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FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
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Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Send One Suit
Program collecting clothing
for women in need. PAGE 2
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Students build support for event
By JIM WRIGHT
The Lawrence Sun
The American Cancer Soci-
ety’s Relay for Life is off to a
strong start.
Members of the Lawrence
School District began the long
process toward the May 18 event
at Lawrence High School with a
kickoff at Quaker Bridge Mall on
Monday, Feb. 20.
Amid balloons and music,
teachers, administrators and
township students sat at tables
signing up walkers and team cap-
tains for the fundraising event
and offering children a chance to
color in ribbons that will decorate
the high school track from 4 to
9:30 p.m. on May 18.
“We’re letting people come to
us,” said Stephanie Coutros of
the American Cancer Society, as
Delores Nelson of Lawrence High
School watched children color in
ribbons. “We’ve had a lot of fami-
lies today, and that’s what the
relay is all about – fighting cancer
as a family.”
Members of the Montgomery
High School student leadership
organization came out on a day
school was closed for Presidents
Day to help build support for the
spring relay.
“They are wonderful,” Coutros
said. “The came out on their day
off.”
Other tables featured signups
for team captains or sun and
moon cards that will be displayed
on a Wall of Hope at the event.
“We’re finding ways for every-
one to honor everyone,” said Jen-
nifer Polakowski, who is the co-
chairwoman of the Relay for Life,
along with Rebecca Gold.
The relay starts with a sur-
vivors’ lap, in which cancer sur-
vivors are invited to circle the
track together to celebrate and be
recognized for their victory over
cancer. Also honored are care-
givers who give time, love and
support to family, friends, neigh-
bors and co-workers who are bat-
tling cancer.
A Luminaria ceremony takes
place after dark in which those
who have been touched by cancer
are honored, and those loved ones
who have been lost to the disease
are remembered.
Candles in small bags filled
with sand, each bag bearing the
name of a person touched by can-
cer, are displayed, and the lap is
often walked in silence.
Completing the ceremony is a
fight back ceremony in which
participants make a personal
commitment to do something to
fight cancer, such as getting a
screening, quitting smoking or
speaking to elected officials about
cancer awareness.
The Relay for Life began in
1985 when Dr. Gordy Klatt spent
24 hours running the track at
Baker Stadium at the University
of Puget Sound in Tacoma – run-
ning for more than 84 miles. More
than 300 of his friends, family
and patients watched his
marathon and friends donated
$25 to run or walk with him for 30
minutes. The efforts raised
$25,000 to fight cancer.
While circling the track, Platt
thought about how others could
join his event and the relay was
born.
That first team relay event – the
City of Destiny Classic 24-Hour
Run Against Cancer – was born.
In 1986, with the help of Pat
Flynn, now known as the Mother
of Relay, 19 teams took part in the
first team relay event on the track
at the historic Stadium Bowl.
Coutros said the goal of this
year’s event, the planning of
which usually begins in August,
is to raise $90,000.
Report:
Crime
on the
rise
By JIM WRIGHT
The Lawrence Sun
Crime was up in Lawrence
by about 24 percent in 2011
over 2010, primarily due to an
increase in burglaries and
thefts, according to the depart-
ment’s annual crime report.
According to figures in the
Uniform Crime Report, offens-
es reported to the federal gov-
ernment included 131 burgla-
ries in 2011, up from 93 in 2010;
larcenies and thefts increased
from 717 to 874 and assaults
rose from 151 to 192. There
were 23 robberies reported in
the township in 2011, up from
19 in 2010 and 28 motor vehicle
thefts, compared with 16 in
2010. Arsons fell from nine to
two and three rapes were re-
ported, the same figure as in
2010.
The last homicide in the
township was in 2001.
The department answered
52,682 calls for service in 2011,
Police Chief Daniel Posluszny
told the township council on
Feb. 7 during departmental
budget discussions, up from
50,615 in 2010.
“We give burglaries as high
a priority as homicide and sex-
ual assault,” the chief told
council members. “When
JIM WRIGHT/The Lawrence Sun
Members of the Lawrence High School student leadership team help children color in ribbons to be used
at the Relay for Life event at Lawrence High School on May 18.
please see BURGLARIES, page 6
Dress for Success Mercer
County, an affiliate of the interna-
tional non-profit organization
that promotes the economic inde-
pendence of disadvantaged
women, is participating in S.O.S.
– Send One Suit – Weekend taking
place March 1 to 4.
In its 10th year, the campaign
encourages women nationwide to
donate one new or nearly new in-
terview suit to help another
woman enter the workforce and
take charge of her life.
