seas and mountains
2
to Europe, the Near East, Africa, Austral
asia, and ultimately to the Americas. Along
the way, rice has become an integral part
of the cuisine of many nations-as a cereal,
a vegetable, and an ingredient in hundreds
of renowned regional dishes. From pilaf to
paela, risotto to riz a l'impiratrice, the basic
ingredient is rice.
Rice Culture in the United States
The arrival of rice in America was purely ac
cidental. And providential, as it happened.
In 1694 a sailing vessel with a cargo of rice
from Madagascar was blown of its course
in an Atlantic storm and sought refuge in
the harbor of Charleston, South Carolina.
The colonists helped to repair the ship's
damage, and in gratitude the captain gave
the colonial governor a small packet of seed
rice. The crop that grew from it was big
enough to supply all of South Carolina and
neighboring colonies, and before long a
thriving export trade with England grew up.
Today rice farms in the United States
mostly in Texas, louisiana, California, Ar
kansas and Mississippi-are probably the
most highly mechanized farms in the world.
Much of the seeding is done from airplanes,
and at harvesttime the felds are drained of
water so that machines can roll in to do
the picking. Two man-days of labor are all
it takes to get a ton and a quarter of rice
from an acre; in some nations it takes 400
man-days a season to get a much smaller
Planted by air and harvested by machine, this California rice feld is never trod by a farmer.
3
THE RICE GRAIN
The important parts of a grain of rice are: 1-the
hull, or husk, which is inedible; 2-the layer of bran
(brown rice, with this layer still present, is the most nu
tritious kind); 3-the kernel; 4-the germ. In milling
and polishing, both the bran and the germ are removed
from the kernel, and with them some of the protein
content and much of the vitamins and minerals. In "en
riched" rice some vitamins have been restored.
yield. As a result the U. S. ranks ffth among
the world's rice producers-and exports
most of its crop to 100 other nations.
The Versatile Grain of Rice
Of all the cereal grains, rice is the most ver
satile; it is equally at home as a breakfast
food and in soups, salads, main dishes and
desserts. Nutritionally, the more than 7,000
known strains of rice are generally alike,
though they have wide diferences in favor
and texture. Rice is mainly a source of car
bohydrates, and one serving (11 cup of
plain cooked rice) supplies about 100 cal
ories. It is also a source of iron, B-complex
vitamins and calcium; it has only a trace of
fat, is low in sodium, and has a low fber
content that renders it 98 per cent digestible.
Rice may be cooked in almost any liquid,
from water to stocks of all kinds.
4
Shoping for Rice
Some imported types of rice from Italy,
Spain and India are available in a few larg
er groceries and food-specialty shops. But
in cooking American or foreign rice dishes,
the rice that grows in this country serves per
fectly well. The leading varieties to be found
in the stores are regular milled white rice,
brown rice, precooked rice, parboiled rice,
wild rice (which comes from another species
of grass), and many seasoned rice products,
in some of which other foods are premixed.
REGULAR MILLED WHITE RICE, the most pop
ular in sales, is available in extra-long grain,
medium and short grain. It is white because
the outer coatings have been removed in
milling and polishing. Most of the food
value has been removed too, and what is
left is nine tenths starch. Much of the white
rice sold in the U. S. has been enriched to re
store vitamin content, just as white-wheat
four is often enriched to replace vitamins re
moved in milling. Long-grain white rice is
four to fve times as long as the grain is
wide. Grains tend to separate in cooking
and are frm, light and fufy. This type of
rice is therefore recommended for poultry
and meat dishes, curries, Chinese and Jap
anese rice dishes, and for use cold in salads.
Medium and short grain are plumper, oval
shaped types, and the particles tend to be
softer and cling together more readily when
cooked. They are used widely for desserts,
croquettes, rice molds, and for some pilaf
and risottos unless otherwise specifed in the
recipe. Yield per cup of white rice is about
3 cups of cooked rice.
BROWN RICE is the whole unpolished grain
with only the outer hull and some of the
bran removed; it is therefore more nutritious
than rice with bran and kernel removed.
Brown rice has a hearty, nutlike favor and
rougher texture than white rice. Because it
is unpolished, brown rice requires a longer
cooking period than white rice. This type
of rice is excellent for stufngs, or as a vege
table with sauce or gravy, or cooked in
broth. And leftover cooked brown rice is a
perfect binder and meat extender in meat
loaf. Yield per cup of brown rice is about
3 to 4 cups of cooked rice.
PARBOILED (CONVERTED) RICE, also known as
converted white rice, has been put through
a special steam-pressure cycle before mill
ing. This process helps to retain much of
the vitamin and mineral content of the rice.
Parboiled rice is available plain, or com
bined with herbs, dehydrated bouillon and
other seasonings, vegetables, shortening
and caramel coloring. Included in this cat
egory are numerous kinds of packaged rice
dinners, in which rice is combined with
other ingredients. Yield per cup of parboiled
rice is about 3 to 4 cups of cooked rice.
PRECOOKED RICE is milled white rice that has
been cooked and then dehydrated. It is re
constituted by adding hot liquid, removing
from heat and allowing to stand for a few
moments. No further cooking is required.
Yield per cup of precooked rice is about 2
to 3 cups of cooked rice.
WILD RICE may be said to be America's ex
clusive epicure grain. It is native to the
lake district of Minnesota, and its culture
traditionally was the special province of the
Chippewa Indians of this region. Much of
it is still harvested by them, by hand, be
fore being sold to commercial packers who
clean, grade and market it. Wild rice has
twice the protein of white rice, and fewer
calories. Its unique favor has made it a spe
cial favorite in homes, fne restaurants, ho
tels and clubs. It is exceptionally delicious
served with meats, poultry and game, in
stufngs, croquettes and as an ingredient
in other dishes. It is also packaged in com
bination with long-grain white rice, dehy
drated bouillon and seasonings. It is avail
able at specialty food stores and in "gour
met food " sections of some supermarkets
and department stores. The price is high
for good reason: The supply is scarce and
the entire crop is produced on only about
25,000 acres of marshland. Yield per cup
of wild rice is about 3 cups of cooked rice.
LEADING U.S. RICES
(Grains shown twice actual size)
WILD RICE
5
rethods
o Gookin
g
1e
Just as there is a little logic, but not much,
in the idea that Chinese cannot be a very dif
fcult language with 750 million people
already speaking it, there is some comfort,
but not much, in the idea that rice cookery
cannot be very hard to bring of with a bil
lion or so people eating rice every day.
Even in Chinese restaurants, where of all
places the cooks should have mastered the
art, the rice that comes to the table is often
a gummy disaster.
There are many ways of cooking rice,
and it is worth experimenting to get to
know more than one. In some countries
rice is always washed before cooking, and
in others, never. In some regions it is
cooked with salt, but in many Japanese
and Chinese recipes salt is omitted because
a salty sauce such as soy sauce will be
added later.
Don't Overcook It!
All the methods described on these pages
have been tested in the FooDs OF THE
WORLD kitchen. Some are adapted from
package directions; whether you are fol
lowing the package directions or not, it is
a good idea to read them. In general, keep
in ' mind that rice should not be overcooked;
the objective is grains that are tender but
frm, whole, separate and free of any starchy
residue. The method you choose will de
pend on your purpose and your taste.
6
BOILING METHOD
Referring to full instructions at right:
l Pour the rice into the boiling water in a
thin, slow stream.
2 After cooking, drain in a colander. The rice
can be served now, or kept warm (below).
3 Set the colander containing the rice in the
pan over boiling water, and cover with a kitch
en rowel to keep the rice warm until ready to
serve. Fluf occasionally to avoid oversteaming
the rice at bottom of the colander.
Boiled Rice
To serve 4
6 quarts water
3 tablespoons salt
1 cup unwashed long-grain white rice
Bring the water to a boil in a large, heavy
pot, add the salt, then pour in the rice in a
thin, slow stream so that the water keeps
boiling. Lower the heat to moderate and
let the rice boil uncovered for about 15 min
utes, or until the grains are just tender but
still feel slightly frm to the bite. Drain the
rice in a colander and serve at once. Or, to
keep the rice warm for later use, pour about
3 inches of boiling water into the pot. Sus
pend the rice-flled colander in the pot,
making sure that the bottom of the colan
der does not touch the water, and place
over low heat. Loosely cover the colander
with a kitchen rowel to help contain the
steam. Fluf the rice occasionally from the
bottom, to prevent the rice underneath from
oversteaming. Alternatively, transfer the rice
to a heated casserole, cover with a kitchen
towel to prevent the rice from drying out,
and keep warm in a 320

