the  orld

t
Jupplement �mber ²+u
BY THE EDITORS OF TIME-LIFE BOOKS
[:n/.n/·
How to Succeed in Deep Frying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Stir-fried Chicken with Pine Nuts and Hot Peppers . . . . . 7
Breaded Veal Cutlets (Wiener Schnitzel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Cofee Ring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Potato Soup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Stir-fried Shrimp with Peas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Stir-fried Chicken with Fresh Mushrooms .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Recipe Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Menu Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Sources for Foods and Utensils ............................ 22
coods ¡ the 'orld
Tl ME- L1 FE BOOKS. NEW YORK
© 1969 Time Inc. All rigl11s reserved. Puhl1shcd simultaneously in Canada.
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In almost every nation where fats and oils
are in good supply, deep frying is an im­
portant way of cooking. It is impossible to
imagine the British cuisine without fsh and
chips, the Italian without fritto misto or the
Japanese without tempura.
Americans probably have more kinds of
oils and fats to choose from than any other
people in the world, and yet deep frying is
an art neglected by United States cooks. Ex­
cept when preparing French fried potatoes,
most Americans rarely use the technique.
Part of the reason for this neglect is that
fried foods have a reputation for being hard
to digest and high in calories. The reputation
is undeserved, for fried foods need not be ex­
cessively fatty, and it is fattiness that many
people object to. Fats do take a longer time
to digest than carbohydrates or proteins, be­
cause the enzymes that digest them are in
the intestines, not in the stomach. This is
the reason fats give that flled-up feeling, but
the time needed for digestion should not be
confused with indigestibility. The calorie in­
dictment is justifed; fats make available
more calories than other nutrients do.
How much these drawbacks apply to fried
foods depends on how the frying is done.
In well-managed deep frying, some foods ab­
sorb little fat, and may be less flling than
the same foods fried by other techniques.
By defnition, deep frying is the process
of cooking by plunging food into hot fat or
oil. This frms and seals the surface instantly,
trapping air and moisture inside; the mois­
ture steams the food to the desired degree.
Properly done, deep frying crisps and browns
the outside of the food, but keeps it moist
and tender within. Successful deep frying,
2
however, is not as simple as it sounds. This
part of the Supplement will deal with facts
you should know about fats and oils, equip­
ment, food preparation, and the techniques
necessary to ensure perfectly fried foods.
Fats an
d
Oils Used
in Deep Frying
From a culinary standpoint, fats and oils are
almost synonymous. Fats (and the hydro­
genated shortenings) are solid at room tem­
perature while oils are liquid, but both
perform much the same function in cooking.
Despite their similarities, all fats and oils
have individual characteristics and one can­
not always be substituted for another. The
most obvious diference between corn oil
and olive oil, for example, or between lard
and vegetable shortening, is in favor. The
taste of a fat or oil afects the taste of the
food and this is a consideration in deep fry­
ing-though perhaps less crucial than in
some other kinds of cooking.
A less obvious characteristic of a fat or
oil is its so-called smoking point. At high
temperatures, the components of fats and
oils begin to break down chemically and give
of a continuous stream of smoke. With fur­
ther heating, they will fash into fame.
When the fat or oil reaches the point of
smoking, breakdown products are already
forming. They are likely to develop a strong
odor, impart a disagreeable taste and odor
to the food, and even cause the fried food
to irritate the stomach. Because deep drying
must be accomplished at fairly high temper­
atures-3500 to 400°-tO seal the food and
avoid fat absorption, only fats and oils with
smoking points above that temperature range
are good candidates for the frying kettle.
Restaurant-type
deep-frying
saucepan with basket
Deep-frying saucepan
with basket
Wire skimmer Slotted spoon
Tongs
Equipment Used in Deep Frying
Electric deep fryer with basket
Mercury-tube deep-frying
thermometer
with kettle clamp
Deep-frying can be a pleasure when you have the right tools to work with (Jee folowing page}.
3
The all-purpose vegetable oils are ideal for
deep frying. Whether made from corn, cot­
tonseed, soybean or peanut oil, they are all
bland in favor and have smoking points well
above 400°. Many of these same oils form
the basis of solid vegetable shortenings;
chemical processing converts the oils into al­
most tasteless, soft and creamy fats that, like
their liquid counterparts, are suitable for
deep frying. However, their smoking points
may be somewhat lower.
Lard has a distinct and, for many palates,
attractive favor. If you have a taste for it,
the smoking point of high-quality lard is
high enough to be safe for deep frying.
The favor of olive oil is too pronounced,
and its smoking point too low for it to be a
good candidate for the deep fryer. Butter and
margarine are also best reserved for other
uses; they contain protein and their smoking
points are relatively low.
None of the ordinary fats or oils suited
the famous French chef Auguste Escofer;
he preferred to render the fat that encases
beef kidney. (This fat is hard to obtain now­
adays, and many fats used today were un­
available to Escofer.) In his time, the beef
fat was relatively inexpensive, a prime con­
sideration for frying on a large scale.
To render beef kidney fat (or pork, if that
is more readily available) is something of
an undertaking: Remove all the bits of mem­
brane and cut the fat into small pieces. Place
the fat in a heavy skillet or saucepan and
cook it over low heat, meanwhile squeezing
and pressing down on the pieces with the
back of a spoon or table fork. When all of
the fat has been rendered into liquid, strain
it through a sieve lined with cheesecloth.
Store tightly covered and refrigerated.
Equipment for Deep Frying
The secret of deep frying is to get the oil or
fat to exactly the right temperature-and
keep it there throughout the cooking pro­
cess. The best way to do this is to use either
a thermostatically controlled electric deep
4
fryer or a deep-frying saucepan with a ther­
mometer clipped to it.
The main advantage of an electric fryer is
the ease of controlling temperature. If you
use a top-of-the-stove pan, choose one that
is heavy enough to sit on the stove steadily
without tipping, and wide enough in diam­
eter to accommodate a reasonable amount
of food. The rule of thumb is that the fryer
should be flled about half full-and you will
need 2 to 3 inches of oil, so be sure that the
pan is at least 4 inches deep.
