GUIDE

TO
LATIN CONVERSATION,
CONTAINING
ACollection of Useful Words,
A List of Comparatives and of Superlatives, the
.. Principal Irregular Verbs, Familiar Expressions
and Phrases, Dialogues, Sentences, Tables of
Money, Weights and Measures., Latin
Abbreviations, Roman Calendar, Cel-
ebrated Sayings from the Rcr..an
Writers, and Latin Quotations
in common use.
I3v A OF THE SOCIETY OF ,uESUS.
-=----
Translated/rom the French. of the Seventh Editwn by
PROF, STEPHEN W. WILBY"
Epiphany Apostolic College.
YOHK:
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JOLIN l\fORPI-IY C6NiJ '" : .. -.. : :
PUB'-ISIi,ERS:
BALTIMORE, MD.
\ 1
,CoPYRIGHT\> 1892, BY JOHN MURPHY & Co,
'i·: :'1
I I {J
I·') tl I
UTILITY AND GENERAL DIVISION
OF THE BOOK.
Some colleges are trying to revive the custom
of speaking Latin in the classroom. The success
that has attended these efforts has fully justified
the method pursued and brought into relief the
real need of elementary books to supplement the
endeavor. The desire of forwarding this move-
ment in faVOl' of more solid studies, and of seeing
the scope of a method becorne more extended
which has already borne such good fruit in .Italy
and in many colleges of France, has prompted
us to write this Guide to Latin. Conversal£on. We
have reunited in a convenient and handy vol-
ume, a vocabulary of ordinary words, a list of
comparatives and of superlatives, the principal
irregular verbs, choice familiar phrases, dialogues,
proverbs, choice sentences and quotations. A
single volume contains, the phrases and dialogues
of Erasmus, of Vives, of Cordier, of Alde- Manuee,
of Fathers Pontanus, Van Torre and Champs-
neups,
3
4 Guide to Latin Conversation.
The vocabulary, distributed under different
headings, contains in alphabetical order the no-
menclature of such words as are most in use. We
have been careful not to introduce in this dic-
tionary any word of uncertain Latinity. Sorne
ecclesiastical terms, names of rank, of sciences, and
of modern inventions, do not belong to the lan-
guage of the Augustan age, and will be easily rec-
ognized. In the list of comparatives and of super- '
latives we w rre more desirous of giving positive
indications than of wishing to make the list com-
plete. The gender of nouns and the quantity of
incrernents and penultimates which do not fol-
low the rules of position, will be found desig-
nated.
A collection of idioms and Latin expressions
follows the vocabulary. We have grouped them
under general titles, which embrace the circle of
ideas most familiar to students. Most of these
phrases are taken from the letters of Cicero:
others from Terence. A few are extracted from
the writings of Titus Livius, of Caesar, and of
Plautus.
There are eighty dialogues, thirty of which
h a ~ e been taken from the conversations of Father
General Division of the Book. 5
Van Torre, a Belgian J esuit.' In the latter part
of the book we have given an idea of the kind of
dialogue that should be used by the pupils of
more advanced studies. All the other dialogues
are those of the Pvoqummasmaia. Latisiuaiie of
. Pontanus.f which the Protestant gymnasiums of
. Germany did not hesitate to accept even at the
hands of a born adversary of the Reform.
The dialogues only are not translated. We
were compelled to lessen their number, and many
professors were of the opinion that it would be
more advantageous to have the pupils translate
them for themselves.
The sentences and choice thoughts come after
the conversations. With a few proverbs from
1 Anthony Van Torre was born at Alost, in 1615,became
a religious in 1632, and passed his life in teaching belles-
lettres, and in supervising classes. He died in 1677, at the
college of Courtrai. His dialogues, wrttten for the college.
of Anvers, were published for the first time in 1657. The
.same Father published, in 1674, A Ccllection of Latin
Phrases.
2 James Pontanus, a Bohemian Jesuit, taught belles-
Iottres for a long time and with great success in Germany.
He died at Augsburg, in 1626, at the age of eighty-four
years. He was the author of Poetical Precepts, Commen-
taries on Virgil and Ovid, several Greek Translations, and
many other writings in prose and verse.
6 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Publius Syrus are grouped noted sayings from
J uvenal, Terence, Seneca, Ovid, Virgil, and
Horace, all of which we have inserted as happy
remembrances of a solid and varied literary edu-
cation.
The book ends with tables, abbreviations, nota-
tions, the Roman calendar, all )f which cannot
but be useful for easy reference.
MANNER OF USING GUIDE TO LATIN
CONVERSATION.
The following method seems to us the most
useful to follow:
(a.) In the sixth class the principal articles of
the vocabulary may be learned, some paragraphs
of Latin phrases, and the dialogues of the first
part. The dialogues of Father Pontanus, being
more erudite and elegant, are more appropriate
for the higher classes. In the learning of the
vocabulary it is necessary that the pupil be able
to give the Latin word in answer to the English
word. This exercise may be taken up once a
week with profit, by having the pupils interro-
gate each other on some particular subject desig-
nated in advance by the professor. The proper
accentuation of every Latin word should be in-
sisted on from the first lesson. A habit of pro-
nouncing words" badly is corrected only with
great difficulty.
(b.) In the fifth class, the vocabulary may be
t.he collection of Latin phrases taken
7
8 Manner of Using Guide.
up, and the colloquia of the second part begun.
The dialogues should be committed to memory
and recited. The professor may appoint two or
three on each side, to converseon a given subject
and name some special day for the dialogue.
This will also answer for a review. Examina-
tions may also be held on the subject matter seen
by each class.
(c.) In the fourth class, the students should
exercise their minds by rendering into Latin, sen-
tences such as are in the book, but with this dif-
ference, they should strive to change the verbs, .
the case of the nouns, the number, the tense, and
even go so far as to introduce new phrases. They
should make a special study of all the dialogues.
When a certain number shall have been learned,
they should seek to converse with one another, or
answer in writing questions put to them by the
professor. The book is suitable for any class arid
may be made useful in a thousand ways which
will snggest themselves to the conscientious pro-
fessor or student.
VOCABULARY.
VOCABULORUM INDEX.
1.
:pEDS, COELICOLJE,
INFEHI.
Deus.
Spirftus sanctus.
Sancta Trinrtas, atis,!
Jesus Chrisms.
Dommus.
Ccelum ; pl. Cosli, orum, rJ1.
Sancta Virge, Inis, f.
Angeli, arum, m. pl.
Archangeli, arum, 'In. pl.
Seraphim, n, ploindo
..A. postol us.
Patriarcha, ~ , 111.,
Propheta, 00, m.
Martyr, yris, m. j.
Confessor, oris, m.
Sanctus, m ; sancta, f.
I'nferi, arum, m: pl.
Infernus.
Diabolus,
GOD, THE INHABITANTS
OF HEAVEN, HELL.
God,
The Holy Ghost,
The Holy Trinity,
Jesus Christ,
The Lord,
Heaven,
The Blessed Virgin,
The Angels,
The Archangels,
The Seraphim,
An Apostle,
Patriarch,
Prophet,
Martyr,
Confessor,
Saint, m., Saint,j.
n-n,
Infernal,
The Devil,
9
10 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Demon,
Satan,
TIME, DIVISION OF
TIME.
Da-mon, onis, m.
Satanas, ::e, m:
2.
TEMPUS, DIVISIO
TEMPORIS.
Age,
Century,
Lustrum,
Year,
l\,{onth,
January,
February,
March,
April,
May,
June,
July,
August,
September,
October,
November,
December,
Week

Monday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Thursday,
Friday,
}Etas, atis, j.; reVUID.
Seculum.
Lustrum.
. Annus.
Mensis, is, 'In.
Januarius.
Februarius,
Martins,
Aprilis, is, m;
Mains.
Junius.
Julius.
Augustus.
September, bris, m:
October, bris, 'In.
November, bris, 'In.
December, bris, 'In.
Hebdornada,
Dies, ei, m. j.
Lunre dies.
Dies Martis.
Dies Mereurii.
Dies J'ovis.
Dies \T
Vocab1llary. 11
Saturday,
Sunday,
flour,
Half-hour,
Quarter-hour,
The Seasons,
Spring,
Summer,
Autumn,
Winter,
Morning,
Dawn,
Daybreak,
Noon,
Afternoon,
Evening,
Twilight,
Night,
Midnight,
Light,
Darkness,
Yesterday,
To-day,
To-morrow,
The day after,
After to-morrow,
The day before,
The day before yes-
[terday,
In the morning,
At noon,
In the evening, '
At night,
Dies Saturni
Dominica dies.
Hora.
Semih6ra.
Quadrans; antis, m;
'I'empora annie
Ve1', veris, n,
JEstas, iitis, 1-
Autumnus.
Hicms, emis, f.
Tempus matutinum
Aurora.
Diluenlum,
Meridies, ei, m.
Pomeridianum tempus.
Vespertinum tempus,
Crepusctilum.
No x, noetis, [,
Media noxa
Lux, lucis, f.; Iumen,
[ill is, n.
Tenebrse, arum, f. pl.
I-Ieri.
lIodie.
Cras,
Postridie.
Perendie.
Pridie.
Nudius tertius.
Mane.
Meridiano tempore,
Vespere.
Noetu.
12 Guide to Latin (lonoereaiion;
3 .
AIR, WATER AND
FIRE.
Air,
- dense,
- thin,
- healthy,
- unhealthy,
\Vind,
Water
To flow,
To gush out,
To make wet,
Damp,
Wet,
Fountain, spring,
Gushing fountain,
Rivulet,
Brook,
Current,
Torrent,
River,
Stream,
Well, .
Pond,
Lake,
Gulf,
Strait,
Sea,
Surge, wave,
Billow,
•JER, AQ,UA ET IGNIS.
Aer,
- erassus.
- tenuis.
Ccelurn sal ubre.
- insalubre.
Aura, ventus.
Aqua.
Fluere.
Scaturire.
Madefacere,
Humidus.
Madldus.
Fans, fontis, 1h.
Scatebra,
Rivulus.:
Rivus.
Fluentum,
Torrens, entis, m.
Amnis, is, m.
Fluvius; flumen, inis, n;
Puteus.
Stagnum.
Laeus, us, 'in.
Sinus, us, 'in.
Fretum.
Mare, is, n;
Unda.
PI uctus, us, m.
""!L
! ~
i ' ( ~ '
~ .
Vocabulary.
13
: : ~
Shore, strand,
Bank,
Channel,
Rain,
I-Iarbor,
Port, .
Fire,
,Flame,
J-Ieat,
Warm,
Light,
Luminous,
To burn,
To warm,
To emit light,
Hearth,
Candle,
Torch,
Fire,
To set fire to,
MINERALS.
Agate,
Alabaster,
Alum,
Amber,
Antimony,
Arsenic,
Asphalt,
Bitumen,
Littus, oris, n.
Ripa.
Alveus.
Pluvial
Statio, ortis, j.
Portus, us, m.
Ignis, is, 111.
Flamma,
Calor, oris, m.
Caltdus,
Lux, lucis, I.; lumen,
Luctdus. [lnis, n
Urere.
Calefacere,
Lucere.
Focus.
Candela.
Treda, fax, facis, f.
Incendium.
Incendere,
4.
MINERALIA ET FOSSILlA,
Achates, re, m. f.
Alabastrites, ee, m.
Al timen, Inis, n.
Succlnum, electrum.
Stibium.
Arsenlcum.
Asphal ti urn, ii, n,
Bitumen, Inis, 11.
..•,4 _ •
14 Guide to Latin Oonversation..
Bituminous,
Brass (bi-metal),
Brick,
Small brick,
Of brick,
Camphor,
Darbuncle,
Chalk,
Clay,
Clayey,
Copper ore,
Made of copfler,
Rust of c o p p e r ~
Mine of copper,
Crystal,
Crystalline,
Diamond,
Of diamond,
Elnerald,
Of emerald,
Elnery,
Enarnel,
Enarrlelled,
Enamelled picture,
FI int-stone,
, Place full of flint-
Gold, [stone,
G-olden,
GUIn,
Gypsum,
Incense,
Iron,
Ivory,
Of ivory,
Bituminous,
..t:Es, a-ris, n.