oven until ready
to serve. Fluf with a fork before serving.
Steamed Rice
To serve 4
1 cup unwashed long-grain white rice
2 cups cold water
Place the rice in a colander or large strainer,
set in the sink and rinse it in cold water
until the water runs clear. Transfer the rice
to a heavy 2- to 3-quart saucepan and add
the 2 cups cold water. Bring to a boil over
high heat and continue to boil for 2 to 3
minutes, or until holes begin to appear in
the surface of the rice through the steam.
Cover tightly, reduce to the lowest heat
and simmer undisturbed for about 20 min
utes. Then remove from the heat but do
not uncover, and let the rice stand for 10
minutes. Remove the lid and fuf the nee
lightly with a fork to loosen the grains.
STEAMING METHOD
Referring to full insrructions at left:
I Use 1 cup rice to 2 cups cold water.
Wash the rice in a colander under the fau
cet until the cold water runs clear.
3 Combine the rice and water in the pan, and
boil over high heat.
4 When holes appear in the surface of the
rice, cover and reduce the heat to low.
5 After cooking, let the rice stand of the
heat, then uncover and Auf it with a fork.
7
Sauteed Rice
To serve 4
3 tablespoons butter or vegetable oil
1 cup unwashed long-grain white rice
2 cups boiling water
1 teaspoon salt
In a heavy skillet or shallow fameproof cas
serole with a cover, heat the butter or oil
over medium heat. Add the rice and stir con
stantly with a wooden spoon for 2 to 3
minutes, or until most of the rice has turned
milky and opaque. Do not let the rice
brown. Then pour the boiling water over
the rice, add the salt and bring back to a
boil, still stirring.
Cover the pan tightly and reduce the heat
to its lowest point, if necessary using an as
bestos mat. Simmer without stirring for 18
to 20 minutes, or until the rice has absorbed
all the liquid. Use a fork to fuf the rice gen
tly before serving. If the rice must wait,
loosely cover the casserole with a kitchen
towel and keep warm in a 250

oven.
Brown Rice
To serve 4
1 teaspoon butter
1 cup brown rice
1 teaspoon salt
211 cups boiling water
In a heavy skillet or 2- to 3-quart saucepan
melt the butter over medium heat. Pour in
the rice and stir until the grains are evenly
coated. Pour in the boiling water and add
the salt. Cover tightly, reduce the heat to
low and simmer for 35 to 40 minutes, or
until all the liquid is absorbed. Fluf gently
with a fork before serving.
Parboiled (Converted) Rice
To serve 4
2 cups cold water
1 cup converted rice
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon butter
8
SAUTEING METHOD
Referring to full instructions at left:
1 Use 1 cup rice ro 3 tablespoons butter.
2 Heat the butter, add the rice and cook over
medium heat, stirring with a wooden spoon
to coat the grains.
3 Pour in 2 cups boiling water, add salt, bring
to a boil again, stirring with a fork. (At this
stage a spoon might crush the grains of rice.)
4 Cover and simmer until water is absorbed.
In a heavy 2- to 3-quart saucepan bring the
water, rice, salt and butter to a boil. At
once reduce the heat to low, cover tightly
and simmer undisturbed for about 25 min
utes, or until all the water is absorbed. If a
drier rice is desired, remove the cover after
cooking and leave on low heat 3 to 4 min
utes, stirring occasionally with a fork.
For a softer, moister rice use up to 1/
cup more water.
Precooked Rice
To serve 4
2 cups water
t! teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon butter
1 cup precooked rice
In a heavy 2- to 3-quart saucepan bring the
water, salt and butter to a boil. Stir in the
rice, cover and remove from the heat im
mediately. Let the rice stand undisturbed
for about 5 minutes, then fuf lightly with
a fork before serving.
Wild Rice
To serve 4
1 tablespoon butter
1 cup wild rice
li teaspoon salt
2 cups boiling water
Melt the butter in a heavy skillet or 2- to 3-
quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the
rice and cook for about 2 minutes, stirring
well until all the grains are coated evenly
with the butter. Then pour the boiling wa
ter over the rice, add the salt, bring to a
boil again, cover tightly and reduce the
heat to its lowest point. Cook undisturbed
for about 30 minutes, or until the rice has
absorbed all the water.
Oven-Baked Method
To serve 4
2 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon butter
1 cup unwashed long-grain white rice
Preheat the oven to 325