If you do not have a special pan, substitute
a deep electric saucepan. Or use a plain deep
saucepan or Dutch oven and a deep-frying
thermometer. In this case select a pan heavy
enough to heat the oil evenly, but not so
heavy that it takes overlong to heat.
A pan made specifcally for deep frying
comes equipped with a perforated metal or
wire basket, making it possible to immerse
a number of small pieces of food in the oil
at one time and lift them out together when
they are cooked. Such baskets, designed to
ft into most 3- to 5-quart saucepans, are also
sold separately. A basket helps ensure uni­
form cooking and often saves time.
For dealing with larger foods, or in lieu
of using a basket, equip yourself with sturdy
tongs and a slotted spoon or wire skimmer
like those shown on page 3. The spoon can
help keep the oil clear of food fragments dur­
ing the frying process.
For draining deep-fried foods, keep paper
towels at hand. And for saving the oil for
future use, you will need a large sieve, plenty
of cheesecloth, and a suitable container (one
that the same oil originally came in is con­
venient because it is already labeled).
Foo
d
s for Deep Frying
Almost every sort of raw food from fruit to
fsh can be deep fried. So, too, can cooked
foods, especially when chopped and made
into croquettes or a flling for pastry.
In most cases raw foods are cut into small
pieces before they are fried so they can cook
through in the time they take to brown.
These pieces should be as nearly the same
size as possible so they will cook in the same
length of time. The smaller the pieces, the
faster they will fry-thus reducing the danger
of their absorbing fat (and calories).
Frozen foods should be thoroughly de­
frosted and, if necessary, drained.
Sometimes food goes into the deep fryer
without any sort of coating-French fried
potatoes are a familiar instance. More typ­
ically, food is coated in one of several ways.
The simplest method is fouring it and shak­
ing of the excess. Or it may be dipped into
four, then into eggs or an egg yolk and oil
mixture, and fnally crumbed.
In many recipes, such as the Italian fritto
misto or the Japanese tempura, food is coated
with a batter made from egg, four and liq­
uid to form a casing less penetrable than the
simple coatings. Still more complicated, but
delectable, are the foods wrapped in pastry
before frying.
Crumb or pastry coating may be applied
hours in advance; the food should then be re­
frigerated until it is to be fried. Flouring, on
the other hand, must be done at the last min­
ute lest the four absorb the moisture of the
food. And most batters, too, require last­
minute application; they are made with beat­
en egg white, which should be added just
before the batter is used and the food fried.
Techniques of Deep Frying
Once begun, the actual deep-frying process
requires close attention. The food should be
arranged in orderly fashion and be easily ac­
cessible. If small batches must be kept hot,
preheat the oven to 250
°
and have ready a
large shallow roasting pan or baking dish
lined with a double layer of paper towels.
Preheat the fat or oil to the required tem­
perature. This may take 15 to 20 minutes,
but remember that correct oil temperature is
essential: if it is too low, the food absorbs
too much oil; if too high, the food may char
before cooking through and the oil may be
spoiled by chemical breakdown. The only ac­
curate guide to temperature is the thermo­
static control on an electric appliance, or a
deep-frying thermometer. Lacking these it
is possible to estimate the temperature of
the fat by dropping a one-inch cube of bread
into it. The cube will brown in one minute
when the fat is at approximately 3 75 o.
If the food is very moist or is to be foured
or dipped in batter, frst pat it completely
dry with paper towels. Surface moisture will
make the hot fat foam and it might bubble
up over the sides of the pan. If the food is
foured, shake of the excess; if coated with
batter, drain the pieces thoroughly.
Place the food in a single layer in the bas­
ket and lower it into the hot fat; should the
fat bubble up too actively, lift the basket
out and wait a few seconds before lowering
it again.
If you are not using a basket, take one or
two pieces of food at a time in tongs or a slot­
ted spoon, hold them close to the surface of
the fat and gently drop them in.
Never try to rush the frying process by
crowding the pan. The pieces should ft eas­
ily in a single layer with some space between
them. If jammed, they are likely to stick to­
gether. Also, adding too many pieces at a
time lowers the temperature of the oil. As
soon as the food is fried to the desired de­
gree, remove it from the hot oil, drain it on
paper towels, and, if necessary, place it in
the oven in the paper-lined baking pan to
keep it warm.
With a mesh skimmer or slotted spoon,
skim the surface of the oil of all bits of food
and loosened batter. Left in the pan, these
particles will burn and discolor the oil. Check
the temperature and let the oil reheat, if nec­
essary, before repeating the procedure with
the next batch of food.
Saving Fats an
d
Oils for Future Use
Successful frying depends on having a deep
layer of oil or fat in the pan-2 or 3 inches
is the minimum to make sure of maintaining
5
a high enough heat. Skimping on oil is poor
economy because unless the food is com­
pletely immersed it will not cook properly.
Many cooks save the oil or fat for re-use.
When you have fnished frying, skim the
oil thoroughly to remove as many particles
of food as possible. Then cool it to room
temperature.
Strain it through a fne sieve lined with a
double thickness of damp cheesecloth before
returning it to the storage container. Cover
tightly and refrigerate until ready to use
again, but be sure its label is legible before
putting it away.
Frying oil may pick up a taste from strong­
favored foods such as fsh; reserve oil used
with them for frying similar foods and label
the container accordingly. In any case, it is
wise to smell and taste previously used oil be­
fore reheating it.
Many cooks suggest that a sliced raw po­
tato, fried in oil that has been used for other
food, will help to absorb unwanted favors.
6
Safety Precautions
Deep frying involves heating a large quan­
tity of oil to a very high temperature-the
kind of operation that requires both care and
caution.
Check the cord of an electric pan to see
that it is out of the way, where it cannot be
bumped to tip the pan, and make sure that
the pan sits steadily without wobbling.