Later, eris, m.; testa.
Laterciilus.
Latericius, testaceus,
Camphora..
Carbunculus,
Marga.
Argilla.
Argil laceus,
£s, eeris, '11.; cuprum.
lEneus, eereus,
.fEriigo, Inis, l
-LEris fodina,
Crystallus, crystallum.
Crystalltnus.
Adamaa, antis, 111.
Adamantmus.
Smaragdus, m;
Smaragdfnus,
Smyris, Idis, [.
Encaustum,
Eneaustus, eneaustrcus,
Encaustlce, es, f.
Silex, Icis, m.f.; lapis) Id is,
Saxetum. [111.
Aurum.
Aureus.
Gummi, n. indo
Gypsum.
Thus, thuris, n,
Ferrum.
Ebur, boris, n.
Eburneus, eburnus.
Vocabulary. 15
Jasper, Iaspis, rdis,f-
Of jasper, Iaspideus,
Lead, Plumbum.
Of lead, Plumbeus.
Mixed with lead, Plumbosus.
Loadstone, Magnes, etis, 'In.
Marble, Marmor, oris, n,
Of marble, Marmoreus,
Adorned with marbl e, Marmoratus,
Mercury, IIydrargyrus.
Nitre, .Nitrum.
Nitrous, Nitrosus.
Nitre-bed, Nitraria.
Ochre, Ochra,
Opal, Opalus, i, j.
Pearl, Unio, onis, f.; margarita.
Pitch, Pix, plcis, j.
Of pitch, Piceus,
Porphyry, Porphyrites, 00, m;
pyrites, Pyrites, fe, m:
Resin, Resina.
Resinous, Resinosus,
Rock, Rupes, is, f.; petra,
Ruby, Carbunculus,
Rust, Rubigo, mis, j.
Saltpetre, Salnitrum.
Salt, Sal, sal is, m,
Natural salt, Sal nativus.
Artificial salt, Sal factitius.
Sea salt, Sal marinus.
Grain of salt, Salis mica.
Mine of salt, Salifodina,
Salt works, Salinse, arum, j. pl.
Sandarach, Sandaraca,
,-
16
Guide to Latin Conversation.
Sapphire,
Of sapphire,
Sardonyx,
Silver,
Of silver,
Soot,
Color of soot,
Blackened by soot,
Stone,
Small stone,
Large stone,
Pumice stone,
Stony,
Full of stones,
Precious stones,
Sulphur,
Sulphurous,
Verdigris,
Vitriol,
Wax,
Sealing wax,
Of wax,
Of the color of wax,
'Vhite lead,
Painted with white
[lead,
TREES, PLANTS,
FLOWERS, FRUITS.
Abraham's-balm,
..Acacia,
Sapphirus, i, j.
Sapphirmus,
Sardonyx, Iehis, m.
Argentum,
Argenteus.
FulIgo, Illis,.f.
Fuligineus.
Fullginosns.
Lapis, Idis, m.
Lapillus.
Saxum.
Pumex, lcis, m.
Lapideus.
Lapidosus.
Ge1111nre, arum, j. pl.
Sulphur, uris, n;
\ Sulphureus.
Scolecia.
Chalcantum.
Cera.
Cera signatoria,
Cereus.
Cerinus,
Cerussa, psiInmythium.
Cerussatus.
5.
ARBORES, PJ.JANTJE,
FLORES, FRUCTtJ'S.
Vitex, Icis, m,
Acacia.
Vocabula1·Y·
17
Acanthus,
Aconite,
Alder-tree,
Almond-tree,
Almond,
Aloes,
Amaranth,
Anemone,
Anise,
Apple-tree,
Of an apple-tree,
Apple,
Apple-orchard,
Apricot-tree,
Apricot,
Arbute,
Arbute-berry,
Artichoke,
Head of artichoke,
Ash-tree,
Of ash,
Wood of ash,
Asparagus,
Balm-mint,
Balsam,
Banana,
Barley,
Of barley,
Basilisk,
Bean,
Beech-tree,
Of beech,
2
Acanthus.
Aconitum,
. Alnus, i, f.
Amygdalus, i, f.
Amygdalum, amygdala,
Aloe, es,1.
Amarantus.
Anemone, es, f.
Anisum, anicetum.
Malus, i,j.
Malrnns.
Malum.
Pomarium.
Armeniaca,
.Armeniacum,
Arbutus, i, j. .
Arbutum,
Cinara,
Cinarre strobflus,
Fraxlnus,
Fraxinens.
Fraxiniitum.
Asparagus.
Apiastrum.
Balsamum,
Arlena,
I-Iordeum.
Hordeaceus.
OcIIDum.
Faba.
Fagus. i,f.
Fageus, fagmus, fagi ..
[neus
18 Guide to Latin (kmocreation,
Beech-nut,
Beet-root,
Bind-weed,
Birch-tree,
Blite,
Borage,
Box-thorn,
Box-wood,
Of box-wood,
Place planted with
Brier, [box-wood,
. Thicket,
Broom,
Bulrush,
Of bulrush,
Full of bulrushes,
Place where bul-
[rushes grow,
Basket made of bul-
Cabbage, [rushes,
Camomile,
Carnation,
Cedar,
Centaury,
Cherry-tree,
Cherry,
Chervil,
Chestnut-tree,
Chestnut,
Chestnut-plot,
Chicory,
Cinnamon,
Cork-tree,
Fagea glans, j.; fagfna
Betaceus (pes). [nux,
Convolvulus.
Betula.
Blttum.
Buglossus, i, m.
Vepres, is, 'In.
Buxus, i, f.; buxum,
Buxeus.
Buxetum.
Rubus.
Rub-tum.
Genista, spartum,
J uncus, scirpus.
.Iunceus.
Juncosus.
J'uncetum.
Sporta.
Brassica, caulis, is, m ~
Anthernis, rdis,}:
Ocellus.
Cedrus, i, f.
Centaureum.
Cerasus, i, f.
Cerasum.
Cserefolium,
Castanea.
Castanea.
Castanetum.
Intuhua i, 'in.j
C a b ~ ~
Suber, eris, n,
i
Vocabnlary.
19
Of cork,
Corn,
Ear of corn,
The beard of corn,
Cress,
Cucumber,
Cumin,
Currant-bush,
Currant,
Cypress-tree,
Cytisus,
Darnel (or coole),
Date-tree,
Date,
Dog- berry-tree,
Dog-berry,
Ebony-tree,
Ebony,
Eglantine,
Elder-tree,
Of the elder-tree,
Elln,
Of elm,
Elm-seed,
Evergreen,
Of evergreen,
Place planted with
Fennel, [evergreens,
Fern,
Fern-plot,
Fig-tree,
Fig,
Flax,
Subereus,
Frumentum.
Spica.
Arista.
Nasturtium.
Cuciimis, is and el'is.
Cumi11urn.
Grossularia.
Grossulariss, acinus
Cupressus, uf.
Cytfsus, m. j.; cytlsum,
Lolium,
Palma,
Palmula.
Cornus, i, fl>
Cornum.
Ebenus.
Ebenum.
Oynosbatos, i, j.
Sambucus.
Sambiioaus.
Ulmus.
Ulmous.
Samera,
Ilex, Icis, j.
llignus, iligneus.
Llicetum.
Marathrus, marathrum
Filix, Icis, f.
Filictum.
Ficus, i, and US, f.
Ficus, i, and us, j.
Linum.
20 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Of flax,
Of fine flax,
Fumitory,
Furze, tamarisk,
Gall-nut,
Garlic,
Clove of garlic,
Hazel-tree,
Of hazel,
Hazel-nut,
Hellebore,
I-lemlock,
I-Iemp,
{-lolly,
House-leek,
Hyacinth,
Ivy,
Of ivy,
Seed of ivy,
Larch-tree,
Of the wood of the
Laurel, [larch,
Of laurel,
Place planted with
[laurel,
Crowned with laurel,
Lavender,
Leek,
Lemon-tree,
Lemon,
Lentil,
Lentisk,
Of lentisk,
Lettuce,
Lineus.
Carbaseus, carbaslnus.
Capnos, i, .f.
Myrica; myrice, es,!.
Galla.
Allium.
N ucleus alii, stica.
Corylus, i, f.
Colurnus.
Avellana,
Helleborum, veratrum..
Ciciita.
Cannabis, is, .f.; cannabus
Aquifolia, aquifalium.
Digitell urn.
I-lyacinthus.
I-Iedera.
Hederaceus,
Hederre acinus.
Larix, Icis, 'ire. j.
Larignus.
Laurus, i, and US, f.
Laurens, laurinus,
Lauretum.
Laureatus,
Saliunca.
Porrus, porruln, pl. pard.
Citrus, i, f.; citrea.
Citreum.
Lens, lentis, f.; lenticula.
Lentiscus.
Lentisctn us.
Lactfica.
Myrt6sus.
Myrta, orum, n. pt
Vocabula1"y.
Licorice, Glycyrrhiza.
Lily, Lilium,
Garden of lilies, Lilietum,
Bulb of the lily, Lilii bulbus.
Linden (or lime-tree), Tilia.
Lucern-grass, Modica,
Lupine, Lupinus. Iupinum,
Madder, Rubia.
Mallow, Malva.
Like to the mallow, Malvaceus.
Maple-tree, Acer, eris, n:
Marigold, Caltha.
Marjoram, Amaracus, i, m.].
Marsh-mallow, Althrea, hibiscum,
Medlar-tree, Mesptlus, i,j.
Fruit of medlar-tree, Mespllum.
Melon, Pepo, onis,m.
lVlillet, Milium.
Mistletoe, Viscum.
Moss, Muscus.
Mountain-ash, Sorbus.
Sorb apple, Sorbum,
Mulberry-tree, Morus, i, j.
Mulberry, Morum,
Mushroom, Fungus, boletus,
Myrrh, Myrrha.
Of myrrh, Myrrheus.
Grain of myrrh, Myrrhre globule,
Myrtle-tree, Myrtus, i, and u s ~ , J :
Place planted with Myrtetum.
[myrtle,
Full of myrtle.
Bays of myrtle,
21
22 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Nard,
Of nard,
Narcissus,
Nettle,
Oak,
Oak-grove,
Acorn,
ouve-tree,
Wild-oli ve,
Place planted with
Olive, [olive,
Onion,
Green-onion,
Orange-tree,
Orange,
Osier-tree,
Of the osier,
Osier-plot,
Palm,
Of palm,
Place planted with
Date, [palms,
Dried dates,
Parsley,
Pea,
Gray pea,
P each-tree,
Peach,
Pear-tree,
Pear,
Peony,
Periwinkle,
Pine,
Nardum, nardus, i,J'
.Nardlnus,
Narcissus, i, rna
Urtica.
Quercus.
Quercctum.
Glans, dis, f.
Olea, oli va,
Oleaster, tri, m.
Ol ivetum. '
Olea, oliva.
Csepa or CH'pe, n. indo
Cepula,
Aurea malus, i, j.
Aureum malum.
Vimen, Inis,
Vimineus.
Virninetum.
Palma, pamula,
Palmarius.
Palmetum.
Palma, palmula.
Patetre, arum,j: pl"
Apium.
Pisum,
Cicer, eris, n:
Persicus, i, f,
Persicum.
Pirus, i,f.
Pirum.
Pavonia.
Vinca pervinca,
Pinus, i, and us,/.
Vocabulary. 23
Of pine, . Pineus.
Place planted with Pinetum,
Pineapple, [pines, Pineal
Pistachio, Pistacium, pistaceum.
Plane-tree, Platanus, i, t:
Of a plane-tree, Plataninus,
Plum-tree, Prunus, u].
Prune, Prunum.
Pomegranate-tree, Punlca, or graniita malus,
Pomegranate, Granatum, [i, t
Pomegranate-flower, Balaustium.
Rind of pomegran- Mali pU111ci corium.
Poplar, [ate, Populus, i, f.
Of poplar, Populeus.
Place planted with Populetum,
Poppy, [poplars, Papaver.
Of poppy, Papavereus.
Stein of poppy, Scorpus papaveris.
. Prune, Prunum.
Pumpkin, Cucurbita,
'Radish, Rapum.