. In a 2- to 3-quart
fameproof casserole, bring the water and
salt to a boil over high heat. Pour in the
rice, add the butter and stir while the water
returns to a boil. Cover tightly and transfer
the casserole to the middle of the oven.
Bake for about 25 minutes, or until all the
water is absorbed.
Double-Boiler Method
To serve 4
311z cups milk
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup unwashed long-grain white rice
When rice is cooked in milk it should be
prepared in the top of a double boiler. Pour
the milk in the top of the double boiler,
add the salt and rice and bring to a boil
over direct heat. Then set the pot into the
lower pan, partially flled with boiling water,
cover tightly and reduce the heat to its low
est point. Check occasionally to make sure
the water has not cooked away.
Cook for about 40 minutes, or until all
the milk is absorbed. Rice cooked this way
is usually used in rice-dessert preparations.
Storing Cooked Rice
Refrigeration: Leftover cooked rice need not
go to waste. It can be stored for a week in
the refrigerator. Place the cooled rice in as
shallow a container as possible, so that the
grains on the bottom will not become sog
gy. The container should be tightly covered
so that the rice will not dry out or absorb fa
vors from other foods.
Freezing: Rice can be frozen for six to eight
months, plain, or with any foods suitable
for freezing. Place the cooled rice in a freez
er container, tightly covered.
Reheating: Refrigerated or thawed frozen rice
may be steamed over boiling water or, with
2 tablespoons of liquid added for each cup
of rice, simmered 4 to 5 minutes in a cov
ered saucepan.
9
renu Ju
gg
estions fom :ur Guisines
A number of subscribers have asked for some suggested menus. The ones on these pages are cre
ated from recipes in four volumes (The Cooking of Provincial France, The Cooking of Italy, The
Cooking of Scandinavia and The Cooking of Vienna's Empire} of the FooDs OF THE WoRLD library,
complemented by a few basic dishes such as green salad that are in every cook's repertoire. Some
recipes will need simple adjustments for the number to be served.
Light Meals
To serve 4
MELON IN SEASON
BACON AND EGG CAKE (Scandinavia}
BUTTER CAKE (Scandinavia)
To serve 6
SUMMER VEGETABLE SOUP (Scandinavia}
VEILED COUNTRY LASS (Scandinavia}
To serve 6
BERGEN FISH SOUP (Scandinavia}
SOUR CREAM WAFFLES (Scandinavia)
To serve 8
SALMON MARINATED IN DILL (Scandinavia)
PICKLED CUCUMBE R SALAD (Scandinavia}
SWEDISH PANCAKES WITH LINGONBE RRIES
(Scandinavia)
To serve 4
EGG NOODLES WITH BUTTER AND CHEESE
(Italy}
SA LADE NI<OISE (France)
To serve 6
COLD BRAISED VEAL WITH TUNA SAUCE (Italy)
TOMATO SALAD (Italy}
CHILLED CHOCOLATE LOAF (Italy)
Dinners
To serve 4
MARINATED MUSHROOMS (France}
SAUTEED CHICKEN WITH CALVADOS AND
CREAM SAUCE (France)
STEAMED RICE (Supplement No. 1)
10
GREEN SALAD
PEARS POACHED IN RED WINE (France)
To serve 6
ROAST LEG OF LAMB (France)
SCALLOPED POTATOES WITH CHEESE (France}
GREEN STRING BEANS (France}
CHERRY CAKE (France}
To serve 4
CHILLED ARTICHOKES WITH MAYONNAISE
(France}
BROILED SALMON STEAKS WITH GARLIC AND
HERB BUTTER (France)
BUTTER-STEAMED NEW POTATOES
(Scandinavia}
CHOCOLATE MOUSSE (France)
To serve 6
BRAISED PORK CHOPS WITH CREAM AND
MUSTARD SAUCE (France)
BRAISED LEEKS (France)
OVEN-BROWNED POTATO WEDGES
(Scandinavia}
LEMON ICE {Italy)
To serve 6
COLD EGGPLANT APPETIZER (Italy}
CANNELLONI (Italy)
GREEN SALAD
PEACHES STUFFED WITH MACAROONS (Italy)
To serve 6
BAKED STUFFED ARTICHOKES (Italy)
BROILED SHRIMP WITH GARLIC BUTTER (Italy)
BRAISED RICE AND PE AS (Italy)
SICILIAN CAKE WITH CHOCOLATE FROSTING
(Italy)
To serve 6-8
PROSCIUTTO ( Jtafy, p. 32) AND MELON
BRAISED VEAL SHANKS (Italy)
BRAISED RICE WITH SAFFRON (Italy}
RAW MUSHROOM SALAD (Italy)
ORANGE ICE (Italy)
To serve 4
BROILED DEVILED CHICKEN (Italy)
BOILED RICE WITH LEMON (Italy}
BRAISED PEAS WITH PROSCIUTTO (Italy)
PEARS STUFFED WITH GORGONZOLA CHEESE
(Italy)
To serve 4
FRESH HAM BRAISED IN MARSALA (Italy)
GLAZED ONIONS (France)
SMALL SPINACH DUMPLINGS (Italy)
MAZARIN CAKE (Scandinavia)
To serve 6
ASSORTED ANTIPASTI (Italy, p. 32)
MEAT LOAF IN SOUR-CREAM PASTRY
(Scandinavia)
FRESH PEAS BRAISED WITH ONIONS
AND LETTUCE (France)
CARAMEL CUSTARD (France)
To serve 4-6
FRENCH ONION SOUP (France)
BAKED STUFFED PIKE WITH CUCUMBERS AND
RICE (Scandinavia)
GREEN SALAD WITH FRENCH OIL AND VINEGAR
DRESSING (France)
APRICOT PANCAKES ( Vienna's Empire)
To serve 4-6
KETTLE GOULASH ( Vienna's Empire}
HOMEMADE EGG NOODLES (Italy)
GREEN SALAD WITH FRENCH OIL AND VINEGAR
DRESSING (France)
APPLE STRUDEL ( Vienna's Empire)
To serve 4
VIENNESE FRIED CHICKEN ( Vienna's Empire)
POTATOES PAPRIKA ( Vienna's Empire}
BOILED ASPARAGUS (France)
LINZER CAKE ( Vienna's Empire)
To serve 4-6
VEAL AND PORK BARBECUE ( Vienna's Empire}
STEAMED RICE (Supplement No. 1)
GREEN SALAD WITH LEMON AND SOUR CREAM
DRESSING ( Vienna's Empire)
SPONGECAKE WITH CHERRIES
( Vienna's Empire)
To serve 4
SPINACH SOUP (Scandinavia)
GRILLED MARINATED MACKEREL (Scandinavia)
TOMATO BUTTER (Scandinavia)
BUTTER-STEAMED NEW POTATOES
(Scandinavia)
ASSORTED CHEESES AND CRISP
BREADS (Scandinavia, pp. 38, 95)
To serve 6
LAMB IN DILL SAUCE (Scandinavia)
STEAMED RICE (Supplement No. 1)
GREEN SALAD
BAKED APPLE HALVES WITH ALMOND TOPPING
(Scandinavia)
To serve 6
PORK LOIN STUFFED WITH APPLES AND PRUNES
(Scandinavia)
OVEN-BROWNED POTATO WEDGES
(Scandinavia)
DANISH CHEESE AND CRISP BREAD
(Scandinavia, pp. 38, 95)
To serve 6-8
ROYAL POT ROAST (Scandinavia)
RED CURRANT JELLY
LACY POTATO PANCAKES WITH CHIVES
(Scandinavia)
CREAMY LAYER CAKE (Scandinavia)
To serve 4
MARINATED EGGPLANT (Scandinavia)
VEAL CUTLETS ( Vienna's Empire}
HOMEMADE EGG NOODLES (Italy)
BROCCOLI BRAISED IN WHITE WINE (Italy)
RED FRUIT PUDDING WITH CREAM
(Scandinavia)
To serve 6-8
GLASSBLOWER
'
s HERRING (Scandinavia)
BOILED LAMB WITH MARJORAM SAUCE
( Vienna's Empire)
HOT fRENCH BREAD (Supplement No. 1)
STRAWBERRIES AND CREAM
11
rn rmerican Jpproach to :rench Cread
"A good source of the exactly right, crisp,
honest loaf is hard to locate, " writes M.F.K.
Fisher in The Cooking of Provincial France,
"but once found, it is worth that trip across
town .... A Frenchman's whole meal can
hinge upon it. .. and, in fact, his existence,
at least by his own reckoning. "
Vital as bread is to the French family's
way of life, the French do not bake it at
home but buy it from the bakery, which is
one reason there is no bread recipe in The
Cooking of Provincial France. Also, the "crisp
and honest loaf "-which is just as desirable
to many Americans as it is to the French
has been most difcult to achieve with
American ingredients and equipment.
Julia Child Has Done It
One night at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Child in Cambridge, Massachusetts,
bread was passed to a FooDs OF THE WORLD
editor. "Try it, " said Julia Child, who is
our consultant on the French volume. "It's
pretty good-but I've gone th