If you are deep frying at the stove, use a
back burner, out of the reach of children.
Choose a well-balanced fat-bottomed pan
that is heavy enough not to tip easily. Place
its handles so they will not be bumped.
Should the oil fame for any reason, turn
of the heat immediately. Drop a pot lid over
the pan if the oil in the pan is burning; douse
fames around it by sprinkling with salt or
baking soda or by covering the whole area
with a wet towel. Don't pick up the pan; air
currents may blow the fames toward you.
Never throw water on a grease fre-it will
only spread the fame.
Sung-tzu-chi-ssu
STIR-FRIED CHICKEN WITH PINE NUTS AND HOT PEPPERS
2 whole chicken
b
reasts a
b
out 3/4
pound each
11 cup pine nuts (pignolia nuts)
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 egg white
111 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine, or
pale dry sherry
11 teaspoon sugar
8- 1 2 lettuce leaves (Boston,
b
ib
b
or
ice
b
erg)
4 ta
b
lespoons peanut oil, or favorless
vegeta
b
le oil
1 teaspoon fnely shredded, peeled
fresh ginger root
3 small, fresh, hot chili peppers, fnely
shredded
1 teaspoon cornstarch dissolved in I
ta
b
lespoon cold chicken stock, fresh
or canned, or cold water
PREPARE AHEAD: 1. One at a time, bone, skin and shred the chicken
breasts in the following fashion: Lay the whole chicken breast on its side
on a chopping board. Holding the breast frmly in place with your hand,
cut it lengthwise through the skin along the curved breastbone with a cleav­
er or sharp knife. Carefully free the meat from the bones with the cleaver.
Then grasp the meat in one hand, and pull it of the bones and away
from the skin-using the cleaver to free the meat if necessary. Turn the
breast over and repeat on the other side. Remove each tube-shaped fllet
from the boned breast meat, and pull out and discard the white tendon in
each fllet. Lay the breast meat and fllets fat, and cut them horizontally
into paper-thin slices. Now cut the slices into shreds about ls inch wide
and 1 l2 to 2 inches long.
2. Preheat the oven to 350
°
. Spread the pine nuts evenly on a jelly-roll
pan or baking sheet and bake them in the center of the oven for about 5
minutes, or until they are lightly speckled with brown. Be careful not to
let them burn. Reserve them in a bowl.
3. Place the 2 teaspoons of cornstarch in a small bowl, add the chicken
shreds and toss them about until they are lightly coated. Add the egg
white, salt, wine and sugar, and stir them with the chicken until they are
thoroughly mixed together.
4. Separate the lettuce leaves, wash them under cold running water and
pat them dry with paper towels. Arrange them on a serving platter and
refrigerate.
5. Have the above ingredients, and the ginger, chili peppers and cornstarch
mixture within easy reach.
TO cooK: Set a 12-inch wok or 10-inch skillet over high heat for 30 sec­
onds. Pour in 1 tablespoon of the oil, swirl it about in the pan and heat
for another 30 seconds, turning the heat down to moderate if the oil be­
gins to smoke. Add the chili peppers, stir-fry for a minute, then scoop
Continued on next page 7
them out with a slotted spoon and set them aside in a small dish. Pour
the remaining 3 tablespoons of the oil into the pan, heat for 30 seconds
and add the ginger. Stir for a few seconds and drop in the chicken
mixture. Stir-fry over moderate heat for 1 or 2 minutes, or until the chick­
en turns frm and white. Stir in the chili peppers and cook only long enough­
about 10 seconds-to heat the peppers through. Give the cornstarch mixture
a quick stir to recombine it and pour it in the pan. Cook for a few seconds,
stirring constantly, until all the ingredients are coated with a light, clear
glaze. Immediately transfer the entire contents of the pan to a heated platter,
and serve at once with the pine nuts sprinkled on top as a garnish and the
lettuce leaves arranged attractively on another plate as wrappers.
To eat, each guest picks up a lettuce leaf in one hand or lays it fat on
a plate. About 2 tablespoonfuls of the chicken mixture are then placed in
the center of the leaf and the leaf is folded in half, enclosing the chicken
within it. The lettuce is rolled into a loose cylinder that can be held in
the fngers and eaten. As a main course, this will serve 4 to 6. As part of
a Chinese meal, it will serve 6 to 8 or even 10.
Revised from the first edition of The Cooking of Chtna.
8
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Wiener Schnitzel
BREADED VEAL CUTLETS
To serve 4
2 eggs
2 tablespoons water
2 pounds leg of veal, cut into slices
114 inch thick
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
114 cup four
1 cup fne bread crumbs
11/ cups lard
Beat the eggs with the water only long enough to combine them. Sprinkle
the veal slices liberally with salt and pepper, dip them in four and shake of
the excess; next dip them in the beaten eggs and fnally in the bread crumbs.
Gently shake any excess crumbs from the cutlets and refrigerate for at least
20 minutes.
Heat the lard in a heavy 12-inch skillet until a light haze forms over it,
then add the cutlets. Cook over medium heat 3 to 4 minutes on each side,
or until they are brown, using tongs to turn them. Serve immediately, gar­
nished with lemon wedges or anchovy butter sauce.
NOTE: Schnitze
l
is common in Germany as well as Austria. To prepare a
classic German version, Schnitze
l
a Ia Ho
l
stein, cook the cutlets as described
above. Then top each cutlet with a fried egg garnished with anchovy fllets
and sprinkled with a few capers. If you wish, you may surround the cutlets
with small portions of several of the following: smoked salmon, caviar,
crayfsh tails, lobster salad, sardines in oil, mushrooms, green beans or
trufes.
Revised from The Cooking of Vtenna' Emptre.