Bed of radish, Raplna,
Reed, Arundo, luis, j.
Reedy, Arundineus.
Place planted with Arundinetum,
Rice, [reeds, Oryza.
Rope-wood, Convolvulus.
Rose-laurel, Rhododaphne, es,!.
Rose-mary, Liban5tis, tdis, f-
Rye, Secale, is, n:
Sage, Salvia.
Sap-wood, Alburnum.
Service-tree, Serbus, i, f.
Walnut shell,
Vineyard,
Vine-dresser,
Tendril,
Leafy branch,
Of a branch,
Violet,
Viburnum,
Walnut-tree,
Walnut,
24 Guide to Latin Oonoereaiion;
Fruit of service-tree, Sorbum.
Sesamum, Sesamum,
Shallot, Ascalonia, ceepa,
Sorrel, Oxalis, tdis, f.
Stock-gillyflower, Leucoion, ii, n:
Strawberry, Fraga, orum, n: pl.
Sunflower, Heliotropium,
'I'amarind, 'I'amariee, es, j.
Thistle, Carduus,
Thicket, Rubetum,
Thorn, Spina.
Thyme, Thymum.
Of thyme, Thymlnus.
Truffle, Tuber, eris, n.
Turnip, Napus.
Twig, Vimen, tnis, n.
Vervain, Verbeniica,
Vetch, Vicia.
Of vetch, . Viciarius.
.Vine, Vitis, is,f.
Vine-branch, Sarmentum; palmes,
. [Itis, rn..
Vinetum, vitiarium,
Vinltor, oris, m;
Clavicula.
Pamptnus,
Pampineus,
Viela, ianthis,
Viburnum.
Nux, nucis,f.
Nux, nucis, j.; J uglans,
[andis.j"
Putamen, Inis, 11.
Vocabulary. 25
The two shells;
Kernel,
Gall-nut,
Wheat,
Wild thyme,
Wild vine, '
Flower of the wild
Willow-tree, [vine,
Of willow,
Wormwood,
Yew-tree,
Of the yew,
ANIMALS.
Adder,
Anchovy,
Ant,
Ape,
Asp,
, Ass,
Young ass,
Badger,
Bat,
Basilisk,
Bear,
Cub,
Beaver,
Ofa beaver,
Bee,
Swarm of bees,
Carinee, arum, J: pl.
Nucleus.
Galla.
'I'ritrcum.
Serpyllum, serpullum.
Labrusca.
CEnanthe, es,f.
Salix, Icis, [.
Salignus, saligneus.
Absinthum,
Taxus, uf.
Taxeus..
ANIMALIA.
Coluber, bri, m;
Aphya, apua; aphye.es.j,
Formica.
Simia, simius.
Aspis, Idis, J.
Asmus,
Asellus,
Meles, is, {.; taxa, 6nl." I.
Vespertilio, onis, 'In.
Basiliscus.
Ursa.
Drsre catulus.
Castor, oris, 7n.; libel', bri,
Fibrinus, castoreus. [me
Apis, is,j.
Apnm examen, Inis, 'fl.
26 (i!u,,;«e
Bee-hive,
Small bee,
Bison,
Blackbird,
Boar,
Buffalo,
Bug,
Bull,
Bustard,
Butterfly,
Calf
Cardel,
Of a camel,
Cantharides, .
Capon, •
Cat,
Caterpillar,
Ohaffinch,
Chameleon,
Chamois,
Ohicken,
Cock,
Comb of cock,
Colt,
She-colt,
Cow,
Crane,
Cricket,
Craw-fish,
Crocodile,
Crow,
Little crow,
Cuckoo,
to Latin Conversation.
I
Alveus, al vearium,
Aploula,
Bison, ontis, rn• .t'
Mertila,
Verres, is, 'in.
Urus.
Cimex, Icis, 'In.
Taurus.
Otis, rdis, f.
Papilia, onis, m;
Vitulus.
Camelus,
Camelinus,
Cantharis, Idis, j.
Capus; capo, onis, m:
Felis, or feles, is,j.
Eriica; carope, es, f.
Frigilla, fringilla,
Chamreleon, ontis . and'
Rupicapra. [onis, 'In.
Gallinaceus pullus,
Gallus.
Crista.
Equulus, equinus pullus.
Equula,
Vacca.
Grus, gruis, f.
Grillus, gryIlus,
Astaeus.
Crocodilus.
Oornix, Icis, j.
Cornicula,
OuciiIus and cucnlus,
Vocabulary. 27
Deer,
Diver,
Dog,
Pup,
Dolphin,
Dorce (gold-headed),
Dormouse,
Dove,
Drone-bee,
Duck,
Eagle,
Eaglet,
Eel,
Elephant,
Trunk,
Falcon,
Ferret,
Field-mouse,
Flea,
Fly,
Fox,
Frog,
Bush-frog,
Tadpole,
Gnat,
Goat,
Kid,
Of a goat,
Goat-house,
Wild-goat,
Goldfinch,
.Goose,
Grasshopper,
Dama, m.].
Mergus.
Canis, is, 'm.t
Catulus.
Delphinus; delphin, inis,
Aurata.' [1n.
Glis, gl iris, m;
Columba.
Fucus.
Anas, atis, f.
Aqutla,
Aqullte pullus.
Anguilla.
Elephantus; elephas, an..
Proboscis, ldis,}:' [tis, f
Falco, onis, m.
Viverra.
Nitedula, nitela,
Pulex, leis, m;
Musca.
Vulpes, is, f-
Rana.
Rubeta,
Gyrinus,
Culex, Ieis, m.
Capra, capella.
I-Ioedus.
Caprinus,
Caprile, is, n.
Capreolus.
Carduelis, is, f-
Ansel', eris, m..
Cicada.
28 Guide to Latin Conversation:
Greyhound,
Gudgeon,
I-Ialycon,
Hare,
Young hare,
Hedgehog,
He-goat,
Of a he-goat,
Heifer,
Hen,
Water-hen,
Turkey-hen,
Hind,
I-Iog,
Little hog,
Hornet,
Horse,
Mane,
Horse-fly,
lIydra,
Jackdaw,
Kite,
Lamb,
Kid,
Lap-wing,
Lark,
Leech,
Leopard,
Lion,
Lioness,
Young lion,
Lizard,
Locust,
Vertagus,
Gobio, onis, m.; gabius
Alcyon; alcedo, Inis, f.
Lepus, oris, m,
Lepuscnlus.
Herinaceus, herici us.
Caper, capri, m.; hircus.
Hircinus,
Juvenca.
Gallina,
Fultca,
Fulix, Icis, j.
Cerna.
Porcus, 'In.; sus, suis, m. j
Porcellus,
Crabro, onis, m:
Equus,
.Iuba,
Asilus, cestrus,
Hydrus,
Graculus,
Milvus.
Agnus.
Agnellus.
Upupa,
Alauda.
.Hirudo, Inis, f.
Pardus.
Leo, onis, m. j.
Lerena,
Le6nis cattilus,
Lacertus, lacerta.
Locusta.
29
Vocabulary.
Galbula$
Pediculus.
Lynx, cis, m.];
Scomber, bri, m;
Pica.
Equa.
Ictis, rdis, f.
Cypselus, cypsellus.
.£salon, onis, m,
Talpa, m.].
Simia, simius,
Tinea.
Sorex, Icis, m:
Mulus.
Mula.
Mullus, barb us.
Mura-na.
Struthiocamelus,
Lutra.
Bubo, onis, 111,.
Noctua.
Strix, strigis, f.
Bubo, onis, m, f
Bos, bovis, m.].
Cornu, US, n, pl.; cornua.
Ostrea, ostreum,
Ostrearium.
Panthera,
Psittacus.
Perdix, icis, m. j.
Perdicis pullus.
Paro, onis, m.
Pelicanua
Lariat,
Louse,
Lynx,
Mackerel,
Magpie,
Mare,
Marten,
Martinet,
Merlin,
Mole,
Monkey,
Moth,
Mouse,
Mule,
She mule,
Mullet,
Murrena,
Ostrich,
Otter,
Owl,
Screech-ow1,
White-owl,
Horned-owl,
Ox,
IIoI'n,
Oyster,
Oyster-bank,
Panther,
Parrot,
Partridge,
Young partridge,
Peacock,
Pelican,
f
30 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Pheasant,
Pig,
Pigeon,
Pike,
Polypus,
Pony,
Porcupine,
Porpoise,
Quail,

Rail,
Ram,

Raven,
Rhinoceros:
Ring-dove,
Of a ring-dove,

Hock-dove,
Salamander,
Salmon,
Sardine,
Scarabee,
Scolopendra,
Scorpion,
Serpent,
Sheep,
Snail,
Sow,
Sparrow,
Sparrow-hawk,
Spider,
Small spider,
J
. Phasiana (avis).
Porcus; sus, suis, m. f.
Columba, columbus.
Lucius.
Polypus.
Mannus.
Hystrix, tcis, j.
Tursio, onis, 'In.
Coturnix, leis, j.
Cuniculus.
Glottis, Idis, f.
Aries, etis, m.
Mus, 111uris, m.
Corvus.
Rhinoceros, otis, m;
Palurnbes, is,j.
Palumbinus,
Rubell io, onis,.f.
Palumbes, is, m. f.
Salamandra.
Salmo, onis, m.
Sardina, sarda,
Scarabreus.
Scolopendra mul ti
Scorpio, onis, ?n.; scorpius
Serpens, entis, 111.•/
Ovis, is, [.
Cochlea.
Sus, suis, j.; porca.
Passer, eris, passel'
Acci prter, tris, m. [ctilus
Araneus, aranea.
Araneolus, araneola.
Vocabulary.
31
Squirrel,
Stag,
Of a stag,
Doe,
To unharbor a stag,
Starling,
Stork,
Swallow,
Swan,
Tarantula,
Teal,
Tench,
Thrush,
Tiger, tigress,
Titlark,
TItmouse,
Toad,
'I'ortoise,
Trout,
Thunny,
Turbot,
Turtle,
Viper,
Vulture"
Wagtail?
Wasp,
Weasel,
Whale,
Wild boar,
Wolf,
She-wolf,
Cub,
Woodeook,
Seiurus,
Cervus,
Cervinus.
Hinnuleus, hinntilus,
· Excitare cervum.
Sturnus.
Ciconia,
Hirundo, Inis, f.
OIOf? oris, m.; cycnus,
Phalangium.
Querqued ula,
Tinea.
Turdns.
Tigris, is, or Idis, m. fa
Ficedula.
£glthus.
Bufo, onis, m.
Testiido, Inis, f.
Tructus, trueta,
Thynnus, thunnus.
Rhombus.
Turtur, uris, m:
Vipera,
, Vultur, uris, m.
Motacilla.
Vespa.
Mustela,
Baleena,
Aper, pri, m;
Lupus.
Lupa.
Lupee catulus,
Rusticiila.
32 Guide to Latin Oonversationo
Woodlouse,
Woodfretter,
Woodpecker,
Worm,
Small worm,
Earth worm,
Tape worm,
Silk worm,
Grub worm,
Wren,
CRIES OF ANIMAr.s,
Ass brays,
Bat whizzes,
Bear gTuni$,
Bee buzzes,
Blackbird whistles,
Bull bellows,
Camel,
Chicken pips,
Cockcrows,
Crow crooks;
Cuckoo sings,
Dog burke,
Elephant 1'Oa1'S,
Fox yelps,
Frog croaks,
Goat bleats,
Multipcda. .
Oossus ; teredo, Inis, t
Picus.
Vermis, is, m.
Verrnicnlus.
Lumbricus.
T ~ n i a .
B0111byx, ycis, m;
Necydalus.
Trochtlus, regaliolus,
7.
VOCES ANIMALIUM.
Rudere, oncare,
Stridere.
Gemerc, srevire
EOlubiHire) b 0 In bit are, '
[susuriire, strepere, stri-
[dere.
Balbutire, canere,
Mugire.
Blateriire,
Pipire.
Cucurire, canere.
Grilliire, stridere.
Cuculfire.
Latrare, baubari, ul uliire,
Barrire, stridere,
Gannire.
Coaxiire, garrire, blater.ire
Baliire, belare.