Dress Barn, the national title
sponsor and drop-off location for
S.O.S. – Send One Suit – Weekend,
will accept donations of profes-
sional apparel for women
throughout the four-day event.
Last year, more than 51,000
suits and career separates were
donated by consumers at Dress
Barn stores. The donations are
distributed to Dress for Success
affiliates located throughout the
United States. On average, more
than 20 percent of each affiliate’s
annual suiting needs are met
through S.O.S –Send One Suit –
Weekend.
“We are proud to participate in
S.O.S. – Send One Suit – Week-
end,” said Dress for Success Exec-
utive Director Lorrie Klaric. “By
donating just one suit, you are
supporting a local woman on her
journey to economic independ-
ence and to achieving a brighter
future for herself and her family.”
2 THE LAWRENCE SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
150 Lawrenceville-Pennington Road
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
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Send One Suit Weekend is March 1 to 4
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(877) 222-3737
PSA
THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR CALLING
US IN THE LAST FEW WEEKS.
Your support has been overwhelming, so much so, that we've
been able to negotiate an extension to our lease. This means
our doors will remain open for a few more days and you can
continue to take advantage of our sale pricing. Hurry in, the
best selections will go fast and our store is closing soon.
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4 THE LAWRENCE SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
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609-924-9700
www.fearawaydrivingschooI.com
Same rates as Lawrence HS for HS students!
FEAR AWAY
Driving SchooI
Route Test Special
$70.00
$110 with 1 Hour Practice
Teen Special
$280.00
+$10 Permit Purchase
BRIEFS
Flushing program runs
through March
Aqua New Jersey will be con-
ducting its flushing program of
the water system in
Lawrenceville at the end of Feb-
ruary and beginning of March.
Customers may experience tem-
porary discoloration and/or de-
creased water pressure during
the process. Running cold water
for a couple minutes should clear
the problem, according to Aqua.
Customers should also store sev-
eral quarts of water for use dur-
ing the flushing process.
For daily updates on the flush-
ing process, call (609) 587-4080, ext.
56514.
Toy and clothing sale
is on March 3
The Lawrenceville Elementary
School PTO will hold its semi-an-
nual spring children’s used toy
and clothing sale on March 3 from
8 a.m. to noon at Lawrenceville
Elementary School, 40 Craven
Lane.
More than 140 families from
the community will be participat-
ing by selling items, including
gently used spring and summer
children's clothing in sizes new-
born to 16, maternity clothing,
baby equipment and accessories,
toys, books, videos and much
more.
The LES PTO hosts this event
every fall and spring, giving com-
munity members an opportunity
to recycle gently used items. Re-
maining items are donated to or-
ganizations that support local
families in need.
For more information, please
contact les.clothing@yahoo.com.
Poison Control Center
(800) 222-1222
PSA
Send us your Lawrence news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@lawrencesun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 5
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Nestled at the base of the Kit-
tatinny Ridge in northern New Jer-
sey, beautiful Camp No-Be-Bo-Sco
was explored by nine Boy Scouts
from Troop No. 28 in Lawrence and
two visiting Webelos at a cabin
campout the weekend of Feb. 17.
The camp, located in Hard-
wick, and founded in 1927, is dot-
ted with log cabins and is one of
the launching points on the Ap-
palachian Trail.
In addition to outdoor cooking
and exploration, the Troop em-
barked on a challenging hike to
become familiar with the terrain.
Troop 28 will hosts its annual
summer camp excursion at No-
Be-Bo-Sco this year and is looking
forward to further exploration.
Troop No. 28 is open to boys
who have completed fifth-grade,
and meets Friday nights from 7:30
to 9 p.m. at the Troop Hut at
Lawrence Road Presbyterian
Church. For information, email
Scoutmaster Bob Murawski at
Bmurawski360@comcast.net.
Special to The Sun
Lawrence Troop No. 28 on a hike at Camp No-Be-Bo-Sco in Hardwick.
Scouts explore Camp No-Be-Bo-Sco
6 THE LAWRENCE SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Lawrence Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08648 ZIP code. If
you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@lawrencesun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@lawrencesun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers – including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@lawrencesun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Lawrence Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium – including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
O
n the surface, two bills recent-
ly introduced in Congress
make sense. They would re-
strict the number of fees airlines
could charge. After all, who hasn’t
been on a plane where everyone is
wrestling to get overhead storage
space for their 73 carry-on bags they
brought to avoid baggage fees?
Problem is, this is America, and
America has achieved economic great-
ness because it allows, for the most
part, businesses to compete without
many rules. Once government gets
into regulating things that don’t relate
to, for example, safety, the whole sys-
tem gets messed up.