9
10
' I
Gu
g
efhupf
COFFEE RING
To make one 10-inch ring
1 cup seedless raisins
114 cup dark rum
1 tablespoon butter, softened
2 tablespoons four
2 tablespoons whole blanched
almonds
3/4 cup lukewarm milk ( 105° to 1 15°)
1 package active dry yeast
A pinch of sugar
8 tablespoons ( 1 quarter-pound
stick) unsalted butter, softened
li cup sugar
2 eggs
2 cups sifted all-purpose four
1 tablespoon fnely grated orange
peel
li teaspoon vanilla extract
11 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup confectioners' sugar
Place the raisins in a small bowl, pour in the rum and let them soak for
about 30 minutes. Then drain and squeeze the raisins dry.
Meanwhile, with a pastry brush and the 1 tablespoon of butter, lightly
coat the bottom and sides of a 10-inch Gugelhupf form, or other ring mold
about 5 inches deep and 10 inches in diameter. Sprinkle the 2 tablespoons
of four over the butter, tipping the mold from side to side to spread the
four evenly. Then invert the mold and rap it sharply on a table to remove
any excess four. Arrange the almonds in a circle on the bottom of the mold
and set aside.
Pour l/4 cup of the lukewarm milk into a small, shallow bowl and sprinkle
the yeast and a pinch of sugar over it. Let the yeast and sugar stand for 2 or
3 minutes, then stir to dissolve them completely. Set the bowl in a warm, draft­
free place, such as an unlighted oven, for about 5 minutes, or until the mix­
ture almost doubles in volume.
Cream the 8 tablespoons of softened unsalted butter and the 1i cup of
sugar together by mashing and beating them against the sides of a bowl
with a large spoon until light and fufy. Beat in the yeast mixture and the re­
maining 1i cup of lukewarm milk. Then add the eggs, one at a time, beating
well after each addition. Beating constantly, add the sifted four, 1iz cup at a
time, and continue to beat until the dough is smooth. Then beat in the or­
ange peel, vanilla extract and salt; lightly but thoroughly stir in the raisins.
Without disturbing the almonds, carefully ft the dough into the mold,
spreading it out to the sides with a spatula. Cover with a kitchen towel and
set in a warm, draft-free place for 11i hours, or until the dough has risen to
the top of the mold.
Preheat the oven to 350°. Bake the Gugelhupf in the middle of the oven
for about 40 minutes, or until it is a light golden brown. Then turn it out on
a cake rack to cool. Just before serving, dust lightly with confectioners'
sugar. Gugelhupf is traditionally served with afternoon cofee.
Revised from the first edition of The Cooking of Vienna' Empire.
11
12
Karto/elsuppe
POTATO SOUP
To serve 6 to 8
6 tablespoons butter
4 slices fresh homemade type white
bread cut into 11-inch squares
4 slices lean bacon, fnely diced
1 medium-sized onion, peeled and
thinly sliced
1 medium-sized carrot, scraped and
thinly sliced
1 medium-sized leek, white part
only, thinly sliced
1 celery stalk, thinly sliced
6 medium-sized baking potatoes
(about 111-2 pounds), peeled and
cut into l-inch cubes
6 cups beef stock, fresh or canned
lz cup fnely chopped onions
1/
3
cup fnely chopped scraped carrots
1/
3
cup fnely chopped leeks, white
part only
1/
3
cup fnely chopped celery
1/z cup light cream
11 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
In a heavy 8- to 10-inch skillet, melt 4 tablespoons of the butter over mod­
erate heat. When the foam begins to subside, drop in the bread squares and
cook, stirring constantly, until they are light brown on all sides. Transfer
these croutons to a plate and set aside. In the same skillet, cook the diced
bacon over moderate heat until it is brown and crisp. Discard the fat and trans­
fer the bacon to paper towels to drain.
Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in a heavy 3- to 4-quart sauce­
pan. Add the sliced onion, carrot, leek and celery and cook over moderate
heat, stirring constantly, for 5 minutes until the vegetables are soft but not
brown. Add the potatoes and 4 cups of stock and bring to a boil over high
heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer partially covered for 30 minutes,
or until the potatoes are tender.
Meanwhile, combine the chopped onions, carrots, leeks and celery with
the remaining 2 cups of stock in a 3- to 4-quart fameproof casserole. Bring
to a boil over high heat, reduce the heat to low and simmer uncovered for
15 to 20 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender. Then with a large spoon
force the cooked potato mixture and all its liquid through a fne sieve di­
rectly into the casserole containing the chopped vegetables, and discard any
pulp left in the sieve. (Or more easily, puree the potato mixture through a
food mill. Do not use a blender; it will make the puree too smooth.) Add
the bacon, 11 teaspoon salt and a few grindings of pepper to the soup and
bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and stir in the cream. Simmer a mo­
ment or two, taste for seasoning, then serve the soup directly from the cas­
serole or ladle it into a heated tureen or individual soup bowls. Sprinkle the
soup with the croutons just before serving.
13
14
Ch 'ao-hsia-jen
STIR-FRIED SHRIMP WITH PEAS
1 pound raw shrimp in their shells
(about 26 to 30 to the pound)
1 pound fresh peas, shelled, or 1 cup
thoroughly defrosted frozen peas
2 teaspoons cornstarch
egg white
2 teaspoons Chinese rice wine, or pale
dry sherry
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons peanut oil, or favorless
vegetable oil
scallion, including the green top,
cut into 2-inch lengths
3 slices peeled fresh ginger root,
about 1 inch in diameter and 1/s
inch thick
PREPARE AHEAD: 1. Shell the shrimp and, with a small, sharp knife, de­
vein them by making a shallow incision down the back and lifting out
the black or white intestinal vein with the point of the knife. Wash the
shrimp under cold running water and pat them thoroughly dry with
paper towels. Split each shrimp in half lengthwise, then cut each of the
halves in two, crosswise.
2. Blanch the freshly shelled peas by dropping them into a quart of rap­
idly boiling water and letting them boil uncovered for 5 to 7 minutes, or
until just tender when tasted. Then drain the peas into a large sieve or col­
ander, and run cold water over them for a few seconds to stop their cook­
ing and set their color. The frozen peas need only be thoroughly
defrosted.