,-.- - - - - - . - ~ - -
33 Vocabulary.
Goose gabbles, Clangere, strepere,
Grasshopper chirp«, Fripinnire, stridere, ca-
[nere, clamare,
Ifawk screeches, shrieks, Pipare, clamiire.
Ifen cackles, Glocire, glocitare, pipiire.
Jackdaw cajoles, Friguliire,
"-
Kid, Vagire.
Kite cries, Jugere.
Lamb bleats, Baliire, beliire.
Leopard mews; Rictare,
Lion roars, Rug'ire, rudcre, frendere.
Locust chirps, Stridere.
Monkey chatters, Stridere,
Mouse squeaks, Ocoinerc.
Nightingale uiarblee, Garrire, canere.
Owl hoots, Bubnliire, uIuEire
.,
Ox bellows, Boiirc, mugire,
I
Partridge eriee, Cacabare, can ere.
Pig grunts, Grunnire, quirritiire,
(
Rabbit squeals, Vagire.
Rat equeaks. Mintrire.
Screech owl hoots, UluHire.
Serpent hisses, Sibiliire, stridere.
Sparrow pil es, Pipilare, gannire.
Stag bells, Rudere,
Swallow chirp«, Fritinire.
Swan sinos, Canere.
Tiger growls, Rauciire, ranciire
Turtle-dove si[jlt.'1, Gemere.
Weasel, Dintrire.
Wild-boar s177ljJlrp, Frendere.
werr hoiole, Ululare,
Wood-pigeon COO8, Gemere.
3
34 Guide toLatin OonversatioTh.
8.
PARTS OF THE HUMAN
BODY.
PARTES CORPORIS
HUMANI.
Arm,
Arm-pit,
Artery,
Back,
Beard,
Belly,
Bile,
Bladder,
Blood)
Bone,
Bosom,
Brain,
Breast,
Calf of the leg,
Cartilage,
Cheeks,
Chin,
Diaphragm,
Down,
Ear
Ear-pick,
Elbow,
Entrails,
Eye,
Eye-lid,
Eye-lashes,
Eye-ball,
Eye-brows,
Brachium, lacertus,
Axilla, ala.
Arteria.
Dorsum.
I Barba.
Alvus, i, f.
Bilis, is, j.
Vesica.
Sanguis, Inis, m;
Os, ossis, n.
Sinus, us, m.
Cerebrum.
Pectus, oris, n.
Sura.
Cartilago, Inis, f.
Genre, arum, f. pt,
Mentum.
Pnecordia, arum" f.. pl.
Pilus.
Auris, is, f.
Auriscalpium.
Cubrtns, cubttum.
Exta; viscera, rt.:Y, n: pl.
Oculus.
Palpebra.
Cilia, arum, n, pl.
Pupilla.
'no pl.
35 l{ocabulary.
Nictare.
Digitus.
Pollex, Ieis, m.
Index, Icis, m. j.
Medius.
Annularis.
Auricularis.
Ilia, ilium, n: pl.
Caro, carnis, j.
Pes, pedis.
Planta.
Fel, fell is, n.
Guttur, uris, n.; jugulum.
Gustus, us, m.
Capillus; crinis, is, m.
Coma; ceesaries, ei, J.
Poples, Itis, m.
Manus.
..:-dextera.
-Iaeva, sinistra,
Palma.
Pugnus.
Palma, vola.
Caput, Itis, 11.
Vertex, tcis, m:
Occipitium, ii, n.
Sinclput, ltis, n.
Auditus, us, m,
Cor, cordis, n.
Cal x, cis, f.
Coxendix, Icis, f.
Intestina, arum, n. pl.
Maxilla, mala.
To wink,
Finger,
Thumb,
Index-finger,
Middle-finger,
Ring-finger,
Little-finger,
Flanks.
Flesh,
Foot,
Sole of foot,
Gall,
Gullet,
Taste,
I-Iair,
Hair of the head,
Ham-string,
I-Iand,
Right-hand,
Left-hand,
Open-hand,
Closed-hand,
Palm ofhand,
I-Iead,
Top of head,
Hind part of head,
Front part of head,
I-Iearing,
I-Ieart,
Heel,
Hip,
Intestines,
.Jaw,
36 Guide to Latin Conoersaiion:
Renes, urn, n: pl.
Genu, us, n.; pl. gell ua.
Gremium.
Crus, uris, n,
Labrum, labium, (gener-
[ally) labra, labia,
[arum, n, pl.
Superius.
Inferius.
Medulla.
Medulla e dorsa.
Lac, lactis, n.
"Bucca; as, oris, n.
Musculus.
Muscus.
Unguis, is, m;
UmbilICUS.
Collum; cervix, ids, f.
Nervus.
Nasus,
Nares, ium, f. 1)1.
Corrugiire nares.
Vibrissae, arum, f. pl.
Palatum,
Pituita.
Costa.
Saliva. [J ld.
Humerus, scapulae, liru m,
Omoplatae, arum, l p',
Latus, eris, 1/.
Calva.
Odoriitus, lIS, 711.
SpUtUlTI.
Spuere.
Kidneys,
Knee,
Lap,
Leg,
Lip,
Upper-lip,
Under-lip,
Marrow,
Spinal-marrow,
Milk,
Mouth,
Muscle,
Mucus,
Nail,
Navel,
Neck,
Nerve,
Nose,
Nostrils,
'I'o curl up the nose,
1rail' of nostrils,
Palate
Phleg:n,
Rib,
Saliva,
Shoulder,
Shoulder- blades,
Side,
Skull,
Smell, '
Spittle,
To spit,
Vocabulary. 37
Sweat,
Tear,
Temple,
Thigh, hip,
Outward thigh,
Inward thigh,
Throat,
Toe (great),
Tongue,
Tooth,
Incisors,
Molars,
To clean the teeth,
To pick the teeth,
Tooth-pick,
Touch,
Windpipe,
Wrinkle,
Vein,
Vertebra,
Visage, face,
The sight,
Sudol', oris, n.
Lacrtma ; lacrlmae, arum,
. [pl. plural used.
Tempus, oris, n. used in pl.
Coxa.
Femen, inus., Inis, n:
Femur, oris, n.
Fauces, cium, f. pl.
Pollex, lcis,m.
Lingua.
Dens, tis, m.
Dentes primores,
Dentes maxillares.
Pergiire dentes.
Perfodere dentes.
Dentiscalpiurn.
Tactus, us, m,
Gula, stomachus,
Ruga.
Vena:
Vertebra.
Vultus, us, '111.; facies, e.i, f.
Visus, US, m,
9.
Abscessus, us,nL ;.vomlcn.
Alopecia.
Apoplexia,
QUALITIES AND DE- DOTES ET VITIA. CORPOR-
FECTS OF 'l'HE HU- IS HUMANI; MORB:,
MAN BODY; DISEASES, MORS.
WOUNDS, DEATH.
Abscess,
Alopecy,
Apoplexy,
38 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Aposteme,
Asthma,
Baldness,
B a l d ~ e a d e d ,
Bandy-legged,
Beauty,
Blearedness,
Blear-eyed,
Blindness,
Blindman,
Blow,
Boil,
Bow-legged,
Bump, hump,
Cancer,
Catarrh,
Chilblain,
Club-foot,
Cold,
To have a cold,
Colic,
To suffer from colic,
Contusion,
Convulsion,
Corpse,
Cough,
To cough,
Crippled, lame,
Crisis,
Cut,
Aposteme, ntis, n.
Anhelatio, onis, f.
Cal vities, ei, j.
Calvus.
Valgus.
Pulchritiido, luis, I-: de"
[cor, oris, m.; venustas,
[atis, f.
Gramia; lema.
Lippus, gramiosus,
Caecttas, atis,f.
Caecus.
Ictus, US, m.; plaga,
Furunculus.
Varus.
Gibbus, i, m.; tuber, eris, n:
Cancer, cri, and eeris, m.
Epiphora.
Pernio, onis, m:
Scaurus.
Epiphora.
Tusses concoquere,
Intest'ini morbus.
Ex intestine Iaboriire,
Contusio; suggillatio,
ranis, j.
Convulsio, ouis, f.
Cadaver, eris, n.
Tussis, is, f.
'I'ussire,
Claudus.
Crisis, is, f.
Caesio; incisio, ouis, /.
Vocabulary. 39
Dandruff,
Deafness,
Deaf,
Death,
Deformity,
Deformed,
Diarrhoea,
Dislocation,
Dislocated,
Dropsy,
Dropsical,
Dumb,
Dwarf,
Dysentery.
Epilepsy,
Eruption, rash,
- on the face,
Erysipelas,
Feebleness,
Feeble,
Fever,
Fistula,
Flat-nosed,
Freckle, mole,
Gangrene,
Gaping,
To gape,
Gargling,
To gargle,
(tout,
- in the hands,
- in the feet.
Porrigo, Inis, j.
Surdttas, [tis, j.
Surdus.
Mol's, rtis, f.; obttus, US, m,
Deformltas; fcedttas, atis,
Deformis, foedus. [f.
Diarrhrea,
Luxatiira.
Luxatus,
Hydrops, 6pi13, rll.; hydro
[pfsis, is,].
Hydroprcus,
Mutus, elinguis,
Pumilio, onis, m.
Dysenteria. [bus.
Comltialis ; sontfous mor-
Impetigo, lnis,.f.
Ortigo, Inis, f.
Erysipelas, atis, n. [f.
Debilitas ; infirmltas, atis,
Debllis, 'infirmus.
Febris, is, f.
Fistula.
Simus,
Naevus.
Gangraena,
Oscitatio, onis, f.
Oscitiire.
Gargarizatio, onis; j.
Gargarizare,
Arthritis, tdis, f.; articu-
[lorum dolor.
Chiragra.
Podagra.
40 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Headache,
Health,
-good,
-bad,
Hemorrhage,
Hemorrhoids,
Hunch-backed,
Hunger,
Indigestion,
Jaundice,
Leanness,
Lean,
Leper,
Leprous,
Lethargy,
Mucus,
Mutilated,
Obesity,
Obese,
One-handed,
Ophthalmia,
Ozoena, affected with,
Palpitation,
Paralysis,
Pest,
Pleurisy,
Phthisis,
Quinsy,
RheuInatis Ill,
Scab, itch,
Scabby,
Sciatica,
Hemicranium.
Valetiido, luis, f.
-:- bona, secunda; santtas,
[iitis, .1:
- infirma, incommoda,
Haemorrhagia, [,
Hyrnorrhois, Idis, f.
Gibbus; gibber, era, erum.
Fames, is, t-
Crudftas, atis, f.
Icterus, i, m,
Macies, ei,.f.
Macer, era, crum,
Lepra.
Leprosus,
Lethargus, i, m.
lVI ucus, i, m.
'I'runcus.
Obesttas, ntis, j.
Obesus,
Mancus.
Lippitiido, Inis, f.
Fetldae naris homo, Inis
Palpitatio, onis, f.
Paralysis, IS, f.
Pestis, iR,./.; pestilentia.
Pleuritis, Idis, [.
Phthisis, is,).
Angina.
Rheumatismus.
Scabies, ei, f.
Scabi6sus..
Ischias, adis, f.
Vocabulary. 41
Sneezing,
To sneeze,
Snivel,
Sob,
Spasm,
Squin1t-eyed,
Stature,
Strength,
Strong,
'Thirst,
Tumor,
Ulcer,
Varix,
Vertigo,
Vomiting,
To vomit,
Wart,


\Vound,
APPAREL OF MEN
AND OF WOMEN.
Apron,
Belt,
Binding,
Bonnet,
Small bonnet,
Sternutamentum.
Sternuere,
Stiria.
Singultus, us, m.
Spasma, atis; '11.; spasmus.
Strabo, onis, 1n.; luscus.
Statura, '
Robur, oris, n.; vires, ium,
[1. pl.; fortitude, Inis, l
Firmus, valfdus.
Sitis, is, t. [eris, 17.
Tumor, oris, m.; tuber,
Ulcus, eris, n,
Varix, leis,.f. 'J11.
Vertigo, Inis, f.
Vomitio, onis, f.; vomf-
. [tus, us, m;
Vomere.
Verruca.
