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FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Musical fantasy
Performance includes magic
and roller skates. PAGE 9
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
The Hopewell Township Committee
has agreed to provide up to $500,000 to
move the baseball fields at Hopewell Val-
ley Central High School to the athletic
fields at Timberlane, on the property of
Timberlane Middle School, to accommo-
date a state-of-the-art AstroTurf field on
the high school property near the
Hopewell branch of the Mercer County
Library.
That field, for which the Turf ’s UP
campaign of the Hopewell Valley Recre-
ation Foundation has raised about
$650,000 of the required $1 million for
construction, would be used for field
hockey, football, men’s and women’s
lacrosse, soccer, marching band and
many other school and community
events.
The township committee was expect-
ed to approve a memorandum of under-
standing with the board of education at
the governing body’s Feb. 27 meeting.
Construction of the field, and of the
relocated ball fields, still require plan-
ning board approval.
The funding to relocate the ball fields
comes from $4 million in surplus in the
municipal budget, which is part of a one-
time, $5 million tax settlement with the
Capital Health facility in the township.
Residents at the Feb. 4 township com-
mittee meeting had expressed concern
the committee was providing the
$500,000 to the board of education for the
relocation project before knowing the
exact costs.
“I’m in favor of the project, but I have
a problem with the process,” resident
Sam Roth said. “Shouldn’t you see what
the school board has before committing
the dollars? How can you be in a partner-
ship with the school board without
Group to provide funds to help move fields
JIM WRIGHT/The Hopewell Sun
This baseball field on the Hopewell Valley Central High School property will be moved to the Athletic Fields at Timberlane,
on the property of Timberlane Middle School, when a new AstroTurf field is constructed in its place.
please see COST, page 6
Businesses reopen after hurricane damage
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
For the tenants at the West
Delaware Shopping Plaza, there
truly is no place like home.
The owners of Uncle Ed’s
Creamery and Chocolates, Za
Restaurant and Shear Hair
DeZigns reopened their business-
es on Jan. 28 after being closed for
five months following Hurricane
Irene on Aug. 21.
Ed Gola, owner of Uncle Ed’s,
said the foundation wall of the
structure had collapsed because
of water pressure.
“We didn’t really have a lot of
internal damage,” he said. “It just
had to be jacked up and the foun-
dation wall repaired. “We had to
have all the electrical and plumb-
ing done over again though.”
Without the hands-on assis-
tance of landlord Dino Spadacci-
ni, he said, “What took five
months could have easily taken a
year. He was great.”
What also has been great, Gola
said, is the response of the com-
munity to the re-opening.
“It’s been unbelievable,” he
said. “The first day we were back,
we had an all-you-can-eat special,
and we were packed. Ever since
then, it’s been a pretty steady
flow. People are excited about us
being back and we are excited to
be back.”
Gola, who opened the shop in
2010, said the first couple of
months of downtime while re-
pairs were made were OK, but,
“by November, I was starting to
get a little antsy.
“I still coached soccer and did
some substitute teaching, so
there were things to do,” he said.
“But it’s great to be back.”
Caroline Biondi, who has
owned Shear Hair DeZigns for 21
years, didn’t miss a beat while the
shopping center was closed. She
simply went across the street and
approached Kathryn Getty
Williams, owner of Getty
Williams Studio in the Penning-
ton Shopping Center, about mov-
please see OWNERS, page 5
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
86 East Broad Street
Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100
www.1stconstitution.com
Reach Our Mortgage Center at 888-519-7677.
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police report
The following is a report from
the Hopewell police department:
A 46-year-old Uniontown, Pa.,
man was charged with drunken
driving after being pulled over on
Route 31 on Feb. 17 at 12:01 a.m.
Police said an officer observed
the man driving 61 in a 40 mph
zone and detected alcohol on his
breath after stopping him. After
performing field-sobriety tests,
the driver was placed under ar-
rest and transported to police
headquarters for processing. He
also was charged with refusal to
submit to a breath test, speeding
and reckless driving.
He later was released into
the custody of a relative and this
case will be heard in municipal
court.
The New Jersey Police Traffic
Officers Association recommends
the following for child pedestrian
safety:
Teach children to stay alert,
even if they believe they have the
“right-of-way,” especially at traf-
fic signals.
While walking across any
street, children should assume ve-
hicle operators are not paying at-
tention, so they should focus on
them.
Continue to check for traffic as
they cross, particularly for turn-
ing vehicles.