ough 200
pounds of four and it isn't quite good
enough yet." The editor thought it was bet
ter than pretty good-certainly crisp enough
and honest enough to impress him.
A few weeks later, Newsweek reported:
"After 200 ... bakings, 250 pounds of four
and fve months of toil-Voila! Julia Child
has done it. She has made French bread
out of bleached American four."
Her recipe is her own. The recipe on the
opposite page was adapted in the FooDs
OF THE WORLD kitchen from a number of
others, including one developed by Eugene
Schertz of the Arthur D. Little laboratories
in Cambridge. Mr. Schertz spent three years
in France with the U.S. Army. Quartermaster
Corps, became devoted to French bread,
and brought back a recipe to work on that
would succeed with American ingredients.
About the Recipe
The recipe is as nearly foolproof as repeated
testing and adjustments could make it. In
appearance the bread resembles the loaves
1 2
of petit pain ordinaire shown on page 82 of
the Provincial France volume. In taste and
texture, if all g_oes well, you will have good
bread. But before you start kneading dough,
remember the realities of the situation. First,
you will be using American commercial
yeast to make the dough rise. This is a re
liable, standardized product with a low and
carefully controlled bacterial content. Many
French bakers still use the traditional sour
dough to make their dough rise; it is a
small piece of fermented dough with yeast
in it, and with a high bacterial content.
The yeast is the leavening agent; the bacte
ria produce acids that give the bread its
distinctive sour favor. From each day's
batch o
f
dough the baker pinches of a
piece to use as a "starter " next day.
Secord, you will be using American four:
either unbleached bread four, though this
may be hard to come by, or all-purpose
four, the formulas for many brands of
which are diferent in various parts of the
country. The bread four is preferred because
it is milled from so-called hard wheat and
has a gluten content of up to 12 per cent.
Gluten is the elastic protein that helps
dough to rise well. (In France as in America,
four from soft wheat, lower in gluten, is
used for pastries.)
Finally, you will be usmg the oven in
your kitchen range. The recipe calls for put
ting a pan of hot water in the bottom o
f
the oven, the purpose being to make steam,
which helps the bread crust to become crisp
and brown. At best this is a homemade sub
stitute for the commercial baker's oven, into
which steam can be introduced in control
lable amounts. (Also, many French bakers
still use brick ovens, which hold their heat
more evenly than a metal oven can.)
So-consider yourself warned, but not in
timidated. At worst you will fnd bread
baking an absorbing way to spend an after
noon-and at best, after due trial and error,
you will fnd that (even though most French
housewives do not and probably cannot )
you, too, can bake a great loaf of bread.
(
II
'I
French Bread
To make three 15-inch loaves
114 cup lukewarm water
1 package active dry yeast
1 teaspoon sugar
111 cups milk
11 cup water
2 teaspoons salt
511 cups unbleached bread four or
all-purpose four
11 cup white or yellow cornmeal
WATER-SALT SOLUTION FOR
BRUSHING
11 cup water
11 teaspoon salt
Sprinkle the yeast into the 1/4 cup of lukewarm ( 100

to 110

) water.
Add the teaspoon of sugar and stir until thoroughly dissolved. Place the
mixture in a warm, draft-free place-such as an unlighted oven-for 5 to
8 minutes, or until the yeast has begun to bubble and has almost dou
bled in volume. (If the yeast does not bubble and expand, it is inactive.
Repeat the process again with fresh yeast.)
Meanwhile, combine the milk, l2 cup of water and 2 teaspoons of
salt in a small saucepan and heat to lukewarm. Pour the mixture into a
large mixing bowl, stir in the yeast solution, then slowly add 5 cups of
the four about 1i cup at a time, mixing with a large spoon as you pro
ceed. Continue to stir until the mixture becomes a medium-frm dough
that can be lifted up in a moist, solid mass. Now, knead it on a lightly
foured surface by pressing it down, pushing it forward, then turning it
back upon itself. Repeat this kneading process for at least 10 minutes,
sprinkling the dough every few minutes with small handfuls of the re
served 1i cup of four to prevent the dough from sticking to the board.
When the dough is smooth and elastic, place it in a large, lightly but
tered bowl, dust it with a tablespoon of four and cover the bowl loosely
with a kitchen towel. Let the dough rise in a warm, draft-free place for
about 1li hours, or until the dough doubles in bulk and. springs back
slowly when gently poked with a fnger. Then punch the dough down
with one blow of your fst to reduce it to its original volume. Cover with
a towel and let it rise again for about 45 minutes, or until it has doubled
in volume.
Divide the dough into 3 equal portions. On a lightly foured surface,
mold and shape each portion into a slightly tapered loaf about 2 inches
in diameter and about 15 inches long. Scatter the 1i cup of cornmeal
over the surface of a large jelly-roll pan or cookie sheet and on it place
the loaves 2 inches apart. With a very sharp knife make diagonal slashes
about 112 inch deep at 2-inch intervals on the top of each loaf.
Then dissolve the salt in li cup of water and, with a pastry . brush,
Continued on next page 13
coat the bread lightly with the solution. Let the loaves rise for about an
hour in a warm, draft-free place until they double in bulk.
Preheat the oven to 400

and set a large, shallow roasting pan flled
with boiling water on the oven foor. Bake the bread on the shelf direct
ly above the water for 15 minutes. Then reduce the heat to 350

, brush
the bread with the water-salt solution, and after 10 minutes brush the
loaves again. Now bake the bread about 20 minutes longer, or until the
loaves are crisp and golden. Remove the bread from the baking sheet
and let it cool on a cake rack before serving.
NOTE: All-purpose four does not produce a bread with as crisp a crust
or as characteristic a French-bread texture as unbleached bread four does.
If you are unable to fnd unbleached bread four in your local supermarkets
or grocery stores, you may be able to purchase it from a baker's supply
house or from a bakery.
14
I
Tarte ala Tomate
TOMATO-CHEESE PIE
To make an 8- to 9-inch pie
PATE BRISfE (pastry dough or pie
crust)
6 tablespoons chilled butter, cut in
1/4-inch bits
2 tablespoons chilled vegetable
shortening
ll/2 cups all-purpose four
l4 teaspoon salt
3 to 5 tablespoons ice water
PATE BRISEE: In a large, chilled mixing bowl, combine butter, vegetable
shortening, four and salt. Working quickly, use your fngertips to rub
the four and fat together until they blend and look like fakes of coarse
meal. Pour 3 tablespoons of ice water over the mixture all at once, toss to
gether lightly and gather the dough into a ball. If the dough seems
crumbly, add up to 2 tablespoons more ice water by drops. Dust the past
ry with a little four and wrap it in wax paper or a plastic bag. Refrigerate
it for at least 3 hours, or until it is frm.
Remove the pastry from the refrigerator 5 minutes before rolling it. If
it seems resistant and hard, tap it all over with a rolling pin. Place the
ball on a foured board or table and, with the heel of one hand, press it
into a fat circle about 1 inch thick. Dust a little four over and under it
and roll it out-from the center to within an inch of the far edge. Lift
the dough and turn it clockwise, about the space of two hours on a
clock; roll again from the center to the far edge. Repeat-lifting, turning,
rolling-until the circle is about 1/s inch thick and 11 or 12 inches across.
If the pastry sticks to the board or table, lift it gently with a metal spatu
la and sprinkle a little four under it.
Butter the bottom and sides of an 8- to 9-inch false-bottomed quiche or
cake pan no more than 11/4 inches deep. Roll the pastry over the pin and un
roll it over the pan, or drape the pastry over the rolling pin, lift it up and
unfold it over the pan. Gently press the pastry into the bottom and
around the sides of the pan, being careful not to stretch it. Roll the pin
over the rim of the pan, pressing down hard to trim of the excess pastry.
With a fork, prick the bottom of the pastry all over, trying not to pierce
all the way through. Chill for 1 hour.
Preheat the oven to 400