Ganglion, ii, n.; panus.
Paronychia, arum, n. pl.
Plaga.
10.
VESTES VIRILES ET
MULIEBRES.
Vestiarium.
Cingulum, zona.
Limbus, fimbria.
})ileus, pileum.
Pileolus.
42 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Boot,
Box,
Bracelet,
Buskin,
Button,
Button-hole,
Cap,
Rim of,
To take off;
To put on,
Chain,
Small chain,
Clasp,
To clasp,
Cloak,
Weather-cloak)
Cloth,
- of gold,
coarse cloth,
Clothing:
To clothe,
Comb,
To comb,
Distaff,
To spin,
Spindle,
Ear-rings,
Egrett,
Fan,
Flax,
Fringe,
Gaiter,
Ocrea.
Theca.
Armilla.
Cothurnus,
G10bnl us; glans, dis. f.
Fissura, rimula.
Petasus.
Petasi marglnes, f pl.
Caput aperire.
Caput operire.
Catena.
Carella,
Fibula, uncinus.
Infibulare.
Pallium. [via.
Pentila, Iacerna, implu-
Pannus.
......,.. aureus.
- crassus, vilis,
Vestis, is, f.; vesntus, us,
[m.; vestimentum.
Vestire.
Pecten, mis, '11.
Pectere.
Colus, us, and i, j.
Nere.
Fusus.
I naures, ium, f. pl.
Crista.
Flabellum.
Linum,
Fimbria.
Pero, onis, m.
Vocabulary. 43
Periseelis, Idis, f.
Digitalia, ium, n.; mant-
[cae, arum, j.
Linteolum,
Emungere,
Galea.
Gemma, lapillus.
Nodus.
Nodare,
Linteum.
Tela.
. Speculum. [no
Torques, is) 111.; monile, is,
- baccatum.
- gemmiitum,
Acus, 11s,f.
Acia, re,f.
Laeerna.
Femoralia, arum, n. pl.
Acicula, spinametalltca,
Sin us, us, m.
Perula.
Crumena, marsupium.
Vi tta, taenia.
Annulus.
Annuli pala. [liebris.
Vestis, is, m.; toga mu-
Sandaliumvsolea.
Forfex, Icis, j.
Forficilla.
Tndusiurn, subucula.
Calceus, calceamentum.
Bornbyx, ycis, m.; sertcum.
Garter
Glove.
Handkerchief,
To blow one's nose,
Hehuet,
Jewel,
Knot,
To knot,
Linen,
Linen-cloth
Mirror,
Necklace,
--- of pearls,
- of precious stones,
Needle,
Needleful,
Overcoat,
Pantaloons,
Pin,
Plait,
Pocket,
Purse,
Ribbon,
Ring,
Bezel of ring,
Robe,
Sandal,
Scissors,
Small scissors,
Shirt,
Shoe,
Silk,
44 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Sleeve,
Slipper,
Spindle,
Spur,
Starch,
Stocking,
Veil,
Waistcoat,
Wig,
Wool,
OF THE SOUL.
Mantee, manulea.
Crepfda. '
Fusus.
Calcar, aris, ?1..
.A.. mylum, amulum.
Tibifile, is, n,
VelU111.
Brevior subuctila.
G-alericulnm.
Lana.
11..
DE ANIMA.
QUALITIES AND DE.. VIRTUTES ET vrriA
FECTS OF THE INrrELLI- JUDICII, VOLUNTA'rIS;
GENCE, OF THE WILI-l; MorruS ANIMI.
THE PASSIONS.
Affability,
Affable,
Ambition,
Ambitious,
Anger,
Angry,
To get angry,
Anxiety,
Arrogance,
Arrogant,
Assassination,
Assassin,
Audacity.
Affabilltas, comltas, atis,!
Affabflis, COITlis.
Ambitio, onis, f.
Ambitiosus, avfdus,
J ra, iracundia.
Iriitus.
Irasci, tumere.
Anxietas, atis, f.
.A.rrogantia.
Arrogans, antis.
Caedes, is, f.
Sicarius.
Audacia.--
Vocabulary. 45
I
I
Audacious,
To dare,
Avarice,
Avaricious,
Babbling,
Babbler,
Barbarity,
Barbarous,
Benevolence,
Benevolent,
Benignity,
Benign,
Bravery,
Brave,
Calumny,
Calumniator, '
To calumniate,
Candor,
Candid,
Character,
Chastity,
Chaste,
Cheerfulness,
Cheerful,
Circumspection,
Circumspect,
Civility,
Civil,
Cleanliness,
Clean,
Compassion,
Compassionate,
To have compassion.
Audax, acis.
Audere.
A.varitia.
Aviirus. [atis, f
Loquacttas, garrulltas,
Loquax, acis; garrnlus.
Barbaria, barbaries, ei, f.
Barbarus.
Beneficentia, Iiberalttas.
Benefrcus.
Benignitas, atis, f.
Benignus.
Fortitiido, Inis, f.
Strenuus, animosus.
Obtrectatio, onis, f.
Obtrectator, oris; m.
obtrectare.
Candor, orip, m,
Candrdus.
Tndoles, is, f. [oris, m.
Castttas, atis, f.; pudor,
Castus, pudicus,
Alacrttas, atis, f.
AIacer, cris, ere.
Circumspectio, onis, f.
Consideratus, cautus,
Urbanttas, atis, f.
Urbanus, eomis. [tia.
Mundities, ei, f; mundi-
Mundus. [onis, f.
Miseratio, commiseratio
Miserrcors. ordis,
Miserere. '
46 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Confidence,
Confident,
To have confidence,
Constancy,
Constant,
Continence,
Continent,
Courage,
Courageous,
To be courageous,
Cruelty,
Cruel,
Deceit, trickery,
Deceitful,
To deceive,
Decency,
Decent,
Despair,
To despair,
Diligence,
Diligent,
Displeasure, vexation,
Docility,
Docile,
Drunkenness,
Drunk,
Given to drink,
Emulation,
Emulous,
Envy,
Envious,
To envy,
Extortion,
Extortioner,
Fiducia, confidentia.
Confidens, entis.
Confidere,
Constantia.
Constans, antis.
Continentia.
Continens, entis,
Audacia.
Audax, acis,
Andere.
Crudelttas, atis, f. saevitia.
Crudelis, saevus.
Dolus, fallacia.
Fraudulentus, subdolus,
Fallere.
Decentia, 'decorum.
Decens, entis; decorus,
. Desperatio, onis, f.
Desperiire, . U.
Diligentia, festinatio, onis,
Diligens, entis; festinus.
Molestia, aerumna,
Docilttas, a t i s , . t ~
DOCllis, facflis.
Ebrietas, vinolentia.
Ebrius, vinolentus,
EbriosHas, atis, f.
Aemulatio, onis,.f.
Aemulus,
Invidia, livor, oris: m;
Irivfdus,
Irrvidere.
Peoulatus, US, m.
Peculator, oris, m.
Vocabulary. 47.
Extravagance,
Extravagant,
To be extravagant,
Faith,
Fear,
Fearful,
To fear,
Fidelity,
Faithful,
Finesse,
Astute,
Flattery,
Flattering,
Flatterer,
To flatter,
Folly, insanity,
Fool,
Fraud,
Friendship,
Friend,
Fury,
Furious,
Generosity,
Generous,
Gentility,
Genteel,
Glory,
Glorious,
Gluttony,
Gluttonous,
Goodness,
Good,
Deliratio, onis, f.
Desipiens, entis; delirus.
Delirare.
Fides, ei, f. [m.
Timor, oris, m.; metus, lIS,
'I'imtdus, pavrdus,
Timere, metuere.
Fides, ei, f.
Fidus, fidelis,
Astutia, callidftas, atis, f.
Astutus, callfdus,
Adulatio, onis, r.
Adulatorius.
Adulator, oris, m.
Adulari, blandiri.
Insama, dementia.
Insanus, dernens, entis.
Fraus, dis, j ~
Amicitia.
Amicus.
Furor, oris, m.
Furens, entis; furiosus.
Munificentia, Iiberalrtas,
[atis,l
Munifrcus. [atis, [,
Lepos, oris, m.; ven ustas,
Leptdus, venustus.
Gloria.
Glori6sus.
Gula,
Gul6sus.
Bonl'tas, atis, f
Bonus.
Immortality,
Immortal,
Impatience,
Impatient,
Importunity,
Importunate,
Imposture,
Imposter,
48 Guide to Lat1:n Oonversation.
Gravity, Gravltas; severttas, atis,}.
Grave, Gravis, scverus,
Haste, eagerness, Festinatio; properatio,
Hasty, Festiniitus. [on is, .f
To hasten, Festinare, properiire.
Hatred, Odium.
IIateful, Invisus,
To hate, Odisse,
Homicide, murder, Homicidium, caedes, is,.f
Homicide, murderer. Hornicida, ae, 'In.
To kill, Neciire, interficere.
Honor, Honor, oris, 'In.
Honorary, Honorariu«.
Honorable, Honorabtlis.
Honorific, HonorifIcus,
To honor, Honorare,
Hope, Spes, spei,./:
Humanity, Humanttas, iitis, f.
Humane, Humiinus.
Ignorance, 'Ignorantia.
Ignorant, Ignarus,
'I'o be ignorant, Ignoriire, nescire,
Immodesty, Immodestia, in verecundia.
Immodest, Irnmodestus, in verecun..
I [dus,
Irnmortalftas, atis, r.
Immortalis.
Irnpatientia,
Impatiens, ends.
I mportunitas, molestia,
Gravis, molestus,
Fraus, fraudis.j. j fallacia,
Deceptor, oris, 'In.
Vocabulary.
Imprudence,
Imprudent,
Impudence,
Impudent,
Incivility,
Uncivil,
Inconstancy,
Inconstant,
Incontinency,
Incontinent,
Indecency,
Indecent,
Indignation,
Indignant, [nant,
To become indi,g-
Industry,
Industrious,
Infidelity.
Unfaithful,
Ingenuousness,
Ingenuous,
Ingratitude,
Ungrateful;
Inhumanity,
Inhuman,
Injustice,
Unjust,
Innocence,
Innocent,
Insolence,
Insolent,
4
Imprudentia.
Inconsultus.
Impudentia.
Irnpudens, entis.
I nul' banltas, rusticltas.
Inurbanus, rusticanus.
Inconstantia,levitas, atis,.t:
Inconstans, antis; levis,
Incontinentia. [mobllis.
Incontinens, entis; in ..
[temperans, antis.
Indecorum.
Indecorus, inverecundus,
Indignatio, onis, [.
Indignus.
Indigniiri.
Industria, solertia.
Industrius, solers, ertis,
Infidelrtas, atis, f.
Infidus, infldelis.
Ingenuttas, atis, f.
I ngenuus, candidus.
Ingratus antmus.
Ingratus,
Inhumanltas, atis,.f.
Inhumiinus, durus.
Injustitia, iniqurtas, atis, f.
Injustus, iniquus.
Innocentia. [ontis.
Innocens, entis; insons,
Insolentia, arrogantia.
Insolens, entis; petnlans,
(antis.
50. Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Intelligence,
Intelligent,
To understand,
Intemperance,
Intemperate,
Jealousy,
Jealous,
To be jealous of,
Joke,
A joker,
Jesting,
To joke.
Joy,
Joyful,
To be joyful,
Judgment,
Justice,
Just,
To judge,
Larceny,
Laziness,
Lazy,
Levity,
Light,
Liberality,
Liberal,
Liberty,
Free,
To free,
Lie,
Liar,
Love,
To love,
Ingenium, intelligentia.
I 11telligens, entis.
111telligere,
Intemperantia.
Intemperans, antis.
Invidia, obtrectatio, onis,},
Irrvfdus.
Irrvidcre.
Cavillatio; onis, f.
Nugax, iicis ; nugiitor,
Nugatorius,joculatorius.
Cavillare.
Laetitia, gaudium.
Laetus; gaudens, entis.
Laetari, gaudere,
Mens, entis, f.; judicium.
Justitia, aequltas, atis, f.
Justus, aequus.
Judicare.
Furtum.
Pigritia; segnities, ei, j.
Piger, segnis.
Levitas, iitis, j.