3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the shrimp and cornstarch, and
toss them together with a spoon until each shrimp piece is lightly coated
with cornstarch. Add the egg white, wine and salt, and stir them with the
shrimp until they are thoroughly mixed together.
4. Have the shrimp, peas, oil, scallions and ginger within easy reach.
TO COOK: Set a 12-inch wok or 10-inch skillet over high heat for 30 sec­
onds. Pour in the 2 tablespoons of oil, swirl it about in the pan and heat
for another 30 seconds, turning the heat down to moderate if the oil be­
gins to smoke. Add the scallions and ginger, and stir-fry for 30 seconds
to favor the oil, then remove them with a slotted spoon and discard. Im­
mediately drop the shrimp into the pan and stir-fry them for 2 minutes,
or until they turn pink. Do not let the shrimp overcook. Then drop in the
peas and stir-fry for about 1 minute to heat the peas through. Transfer the
entire contents of the pan to a heated platter and serve at once. As a main
course, this will serve 2 to 4. As part of a Chinese meal, it will serve 4 to 6.
Revised from the first edition of The Cooking of Ch1na.
15
16
• I
Mo-ku-chi-pien
STIR-FRIED CHICKEN WITH FRESH MUSHROOMS
2 whole chicken breasts, about
3
/4
pound each
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 egg white
1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine, or
pale dry sherry
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 pound fresh snow peas (frozen,
thoroughly defrosted snow peas
will do, but they will not have the
crispness of the fresh ones)
4 tablespoons peanut oil, or favorless
vegetable oil
1/4 pound fresh mushrooms, about 1
inch in diameter, sliced 1/4 inch
thick
2 slices peeled fresh ginger root,
about 1 inch in diameter and 1/s
inch thick
1 teaspoon cornstarch dissolved in 1
tablespoon cold chicken stock or
water
PREPARE AHEAD: 1. One at a time, skin, bone and slice the chicken
breasts in the following fashion: Lay the whole unsplit chicken breast on
its side on a chopping board. Holding the breast frmly in place with
your hand, cut it lengthwise through the skin along the curved breastbone
with a cleaver or sharp knife. Carefully free the meat from the bones with
the cleaver. Then grasp the meat in one hand, and pull it of the bones
and away from the skin-using the cleaver to free the meat if necessary.
Turn the breast over and repeat on the other side. Remove each tube­
shaped fllet from the boned breast meat, and pull out and discard the white
tendon in each fllet. Lay the breast meat and fllets fat, and cut them into
paper-thin slices. Then cut the slices into pieces about 2 inches long and
1 inch wide.
2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the chicken and 2 teaspoons of corn­
starch, and toss them about with a spoon until each piece is lightly coated.
Add the egg white, wine and salt, and stir them with the chicken until they
are thoroughly mixed together.
3. Snap of the tips of the fresh snow peas and, with a small, sharp
knife, string the pea pods.
4. Have the chicken, snow peas, oil, mushrooms, ginger, and the corn­
starch mixture within easy reach.
TO COOK: Set a 12-inch wok or 10-inch skillet over high heat for
about 30 seconds. Pour in 1 tablespoon of oil, swirl it about in the pan
and heat for another 30 seconds, turning the heat down to moderate if
the oil begins to smoke. Add the mushrooms and snow peas, and stir-fry
over moderate heat for about 2 minutes. With a long spoon, transfer the
vegetables to a platter and set aside. Add 3 tablespoons of oil to the pan and
let it heat for 30 seconds. Drop in the ginger slices, cook for about 30 seconds,
then remove and discard them. Immediately add the chicken and stir-fry
Continued on next page
17
for about 2 minutes, or until the pieces are frm and white. Return the re­
served cooked vegetables to the pan. Give the cornstarch mixture a quick
stir to recombine it, add it to the pan and cook, stirring constantly for a
few seconds, until the ingredients are coated with a light, clear glaze. Trans­
fer the entire contents of the pan to a heated platter and serve at once.
As a main course, this will serve 4. As part of a Chinese meal, it will serve 6 to 8.
18
Revised from the first edition of The Cooking of China.
RECIPE NOTES
Here are some useful comments and sug­
gestions to be copied into your Recipe
Booklets.
THE COOKING OF VIENNA"S EMPIRE
Filbert Slices: These little cookies, which are
rather salty, should be served as snacks or
cocktail food.
THE COOKING OF SCANDINAVIA
Spritz Ring Cookies: Increase the butter to
11 pound.
THE COOKING OF !TAL Y
Lasagne Besciamela Sauce: Use 6 tablespoons
of butter.
THE COOKING OF GERMANY
Red Cabbage with Apples: Use 1 cup of boil­
ing water.
Dessert Dumplings with Vanila Sauce: The
dumplings require 2
3
/4 cups of four.
AMERICAN COOKING
Broiled Long Island Duckling: Do not pour
the pan drippings over the duck.
THE COOKING OF CHINA
Almond Cookies: Use 212 cups of all-purpose
four and 11 teaspoon of baking soda.
Peking Duck:
Do not add any water to the pan in which
the duck is roasted.
THE COOKING OF THE BRITISH ISLES
Trie: Use a glass serving bowl 8 to 9 inch­
es across and 3 inches deep.
··_¸¸·//· ··]·· ·_i·¸/·/··
The menus on these pages are drawn from seven FOODS OF THE WoRLD volumes (U.S.A.,
China, Latin America, Germany, British Isles, Spain and Portugal, and Japan) and Supplement
Number One. Many readers have asked for suggested ways of combining dishes from diferent cui­
sines, and you will fnd examples in the frst group below. They can help you fnd good com­
binations of your own. The later groups comprise meals that are mainly German, Latin American,
Spanish and Portuguese, and Chinese. The menus are arranged in order of increased servings.
For more menus, see page 200 of The Cooking of China and page 198 of The Cooking ofjppan.
