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FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Free tax assistance
Help for low- to moderate-
income adults. PAGE 2
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Budget
less
than
2011’s
By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
West Windsor’s 2012 budget
is set to be $13,000 less than
last year’s budget, which
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh says is
a major achievement for the
municipality, especially since
the township has grown since
last year and continues to do
so.
The West Windsor township
administration and Hsueh pre-
sented the township’s 2012 mu-
nicipal budget and capital
budget to members of the
town council at a Feb. 13 meet-
ing.
The tax levy, business ad-
ministrator Robert Hary said,
is set to rise $409,756, which is
a 1.86 percent increase over
last year. The increase, Hary
said, is due to a loss in revenue
for the township since last
year.
Hary said a rough estimate
indicated that tax on a home
assessed at $523,950 would go
up by about $50, though he
cautioned exact figures are not
yet available.
Some of the township’s
spending increases, Hary said,
Holiday
event,
with a
twist
By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
On Feb. 14, several young
girls were sitting around a
table, using icing to decorate
heart-shaped sugar cookies.
Was this a Valentine’s Day
party?
Actually, no.
These cookies have a jagged
line down the center and some
have holes in them.
West Windsor Library’s
Anti-Valentine’s Day party
was all about turning Valen-
tine’s Day traditions on their
heads.
At one table, kids could cre-
ate “anti-valentines” using
construction paper and col-
ored markers. Suggested ap-
propriate messages for the
anti-valentines were phrases
like “this heart is not for sale”
and “back off, you lovey-dovey
freak.”
Behind the event is Carolyn
Aversano, West Windsor Li-
brary’s young-adult librarian.
“I stole the idea from a
friend at the South Brunswick
library,” she said.
Aversano also said she’d
seen the idea on blogs and
thought it might be a fun event
for Valentine’s Day here.
Demonstrating school pride
JULIE STIPE/
The West Windsor Sun
ABOVE: Members of the
cheerleading squad at
West Windsor-Plainsboro
High School South show
their ‘Pirate Pride’ during
a practice. LEFT: During
cheerleading practice at
West Windsor-Plainsboro
High School South, stu-
dents poise to begin their
routine.
please see WEST, page 6
please see VALENTINE’S, page 4
2 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh has an-
nounced free tax assistance will
be offered at the West Windsor
Senior Center for low and moder-
ate income, older adults in the
surrounding area.
Expertly trained volunteers
from the American Association of
Retired Persons will assist in the
preparation of the federal and
state income-tax returns free of
charge.
These volunteers are trained in
cooperation with the IRS and
New Jersey State Income Tax De-
partment.
Personal assistance will be pro-
vided to help the taxpayer com-
plete federal and state tax re-
turns.
Hsueh stated: “We are pleased
to provide this service to those
that would otherwise not be able
to afford assistance. We are grate-
ful to the volunteers who are par-
ticipating.”
The program will be available
at the West Windsor Senior Cen-
ter, 271 Clarksville Road, West
Windsor, on Tuesday mornings
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., now through
April 10.
Individuals are reminded to
bring copies of their 2010 federal
and state income tax returns as
well as the 2011 information nec-
essary to complete the 2011 tax re-
turns (e.g., W-2 and 1099 income
forms, property tax bills, itemized
deductions such as medical bills
and charitable contributions,
etc.).
Free tax assistance for low-
and moderate-income adults
The Mercer County Library
System announces its spring 2012
art show, “The Art of Reading.”
Fourth through eighth graders
can submit one painting or draw-
ing, no bigger than 9”x12”, to their
local branch library by March 23.
The artwork will be judged on ad-
herence to the theme.
A panel of local judges from
each community will award local
prizes of first, second and third
place. The first, second and third
place winners from each branch
will then go to the Lawrence
Headquarters Branch for a final
system-wide judging. An art re-
ception is April 29 from 1 to 2 p.m.
Refreshments will be served.
For a registration form, see the
Mercer County Library website
at webserver.mcl.org.
‘Art of Reading’ collecting student works
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“A lot of teenagers don’t date or
aren’t allowed to date,” Aversano
said. “It stinks when you’re not
allowed to date or don’t have a
boyfriend on Valentine’s Day.”
Several tables in the room were
set up for different activities. At
one table were piles of scrap fab-
ric and stuffing for creating
voodoo dolls. Another had rolls of
duct tape in a rainbow of colors
for creating duct tape roses.