Naturally, the airlines aren’t in favor
of these bills. Some of them already
waive baggage fees for one or two
pieces.
Others correctly point out that,
charging fees, while keeping fares
lower, gives consumers a choice. In-
deed, if you travel without checked
bags, you probably would opt for the
airlines that offer lower fares, but
charge for checked baggage. It’s less
money out of their pockets for the
same service they would receive on
any airline.
Congressional supporters of the
bills point out that consumers don’t
like the fees. Well, of course, they
don’t. No one likes fees.
If Congress would check, we’re sure
it would find that people don’t like
high airline ticket prices, either. Or, in
keeping with the air travel theme,
parking rates that rise as you get clos-
er or more convenient parking spots at
an airport. Or high-priced food in air-
port restaurants.
Sure, some air travellers can feel
like they are being nickeled and dimed
to death. But it’s their choice to fly the
airlines that charge these fees. There
are any number of ways to avoid the
fees, they just choose not to do so.
This is a business model, pricing
choice. It’s what keeps businesses
competitive. Congress should stay
away.
Keep air fee bills grounded
Congress should let the free enterprise system work
Hands off private business
Congress has better things to do with
its time than to get involved with air-
line fees. Let consumers make choic-
es and the airlines make business
decisions.
someone’s house is entered, that is one of
the top three sins. We take that very seri-
ously and we actively investigate burgla-
ries.”
There were 293 burglaries reported in
the township in 1991, he said, to put the
rate in historic perspective, and 93 in 2010,
but, “One burglary is one burglary too
many.”
Different methods are being used in bur-
glaries, he told the council, and different
articles are being stolen.
“It may be that the price of gold is going
up,” he said. “You may catch who did it, but
if you don’t get the jewelry back, it’s a ter-
rible loss.”
The solvability rate on burglaries, he
said is about 14 to 20 percent, but: “More
importantly, we’re trying to stop it before it
happens.”
Domestic violence, according to the de-
partment’s annual report, is down by 2 per-
cent compared with 2010. During 2011, 183
cases of domestic violence were reported
in the township, compared with 187 in 2010.
The department’s Domestic Violence Re-
sponse Team was called to assist 66 victims
in 2011, providing informal counseling and
referrals.
Active motor-vehicle enforcement is a
tool to help crime go down, the chief said,
but more vehicles are being illegally en-
tered, including more unlocked vehicles.
The officers are committed not only to
reducing crime, the chief said, “but the
fear of crime through active enforcement
of township laws, as well as ensuring that
any issue that comes to the department’s
attention, is handled as professionally and
promptly as possible.”
“We are a service-oriented police depart-
ment,” the chief said. “Throughout 2011,
we worked tirelessly to ensure quality
service to our citizens – regardless of the
time of day, weather conditions or other
factors.”
Patrol officers are assigned to specific
neighborhoods for a one-year period to bet-
ter interact with businesses and residents
and enhance the police-public partnership
police are trying to achieve.
According to the report, based on the re-
sults of a manpower study, more of those
patrol officers will be assigned to the after-
noon and evening shifts rather than late-
nights.
Accidental injury calls increased 133
percent in 2011, according to the report,
and calls related to liquor laws were up 200
percent.
The police department currently con-
sists of 65 officers, nine civilian communi-
cations officers, five general-assignment
detectives and two juvenile detectives, who,
Posluszny said, are responsible for every-
thing from the Drug Abuse Resistance Ed-
ucation (DARE) programs in schools to in-
vestigating juvenile crime.
There also are eight sergeants and an in-
formation technology officer.
Posluszny is requesting funding for an
additional sergeant to provide more patrol
shift supervision, and, as the township has
approved an armed court attendant for
municipal court, the officer currently pro-
viding security in municipal court will
move to patrol duties.
Councilman Greg Puliti, who serves as
council liaison to the public safety commit-
tee, asked the chief on Feb. 7 what the ideal
number of officers on the force would be.
“That depends on the level of protection
the township desires,” the chief respond-
ed.
The annual report states the department
“wishes to maintain the police force at its
current level, based on the high demand
for police services ... however, any addi-
tional reductions in staff may result in the
department re-evaluating the services it
Burglaries, thefts increased in 2011, says report
BURGLARIES
Continued from page 1
please see REPORT, page 7
provides to the community.”
The Quaker Bridge Mall Sub-
station, established in February
1993 to provide a permanent po-
lice presence at the mall, received
1,743 calls for service in 2011,
down from 1,888 in 2010, for a 7
percent decrease. The police de-
partment continues to maintain
89 fixed posts at the mall due to
domestic preparedness initia-
tives, terrorism prevention and
crime prevention.