General
To serve 3 to 4
CALF'S LIVER WITH APPLES AND ONION RINGS
(Germany)
PORTUGUESE FRIED POTATOES (Spain and
Portugal)
HAZELNUT CREAM PUDDING (Germany)
To serve 4
BROILED SQUAB WITH LEMON-SOY BUTTER
(U.S.A.)
SAFFRON RICE (Spain and Portugal)
SPINACH WITH TOASTED SESAME SEEDS Qapan)
THREE-LAYER CHOCOLATE CAKE (U.S.A.)
To serve 4
DEVILED KIDNEYS (British Isles)
PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH FRIED TOMATOES
(U.S.A.)
WATERCRESS AND WATER CHESTNUT SALAD
(China)
FARINA LAYER CAKE (Germany)
To serve 4
CHICKEN STEAMED IN FRUIT JUICES (Latin
America)
BOILED RICE (Supplement No. 1)
STIR-FRIED STRING BEANS AND WATER
CHESTNUTS (China)
DEEP-DISH PEACH PIE WITH CREAM-CHEESE
CRUST (U.S.A.)
To serve 4
VELVET CORN SOUP (China)
COLD PICKLED CHICKEN (Latin America)
GREEN BEAN SALAD (Germany)
STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE (U.S.A.)
To serve 4 to 6
CRABMEAT IN VINEGAR SAUCE Qapan)
RED SNAPPER BAKED WITH POTATOES (Spain
and Portugal)
GREEN SALAD
LEMON-ORANGE ICE (U.S.A.)
To serve 4 to 6
DEEP-FRIED PHOENIX-TAILED SHRIMP (China)
CAESAR SALAD (U.S.A.)
FRENCH BREAD (Supplement No. 1)
FRUIT AND CHEESE
To serve 4 to 6
BROILED SHAD (U.S.A.)
BOILED POTATOES
SOY-AND-SESAME SEED DRESSING WITH STRING
BEANS Qapan)
SUMMER PUDDING (British Isles)
To serve 6
CLEAR CLAM SOUP WITH MUSHROOMS Qapan)
CROWN ROAST OF LAMB WITH PEAS AND NEW
POTATOES (U.S.A.)
RASPBERRY SHERBET
ALMOND CRESCENT COOKIES (Germany)
To serve 6
JELLIED FISH (China)
LANCASHIRE HOTPOT (British Isles)
SPINACH SALAD (U.S.A.)
COLD ORANGE SOUFFLE (U.S.A.)
To serve 6 to 8
GUACAMOLE (Latin America)
CHILI CON CARNE (U.S.A.)
ENDIVE SALAD
FROZEN CRANBERRY MOUSSE (U.S.A.)
19
To serve 6 to 8
VEAL AND HAM PIE (British Isles)
HOT MUSTARD PI KLE (British Isles)
TOMATO AND WATERCRESS SALAD
PEKING DUST (China)
To serve 8 to 10
CLAMS OR OYSTERS ON THE HALF SHELL WITH
LEMON WEDGES
STUFFED AND ROLLED FLANK STEAK, WITH
ARGENTINE SPICE PARSLEY SAUCE (Latin
America)
BAKED POT A TOES
BLACK FOREST CHERRY CAKE (Germany)
German
To serve 4
ENDIVE BAKED WITH HAM AND CHEESE
(Germany)
WHITE BREAD WITH CARAWAY SEEDS
(Germany)
SLICED TOMATOES
STEAMED CHOCOLATE PUDDING (Germany)
To serve 4
BEEF SHORT RIBS IN LEMON-AND-CAPER SAUCE
(Germany)
TINY DUMPLINGS (Germany)
GREEN BEAN SALAD (Germany)
BROWN BUTTER COOKIES (Germany)
BLUEBERRIES OR RASPBERRIES
To serve 6
BRAISED RABBIT IN SPICED RED WINE SAUCE
(Germany)
FARINA DUMPLINGS (Germany)
GREEN BEANS
LEMON-CREAM DESSERT (Germany)
To serve 6 to 8
HAM BRAISED IN BURGUNDY (Germany)
POTATO DUMPLINGS (Germany)
BRUSSELS SPROUTS
ALMOND LAYER CAKE OR STEAMED CHOCOLATE
PUDDING (Germany)
To serve 6 to 8
VEAL ROAST STUFFED WITH KIDNEY
(Germany)
20
MUSHROOMS WITH TOMATOES AND BACON
(Germany)
GREEN SALAD
APPLE AND RUM CUSTARD CAKE (Germany)
Latin American
To serve 4
BRAISED DUCK WITH CORIANDER RICE (Latin
America)
BROILED TOMATOES SPRINKLED WITH
BREADCRUMBS
CARAMEL-FILLED COCONUT COOKIES (Latin
America)
SLICED FRESH PINEAPPLE
To serve 4
POTTED SHRIMP (British Isles)
PORK IN ORANGE AND LEMON SAUCE WITH
SWEET POTATOES (Latin America)
GREEN SALAD
CARAMELIZED MILK PUDDING (Latin America)
To serve 4
CRAB PUDDING (Latin America)
FRENCH BREAD (Supplement No. 1)
GREEN SALAD
SLICED PINEAPPLE, PAPAYA AND/OR MANGOES
WITH LIME WEDGES
To serve 6
PORK AND VEAL STEW WITH GREEN TOMATOES
(Latin America)
STEAMED RICE (Supplement No. 1)
GREEN SALAD WITH AVOCADO SLICES
PUMPKIN PUDDING (Latin America)
To serve 6
FRIED TORTILLAS WITH BEANS AND PIGS' FEET
(Latin America)
CACTUS LEAF SALAD (Latin America)
HONEYED SQUASH (Latin America)
To serve 6
FRIED SAUSAGE-FILLED TORTILLAS WITH RED
CHILI SAUCE (Latin America)
REFRIED BEANS (Latin America)
TORTILLAS (Latin America)
GUACAMOLE ON LETTUCE (Latin America)
PINEAPPLE CUSTARD (Latin America)
To serve 6
AVOCADO CREAM SOUP (Latin America)
FISH AND SHRIMP IN GINGER-FLAVORED
PEANUT SAUCE (Latin America)
RICE AND COCONUT MILK PUDDING (Latin
America
BAKED CHAYOTE SQUASH (Latin America)
Spanish and Portu