. To keep the bottom of the pastry from puf


ing up, spread a sheet of buttered aluminum foil across the pan and press
it gently into the edges to support the sides of the pastry as it bakes.
Bake in the middle of the oven for 10 minutes, then remove the foil.
Prick the pastry again, then return it to the oven for 3 minutes, or until
it starts to shrink from the sides of the pan and begins to brown. Re
move it from the oven and set it on a wire cake rack to cool.
Continued on next page 15
TOMATO-CHEESE FILLING
2 or 3 large tomatoes, cut in 1/-
inch slices
1 pound Gruyere cheese, cut in thin
slices
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried basil or 1 tablespoon
fnely cut fresh basil
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons melted butter
TOMATO-CHEESE FILLING: Sprinkle the tomato slices generously with salt,
and place them on a cake rack to drain for about 11 hour.
Preheat the oven to 3 75 o. Arrange the cheese slices, slightly overlapping,
in the bottom of the pastry shell, and place the drained tomato slices side
by side on top. Sprinkle with a few grindings of black pepper, the basil
and the grated Parmesan cheese. Dribble the melted butter over the to
matoes and bake in the upper third of the oven for 25 minutes, or until
the cheese has melted and the top of the pie is lightly browned. Serve
hot or warm.
NOTE: An 8-inch-square baking dish may be used. If you wish to make a
larger pie, double all ingredients and use an 11-inch-squae baking dish
or a 12-inch false-bottomed quiche or cake pan.
16
Poulet en Cocotte Bonne Femme
CASSEROLE-ROASTED CHICKEN WITH VEGETABLES
To serve 4
A 311- to 4-pound roasting chicken
4 tablespoons soft butter
1/4 teaspoon fnely chopped garlic
11 teaspoon dried thyme, crumbled
14 pound salt pork, diced
2 cups water
5 tablespoons butter
16 peeled white onions, about 1 inch
in diameter
6 peeled carrots, cut in 2-inch
cylinders or olive shapes
16 one-inch potato balls, or potatoes
cut in 2-inch olive shapes
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Bou
q
uet garni made of 4 parsley
sprigs and 1 bay leaf, tied together
Preheat the oven to 350

. Wash the chicken quickly under cold running


water and dry it thoroughly inside and out with paper towels. Cream 2
tablespoons of soft butter until it is fufy, and beat in the garlic and thyme.
Spread the seasoned butter inside the chicken. Truss the chicken and rub
the outside with the remaining 2 tablespoons of soft butter.
Blanch the salt pork dice by simmering them in 2 cups of water for 5
minutes; drain on paper towels and pat dry. In a heayy, enameled oval
casserole just large enough to hold the chicken comfortably, melt 1 table
spoon of the butter over moderate heat and in it brown the pork dice, stir
ring them or shaking the casserole frequently, until they are crisp and
golden. Remove them with a slotted spoon and set aside to drain on paper
towels. In the rendered fat left in the casserole, brown the chicken on all
sides. Remove from heat and pour of all but a thin flm of fat from the cas
serole. Return the chicken and the browned pork dice to it and set aside.
In a heavy 10- to 12-inch skillet, melt the remaining 4 tablespoons of
butter over moderate heat and in it cook the onions, carrots, and potatoes,
stirring frequently, for 5 minutes, or until coated with butter and lightly
colored. Remove the vegetables and arrange around the chicken. Season
with salt and pepper, add the bouquet garni, and cover the casserole. If the
cover isn't snug, drape a piece of foil over the chicken before covering it.
On top of the stove, heat the casserole until the fat begins to splutter.
Cook the chicken on the middle shelf of the oven, basting it every 20 min
utes with the juices that will accumulate in the casserole. After 11/4 hours,
start testing the chicken by lifting it with a wooden spoon inserted in its
tail opening. When the juices that run out are yellow, it is done.
To serve, transfer the chicken to a heated platter and arrange the vegeta
bles attractively around it. Discard the bouquet garni and skim as much
surface fat as possible from the sauce left in the casserole. Taste the sauce
and correct the seasoning. The chicken may be carved in the kitchen or at
the table. Serve the sauce separately.
From The Cook1ng of Provincial France. 17
18
Crostata di Ricotta
CHEESE PIE
To make 1 nine-inch pie
PASTA FROLLA
2 cups unsifted all-purpose four
12 tablespoons lard or butter,
at room temperature
but not soft
4 egg yolks
114 cup sugar
3 tablespoons dry Marsala
1 teaspoon freshly grated lemon peel
11 teaspoon salt
PASTA FROLLA (pastry crust): In a large mixing bowl, make a well in the
center of 2 cups of four. Drop into it the butter (or lard), egg yolks, sugar,
Marsala, lemon peel and salt. With your fngertips, mix the ingredients
together, incorporating as much four as you can. With the heels of your
hands, work in the rest of the four until the dough is smooth and can be
gathered into a ball. Do not, however, knead the dough or work it any more
than necessary. (If you have an electric mixer with a paddle attachment, all of
the ingredients can be placed in the bowl at once and mixed at low speed until
they are just combined.) The dough can be rolled out at once, but if it seems
at all oily, refrigerate it for about 1 hour, or until it is frm but not hard.
Break of about 1/4 of the dough, dust lightly with four and cover with
wax paper or plastic wrap; set aside in the refrigerator. Reshape the rest of
the dough into a ball and place on a lightly foured board or pastry cloth.
With the heel of your hand, fatten the ball into a disk about 1 inch thick.
Dust a little four over both sides of the disk to prevent the dough from
sticking, and begin rolling it out-starting from the center and rolling to
within an inch of the far edge. Gently lift the dough, turn clockwise, and
roll out again from the center to the far edge. Repeat lifting, turning and
rolling until the disk is about 1/s inch thick and at least 11 inches across.
If the dough sticks to the board or cloth while you are rolling it out, lift it
gently with a wide metal spatula and sprinkle a little four under it.
Lightly butter the bottom and sides of a 9-by-111-inch spring-form or
false-bottom cake pan. Then, starting at the nearest edge of the circle, lift
the pastry and drape it over the rolling pin. Place the pin in the middle
of the buttered pan, and unfold the pastry over it, leaving some slack in
the center. Gently press the pastry into the bottom and around the sides of
the pan, taking care not to stretch it. Roll the pin over the rim of the pan,
pressing down hard to trim of the excess pastry around the top.
Unwrap the remaining pastry, place it on a lightly foured board or cloth,
fatten it with the heel of your hand and roll it into a rectangle about 12
inches long. With a pastry wheel or sharp knife, cut the rectangle into long,
even strips about 1/ inch wide.
Continted on next page 19
RICOTTA FILLING
5 cups ricotta cheese (212 pounds) ,
or whole-curd cottage cheese
rubbed through a coarse sieve
'1 cup sugar
1 tablespoon four
'1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon freshly grated orange peel
4 egg yolks
1 tablespoon white raisins, rinsed and
drained
1 tablespoon diced candied orange
peel
1 tablespoon diced candied citron
2 tablespoons slivered blanched
almonds or pine nuts
1 egg white mixed with 1 tablespoon
water
RICOTTA FILLING: Preheat the oven to 350