Levis.
Liberalttas, ntis, f,
Liberalis.
Libertas, ntis, f
Liber, .era, erum.
Liberare.
Mendacium.
Mendax, iicis
Amor, oris, m;
Amare,
Vocabulary. 51
..
Magnanimous,
Magnificence,
Magnificent,
Malice,
Malignant,
Massacre,
To massacre,
Mercy,
Merciful,
Mockery,
Mocker,
To mock,
Moderation,
Moderate,
Modesty,
Modest,
Negligence,
Negligent,'
To neglect,
Obedience,
Obedient,
To obey,
Oblivion,
Oblivious,
To forget,
Obstinacy,
Obstinate, head..
[strong,
Pain,
Doleful,
Painful,
To suffer,
Magnantmus. [oris, ~ n .
Magnificentia, splendor,
Magniflcus, splendtdus,
Malitia; malignltas, atis,j:
Malignus, malitiosus.
Caedes, is,j.; strages, is, j.;
[occisio, onis, f.
Occidere. [onie, j:
Misericordia, miseratio,
Misertcors, ordis.
Irrisio, onis, j:; ludibrium.
Derisor ; irrisor, oris, m,
Deriders.
Moderatio, onis, j.; modus.
Moderatus, temperatus,
Modestia.
Modestus.
Negligentia, incuria.
Indillgens; negltgens,
Negligere, [entis.
Obedientia.
Obediens, entis.
Obedire.
Oblivium ~ obli vio, onis, f.
Obliviosus,
Oblivisci.
Obstinatio, onis, j.
Pertfnax ; pervtcax,
[ficis ; obstinatus,
Dolor, oris, m;
Dolens, entis.
Acerbus, gravis.
Pati, dolere,
52 Guide toLatin Ikmoereoiion:
Parricide,
A parricide,
Parsimony,
Thrifty,
Passion,
Passionate,
Patience,
Patient,
Perfidy,
Perfidious,
Piety,
Pious,
Pride,
Proud,
Probity,
IIonest,
Prodigality,
Prodigal,
Propriety, '
Proper,
Prudence,
Prudent,
Punishment,
Rage,
Enraged,
Raillery,
Banterer,
Religion,
Religious,
Respect,
Respectable,
Parricidiurn,
Paruicida, matricide,
Parcimonia.
Parcus.
Anfrni motus; affectus.
Irnpotens, entis; cu-
Patientia. [ptdus,
Patiens, entis,
Perfidia; infidelttas, a t i s , . ~
Perffdus.
Pietas, ntis, f.
Pius.
Superbia..
Snperbus.
Probttas, atis, j.
Probus.
Effusa Iiberalftas, atis, f . ~
[effusio, 011 is, j: \
Prodtgus. \
Mundities, ei,j.; munditia,
Mundus,
Prudentia.
Prudens, cautus,
Pcena.
Rabies, ei, j.
Rabtdue, rabiosus.
J ocatio; cavillatio, onis,.f.
Joculator, cavilliitor.
Religio, onis, j.
Religiosus, pius.
Reverentia ; observant i»,
[veneratio, on is,
Venerandus.
Vocabulary. , 5&
Respectful,
Robbery,
Robber,
Ruse,
Subtle,
8acrilege,
Sacrilegious,
Sadness,
Sad,
Sanctity,
Holy,
Sedition,
Seditious,
Silliness,
Silly,
Simplicity,
Simple,
Slander,
Slanderer,
To slander,
Softness,
Soft,
Temerity,
Rash,
Temperance,
Temperate,
'I'emperance in
Terror, '{drinking,
Terrible,
To be afraid,
Theft,
Reverens, entis,
Latrocinium.
Latro, prredo, "onis, m.
Dolus; astus, US, m,.; calli-
[dttas, atis, f
Callidus, astiitus.
Sacrilegium.
Sacrilegus,
Tristitia.
Tristis.
Sanctltas, litis, j.
Sanctns.
Seditio, onis, j.
Seditiosus,
Ineptire, arum, j. pl.
Insulsus, ineptus,
Simpllcftas, atis, f.
Simplex, Icis, [onis, f
Maledictio.; obtreetatio,
Obtrectiitor, oris, m.;
[maledicns
Maledicere.
Mollitia.; mollities, ei, f
Mollis.
'I'emerttas, atis, j.
'I'emorarius,
Temperantia.
Temperans, antis.
Sobrietas, atis, f.
Terror, 6ris,111.
'I'erribflis.
Pavere, timere.
Furtum.
r
54 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
I
II
I
Thief,
To steal,
Thought,
Timidity,
Timid,
Trickery,
Deceitful,
Tyranny,
Tyrannical,
Wickedness,
Wicked,
Wisdom,
Wise,
Valor,
Valiant,
Vigilance,
Vigilant,
To be vigilant,
OF A CITY AND OF
ITS PARTS.
Abbey,
Academy,
Arsenal,
Arms,
Ba1l
1
Boar-spear,
Bow,
Fur, furis, m:
Furiiri.
Cogitatio, onis, j.; senten-
[tia, consilium.
Timidltas, atis, f.
Timldus.
Fallacia.
Fallax, acis.
Tyrannis, Idis, j.
Tyrannlcus. [f
Improbltas, pravltas, atis,
Malus, improbus,
Sapientia, prudentia.
Sapiens; prudens, entis,
Fortitiido, Inis, j.; virtus,
Fortis, strenuus. Lf.
Vigilantia, sedulttas, ati'":,
Vigllans, antis; sedulus
Vigllare.
12.
DE CIVITATE EJUSQUE
PARTIBUS.
Abbatia.
Academia.
Armamentarium.
Arma, arum, -n. pl.
Glans, dis, .f.; globus.
Venabulum.
Arcus, US, m;
Vocabulary. 55
Buckler,
Cannon,
Cuirass,
Dart, arrow,
Helmet,
Javelin,
Lance,
Pike, spear,
Poniard,
Quiver,
Sabre,
Sword,
Basilica,
Bishopric,
Butcher-shop,
Castle,
Church,
Citadel,
College,
School,
Master of,
Pupil,
School-mate.
Cross-road,
Fortification.
Camp,
Ditch,
Palisade,
Mine,
Machine,
Gate,
Hostelry,
Market,
Scutum, clypeus.
Tormentum, bellfcum,
Lorica.
Telum.
Galea; cassis, fdis, f.

Lancea.
Hasta.
Sica; pugio, onis, m.
Pharetra.
Aoinaces, is, m;
Ensis, is,J.; gladius.
Basihca,
Episcopi palatium.
Laniena,
Castellum, castrum,
Ecclesia.
Arx, arcis, f. [Iud us.
Gymnasium, litterari Us
Schola.
Ludimagister, tri, m.
Disci pulus.
Condisoiptilus.
Compttum, trivium.
Munitio, onis,./:
Castra, orum, n, pl.
Fossa.
Vallum,
Cuniculus,
Machfna,
Porta.
Diversorium.
Macellum.
56 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Merchant,
Buyer,
Purchase,
To.buy,
Price,
To pay,
Sale,
To sell,
Merchandise,
Monument,
Palace,
prison,
Warden,
Shop,
Square,
t Street,
Alley,
Temple,
Parvise,
Choir,
Altar,
Tabernacle,
Lectern,
Sacristy,
Pulpit,
Gallery,
Chapel,
Belfry,
Bell,
Theatre,
Amphitheatre.
Tower,
Walls,
lvlercator, oris, m,
Emptor, oris, m;
Emptio, onis, f.
Emere.
Pretium.
Solvere.
Venditio, onis, f.
Vendere.
Merx, mercis, f.
Monumentum.
Palatium.
Career, eris, m..; custodia.
Career is custos, odis, JlL.
Taberna.
FOrUlTI.
Vicus, via.
Angiportns, us, m.
Templum.
Proanus.
Chorus.
Ara; altare, is, n.
'I'abernaculuIll.
Pluteus.
Sacrarium.
Cathedra, pulpttum.
Suggestum: suggestus,
Sacellum. [us, 111,.
Campanile, is, n:
Campana.
Theatrum.
Amphitheiitrum.
Turris, is, f.
Moenia, arum, n: pl.
Vocabulary.
13.
57
OF THE INHABITANTS
OF A CITY.
DE INCOLIS
CIVITATIS.
Architect,
Artisan,
Astro loger,
Astronomer,
Author,
Chancellor,
Citizen,
Clerk,
Comedian,
Comedienne,
Dean,
Doctor,
Doctor of medicine,
Door-keeper,
Executioner,
Emperor,
Empress,
Empire,
Farmer,
Freedman,
Geometrician, .
Grammarian,
Hawker,
Historian,
I-Iost,
Judge,
Jurisconsult,
Archi tectus.
Artlfex; optfex, Icis, 'In.
Astrologus,
Astronomus,
Scriptor, oris, m:
Cancellarius.
Civis, is, 11t.
Scriba, ~ , ?n.; tabularius.
Corncedus; histrio, onis, 111.
Mirna, mimula,
Decanus,
Doctor, oris, m.
Medfcus. ['lll.
Accensus, apparttor, oris,
Carntfex, Ieis, m.
Imperator, oris, m,
Imperfitrix, Icis, f.
Imperium.
Rustrcus,
Libertus. [n1.
Geometres, geometra, re,
Grammatious.
Prreco, onis, m,
I-listo rfcus.
Hospes, His, m;
Judex, Icis, m. [tus
J urisconsultus, jurisper"i-
58 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
King,
Queen,
Kingdom,
Lawyer,
Lodger,
Magistrate,
Master,
Mathematician,
Musician,
Notary,
Will,
Orator,
Oration,
Painter,
Philologist,
Philosopher,
Physician,
Poet,
Preacher,
Sermon,
Prefect,
Priest,
Pope,
Cardinal,
Archbishop,
Bishop,
Prelate,
Canon,
Archdeacon,
Parish-priest,
Vicar,
Deacon,
Sub-deacon,
Rex, regis, m.
Regina.
Regnum.
CausidIcus, patronus
Inquilinus.
Magistratus, .us, m;
Domtnus, herus,
Mathematlcus.
Musfcus,
Libellio, onis, m,
Testamentum.
Orator, oris, m,
Oratio, onis, j.
Pictor, otis, m.
Philologus.
Philosophus.
Physlcus.
Poeta, ee, m;
Concionator, oris, m.
Concio, onis, f.
Preefeotus.
Saeerdos, otis, m.
Papa, 00, m.
Cardiniilis, is, m:
Archiepiscopus,
Episcopus,
Antistes, Itis, m.
Canonlcus.
Archdiaconus. [ chus
Curio, onis, 'tn.; paro-
Vicarius.
Diaconus,
Sub-diaconus.
59 Vocabulary.
Acolythus.
Abbas, atis, m.
Abbatissa.
Clertcus.
£dituus.
Princeps, Ipis, m:
Magister, tri, m.
Disciptilus, alumnus.
Coactor, exactor, oris, m.
Rector, oris, m.
Monachus, Calis, is,}
Monacha, sanctimoni-
Rhetor, oris, m:
Dives, di vftis,
Pauper, eris.
Mendicus.
Sculptor, oris, m.
Scriba, 00, m.; librarius.
Servus.
Miles,ltis,m.
Eques, Itis, m:
Pedes, Itis, 'in. [tus.
Rei marittmae praefec..
Dux, ducis, m.
Chiliarchus, Iegionis
[tribiinus.
Centurio, onis, m:
Legiitus.
Decurio, onis, m.
Signrfer, eri, 'in.; vexi l-
[larius,
Speculator, excubrtor,
[oris, ru,
Captain,
Lieutenant,
Corporal,
Ensign,
Sentinel,
Acolyte,
Abbot,
Abbess,
Clerk,
Sacristan,
Prince,
Professor,
Pupil,
Receiver,
Rector,
Religious, monk,
Religieuse,
Rhetorician,
Rich man,
Poor man,
Beggar,
Sculptor,
Secretary,
Slave,
Soldier,
Cavalier,
Foot-soldier,
Admiral,
General
Colonel ~ f infantry,
60 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Sophist,
Surveyor,
Theologian,
Treasurer,
Valet, attendant,
Woman-servant,
AGE,
REI..lATIONSHIP.