According to the report, overall
crime increased 2 percent at the
mall in 2011 with 372 adults ar-
rested, a 26 percent increase, and
153 juveniles taken into custody, a
9 percent increase.
Four auto thefts or attempted
thefts occurred at the mall in
2011, compared with two in 2010.
The investigation division of
the department increased its rate
of cleared cases from 39 percent
to 47 percent in 2011.
A cleared case is one in which
the suspect has been identified
and complaints have been signed
by an officer. Exceptionally
cleared cases are ones in which a
suspect has been identified, but
no complaints have been signed.
Unfounded cases are classified as
those in which it is found that no
crime occurred.
According to the report, 53 per-
cent of the cases not cleared re-
main open, or under active inves-
tigation, or inactive until further
evidence is found.
Juvenile cases in the township
declined 26 percent in 2011, ac-
cording to the report, as the juve-
nile division investigated 326
cases, compared with 352 in 2010.
The division cleared 76 percent of
juvenile cases last year, compared
with 60 percent in 2010.
Township police issued 7,477
traffic tickets in 2011, down from
8,338 in 2010. The number of traf-
fic accidents decreased from 1,564
to 1,402, with the highest number
of intersection crashes at the
Brunswick Circle, where 80 were
reported.
The second highest number oc-
curred at Franklin Corner/Basin
Baker’s Road.
That intersection is also where
a red light camera from Ameri-
can Traffic Solutions was in-
stalled last November on a trial
basis. During that 30-day period,
police issued 2,158 warnings to
motorists for going through the
red light. The camera takes both
still photos and video of cars
going through the red light, and
summonses are issued on the
basis of those photos.
Posluszny said at the Feb. 7
meeting that 1,104 summonses
were issued in January in the red
light traffic camera program, of
which three were dismissed in
municipal court and 932 disposed
of out of court, meaning the fine
was paid without a hearing.
Township magistrate Kevin
Nerwinski told the township
council at the Feb. 7 meeting that
the municipal court office is see-
ing an increase in calls from mo-
torists about the red light pro-
gram and an increase in adminis-
trative work.
“Although it’s too early to ade-
quately measure, it appears so far
that the red light camera pro-
gram has shown a great chance of
success at improving safety at a
very dangerous intersection.”
FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 7
We are pleased to welcome our newest audiologist
Joanne L. Rosenberg, M.A. CCC-A, FAAA
º B.S. Boston University
º M.A. Temple University
º CAGS Gallaudet University
º 19 years of service as a manufacturers' Sales
Representative and Audiology Trainer
Call today to schedule an appointment with Joanne
(609| 895-1666
177 Franklin Corner Road, Suite 1-B
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
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REPORT
Continued from page 6
Report states police department
aims to maintain number on force
Addiction Hotline
of New Jersey
(800) 238-2333
PSA
WEDNESDAY
February 29
FOR CHILDREN
Kid Time Story and Craft: 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. at the Lawrence Branch
Library. Kid Time story and craft for
grades kindergarten through fourth.
In the activity room. No registration
is required.
Open Activity Room Time: Ages 2
to 5 years with caregiver. 9:35 a.m.
at the Lawrence Branch Library.
Library staff will not be present in
the room. Children and caregivers
may play, read, socialize and craft at
their own pace. Toys, crayons, paper,
flannel-board and other educational
materials in the room may be uti-
lized.
Preschool Open Craft: Ages 2 to 5
years with caregiver. 11:30 a.m. at
the Lawrence Branch Library. No
registration required. This is a self-
directed craft activity. Library staff
will not be present in the room.
THURSDAY
March 1
FOR ALL
Lawrence Township Recreation
Advisory Committee meeting: 7:30
p.m. on the first Thursday of the
month. Visit www.lawrencetwp.com
for more information.
Crochet Corner: 3 p.m. at Lawrence
Branch Library. Needle crafters who
already know the basic crochet
stitches are invited to drop in to
socialize and work on a project of
their choice. Experienced needle
crafter Margaret Woo will be avail-
able to assist individuals. Registration
suggested. Call (609) 989-6920.
Foreign and Independent Films at
Your Library: 6:30 p.m. at Lawrence
Branch Library. A viewing of “The
Color of the Mountain.” Manuel is
obsessed with playing soccer any
chance he gets and dreams of
becoming a great goalkeeper. Short-
ly after Manuel receives a new ball
for his birthday, the ball gets kicked
into a minefield, and he and his
friends will do everything in their
power to recover their prized
belonging. Spanish with English sub-
titles. Refreshments will be served.
Registration suggested.