Printed photos of romance
book covers and romantic movie
posters were taped to one wall,
with a sign declaring it an area
for “artistic license therapy.”
Aversano explained that the
pictures were to scribble on.
“The Twilight” movie fran-
chise was well represented, as
were the movies “Water for Ele-
phants,” “Maid of Honor” and
“The Ugly Truth.”
Amirah Hussain, a student at
West Windsor-Plainsboro High
School South, made a voodoo doll
and then moved on to the broken-
heart cookies. She finished up by
learning how to make a rose out
of duct tape.
Hussain didn’t seem too pes-
simistic about the holiday, howev-
er.
“I don’t really hate Valentine’s
Day,” she admitted, “I just
thought it would be fun.”
Others, though, were more cyn-
ical.
Homeschooled sisters Eily and
Lucy Mixson came to the event
dressed entirely in black and
made their feelings about Valen-
tine’s Day very clear.
“We don’t like Valentine’s Day,”
Lucy declared. “It’s just too much
pink.”
Valentine’s Day, she said, is
about sweets.
“I’m just going to eat cookies
because that’s what you do on
Valentine’s Day,” she said. “Valen-
tine’s Day is about chocolate.”
Eily was firm about her renun-
ciation of the holiday.
“I just don’t want a valentine –
ever,” she said. “I have brothers. I
think I have enough boys.”
Both the cookie-decorating sta-
tion and the artistic license thera-
py wall proved popular.
The Mixsons were especially
excited about the opportunity to
vandalize promotional posters
from the “Twilight” movie by
drawing mustaches and beards
on the actors – and giving teen
dreamboat Robert Pattinson a
bloody hole in the head.
When it was time to go, Lucy
seemed reluctant to leave, but
Eily reassured her that their
work was done.
“You’ve defaced all the Twilight
photos, don’t worry,” she said.
Valentine’s Day gets a
makeover at teen
library party
VALENTINE’S
Continued from page 1
Send us your West Windsor news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@westwindsorsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 5
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The West Windsor community
orchestra Sinfonietta Nova will
perform its spring concert on Sat-
urday, March 3, at 7:30 p.m. at The
College of New Jersey’s Mayo
Concert Hall in Ewing.
The concert will feature two
winners of the orchestra’s 2011-
2012 youth concerto competition –
Enrique Rodriguez and Soyeong
Park, both on violin.
The concert will also include
Benjamin Britten’s “Young Per-
son’s Guide to the Orchestra.”
General admission tickets are
$15, senior tickets are $12, and
student tickets are $8.
Mercer County Clerk Paula
Sollami Covello announced that
her office will participate in Pass-
port Day in the USA, a nation-
wide event held in conjunction
with the U.S. State Department.
On Saturday, March 10, from 10
a.m. to 2:30 p.m., the Mercer
County Connection in Hamilton
will offer special hours for accept-
ance and processing of passport
applications. The clerk will pro-
vide additional staff to assist resi-
dents with passport applications
and photos.
The Mercer County Connec-
tion is located in the Hamilton
Square/Acme Shopping Center
on Highway 33 and Paxson Av-
enue in Hamilton.
Reservations are preferred.
To guarantee a time call (609)
989-6473. However, walk-ins are
welcome and every effort will be
made to accommodate residents.
For those who will be unable to at-
tend the event, the clerk’s office
processes passport applications
on a daily basis, Monday through
Friday, during business hours at
the clerk’s main office, 209 South
Broad St., Trenton.
In addition, residents can
apply anytime for a passport at
the county connection satellite of-
fice. The satellite office – opened
by County Executive Brian Hugh-
es – offers daily and limited
evening and Saturday hours for
the convenience of residents.
Passport photos are available
at both locations.
For further information on
passport requirements and what
personal documents are needed
to obtain one, visit www.mercer-
county.org and click on county
clerk or call (609) 989-6473.
Plan to travel? Apply for passport
on special day in Mercer County
Orchestra performs spring concert on March 3
Visit us online at
www.westwindsorsun.com
6 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN — FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JULIE STIPE
West Windsor Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08550 ZIP code. If
you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@westwindsorsun.com. For advertis-
ing information, call 609-751-0245 or
email advertising@westwindsorsun.com.