Adolescence (from 14
[to 28 years),
Young man,
Young woman,
Ancestors;
Aunt (father's sister),
Aunt (nlother'ssister),
Brother,
Brother-in-law,
Childhood,
More advanced,
Infant, [of 7 yrs.),
Child (up to the age
Child (up to the age
[of 14 yrs.),
Child (with father
[alive),
Ohild (with mo ther
[alive),
Cousins (children of
[two brothers).
Sophista, ae, m:
Mensor, oris, 'in.
Theologus.
Aerarii tribiinus,
Famiilus.
Famula.
14.
AETAS, COGNATIO ET
AFFINITAS.
Adolescentia,
Adolescens, entis, m.
Adolescentula, ae, j.
Atavi, orum, 'in, pl.
Amtta,
Matertera.
Fvater, tris, m,
Le vir, Iri, m.
Iufautia,
Pueritia,
Infans, antis, m. f.
Puellus, 'in.; puellula, f,
Puer, m.; puella.j;
Patrimus,
Matrimus.
Patrueles, 'in. j. pl.
/
Vocabulary. 61
Husband,
Man of ripe age,
Man of advanced age,
Mother,
Mother of family,
Mother (step),
Mother-in-law,
Nephew, niece,
Nurse,
Oldage,
Cousins (children of
[two sisters),
Cousins (children of
[brother and of sis-
Daughtel', [ter),
Granddaughtel',
Great-grand-
[daughter.
Daughter-in-law,
Daughter (minor),
Daughter (adopted),
Daughter (step),
Father,
Father of family,
Father-in-law,
Grandfather,
Grandmother,
Great-grandfather,
Great-grandn10ther,
Great-great-grand-
[father,
Great-great-grand-
[mother,
Consobrini, m.; oonsobri-
[nae.j;
Amitini, 'In.; amitinae, j.
Filia, nata.
Neptis, is,j.
Proneptis, abneptis, is,fl
Nurus, us, f.
Filia farnil ias,
Filia adoptiva,
Privigna.
Pater, patris, m,
Paterfamilias, rn.
Socer, eri, m:
Avus,
Avia.
Proavus,
Proavla,
Abavus.
Abavra.
Maritus, conjux, jugis, m;
Vir maturre ootiitiB.
H01I10 retiitis provectee,
Mater.
Mater familias, j.
Noverca.
Socrus, us, f.
Filius, filia fratris, sororis,
Nutrix, Icis, }:; nutricula,
Senectus, tiitis, f.
62 rsruide to Latin Conversation.
Filius, natus.
Nepos, otis. [m
Pronepos, abnepos, o t i ~
Gener, generi, m.
Filius familiae, m;
Filius adoptivus,
Privignus.
Patruus,
Avuncnlus.
Virgo, luis, f.
Pupillus.
Pupilla. [gis, f.
Uxor, oris, f.; conjux jii..
Mulier, eris,.f.
J uventus; litis, t
J'uvenis,
Homo, Inis, m;
Vir, viri, m,
Fratria.
Senex, is, m.
Anus, us,/.
Soror, oris, f.
Glos, gloris, j.
Old man,
Old woman,
Sister,
Sister-in-law (sister
[of husband),
Sister-in-law (wife of
[brother),
Son,
Grandson,
'Great-grandson,
Son-in-law,
Son (minor),
Son (adopted),
Stepson, [brother),
Uncle (father's
Uncle (mother's
Virgin, [brother),
Ward (boy),
Ward (girl),
Wife,
Woman,
Youth,
Young man,
Man, [woman),
Man (opposite of
15.
OF A HOUSE AND DE DOMO EJUSQUE
OF ITS PARTS. P ARTIBUS.
Air-hole, Spiramen, mis, n.; spiracii-
[lum,
Arch, Camera; fornix, lcis, m,
Vocabulary. 63
Area, .
Bakery,
Balcony,
Balustrade,
Barn,
Bench,
Bolt,
Cabin,
Small cabin,
Castle,
Chamber, room,
Sleeping-chamber,
Closet,
Valet de chambre,
Chimney,
Chimney-place,
Corridor,
Court,
Lower court,
Cow..house, ·
Ox stall,
Sheep cot,
Hog sty,
Goat house,
Door,
Small door,
Back door,
Front door,
False door,
Door case,
Uprights,
Cross..piece.
Dove..house"
Area.
Pistrina.
Meenianum, podium.
Clathri, orum, m.; septum.
Horreum.
Sedile, is, n;
Pessulus,
Casa, turgurium.
Casnla,
Castellum.
Conclave, is, n;
Oubicnlum,
Cella.
Cubicularius.
Caminus.
Focus.
Circuitio, onis,}:
Area, aula.
Chors, chortis, J.
Stabulum.
Bovile,bubile, is, n;
Ovile, is, n:
Suile, is, n.
Caprile, is, n:
Porta; fores, ium, j. pl.
Portula, ostiolum.
Postieum.
Antica,
Pseudothyrum,
Antepagmenta, arum, n. pt.
Scapi cardiniiles.
Supercilium.
Columbarium.
64 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Villa.
Valetudinarium.
Culina,
Coquus.
Coqua.
Diazoma, ntis, n:
Furnua m.
Palatium.
Pali, valli, arum, m. pi"
Plutcum,
Septum.
Floralia, ium, n; pl.
Sepimen, .im.
Edifice,
Entry,
Farm,
Small farm,
Floor,
To plank a floor,
Board,
Floor, story,
Highest floor,
Lowest floor,
Ground floor,
Four storied house,
ti'urnace,
Garden,
Kitchen-garden,
Gutter,
Hay-loft,
House,
Small house,
Country house,
Infirmary,
Kitchen,
Cook (m,),
Cook (1),
Landing-place,
Oven,
Palace,
Palisade,
Parapet,
Park,
Parterre,
Partition,
Aedificium.
Ambulacrum.
Praedium.
Praediolum.
'I'abulatum,
Constabuliire, assare,
Axis, is, m. f.; tabula.
Contabulatio, onis, [.
Domus suprema pars.
Demus inf'Ima pars,
Solum. [quatuor
Domus tabulatorum
Fornax, acis, f.
Hortus.
,- olitorius.
Colliquiae, arumf. pt
Fenilia, ium, n, pl.
Domus.j.; aedes, ium,..f. pl
Domnnciila, aediculae
[arum,! pi
Vocctbulary. 65
1
I
Pedestal,
Pilaster,
Pillar,
Twisted pillar,
Fluted pillar,
Cap of pillar,
Portico, piazza,
Poultry-bouse,
Quincunx,
Rail,
Refectory,
Ridge,
Roof,
Shutter,
Stable,
Stairs,
Steps,
Vestibule,
Wainscot, ceiling,
Wall,
- of a house,
Window,
- with bars,
- with blinds,
Wine cellar,
Cask,
Barrel,
Wood-shed,
Log,
5
.Stylobata, ae, m,
Parastata, ae, m,
Columna.
- tortflis.
- striata.
Capitulum.
Portfcus, US, f.
Gallinarium.
Quincunx, uncis, m.
Clathri ; cancelli, arum,
[1'1'1. pl.
Coenaculum, triclinium.
Oulmen, Inis, m.; fastigium.
Tectum.
Foricula.
Equile, is, n.
Scalae, arum, f. pl.
Podium.
Vestibulum.
Laciinar, laequear, aris, 11.
Murus; mcenia, inm, n, pl.
Paries, etis,1n.
Fenestra.
- clathrfita,
- reticuliita.
Vinaria cella.
Dolium.
Codus.
Cella lignaria.
Stipes, Itis, m.
66 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
16.
PRINCIPAL ARTICLES
OF FURNITURE OF
A HOUSE.
Alcove,
Bag,
Baggage,
Balance,
Tree of-
Beam of-
Ends of-
Needle of-
Plate of-
Basin,
Basket,
SmaB basket,
Bath-tub,
Battledore,
Bed,
Bell (small),
Bellows,
Bench,
Small bench,
Bobbin,
Bolter,
Bottler
Small b t > \ \ . ~ e ,
Large bottl.
Bowl,
Brick pavement,
Paved,
DE PRJECIPUIS DOMUS
SUPELLECTIBUS.
Zothecula,
Panarium,
.Sarctna,
Libra, trutma, statera.
Ansa.
Scopus, jugum.
J ugicornua, capita.
Exiimen.Tnis, n,
Lanx, cis, f.; Ianciila,
Pelvis, is,/.; pelluvia,
Corbis, is, f.; sparta.
Sportella.
Solium, piseina,
Palmula.
Lectus.
Cymbalum, crepitaoulu--
Follis, is, 'In.
'Scamnum,
Scabellum.
Sucula,
Farinee incerniculum.
Lagena.
Laguncnla,
Amphora,
Gabata,
Pavimentum.
Pavimentatus,
Vocabulary. 67
Broom,
Brush,
Bucket,
. Bucket of a well,
Burning of coal,
Bushel,
Canopy,
Carpet,
Tapestry,
Casket,
Chafing dish,
Chair,
Small chair,
Chandelier,
Candle,
Light,
Flame,
Fly protector,
Cinders,
11ot-
Closet,
Cork,
Cover, lid,
Covering,
-of bed,
- of well,
Desk, bookcase,
Drawer,
Drying-pan,
Duster,
Earthen-pan,
Ewer,
Fan,
Scopes, arum, f. pl.
Scoptila.
Sittila, sitnlus.
Haustrum.
Pruna.
Modius.
Umbella.
Tapes, etis, m:
Peripetasma.
Arcula, capsa, capsula.
Focnlus.
Sella.
Sellula.
Candelabrum.
Candela.
Lumen, luis,n.
Fax, acis,!; teeda,
Muscarium,
Cinis, eris, m,
Favil1a.
Area, armarium.
Obturamentum.
Operculum.
'I'egumen, luis, n. [n.
Stragulum ; toral, alis,
Puteal, alis, n.
Pluteus.
Penicillus.
Vaporarium, hypcaustum.
Penieulus, penicillum.
Cymhium.
Aqufilis, is, m.
Flabellunl.
- - ~ I - ~
68 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Faucet,
Filter,
Fire,
Flame,
Spark,
Fire-brand,
Flagon,
Fly-flap,
Frying-pan,
Furniture,
Goblet,
Grater, rasper,
Gratings,
Grid-iron,
I-Iandkerchief,
Handle,
Small handle,
Two- handled vessel,
I-Iook, large,
- small,
Ink-stand,
Jar,
Jewel-box,
Jug,
Small jug,
Kettle,
Key,
Small key,
To lock,
Knife, .
Small knife,
Ladder, step,
Lamp,
Tubulus.
Colum.
Ignis, is, 'In.
Flamma.
Scintilla, scintillrila,
Titio, onis, m.; torris, is, m.
Laguncula.
Muscarium.
Sartago, lnis,.f.
Supellex, ecttlis, f.
Calix, lcis, 'In. ....~
Scobina.
Scobis, is, j.; pociilum.
Craticula.
Sudarium.
Ansa.
Ansula,
Dicta,
Uncus..
Uncinus, hamus.
Atramentarium.
I-Iydria, urna,
Scrinium.
Hydria urna.
Urnula, urceolus,
Cortina, ahenum,
Clavis, is, .I,
Clavicula.
Obserare.
CuItel', tri, 'In.
Cutellus.
Gradus.
Lucerna, Iychnus.
VocalJulary. 69
· WIck,
Base of lamp,
Lantern,
Latch,
Lip of a vessel,
Manger, crib,
Bird-crib,
Marker,
Mat,
Mortar,
l\1ouse-trap,
Mouse,
Nail,
Napkin,
Pan,
Pillow,
plate,
pocketbook,
Portmanteaus,
Pot, '
Small pot,
Butter pot,
Milk pot,
Pump,
Rake,
Razor,
Reed,
Rubbing-cloth,
Sack,
Small sack,
Salad-dish,
Salt-cellar,
Small salt-cellar,
Ellychnium, myxus.
Lyohniichus.
Laterna.
Versatrlis pestilus, m,
Gultus, gultnlus,
Preesepe, is, n.; pra-sepium.
Scutella, gabata,
'Ireniola indicina,
Matta.