FOR TEENS
Teen Take-home Craft: Begins 9:30
a.m. at Lawrence Branch Library.
For teens ages 10 to 18. Stop by dur-
ing March and pick up a free take-
home craft - a chopstick vase!
FRIDAY
March 2
FOR ALL
Meditation Circle: 2:30 p.m. at
Lawrence Branch Library. Slow
down and join Reference Librarian
Ann Kerr and reduce stress using
meditation. Light stretching at the
beginning of the meditation hour
will relax your muscles and allow
you to be more comfortable and
focused. Registration suggested.
Posture Perfect: 3:30 p.m. at
Lawrence Branch Library. Reference
Librarian Ann Kerr and certified fit-
ness trainer Maria Okros will share
some simple exercises to improve
your posture and increase your flex-
ibility. Registration suggested.
Drum Circle: 4:30 p.m. at Lawrence
Branch Library. Entertainers will
facilitate a beginner’s drum circle.
Bring your own drum or use one of
ours. Shakers, gongs, bells and oth-
er percussion also welcome.
Refreshments served. Registration
is suggested.
FOR CHILDREN
Dr. Seuss Birthday Party: Ages 2
to 5. 11 a.m. to noon at Lawrence
Branch Library. Celebrate Read
Across America Day with a birthday
party for Dr. Seuss. Celebrate with
stories, songs, crafts and refresh-
ments, with special guest appear-
ances from library staff and guitar
singer Pat McKinley. Online registra-
tion required.
SATURDAY
March 3
FOR ALL
Boomers & Seniors Saturday
Morning Wii Bowling League: 10
a.m. at Lawrence Branch Library.
Wii, an interactive video game, is a
fun and easy way to get some light
exercise and socialize with friends.
Refreshments served. Registration
suggested.
School System Q&A from New
Jersey Department of Education:
Noon to 3 p.m. at Lawrence Branch
Library. New Jersey Department of
Education will be displaying an
informational table at the library on
the new Family and Community
Relations Office and how it can help
families navigate their respective
school district and help you get
your questions answered regarding
academic standards, assessment
tests, school safety, children with
special needs, home schooling, legal
issues, student transportation, col-
lege and career readiness, how par-
ents can get involved in their chil-
dren’s education, and other aspects
of the state’s education system. No
registration required.
calendar PAGE 8 FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
Want to be listed?
To have your Lawrence meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event. Send information by mail to: Calendar,
The Lawrence Sun, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J.
08542. Or by email: calendar@lawrencesun.com. Or you can sub-
mit a calendar listing through our website (www.lawrencesun.com).
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FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 9
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(1 mile south of Rider University on Route 206)
www.bossiosdeli.com
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BREAKFAST
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Huge Selection
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Many different collections to select from.
10 THE LAWRENCE SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
McGraw-Hill Education and
Slackwood School celebrated Abi-
gail Crutchley’s winning submis-
sion to “This is McGraw-Hill My
Math” student art contest at a
party for Abby’s third-grade class
on Feb. 16. Unveiled at the party
was the publisher’s new math se-
ries cover with Abby’s winning
artwork prominently displayed.
As three McGraw-Hill repre-
sentatives, Michael D. Healy, Kate
Rodgers and Mary Molyneaux-
Leahy, entered Joanne Cording-
ley’s classroom, which is Abby’s
class, with balloons, cake and
poster of new math book cover in
hand, the surprised third-graders
were using calculators in a math
lesson led by math teacher
George Regan.
Texas Instruments supplied
the calculators to the class as part
of the almost $15,000 in fun and
functional prizes earned by
Abby’s winning entry.
Additional contest sponsors in-
clude Promethean, netTrekker,
Psychological Software Solutions,
Intel, eInstruction, VWR Educa-
tion/Science Kit, The Math
Forum @ Drexel and Crayola.
The national art contest recog-
nized 12 winners out of more
than 2,400 submissions this past
December.
In addition to being featured in
the new course materials, Abby’s
artwork will be displayed at the
opening of the Museum of Math-
ematics in New York. View all the
winning artwork in an online
gallery at mymath.shycast.com.
“We are impressed by the cre-
ativity shown by all the winners
of ‘This is McGraw-Hill My Math’
contest,” said Lisa O’Masta, vice
president of McGraw-Hill School
Education. “We are thrilled to
recognize the students, teachers
and schools that showcased the
importance of math in their
everyday lives through this con-
test.”
Local third-grader wins
national art contest
Special to The Sun
Student Abigail Crutchley
stands beside her winning art-
work.
classified
T HE L AWR E N C E S U N
FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
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$
20per week
B US I NE S S
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80per month Only
$
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun • West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
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