. Combine thericotta cheese with


11 cup of sugar, 1 tablespoon four, 12 teaspoon salt, the vanilla, grated
orange peel and egg yolks, and beat until they are thoroughly mixed. Stir
in the raisins and the candied orange peel and citron. Spoon this flling into
the pastry shell, spreading it evenly with a rubber spatula. Sprinkle the top
with slivered almonds or pine nuts, then weave or crisscross the pastry
strips across the pie to make a lattice design. Brush the strips lightly with the
egg-white-and-water mixture. Bake on the middle shelf of the oven for
1 to 11/4 hours, or until the crust is golden and the flling is frm.
Remove the pie from the oven and set it on a large jar or cofee can. Then
slide of the outside rim of the pan. Cool the pie on a wire cake rack, leaving
the bottom disk of the pan in place. If you would prefer to remove the disk
before serving, wait until the pie is cool, loosen the bottom crust with a
wide metal spatula, and carefully slide the pie onto a round serving plate.
From The Cooking of lralr
20
Saute de Lapin au Vin Blanc
RABBIT STEWED IN WHITE WINE SAUCE
To serve 4 to 6
A 211- to 3-pound fresh rabbit or
defrosted frozen rabbit, cut in
serving pieces
1 cup dry white wine
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
14 cup olive oil
1 onion, thinly sliced
11 teaspoon dried thyme
1 bay leaf, crumbled
2 teaspoons fnely chopped fresh
parsley
11 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1/4 pound lean salt pork, diced
2 cups water
1 tablespoon butter
12 to 16 peeled white onions, about
1 inch in diameter
3 tablespoons fnely chopped shallots
11 teaspoon fnely chopped garlic
2 tablespoons four
111 cups beef stock, fresh or canned
Bou
q
uet garni made of 4 parsley
sprigs and 1 bay leaf, tied together
Wash the rabbit under running water and dry it with paper towels. Com
bine 11 cup of the wine, 1 tablespoon wine vinegar, olive oil, the sliced
onion, thyme, bay leaf, parsley, salt and pepper for the marinade in a
shallow baking dish or casserole. Marinate the rabbit 6 hours at room
temperature, 12 to 24 hours refrigerated. Turn the pieces every few hours.
Simmer the pork dice in 2 cups of water for 5 minutes; drain and pat
dry with paper towels. In a heavy 10- to 12-inch skillet, melt 1 table
spoon of butter over moderate heat and in it brown the pork dice until
they are crisp and golden. Set the pork aside and pour most of the fat
into a bowl, leaving just a flm on the bottom of the skillet. Brown the
onions in the fat left in the skillet, then transfer them to a bowl.
Remove the rabbit from the marinade and dry it with paper towels.
Reserve the marinade. Brown the rabbit in the skillet, adding more fat
as needed, then transfer the pieces to a heavy fameproof 2- to 3-quart
casserole. Pour of almost all the fat from the skillet, add the shallots
and garlic and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. Stir in the four and
cook, stirring over low heat 1 minute. Remove from heat and pour in the
remaining 11 cup wine and stock, stirring constantly. Cook over moderate
heat, stirring, until the sauce thickens. Then pour it over the rabbit and
add the bou
q
uet garni, reserved marinade and browned pork dice. Preheat the
oven to 350