Sometimes, motorists are un-
sure whether a pedestrian wants
to cross – so when children do not
intend to cross, they should move
back from the edge of the road-
way to avoid confusion.
If a child does want to cross a
street, teach them how to estab-
lish eye-to-eye contact with mo-
torists.
Use safety when crossing streets
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR CALLING
US IN THE LAST FEW WEEKS.
Your support has been overwhelming, so much so, that we've
been able to negotiate an extension to our lease. This means
our doors will remain open for a few more days and you can
continue to take advantage of our sale pricing. Hurry in, the
best selections will go fast and our store is closing soon.
Mon-Sat 10AM-8PM · Sunday 12PM-6PM
CASH · CHECK
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
Special to The Sun
The Pennington Players will perform magic on roller skates with
their upcoming performance of the musical fantasy ‘Xanadu’ at
Mercer County Community College’s Kelsey Theatre. For the full
story, please see page 9.
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Owners happy to reopen
ing her business there temporari-
ly.
“She was very kind,” Biondi
said. “She didn’t know me from a
hole in the ground, but 36
hours after I found out her name,
I was moving my things in
there.”
Williams, she said, had nine
styling stations and three employ-
ees.
“I had six employees, so it
worked out nicely,” she said. “It
was a little weird because it’s like
we were running two shops in
one. We had separate storage
areas and everything.”
Biondi said she was happy to
return to a place she has called
her professional home for 26
years.
“I started working there in
high school when I was 17,” she
recalled. “I have clients that I cut
their hair when they were 4 or 5,
and now they are lifting their
kids into my chair. It’s really been
so nice to see families grow up (in
the shop) and we have such nice
neighbors here.
“This is the oldest shop in
town,” she said. “So it really has a
homey feel. We couldn’t wait to go
back.”
OWNERS
Continued from page 1
JIM WRIGHT/The Hopewell Sun
The West Delaware Shopping Center on Delaware Avenue in Pennington reopened Jan. 28 after sustain-
ing foundation damage during Hurricane Irene in August.
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers – including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium – including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
O
n the surface, two bills recent-
ly introduced in Congress
make sense. They would re-
strict the number of fees airlines
could charge. After all, who hasn’t
been on a plane where everyone is
wrestling to get overhead storage
space for their 73 carry-on bags they
brought to avoid baggage fees?
Problem is, this is America, and
America has achieved economic great-
ness because it allows, for the most
part, businesses to compete without
many rules. Once government gets
into regulating things that don’t relate
to, for example, safety, the whole sys-
tem gets messed up.
Naturally, the airlines aren’t in favor
of these bills. Some of them already
waive baggage fees for one or two
pieces.
Others correctly point out that,
charging fees, while keeping fares
lower, gives consumers a choice. In-
deed, if you travel without checked
bags, you probably would opt for the
airlines that offer lower fares, but
charge for checked baggage. It’s less
money out of their pockets for the
same service they would receive on
any airline.
Congressional supporters of the
bills point out that consumers don’t
like the fees. Well, of course, they
don’t. No one likes fees.
If Congress would check, we’re sure
it would find that people don’t like
high airline ticket prices, either. Or, in
keeping with the air travel theme,
parking rates that rise as you get clos-
er or more convenient parking spots at
an airport. Or high-priced food in air-
port restaurants.
Sure, some air travellers can feel
like they are being nickeled and dimed
to death. But it’s their choice to fly the
airlines that charge these fees. There
are any number of ways to avoid the
fees, they just choose not to do so.
This is a business model, pricing
choice. It’s what keeps businesses
competitive. Congress should stay
away.
Keep air fee bills grounded
Congress should let the free enterprise system work
Hands off private business
Congress has better things to do with
its time than to get involved with air-
line fees. Let consumers make choic-
es and the airlines make business
decisions.
Cost to relocate fields estimated at $500,000
knowing what they are giving you?”
Mayor Michael Markulec said the school
board would be getting bids on the project
and: “We are participating in the project al-
most in the form of a grant.”
Township Administrator/Engineer Paul
Polgorzelski said the relocation of the
fields would cost an estimated $500,000
when all factors, such as electrical systems
for the fields, are figured in.
“Why not have the memorandum of un-
derstanding before the transfer?” asked res-
ident Carole Deddy. “Once that money’s
gone, you’re not getting it back.”
Committeewoman Vanessa Sandom said
the transfer would be contingent on the
memorandum of understanding with the
board of education that was acceptable to
the township committee.