The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
ments from readers – including any infor-
mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@westwindsorsun.com, via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too. The
West Windsor Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
in our opinion
O
n the surface, two bills recent-
ly introduced in Congress
make sense. They would re-
strict the number of fees airlines
could charge. After all, who hasn’t
been on a plane where everyone is
wrestling to get overhead storage
space for their 73 carry-on bags they
brought to avoid baggage fees?
Problem is, this is America, and
America has achieved economic great-
ness because it allows, for the most
part, businesses to compete without
many rules. Once government gets
into regulating things that don’t relate
to, for example, safety, the whole sys-
tem gets messed up.
Naturally, the airlines aren’t in favor
of these bills. Some of them already
waive baggage fees for one or two
pieces.
Others correctly point out that,
charging fees, while keeping fares
lower, gives consumers a choice. In-
deed, if you travel without checked
bags, you probably would opt for the
airlines that offer lower fares, but
charge for checked baggage. It’s less
money out of their pockets for the
same service they would receive on
any airline.
Congressional supporters of the
bills point out that consumers don’t
like the fees. Well, of course, they
don’t. No one likes fees.
If Congress would check, we’re sure
it would find that people don’t like
high airline ticket prices, either. Or, in
keeping with the air travel theme,
parking rates that rise as you get clos-
er or more convenient parking spots at
an airport. Or high-priced food in air-
port restaurants.
Sure, some air travellers can feel
like they are being nickeled and dimed
to death. But it’s their choice to fly the
airlines that charge these fees. There
are any number of ways to avoid the
fees, they just choose not to do so.
This is a business model, pricing
choice. It’s what keeps businesses
competitive. Congress should stay
away.
Keep air fee bills grounded
Congress should let the free enterprise system work
Hands off private business
Congress has better things to do with
its time than to get involved with air-
line fees. Let consumers make choic-
es and the airlines make business
decisions.
are due to increases in salaries and wages
– and in the costs of debt service, brush
disposal and gasoline.
The township has made large reductions
in its spending on health care and pen-
sions, Hary said, as well as by paring down
its staff.
Hary stressed the Mayor and adminis-
tration had created the budget with long-
term financial goals in mind, and that the
budget’s impact on the township’s finan-
cial situation in the future had been care-
fully considered.
“We need to be cognizant of long-term
debt,” Hary said.
Hary also warned against putting off im-
provements that the township needs and let-
ting the expenses fall to future generations.
Comments made both by residents and
board members, however, showed a deter-
mination to curb spending and few qualms
over letting purchases wait.
“In this town, we are penny-wise and
pound-foolish,” West Windsor resident
Debbie Hepler said.
Hepler questioned whether the town-
ship’s agreement with East Windsor, in
which the townships share animal-control
services rather than each paying a full-
time animal control officer, really does
save the township money.
Hepler also said the township is paying
for two police officers to take helicopter fly-
ing lessons, as well as maintaining a num-
ber of heavy-duty vehicles that Hepler said
are not used only for township business –
but are driven home by township employ-
ees.
These expenditures, she argued, are un-
necessary uses of township funds.
Addressing Hepler’s concerns regarding
animal control services, Councilman
Bryan Maher said the council had “been
over the math a couple of times,” and in-
sisted the shared-services agreement was a
money saver.
The township began sharing animal-
control services with East Windsor last
spring after laying off Bettina Roed, West
Windsor’s longtime animal control officer.
Although renewal of the shared-services
contract was voted down in December, a
new township council voted last month to
keep the agreement.
Regarding the township paying for two
police officers to take helicopter lessons,
Maher said: “I find that to be quite alarm-
ing, disturbing.”
Maher also said he would “call on our de-
partment heads to scrutinize more closely”
how the township’s funds are being used.
“We cannot continue to spend money
like it’s going out of style,” Maher said.
Hary said he wanted to set the record
straight.
“It is true that two police officers have
put in for reimbursement for helicopter
training. It is not true that the township is
paying for it,” Hary said.
Resident Kim White said she agreed
with Hepler’s objections about the town-
ship’s use of its current vehicles and its
plans to buy new ones, particularly the
township’s proposal to purchase a new
Ford F-550 truck for the department of
public works.
Maher suggested the recommendation
authorizing the truck’s purchase be pulled
and discussed separately. Maher also re-
quested an inventory of vehicles owned by
the township and descriptions of their con-
dition saying, “It’s an ideal time to do this,
as we’re coming up on budget season.”
