ENHANCING YOUR CLASS THROUGH COTEACHING AS A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TOOL

Marianela Ayub & Andrea Repetto
marianela.ayub@alianza.edu.uy andrea.repetto@alianza.edu.uy

TABLE OF CONTENTS
o o o o o o o Co­Teaching definition Elements of Co­Teaching Co­Teaching Approaches Our Case Challenges Benefits Conclusion

WHAT IS CO-TEACHING?
 “Co­teaching  occurs  when  two  or  more  professionals  jointly  deliver  substantive  instruction  to  a  diverse,  blended  group  of  students in a single physical space.” Friend & Cook (2007)   

ELEMENTS OF CO-TEACHING
 Involves two or more certified teachers  Teachers jointly deliver substantive instruction  Occurs in diverse classrooms  Occurs within a shared physical space  Requires: parity, committment and mutual  respect.

CO-TEACHING APPROACHES
1. One Teaches, One Observes.  2. One Teaches, One Assists.  3. Parallel Teaching.  4. Station Teaching.  5. Alternative Teaching     6. Team Teaching               

BASIS FOR SELECTING A COTEACHING APPROACH
Four elements: 1­Student characteristics and needs. 2­ Teacher characteristics and needs. 3­Curriculum, including content and instructional  strategies. 4­Pragmatic considerations. 

WHY CO-TEACH?
o o o o o o Incorporate two students later to the course. Range of age: 6 to 11 years old Different exposure to the language. Cases of misbehavior within the group Lack of motivation Diverse needs and interests

OUR CASE: AN ECLECTIC MODEL OF CO-TEACHING
 Both teachers taught and assisted, switching roles  throughout the class.  Planning according to students needs and  teaching styles  Preset rules for classroom  management  Ongoing assessment of the students’  performance and needs  Debriefing and mutal feedback

CHALLENGES
 FOR THE STUDENTS

 Acceptance  Lack of concentration  Motivation  Risk of students becoming dependent learners

CHALLENGES
FOR THE TEACHERS

  Trust and commitment   The unexpected   Flexible and responsive attitude  Hierarchical relations of power and status  Logistical issues  Share an individual role

CHALLENGES
FOR THE INSTITUTION  Lack of funding   Willingnes to cooperate with teachers    Scheduling constraints 

BENEFITS
FOR THE STUDENTS:  Positive effects on self­esteem  Enhances academic performance  Provides a collaborative model to imitate  Stronger peer relationships

BENEFITS
FOR THE TEACHERS  Professional growth  Shared responsibilities  Blending of teacher’s styles and expertise  Opportunity to reach all students  Develops teamwork skills  Creatively addressing challenges

BENEFITS
FOR THE INSTITUTION  Increased quality and professionalism of teaching  staff  Enhances sense of community   Fewer use of assisted education services

TO BEAR IN MIND…
 Be patient  Be open­minded and respectful  Forsee unexpected situations  Different alternatives to co­teaching  Ongoing Assessment & Feedback  Implementation of co­teaching principles outside  the classroom  See collaborative teaching as powerful tool for  professional development.  Enjoy learning from a peer

BAWUENS, J. & HOURCADE, J. J. (1991). Making co­teaching a  mainstreaming strategy. Preventing School Failure, 35, (4), 19­24. FRIEND, M & COOK, L (2007). Interactions: Collaboration skills for school  professionals (5th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. G. CONDERMAN, V. BRESNAHAN, T. PEDERSEN, (2008),Purposeful  Co­Teaching: Real Cases and Effective Strategies LYNNE COOK, Ph.D. (2004), Co­Teaching: Principles, Practices and  Pragmatics, New Mexico Public Education Department, Quaterly Special  Education Meeting, Albuquerque, NM.                

REFERENCES

 marianela.ayub@alianza.edu.uy  andrea.repetto@alianza.edu.uy

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.