g
uese
To serve 2 to 4
PEAS WITH EGGS, SAUSAGES AND CORIANDER
(Spain and Portugal)
PORTUGUESE CORNBREAD (Spain and
Portugal)
MIXED GREEN SALAD (Spain and Portugal)
FRESH FRUIT AND CHEESE
To serve 4
"QUARTER-HOUR" CLAM, SHRIMP, HAM AND
RICE SOUP (Spain and Portugal)
PORTUGUESE STEAK (Spain and Portugal)
PORTUGUESE FRIED POTATOES (Spain and
Portugal)
MIXED GREEN SALAD (Spain and Portugal)
MOCHA LAYER CAKE WITH RUM (Spain and
Portugal)
To serve 4 to 6
SALT COD WITH POT A TOES, ONIONS AND BLACK
OLIVES (Spain and Portugal)
GREEN SALAD
"BACON FROM HEAVEN" ALMOND CAKE (Spain
and Portugal)
To serve 6
PAELLA (Spain and Portugal)
FRENCH BREAD (Supplement No. 1)
GREEN SALAD
SLICED ORANGES SPRINKLED WITH BRANDY
AND CINNAMON-SUGAR
To serve 6 to 8
SPICY GARLIC SOUP (Spain and Portugal)
ROLLED LEG OF LAMB ROASTED WITH MINT
(Spain and Portugal)
GREEN BEANS IN TOMATO SAUCE (Spain and
Portugal)
ORANGE CARAMEL CUSTARD (Spain and
Portugal)
Chinese
To serve 4*
CUCUMBER SALAD (China)
BRAISED SPARERIBS WITH FERMENTED BLACK
BEANS (China)
LOBSTER CANTONESE (China)
STIR-FRIED STRING BEANS AND WATER
CHESTNUTS (China)
To serve 4 to 5*
WINTER MELON SOUP (China)
SHRIMP EGG FOO YUNG (China)
WATERCRESS AND WATER CHESTNUT SALAD
(China)
EIGHT-PIECES CHICKEN (China)
STIR-FRIED BEEF TENDERLOIN WITH VEGETABLES
(China)
To serve 4 to 5*
VELVET CORN SOUP (China)
FRIED SQUABS (China)
JELLIED FISH (China)
LION'S HEAD (China)
STIR-FRIED SNOW PEAS WITH CHINESE
MUSHROOMS AND BAMBOO SHOOTS (China)
To serve 6 to 8*
BRAISED CHINESE MUSHROOMS STUFFED WITH
PORK AND WATER CHESTNUTS (China)
SHARK'S FIN SOUP (China)
STIR-FRIED CHICKEN WITH FRESH BEAN
SPROUTS (China)
ROAST PORK STRIPS (China)
BRAISED STAR ANISE BEEF (China)
FRESH ASPARAGUS SALAD (China)
STIR-FRIED CRABMEAT WITH BEAN CURD (China)
WATERMELON SHELLS FILLED WITH FRUIT (China)
To serve 6 to 8*
EGG ROLLS WITH SHRIMP AND PORK (China)
STEAMED SEA BASS WITH FERMENTED BLACK
BEANS (China)
RED-COOKED PORK SHOULDER (China)
CREAMED CHINESE CABBAGE (China)
FRESH LOTUS ROOT SALAD (China)
HAM AND EGG FRIED RICE (China)
STIR-FRIED CHICKEN WITH FRESH MUSHROOMS
(China)
EIGHT-TREASURE RICE PUDDING (China)
* Serve tea and boiled rice with al Chinese meal.
Jources fr :ods and Utensils
The stores listed on these pages are
grouped by state and also by cui­
sine: Latin American, Spanish and
Portuguese; Chinese; and Japanese.
These are primarily food markets,
but many of them also carry uten­
sils. All are frms that will accept
mail orders.
Latin American,
Spanish and Portu
g
uese
ARIZONA
Sunland Food Market
1002 E. Buckeye Rd.
Phoenix, 85034
CALIFORNIA
Casa Lucas Market
2934 24th St.
San Francisco, 94110
Del Rey Spanish Foods
Central Market, Stall A-7
317 S. Broadway
Los Angeles, 90013
FLORIDA
Epicure Markets
1656 Alton Rd.
Miami Beach, 33139
The Delicatessen, Burdine's
Dade land Shopping Center
Miami, 33156
ILLINOIS
Casa Cardenas
326 S. Halsted
Chicago, 60608
La Casa Del Pueblo
1810 S. Blue Island
Chicago, 60608
22
Miavana Grocery
4007 N. Broadway
Chicago, 60613
INDIANA
El-Nopal Food Market
810 E. North St.
Indianapolis, 46202
IOWA
Nelson's Meat Market
3201 First Ave. S.E.
Cedar Rapids, 53402
Swiss Colony
Lindale Plaza
Cedar Rapids, 53402
LOUISIANA
Central Grocery
923 Decatur
New Orleans, 70116
Progress Grocery
915 Decatur
New Orleans, 70116
MASSACHUSETIS
Cardullo's Gourmet Shop
. 6 Brattle St.
Cambridge, 02138
MICHIGAN
Continental Gourmet Shop
210 S. Woodward
Birmingham, 48010
La Paloma
2620 Bagley
Detroit, 48216
MINNESOTA
La Casa Coronado
23 N. Sixth St.
Minneapolis, 55403
MISSOURI
Heidi's Around the World Food
Shop
1149 S. Brentwood Blvd.
St. Louis, 63117
NEW YORK
Casa Moneo Spanish Imports
210 W. 14th St.
New York, 10011
OHIO
Spanish & American Food Market
7001 Wade Park Ave.
Cleveland, 44103
PENNSYLVANIA
Baldinger's
Perry Hwy., R.D. 1
Zelienople, 15237
TENNESSEE
Morris Zager
230 Fourth Ave. N.
Nashville, 37219
TEXAS
Antone's Import Company
P.O. Box 3352
Houston, 77001
JimJamail and Sons
3114Kirby Dr.