Hary told the council that the depart-
ment “held off as long as they could,” but
that it needs the new truck as the truck
currently being used is in bad condition.
However, Hary said he had no problem de-
laying the decision to purchase the vehicle
until after the March 2 meeting with de-
partment heads.
A public budget work session is sched-
uled for March 2 at 12:30 p.m. in the West
Windsor Municipal Building.
WEST
Continued from page 1
West Windsor budget on track to be $13,000 less than 2011
FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 7
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Princeton University professor
Brian Kernighan, a renowned au-
thor and icon of the computer
world, will discuss the impor-
tance of understanding numbers
in a talk at Mercer County Com-
munity College on Wednesday,
March 7, at noon in the communi-
cations building, Room 109, at the
West Windsor Campus, 1200 Old
Trenton Road.
The talk, entitled, “Millions,
Billions, Zillions: Why (In)numer-
acy Matters,” is the second in the
college's Spring 2012 Distin-
guished Lecture Series.
Kernighan, of Princeton, is a
computer scientist who previous-
ly worked at Bell Telephone Labo-
ratories and contributed to the
design of the pioneering AWK
and AMPL programming lan-
guages, along with UNIX, a com-
puter operating system.
Kernighan earned his Ph.D. in
electrical engineering from
Princeton University, where he
has held a professorship in the de-
partment of computer science
since 2000.
Altogether he has authored 10
books related to computers and
technology, and holds four
patents.
According to Kernighan, tech-
nology has buried us in an ava-
lanche of numbers, graphs and
charts, many of which claim to
present the truth about important
issues in the news today. At the
same time, our personal facility
with numbers has diminished,
leaving us at the mercy of quanti-
tative reasoning and presentation
that is biased, misleading, and
often wrong.
In this presentation,
Kernighan will explore some of
the central ideas attached to this,
and offer some common sense
principles for estimating when
we are presented with inaccurate
or incomplete information.
The lecture is free and open to
the public. For more information,
visit www.mccc.edu.
Learn why numbers
matter at March 7 talk
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Send us your West Windsor news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@westwindsorsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
WEDNESDAY
February 29
FOR ALL
Village PTA meeting: 9:30 a.m. at
the media center. Visit www.village
pta.org for more information.
FOR CHILDREN
Toddler Story Time & Craft: Ages 2
to 4. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Siblings welcome.
Stories and music followed by a
craft. No registration required.
THURSDAY
March 1
FOR ALL
“Peter Pan” at West Windsor-
Plainsboro High School North: The
high school theater company pres-
ents “Peter Pan” from Thursday,
March 1, until Sunday, March 4.
Show times are 6:30 p.m. on March
1, 8 p.m. on March 2, 2 and 8 p.m. on
March 3 and 2 p.m. on March 4. For
more information or tickets email
cherylanne.thyrum@ww-p.org.
Tickets will also be sold at the door.
“Once on this Island” at Grover
Middle School: The middle school
theater company presents “Once on
this Island” from Thursday, March 1,
until Saturday, March 3. Show times
are 7 p.m. on March 1 and 7:30 p.m.
on March 2 and 3. Tickets are $8
and can be purchased in advance or
ay the door.
“Peter Pan” Dinner with the Char-
acters: 5 p.m. at West Windsor-
Plainsboro High School North dining
hall. Enjoy dinner with the theater
company’s characters of “Peter
Pan.” Tickets $8. Children 4 and
under are free. Follow up with the
6:30 p.m. performance. (Tickets for
the show are $10.) For more infor-
mation or tickets email cherylanne.
thyrum@ww-p.org. Tickets will also
be sold at the door.
West Windsor Affordable Housing
Committee meeting: 7:30 p.m. at
the Township Municipal Complex, 271
Clarksville Road. For more informa-
tion visit www.westwindsornj. org.
Public Skate: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Public
skating for all ages at Mercer County
Park, 1638 Old Trenton Road.
FOR CHILDREN
Picture Books & Craft: Ages 3 to 5.
10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Stories followed by
a craft. No registration required.
FRIDAY
March 2
FOR ALL
Council budget meeting: 12:30 to 5
p.m. at the Township Municipal
Complex, 271 Clarksville Road. For
more information visit www.west
windsornj.org.
Public Skate: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and
7:30 to 10 p.m. Public skating for all
ages at Mercer County Park, 1638
Old Trenton Road, West Windsor.