.
Bring the stew to a boil on top of the stove, cover, and cook on the
middle shelf of the oven for 40 minutes. Gently stir in the onions and
cook for another 20 minutes, or until the rabbit is tender when pierced
with the tip of a sharp knife. Just before serving, stir the remaining 1
tablespoon of vinegar into the sauce and taste for seasoning. Serve the
stew directly from the casserole.
From The Cooking of Provincial France. 21
J Jhoppers Guide to :od and Utensils
The stores l i sted on these pages
are grouped by ci ti es and by four
cui si nes: French, I tal i an, Scandi
navi an and Hungari an. Al l are frms
that accept mai l orders. Some of
the i nformati on i n thi s gui de has
appeared i n The Cooking of Provincial
France and The Cooking of Italy.
French Foodstuf
ATLANTA, GA.
Davi son' s Gourmet Shop
1 80 Peachtree St. N. W. 30303
BOSTON, MASS.
Cardul l o' s Gourmet Shop
6 Brattle St. , Cambridge 02 1 38
Jordan Marsh
450 Washi ngton St. 02 1 1 1
Malben' s Frui t Co.
! 5 8 Massachusetts Ave. 02 1 1 5
S. S. Pierce
1 3 3 Brookl i ne Ave. 02 1 1 5
1 44 Tremont St. 02 1 1 1
CEDAR RAPIDS, lOW A
Ki l l i an' s
20 1 3 rd Ave. S. E. 5 2401
Nelson' s Meat and Delicatessen
3201 1 st Ave. S. E. 52401
CHICAGO, ILL.
The Epicure Shop
Carson Pirie Scott & Co.
1 S. State St. 60603
The Pantry
Marshall Field & Co.
1 1 1 N. State St. 60602
Stop and Shop
1 6 W. Washi ngton Bl vd. 60602
DALLAS, TEXAS
The Epi cure Shop
Nei man- Marcus
Mai n at Ervay 7520 1
22
DENVER, COLO.
American Tea, Cofee and Spice Co.
! 5 1 ! Champa St. 80202
Cassi dy' s Del i catessen
2406 E. 3rd Ave. 8022 3
May- D&F Gourmet Shop
16th and Tremont Pl ace 80202
DETROIT, MICH.
J. L. Hudson
1 206 Woodward 48226
HOUSTON, TEXAS
Cheese Market of Houston
1 2850 Memorial Dri ve 77024
European Import Store
(91 0 Preston St. )
P. O. Box 2205 77001
Foley ' s Gourmet Shop
1 1 00 Travi s 77002
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
L. S. Ayres & Co.
1 W. Washi ngton St. 46204
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Gardro' s Gourmet Shop
3566 St. Johns Ave. 32205
May- Cohen' s
1 1 7 W. Duval St . 32202
LOS ANGELES, CALIF.
Jurgensen' s Grocery Co.
409 N. Beverly Dri ve
Beverly Hi l l s 902 1 0
107 1 Gl endon Ave.
Westwood Vi l lage 90024
MIAMI, FLA.
Burdi ne' s
22 E. Flagler S t . 3 3 1 3 1
The Cheese Shop
76 Miracle Mi le
Coral Gabl es 3 3 1 34
Jordan Marsh
1 5 01 Bi scayne Blvd. 3 3 1 3 2
MONTREAL, QUE., CANADA
Di onne Fi l s & Cie
1 2 2 1 St. Catherine St. W.
Eaton' s Gourmet Department
677 St. Catherine St. W.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
D. H. Hol mes
81 9 Canal St. 701 1 2
M. Langen stein & Sons
1 3 30 Arabel l a 701 1 5
NEW YORK, N. Y.
Bloomi ngdale' s Gourmet Dept.
Lexi ngton at 59th St. 10022
Charl es & Co.
340 Madi son Ave. 1 001 7
Cheese of Al l Nati ons
1 5 3 Chambers St. 1 0007
Mai son Gl ass
5 2 E. 58th St. 1 0022
Maryl and Gourmet Mart
41 4 Amsterdam Ave. 1 0024
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
Brandei s
!6th and Dougl as 68 1 02
Ki lpatri ck' s
1 509 Douglas 68 1 02
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
Gi mbel s Department Store
9th and Market Sts. 1 91 07
John Wanamaker
1 3th and Market Sts. 1 91 02
PITTSBURGH, PA.
Kaufmann' s Department
Store
400 Fi fth Ave. 1 52 1 9
ST. LOUIS, MO.
Hei di ' s Around the World Foods
1 1 49 S. Brentwood Bl vd.
63 1 1 7
Paul ' s Cheese Stal l
1 1 6 Uni on Market
700 North 6th St. 63 1 01
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.
Ci cy of Pari s
Uni on Square 94 1 32
Gol dberg Bowen
3 1 4 Sutter 94108
Si mon Brothers
2829 Cal i forni a St. 94 1 1 5
SEATTLE, WASH.
Frederick & Nel son
Fi fth and Pi ne 98 1 01
Northwest Gourmet Center
1 208 Lake St. , Renton 98055
WASHINGTON, D. C.
Wi ne and Cheese Shop
14 1 3 Wi sconsi n Ave. N. W. 20007
TORONTO, CANADA
The Old World Cheese Shop
809 Yonge St. , Toronto 5
Eaton' s Hostess Shop
1 90 Yonge St. , Toronto 1
Italian Foodstuf
ATLANTA, GA.
Davi son' s Gourmet Shop
180 Peachtree St. N. W. 30303
BALTIMORE, MD.
Pastore' s Grocery Store
1 007 E. Lombard St. 2 1 202
Sorrento Grocery
72 1 2 Hartford Rd. 2 1 2 1 4
BOSTON, MASS.
Cardul l o' s Gourmet Shop
6 Brattle St . , Cambri dge 02 1 38
BURLINGTON, VT.
lzzo Market
77 Pearl St. 05401
Merola' s Grocery Store
1 563 North Ave. 05401
CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA
Nelson' s Meat and Del i catessen
3201 1 st Ave. S. E. 5 2401
Swi ss Colony
Li ndal e Plaza 5 2402
CINCINNATI, OHIO
Bruno' s Foods
4970 Glenway Ave. 45238
LaRosa' s
241 5 Boudi not Ave. 45238
DALLAS, TEXAS
Cappello' s
5 3 2 8 Lemmon Ave. 75 209
The Epi cure Shop
Nei man- Marcus
Main at Ervay 75201
Si mon Davi d
7 1 1 7 Inwood Rd. 75 209
DENVER, COLO.
P. C. Manci nel l i
3300 Osage St. 802 1 1
Pi nel l i & Son
1 409 1 5 th St. 80202
DETROIT, MICH.
Lombardi Food Co.
605 East Ten Mi l e Road
Royal Oak 48220
Vendetti & Sons
16508 Woodward Ave.
Hi ghland Park 48203
HOUSTON, TEXAS
Antone' s I mport Co.
(807 Taft)
P. O. Box 3 3 5 2 7700 1
European Import Store
( 91 0 Preston St. )
P. 0. Box 2 205 7700 1
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA
Guy Montani Fi ne Foods
1 2 West 27th St. 46208
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Gus Panos' Grocery
5 1 5 N. Main Sr. 32202
Joseph Assi Bakery & Del i ca
tessen
3 3 1 6 Beach Bl vd. 32207
LOS ANGELES, CALIF.
Fazzi Fancy Foods
1 5 38 North Western Ave. 90027
R. Fazzi and Co.
225 S. Spring St. 9001 2
MEMPHIS, TENN.
Barzi zza Bros. Internati onal
Trade Center
35 1 South Front St. 38 1 03
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Di Puma' s I tal i an Supermarket
and Pastry Shop
1 6385 West Dixie Hi ghway
3 3 1 60
MONTREAL, QUE., CANADA
Di onne Fi l s & Ci e
1 2 2 1 Sr. Catheri ne St. W.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
Central Grocery Co.
92 3 Decatur St. 70 1 1 6
Progress Grocery Co.
91 5 Decatur St. 701 1 6
NEW YORK, N. Y.
Bl oomi ngdal e' s Gourmet Shop
Lexi ngton at 59th St. 1 0022
Cheese of Al l Nati ons
1 5 3 Chambers St. 1 0007
Macy ' s Gourmet Shop
Herald Square 1 0036
Manganaro Foods
488 Ni nth Ave. 1001 8
Tri nacri a Importi ng Co.
4 1 5 Thi rd Ave. 1 001 6
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
Luci o Mancuso & Son
1 902 East Passyunk Ave. 1 91 48
PHOENIX, ARIZ.
Capi tano' s
42 1 N. 7t h Ave. 8500 1
7 1 24 N. 35 th Ave. 8502 1
PITTSBURGH, PA.
Savarese Co.
20 1 1 Penn Avenue 1 5 2 2 2
PORTLAND, ORE.
Pi eri ' s
3 82 4 S. E. Powell Bl vd. 97202
ST. LOUIS, MO.
Hei di ' s Around the World Foods
1 1 49 S. Brentwood Bl vd. 63 1 1 7
l tal o- American I mporti ng Co.
5 1 2 Frankl i n Ave. 63 1 01
Vol pi I tal i an Foods, Inc.
6256 Daggett Ave. 63 1 1 0
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.