Houston, 77006
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Kitchen Bazaar
4455 Connecticut Ave. N.W.,
20008
La Sevillana
2469 18th St. N.W., 20009
Pen a's Spanish Store
1636 17th St. N.W., 20009
Chinese
ARIZONA
Tang's Imports
4821 N. 20th St.
Phoenix, 85016
LOUISIANA
Chinese American Company
719 Royal St.
New Orleans, 70116
MICHIGAN
Wah Lee Company
3409 Cass
Detroit, 48201
TENNESSEE
Morris Zager
230 Fourth Ave. N.
Nashville, 37219
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Kitchen Bazaar
4455 Connecticut Ave. N.W.,
20028
(utensils only)
For additional listings, see page
199 of The Cooking of China.
japanese
Many Japanese markets also car­
ry Chinese foods. If you have
difculty getting items by mail
from sources listed below, the
Japan Food Corporation, a large
importing frm, may be able to
suggest stores in your area that
carry Japanese foods and utensils
but do not handle mail orders.
For such information, write the
Japan Food Corporation ofce
nearest you:
900 Marin St.
San Francisco, California 94119
920 S. Mateo St.
Los Angeles, California 90021
704 " A" St.
National City, California 92050
1515 N. "C" St.
Sacramento, California 95814
20021/ White St.
Houston, Texas 77007
1850 W. 43rd St.
Chicago, Illinois 60609
11-31 31st Ave.
Long Island City, New York
11106
9179 Red Branch Rd.
Columbia, Maryland 21043
ALABAMA
Toni's Oriental Grocery
R.R. #2, Box 259
Daleville, 36322
CALIFORNIA
Enbun Company
248 E. First St.
Los Angeles, 90012
Ida Company
3 39 E. First St.
Los Angeles, 90012
Modern Food Market
140 S. San Pedro St.
Los Angeles, 90012
Rafu Bussan Company
344 E. First St.
Los Angeles, 90012
COLORADO
Granada Fish
1919 Lawrence
Denver, 80202
Pacifc Mercantile Company
1946 Larimer St.
Denver, 80202
FLORIDA
Tropi Pak Food Products
3664 N.W. 48th St.
Miami, 33142
GEORGIA
Jo Ann's Market
38 38 Cusseta Rd.
Columbus, 31903
ILLINOIS
Diamond Trading Company
1108 N. Clark St.
Chicago, 60610
Franklin Food Store
1309 E. 53rd St.
Chicago, 60615
S & I Grocery
1058 W. Argyle St.
Chicago, 60640
Star Market
3349 N. Clark St.
Chicago, 60657
KANSAS
Imported Foods
1038 McCormick
Wichita, 67213
Jade East Store
1030 Grant Ave.
Junction City, 66441
LOUISIANA
Oriental Trading Company
2636 Eden born Ave.
Metairie, 70002
MASSACHUSETTS
Yoshinoya
36 Prospect St.
Cambridge, 02139
23
MICHIGAN
Kado's Oriental Imports
251 Merrill
Birmingham, 48011
MINNESOTA
International House
712 Washington Ave. S.E.
Minneapolis, 55414
MISSOURI
Aloha Enterprises
1741 Swope Pkwy.
Kansas City, 64110
The Country Store
421 Nichols Rd.
Kansas City, 64112
Maruyama's
100 N. 18th St.
St. Louis, 63103
NEBRASKA
Oriental Trading Company
1115 Farnam St.
Omaha, 68102
NEVADA
Terry's Oriental Gift Shop and
Imports
120 W. Second St.
Reno, 89501
NEW JERSEY
Haruko's Oriental Bazaar
Rt. #3, Box 3143
Browns Mills, 08015
NEW YORK
Japanese Foodland
2620 Broadway
New York, 10023
Japan Mart, Inc.
239 W. 105th St.
New York, 10025
Katagiri Company
224 E. 59th St.
New York, 10022
Nippon Do
82-69 Parsons Blvd.
Jamaica, 11432
Oriental Food Shop
1302 Amsterdam Ave.
New York, 10027
Tanaka & Company
326 Amsterdam Ave.
New York, 10023
NORTH CAROLINA
Oriental Food Shop
P.O. Box 202
(N. Main St.)
Spring Lake, 28390
OHIO
Dayton Oriental Food
812 Xenia Ave.
Dayton, 45410
Omura Japanese Food and Gift
Shop
3811 Payne Ave.
Cleveland, 44114
OKLAHOMA
Takara Oriental Foods
2012 Cache Rd.
Lawton, 73501
OREGON
Anzen Importers
From time to time we expect to ofer Fooos OF THE WORLD subscribers
cooking equipment that may be ordered direct from TIME-LIFE BooKS.
Photograph on page 3 by Anthony Donna.
736 N.E. Union Ave.
Portland, 97232
Soy Bean Products
P.O. Box 568
(336 S.W. Fifth St.)
Ontario, 97914
UTAH
Sage Farm Market
52 W. First St. S.
Salt Lake City, 84101
Yamaguchi & Company
260 25th St.
Ogden, 84401
WASHINGTON
North Coast Supply
West 27 Main St.
Spokane, 99201
Tobo Company
504 12th Ave. S.
Seattle, 98144
Uwajimaya, Inc.
422 S. Main St.
Seattle, 981 04
WASHINGTON, D.C.
House of Hanna
1468 "T St. N.W., 20009
Mikado
4709 Wisconsin Ave. N.W.,
20016
WISCONSIN
International House of Foods
Madison Division
440 W. Gorham St.
Madison, 53703

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