Committeewoman Kimberly Johnson
suggested the township consider spending
some of the surplus on a senior citizen cen-
ter.
“I agree with this project,” she said. “I
think it’s a good idea and it makes sense.
We are uniquely positioned right now with
this settlement, but if we have the money
that can be spent like this, we should also
consider spending on the senior center.”
Deddy also suggested the surplus could
be used for tax relief.
“I’m pleased to live in Hopewell Town-
ship,” she said “I’m pleased with the educa-
tion system and the fact that we have rea-
sonable facilities for various stakeholders,
but you’re really talking about the taxpay-
ers of Hopewell Township. It’s money. It
doesn’t matter whether it’s the school
board’s money or the township’s money. It’s
the taxpayers’ money.”
“That money could go to reduce the tax
base,” said resident Anthony Arnone. “I’m
not against the project, but don’t think
we’re pulling money out of the air, because
we’re not.”
Deddy also asked if the committee could
reach out to Hopewell Borough and Pen-
nington to help fund the project.
“We’ve heard that 60 percent of the stu-
dents participate in athletics,” she said.
“We know they are not all from Hopewell
Township, so why not ask some of the other
communities that are benefiting from this
to appropriate some funds?”
Deputy mayor James Burd said the other
towns would probably respond that there
was no money to appropriate, but the re-
quest could be made.
“We hear you loud and clear that we
should be asking other municipalities to
participate,” Markulec said.
Roth also asked about public use of the
new turf field, and Superintendent of
Schools Thomas Smith said it would be pri-
marily for school use, but the recreation
commission would also have access to the
facility.
“We’re still trying to iron out a usage
policy,” he said. “We do see it as a
community field, and our fields are used
by various groups throughout the town-
ship.”
“What percentage would be allocated to
the public?” Roth asked. “Schools are open
all the time, except in the summer – and on
the weekends, there are other activities
going on.”
Smith said the school use ends at about 6
p.m. during the week, and usually at about
noon on weekends.
John Butler, a trustee on the recreation
commission, said of the 60 percent of the
students in the high school who are in ath-
letics, “it is probably safe to assume that
two-thirds of them are in outdoor athletics.
You also have about 75 members of the
marching band and the cheerleaders that
will be benefitting from this field. That’s an
awful lot of the student body and the com-
munity that will benefit from the Turf
field.”
COST
Continued from page 1
FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Òn Tuesdays
Children’s author Dan Gutman
told Hopewell Elementary School
students last week that visiting
the National Yo-Yo Museum in
Chico, Calif., the Rock and Roll
Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio,
and the World’s Biggest Ball of
Twine in Cawker City, Kan., are
all in a day’s work when he’s writ-
ing a children’s book.
“I go to these places to do re-
search,” he told fifth-graders on
Feb. 10 as he showed slides of
these places, which he visited
while writing “The Genius Files:
Mission Unstoppable,” his first
book to appear on the New York
Times Bestseller List.
Gutman’s visit to HES was
sponsored by the Hopewell Valley
Education Foundation and the
Hopewell Elementary School Par-
ent-Teacher Organization. Dur-
ing the day, he discussed the
process of writing with each
grade level.
In kindergarten, he read his
picture book “Casey Back at Bat,”
and discussed the storyline with
students.
At the fifth-grade level, Gut-
man discussed genre, character
and plot in his bestselling “Ge-
nius Files,” in which 12-year-old
twins Coke and Pepsi are identi-
fied as young American geniuses
by the U.S. government and are
recruited to solve the country’s
problems.
As the book unfolds, Coke and
“Pep” as she’s known, cross the
country on a family vacation with
their unwitting parents, and are
pursued by evil characters look-
ing to derail them on their secret
mission in, among other locales,
each of the places Gutman visit-
ed.
“I wrote 103 books to make it
on to the bestseller list,” Gutman,
who has been writing for 30 years,
told Hopewell students. Those
books include the “My Weird
School” series, which depicts a
grammar school filled with crazy
teachers, and the “Baseball Card
Adventure Series,” in which the
main character finds baseball
cards, such as those of Babe Ruth
or Jackie Robinson, that propels
him back in time and to numer-
ous adventures.
Gutman said that series re-
quires much research into an
area he is passionate about –
sports – and, particularly, base-
ball.
But becoming a famous author
hasn’t been all fun and games, he
noted.
Indeed, Gutman showed stu-
dents a binder stuffed with
dozens of rejection letters he has
gotten over the years from pub-
lishers of various books.
“But did I give up?” he asked
the HES students repeatedly.