Si mon Brothers
2829 Cal i forni a St. 94 1 1 5
SEATTLE, WASH.
Delaurenti and Co.
Stal l 5, Lower Fl oor
Pi ke Pl ace Market 98 1 01
VANCOUVER, B. C. , CAN ADA
Gi rardi Enterpri ses
25 65 E. Hasti ngs
Marotto' s I tal i an Del i catessen
1 625 Renfrew
23
WASHINGTON, D. C.
Wine and Cheese Shop
1 41 3 Wi sconsi n Ave. N. W. 20007
Scandinavian Foodstuf
ALBUQUERQUE, N. M.
Fremont ' s Fine Foods
566 Coronado Cntr. N. E. 87 1 1 0
ATLANTA, GA.
Davi son' s Gourmet Shop
180 Peachtree St. N. W. 30303
BOSTON, MASS.
Cardul l o' s Gourmet Shop
6 Brattle St. , Cambri dge 02 1 38
Jordan Marsh
450 Washi ngton St. 02 1 1 1
S. S. Pierce
1 3 3 Brookl i ne Ave. 02 1 1 5
144 Tremont St. 02 1 1 1
CEDAR RAPIDS, lOW A
Ki l l i an' s
201 3 r d Ave. S. E. 5 2401
Nel son' s Meat & Delicatessen
3201 1 st Ave. S. E. 5 2401
Swi ss Colony
Lindale Pl aza 5 2402
CHARLOTTE, N. C.
Bel k Bros. Gourmet Shop
5th and College Sts. 28201
Leo' s Del i catessen
1 503 El i zabeth Ave. 28202
Reid ' s Super Markets
707 Provi dence Rd. 28207
CHICAGO, ILL.
The Epi cure Shop
Carson, Pi ri e, Scott & Co.
1 S. State St. 60603
Evanston Sea Food
7 1 9 Main St.
Evanston 60202
Kuhn' s Delicatessen & Li quors
305 1 - 5 3 N. Li ncoln Ave. 60657
The Pantry
Marshal l Fi el d & Co.
1 1 1 N. State St. 60601
Scandi a Fi sh and Del i catessen
1 033 W. Belmont 60657
Schott and Son, Inc.
5247 N. Cl ark St. 60640
24
Stop and Shop
16 W. Washi ngton Blvd. 60602
Vollendorf' s Scandi a Foods
3944 W. North Ave. 60647
CINCINNATI, OHIO
Svensk Buti k
61 7- B Vi ne St. 45202
CLEVELAND, OHIO
Hal le Bros. Co.
1 228 Eucl i d Ave. 441 1 5
Hi gbee' s Department Store
1 00 Publ i c Sq. 44 1 1 3
DALLAS, TEXAS
Cappel l o' s
5328 Lemmon Ave. 75 209
The Epi cure Shop
Nei man- Marcus
Mai n at Ervay 75201
Si mon David
7 1 1 7 I nwood Rd. 75 209
DETROIT, MICH.
). L. Hudson Co.
1 206 Woodward 48226
HOUSTON, TEXAS
Antone' s Import Co.
(807 Taft St . )
P. O. Box 3352 7700 1
European Import Store
(91 0 Preston St. )
P. O. Box 2205 7700 1
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Joseph Assi Bakery & Delicatessen
3 3 1 6 Beach Blvd. 32007
KANSAS CITY, MO.
The Country Store
42 1 Ni chol s Rd. 641 1 2
Hi ckory Farms of Ohi o Store
Prairie Vi l l age, Kans. 66208
Mi lwaukee Delicatessen
6201 Oak St. 641 1 3
Swanson' s Grocery
1 8 1 1 Westport Rd. 64 1 1 1
LOS ANGELES;CALIF.
Jurgensen s Grocery Co.
409 N. Beverl y Dr. , Beverl y Hi l l s
902 1 0
LOUISVILLE, KY.
Strohm Market
92 1 Barrett Ave. 40205
MEMPHIS, TENN.
Barzi zza Bros. I nternational
Trade Center
3 5 1 S. Front St. 3 81 03
MILWAUKEE, WIS.
Gi mbel s-Schusters
1 01 W. Wi sconsi n Ave. 5 3202
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Mai d of Scandi navi a
3245 Ral ei gh Ave. S. 5 5 4 1 6
MONTREAL, QUE., CANADA
Dionne Fils & Cie
1 2 2 1 St. Catherine St. W.
Eaton' s Gourmet Department
677 St. Catherine St. W.
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
M. Langenstei n & Sons, I nc.
1 3 30 Arabella 701 1 5
NEW YORK, N. Y.
Bl oomi ngdal e' s Gourmet Dept.
Lexi ngton at 5 9th St. 1 0022
Cheese of Al l Nati ons
1 5 3 Chambers St. 1 0007
Cheese Vi l l age Ltd.
3 Greenwich Ave. 1 00 1 1
H. Roth & Son
1 5 77 1 st Ave. 1 0028
Maryl and Gourmet Mart
41 4 Amsterdam Ave. 1 0024
Nyborg & Nel son, Inc.
937 2nd Ave. 10022
Papri kas Wei ss
1 5 46 2nd Ave. 1 0028
PITTSBURGH, PA.
Kaufmann' s Department Store
400 5 th Ave. 1 5 2 1 9
Swi ss Colony
1 3 3 S. Hi l l s Vi l l age 1 5 2 41
PORTLAND, ME.
Mi tchel l ' s of Portland
25 Forest Ave. 041 01
64 Pi ne St. 041 02
Model Food I mporters I nc.
95 Mi ddl e St. 041 1 1
ST. LOUIS, MO.
Hei di ' s Around the World Foods
1 1 49 S. Brentwood Bl vd. 63 1 1 7
). Vaughan, I nc.
7 1 5 St. Charles St. 63 1 01
Paul' s Cheese Stall Paprikas Wei ss Kilpatrick' s
1 16 Union Market, 700 N. 6th 1 546 2nd Ave. 10028 1 509 Douglas 68102
63 1 01
ST. LOUIS, MO. PHOENIX, ARIZ.
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH Heidi ' s Around the World Foods Diamond' s
Henry' s Meat and Delicatessen 1 149 South Brentwood Blvd. 63 1 1 7 Park Central Shopping Center
236 East 2nd St. S. 84105 8501 3
Linner' s Delicatessen Goldwater' s
69 West 3rd St. S. 841 01
Utensils
Park Central Shopping Center
Lu Dornbush Delicatessen
8501 3
163 East 3rd St. S. 84105
ATLANTA, GA.
Rich' s
SAN FRANCISCO, CALI F.
.
Nygren Market
45 Broad St. S. W. 30303
The Capricorn
92 East 27th St. S. 84106 1 846 Union St. 941 23
BOSTON, MASS.
Thomas E. Cara Ltd.
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.
Jordan Marsh
5 1 7 Pacifc Ave. 941 3 3
Goldberg Bowen
450 Washington St. 02 1 1 1
3 14 Sutter St. 94108
Williams-Sonoma
Norse Cove
The Pot Shop
576 Sutter St. 94102
381 Boylston St. 02 1 16
434 Castro St. 941 14
SEATTLE, WASH.
CHI CAGO, ILL.
Frederick & Nelson
SEATTLE, WASH.
Carson Pirie Scott & Co.
5th and Pine 981 01
Carter' s Fine Foods and Delica-
1 S. State St. 60603
tessen Northwest Gourmet Center
4523 University Way N. E. 98105
DENVER, COLO.
1 208 Lake St. , Renton 981 5 5
Chi p' s Delicatessen
Denver Dry Goods Co.
Security Market
16th and California 80202
TORONTO, CANADA
3rd Ave. and Virginia St. 98 105
Pampered Kitchens
DETROIT, MICH.
The Colonnade, 1 3 1 Bloor St. W. ,
Johnsen' s Scandinavian Foods
). L. Hudson Toronto 5
2248 N. W. Market 98 107
1206 Woodward 48226
Specialty Spice Shop
HOUSTON, TEX.
Seeds and Potted Herbs
Stall 3, Lower Floor, Pike Place
Market 981 01
Petite Marmite
61 1 0 Westbury Square 77035
Earl May Nursery
VANCOUVER, B. C. , CANADA
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.
Shenandoah, Iowa 5 1601
Dovre Import & Export Ltd.
L. S. Ayres & Co. Henry Field Co.
369 E. Hastings St.
1 W. Washington St. 46204 Shenandoah, Iowa 5 1601
Hungarian Foodstuf
MIAMI, FLA.
Tool Shed Herb Nursery
Salem Center
Burdine' s
North Salem, N.Y. 10560
22 E. Flagler St. 3 3 1 3 1
DALLAS, TEXAS
Wayside Gardens
Cappello' s
NEW YORK, N. Y.
Mentor, Ohio 44060
5328 Lemmon Ave. 75209
Bazaar de Ia Cuisine
Weston Nurseries
Simon David 160 E. 5 5th St. 10022
East Main St.
7 1 17 Inwood Rd. 75 209
Bazaar Frantais
Hopkington, Mass. 01 748
666 6th Ave. 1001 0
White Flower Farm
MONTREAL, QUE., CANADA
Old Europe Fine Foods The Bridge Co.
Litchfeld, Conn. 06759
3855 St. Lawrence Blvd. 2 1 2 E. 52nd St. 10022
Sepps Sausages & Delicatessen Inc.
Hammacher Schlemmer
Shalots
3769 St. Lawrence Blvd.
145 E. 57th St. 10022
Eaton' s Gourmet Department La Cuisiniere
GNL Shallot Distributors
677 St. Catherine St. W.
93 Madison Ave. 1002 1
5 1 De Shibe Terrace
NEW YORK, N. Y.
OMAHA, NEB.
Vineland, N.. 08360
H. Roth & Son
Brandeis Les Eschalotes
1 577 1 st Ave. 1 0028 16th and Douglas 68102 Ramsey, N.J. 07446
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