SATURDAY
March 3
FOR ALL
Mom-Son Event at East Windsor
Bowl: Noon to 2 p.m. at East Wind-
sor Bowl, 529 Route 130 North.
Unlimited bowling for two hours,
shoe rental, pizza and soda. $40 for
each mother/son pair. $20 per addi-
tional child. To register, visit
www.wwparks-recreation.com.
WW-P Local Community Business
Expo: West Windsor-Plainsboro Com-
munity Education and the Village
School PTA host the inaugural busi-
ness expo. For more information call
Melissa Conklin at (609) 716-5030.
Dumpster Drop-off Day: 8 a.m. to 2
p.m. at West Windsor Public Works,
70 Southfield Road. West Windsor
residents only; proof of residency
required. For more information call
(609) 799-8370 or visit www.west-
wind sor.org.
Public Skate: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 5 to 7
p.m. and 8 to 10 p.m. Public skating
for all ages at Mercer County Park,
1638 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor. Questions, call (609) 371-
1766.
SUNDAY
March 4
FOR ALL
Public Skate: 1 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Pub-
lic skating for all ages at Mercer
County Park, 1638 Old Trenton Road.
MONDAY
March 5
FOR ALL
Socrates Café: 7 to 9 p.m. at West
Windsor Branch Library. Partici-
pants pose questions, listen to oth-
ers, raise challenges, and consider
alternative answers.
Public Skate: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pub-
lic skating for all ages at Mercer
County Park, 1638 Old Trenton
Road.
TUESDAY
March 6
FOR ALL
Friends of the West Windsor
Library Book Sale: Kicks off at 6
p.m. at the West Windsor Branch
Library. Thousands of books, books
on CD, DVDs and music CDs in good
condition. Priced from 50 cents to
$4. Sale runs through Sunday,
March 11. Hours are 6 to 9 p.m. on
March 6, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on March 7,
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on March 8, 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. on March 9 and 10 and
12:30 to 4 p.m. on March 11.
West Windsor Human Relations
Council meeting: 8 p.m. at the
Township Municipal Complex, 271
Clarksville Road. For more informa-
tion visit www.westwindsornj.org.
Public Skate: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Pub-
lic skating for all ages at Mercer
County Park, 1638 Old Trenton
Road, West Windsor.
calendar PAGE 8 FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012
NEW LOCATION!
Princeton Presbyterian
Church In West Windsor
New classes start
Tuesday, March 20th
20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
classified
T HE WE S T WI N DS O R S U N
FEBRUARY 29-MARCH 6, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun • West Windsor Sun
LET
THE
SUNS
WORK
FOR
YOU!
Call
(856) 427-0933
for Advertising info.
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
Dog Boarding
Roofing
Firewood
Tree Service
Has your high water alarm
gone off recently?
J WHALEN & SON
PUMP SERVICE
Sewage and Sump Pumps
Installed and Repaired
Call 609-737-2722
Pump Services
FIREWOOD
Delivered º Dumped
All 14-18 inches long
Split º Aged Full Cord
SALE $195
Call: 908-359-3000
Professional Tree Care & Arborist Services
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
Servicing Your Community For Over 20 Years
609-730-8199
www.arborbarbertree.com
A portion of
our proceeds
are donated
to animal
rescue!
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
• Certified Arborist
• Corrective Pruning
• Tree Removal
• Cabling & Bracing
• Stump Grinding
• Cat Rescue
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
• Certified Arborist
• Corrective Pruning
• Tree Removal
• Cabling & Bracing
• Stump Grinding
• Cat Rescue
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 3/31/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
Autos
CHRYSLER CIRRUS LXi ‘00
White/tan Lthr; Sun Roof;
Power assist; one owner;
Good written report; 90K mi;
$3,900
609-883-1774
Academic Sucesss:
TUTORING
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate Over 25 years
exp. Caring individualized
instruction SAT Reading,
Writing, Math, Subject
Tests ACT; All Standardized
Tests H.S. Eng. Lit. and
Writing; Math to Pre-Calc.,
History Elem. Phonics,
Reading; Math; Study
Skills; E.S.L. Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
Tutoring
If you’re reading your competitor’s ad?
Who’s making money… you or them?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933 x 512
INTO ACTION!
Mila's Cleaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free Estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
CIeaning