“No, I did not,” he said, a lesson
applicable for writing and any
pursuit in life.
For more information about
Gutman’s books, visit
www.dangutman.com.
Children’s author visits
elementary school
Pet Friends – Grief
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(800) 404-7387
PSA
WEDNESDAY
February 29
FOR ALL
Movies for Adults: 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
and 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library. Watch “MoneyBall”
(rated PG-13). Oakland A's general
manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt)
challenges the system and defies
conventional wisdom when he is
forced to rebuild his team on a limit-
ed budget. Despite opposition,
Beane, with the help of a number-
crunching economist (Jonah Hill),
develops a roster of misfits and for-
ever changes the way the game is
played.
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5 years. 11
a.m. at Hopewell Branch Library.
Siblings welcome. These story times
introduce children to the best age-
appropriate stories. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities are
part of the program. Parental super-
vision required.
THURSDAY
March 1
FOR ALL
Hopewell Valley Green Team meet-
ing: 7:30 p.m. at the Township Build-
ing. For more information visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5 years. 11
a.m. at Hopewell Branch Library.
Siblings welcome. These story times
introduce children to the best age-
appropriate stories. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities are
part of the program. Parental super-
vision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library. Singing, dancing and
rhymes. Through structured group
activities, play with musical instru-
ments, puppets, parachutes and
more.
FRIDAY
March 2
FOR CHILDREN
Open Play Time: 11 a.m. to noon at
Hopewell Branch Library. Open play
time in the children’s activity room.
Adult supervision required.
calendar
PAGE 8 FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
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‘Xanadu’ performance to
feature magic on roller skates
The Pennington Players will
perform magic on roller skates
with their upcoming perform-
ance of the musical fantasy
“Xanadu” at Mercer County Com-
munity College’s Kelsey Theatre.
Dates and show times for this
spirited take on 1980s popular cul-
ture are: March 9, 10, 16 and 17 at
8 p.m.; and March 11 and 18 at 2
p.m.
Kelsey Theatre is located on
Mercer’s West Windsor campus,
1200 Old Trenton Road.
A reception with the cast and
crew follows the opening-night
performance on March 9.
Based on the film starring
Olivia Newton-John and Gene
Kelly, “Xanadu” follows the jour-
ney of a beautiful Greek muse,
Kira, who descends from Mt.
Olympus to Venice Beach, Calif.
Her quest is to inspire a strug-
gling artist, Sonny, to achieve the
greatest creation of all time: the
first Roller Disco!
With “Xanadu’s” classic num-
bers like “Magic,” “Suddenly”
and “Evil Woman,” the audience
will roll right with the lively orig-
inal musical score composed by
pop-rock legends Jeff Lynne (of
Electric Light Orchestra) and
John Farrar.
The show is performed without
an intermission and runs approx-
imately 90 minutes.
The original Broadway produc-
tion opened in 2007 to glowing re-
views, and was nominated for
four Tony Awards, including Best
Musical.
“Xanadu” features Jaclyn
Dixon of West Deptford as
Clio/Kira, and Matt Reher of
Philadelphia as her mortal lover,
Sonny.
The production team includes
John Boccanfuso of Yardville as
the director and choreographer;
Frank Ferrara of West Windsor
as the producer; Tracy Witko of
Chester as the musical director;
Michelle Rittmann of Ewing as
stage manager and costume de-
signer; and Judi Parrish of West
Trenton as set and lighting de-
signer.
The Pennington Players have
been entertaining local audiences
since 1951, and were the first
group to perform at the Washing-
ton Crossing State Park Open Air
Theatre.
The Players produce three to
four shows each year at Kelsey
Theatre, ranging from children’s
shows to smaller dramas to full-
scale musicals. Their Kelsey
shows at have included “Urine-
town,” “13,” “Ragtime,” “The
Wiz” and “Once On This Island.”
Tickets are $18 for adults, $16
for senior citizens, and $14 for stu-
dents and children and may be
purchased by calling the Kelsey
Theatre box office at (609) 570-
3333, or online at www.kelseythe
atre.net. Kelsey Theatre is wheel-
chair accessible, with free park-
ing next to the theater.
For more information about
the Pennington Players and the
show, visit www.penningtonplay-
ers.org. Previews and more infor-
mation are also available at
www.facebook.com/Xanadu-
AtKelsey.
Narcotics Anonymous
of New Jersey
(800) 992-0401
PSA
National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-8255
PSA
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 PAGE 11
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