Mortarium.
Muscipnla, muscipnlum.
Sorex, leis, sn:
Clavus.
Mantile, is, n.; mappa.
Cacabus, olla.
Cervical, aUs, n.;pulvinu3
Escarius orbis, is, m.
Capsa, scrinium.
Hippopera,
Vas, vasis; vasa, 01'11111.
Vasetilum,
Sinium
Mulctrale, is, m:
Antlia.
Radlila, rallum,
.Novactila.:
Arundo, Inis, f.; baeulur
Sudarium.
Saccus.
Sacculus.
Olitoria lanx, ancis, f
Salmum.
Salillum.
70 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Sauce pan,
Scales,
Scraper,
Seal,
Seat,
Small seat,
Sheet,
Shovel,
Side-board,
Sieve,
Skillet,
Small wood,
Snuff-box,
Snuffers,
Socket of candlestick,
Spindle,
Spit,
Spoon,
Pot-ladle,
Spout,
St.:ttue,
Small statue,
Stool,
Straw-mat,
StrickIe,
Table, [menslons,
Table of small di-
Table utensils,
Earthenware,
Silver,
Gold,
Tea-pot,
Tonge;,
£nea paropsis, rdis, f.
Scalae. arum, j. pl.
Radiila.
Sigillum.
Sella, sedes, sedile.
Sedecala, selhila,
Lecti linteum.
Batillum, pala.
Armarium, abacus.
Cribrum incernici11um.
Pultarius.
Cremium.
Tabaci pixidicula.
Forfex, Icis, f.; forficula,
Candelre receptaculum.
Rhombus.
Vern, us, n,
Cochlear, aris, n:
Trulla.
Epistomium.
Statua, signum.
Sigillum.
Sellula.
Storea, storia,
Putellum.
Mensa.
- Monopodium.
Vasa, orum, n. pl.
Fictilia, orum, n. pl.
Argentea, orum, n. pl.
Aurea, arum, n: pl.
Cucumella.
Forceps, forcrpis, m: j.
Vocabulary.
71
Tray,
Trunk,
Tub,
Umbrella,
Urn,
Utensils,
Valise,
Valve,
Vial,
Vine-arbor,
Warming-pan,
Warming-place,
Wash-basin,
Watering-pot,
To sprinkle water,
Writing-desk,
Yard,
TABLE VIOTUALS.
Almond,
Apple,
Apricot,
Banquet, repast,
Beer,
Bottle,
Bread,
Breakfast, .
To take breakfast,
Butter,
Cake,
Alveus.
Area, or copsa sarcinaria.
Cupa, labrum.
Umbella.
Urna.
Utensilia, ium, n. pl.
Vidnlus,
Parma.
Vitrea ampulla.
Pergnla, trichila,
Ignitabulum.
Focus.
Malluvium.
Alveolus.
Aspergere, conspergere,
Abacus.
Ulna.
17.
MENSA. CIBARIA.
Amygdala.
Malum.
Malum armeniacum,
Convivium; eptilre,
Licera, [arum, f. pl.
Lagena, ampulla, serial
Panis, is, m:
J entaculum.
Jentaculurn semere.
Butyrum.
Crustum.
72 Guide to Latin. Conversation.
Cheese,
Oherry,
Crumpet,
Decanter,
To drink,
To sip,
To be thirsty,
Thirst,
Dinner,
To dine,
Dish,
- small,
-long,
-large,
- large and deep,
Drink, beverage,
Drinker,
To eat,
To be hungry,
Hunger,
Egg,
Fig,
Fork,
Gallipot,
Glass,
Grape,
I-Iam,
ICnife,
Meat,
Beef,
Pork,
Veal,
Lamb,
Caseus.
·Cerasum.
Placenta.
Aq ualis, is, m;
Bibere, potare.
Sorbillare,
Sitire,
Sitis, is, f.
Prandium.
Prandere.
Lanx, cis, m.; catinus,
Oatillus, eatillum.
Paropsis, Idis, j.
Gabata,
Magis, tdis, j.
Potus.ius, m.
Potator, onis, m.
Edere, or esse, comedere
Esurire.
Fames, is, j.
Ovum.
Ficus, i,.f.
Fusciniila, fusefna.
Pultarius. [leis, m,
Poculum, scyphus, calix,
Uva.
Petaso, onis, m.
CuItel', tr i, m.
Caro, carnis, [,
-.... bubiila,
- suilla.
- vitulina.
- agnina,
Batura.
Lac, Iactis, n,
PuIs, pul tis, .I:
Sinapeddchos, i, m. (is, I.
Sinapi, n, ind.; sinapis,
Mantile, mantele, is, 71.;
[mantilium, mantelium.
Avelliina.
Olearium; vas, vasis, n.
Oleum.
Malum aureum,
Malum perstcum,
Pirum.
Piper, ~ r i s , n.
Orbis, is, m:
Prunum,
Scutella.
Assum. -,'
Salinum.
Sal, salis.
Piper, eris, n.
Tomacma, tomaclum.
Placenta.
Cochlear, uris, u,
Saccharum.
- c.rudum.
Cosna,
Coenare.
Bellaria, orum, n; pl.
Acetabulum.
Acetum,
Aqua.
-I, - -
!
i Medley,
":. Milk,
- thick,
l\tIustard-bottle,
Mustard,
Napkin,
Nut,
Oil-bottle,
Oil,
Orange,
Peach,
., Pear,
t Pepper,
Plate,
Plum,
Porringer,
Roast,
Sal t-cellar,
Salt,
Pepper,
Sausage,
Sea-biscuit,
Spoon,
Sugar,
- coarse,
Supper,
To take supper,
Sweet-meats,
Vinegar-bottle,
Vinegar,
Water,
Vocabulary. 73
74 Guide to Latin Conversat·ion.
Wine,
- fermented,
- unfermented,
- paltry,
GRAMMAR.
Letter, .
Vowel,
Consonant,
Syllable,
Diphthong,
Word,
Parts of a discourse,
Noun, substantive,
Case,
Nominative,
Genitive,
Dative,
Accusative,
Vocative,
Ablative,
G-ender,
Masculine,
Feminine,
Neuter,
Number,
Singular,
Plural,
Dual,
Declension,
Vinum.
Vappa.
Mustum.
Villum.
18.
GRAMJ\-IATICA.
Littera,
Vocalis.
Consonans, antis.
SylHtba.
Diphthongus.
Dictio, onis,.f.; vocabulum
Partes orationis.
Nomen, mis, 1'1.; nomen

Casus, 118, m.
Nominativus.
Genitivus casus, patrius.
Dativus.
AccusativUS.
Vocativus.
Ablatlvus.
Genus, eris, n,
Masculinum.
Femininum.
Neutrum.
Numerus,
Singularis.
Plurdlis.
Dualis.
Declinatio, onis,f.
Vocabulary..
I
I
I
I
1
I
Adjective,
Grades of comparison,
Positive, '
Comparative,
Superlative,
Pronoun,
Personal,
Demonstrative,
Possessive,
Relative,
Verb,
Active,
Passive,
Neuter,
Deponent,
Impersonal,
Substantive,
Defective,
Irregular,
Regular,
Mood, .
Indicative,
Imperative,
Optative,
Subjunctive,
Tense,
Present,
Imperfect,
Perfect,
Pluperfect,
Future,
Future perfect,
Participle,
75
Nomen adjectivum.
Gradus comparationis,
Positivus.
Comparativus.
Superlativus,
Pronomen, Inis, n.
Personale.
Demonstrativum,
Possess!vum,
Relativum.
Verbum.
Activum,
Passivum.
Neutrum.
Deponens, entis.
Impersonale.
Substantivum,
Defectivum.
Anomalum, irregulare,
ReguHire.
l\iodus.
Indicativus,
Irnperativus,
Optativus,
Subjunetivus,
Tempus, oris, n,
Prsesens, entis,
Imperfectum,
Perfectum.
PIusquam perfectum
Futurum.
Futurum exactum.
Partieipi um.
76 Gtttide to Latin. Conve-i's(Lt'ion.
Gerund,
Number,
Singular,
Plural,
Dual,
Person,
Conjugation,
POETRY.
Quantity,
Syllable,
Long,
Short,
COlllU10l1,
Increment,
Foot,
Spondee,
Dactyl,
Auapeest,
Trochee,
Iambus,
'I'ribrach, '
Amphibrach,
Pyrrhic,
Verse,
Meter hexameter,
Pentameter,
Iambic,
Trochaic,
Lyric, .
Gerundium.
Numerus.
Singulfiris.
Pluralis.
Dualis.
Persona.
Conjugatio, onis, f.
19.
P<ETICA.
Qnantrtas, atis,j:
SylHiba.
Longa.
Brevis.
Communis,
Lncrementum.
Pes, pedis, m.
Spondeus.
Dactylus.
Anaprestns.
Trocheeus.
Iambus.
Tribrachus.
Amphibriichus.
Pyrrhtcum.
Versus, us, m.
Metrum hexametrum.
.
Iamblcum.
'I'rochaicum.
Lyrfcum.
77
Choriambie,
Glyconic,
Phalencic,
Sapphic,
Adonic,
Alcaic,
Anuprestic,
Poem,
Elegy,
Eclogue,
Satire,
Sylva,
Ode,
Epigram,
Enigma,
Enlblem,
Strophe,
Distich,
Fable,
Apologue,
RIIETOHIC.
Orator,
Invention,
Disposition,
Elocution,
Memory,
Pronunciation,
Argnment,
Intrinsic loci,
Choriambfcum.
Glyconium.
Phalencium.
Sapphfcum.
Adonium,
Alcatcum.
i
Carmen, inis, n.; pOe01[\,
Elegia. I [atis, n,
Ecl()ga.
Satyra.
Sylva.
Oda; ode,' es, f.
I?a, LUis, n.
atIs, n.
Emblema, litis, n.
Strophe, es, f.
Disttchon, i, n,
:H'abula, fabella.
Apologus,
20.
RHETOHICA..
Orator, oris, m.
I nventio, onis.
I )isposi tio, on is, [,
Elocutio, onis,;:
Memorin,
Pronunclfitio, onis, f.
Argumentum.
Loci in trinseci, orulll, m.
78 Guide to Ledin Conoereation.
Definition,
Enumeration,
Etymology,
Derivatives,
Genus,
Species,
Similitude,
Dissimilitude,
Contraries,
Adjuncts,
Antecedents,
Consequents,
Contradictions,
Causes,
Effects,
Comparison,
Extrinsic loci,
Judgments formed
[beforehand,
Report,
Documents,
Oath,
Torment,
Witness,
Parts of a speech,
Exordium,
Narration,
Confirmation,
Refutation,
Peroration,
Figures of words,
Conversion,
Complexion,
Definitio, onis, j.
Enumeratio, onis, j.
Etymologia.
Conjugata, arum, n, pl.
Genus, eris, n,
Species, ei, f.
Similitude, mis, f.
Dissinrilitudo, Inis, J.
Contraria, orum, n: pl.
Adjuncta, orum, n: pl:
Antecedentia, urn, '11. pi.
Consequentia, urn, n: pl.
Repugnantia, um, n. pl.
Causre, arum, f. pl.
Effecta, orum, n. 1)1.
Comparatio, onis, f.
Loci extrinseci, orum,
[no pl.
Prrejudicia, orum, n. pl.
FaIlla.
'I'abnlse, arum, J. pl.
Jusjurandum.
Tormentum.
Testis, is, 'In.f
Orati6nis partes.
Exordium.
Narratio, onis, f.
Confirmatio, onis, f.
Refutatio, onis, f.
Peroratio, onis.
Figu reevarborum.
Conversio,onis,J.
Complexio, onis, j.
Vocabula1'Y·
79
Conduplication,
Translation,
Gradation,
Synonym,
Synecdoche,
Adjunction,
Disjunction,
Paranomasia,
Pleonasm,
Ellipsis,
Syllepsis,
Figures of thought,
Allegory,
Antithesis,
Apostrophe,
CO1111Uun ication,
Concession,
Correction,
Deprecation,
Distribution,
Dubitation,
Exclamation,
Climax,
Hypotyposis,
Imprecation,
Interpretation,
Interrogation,
Irony,
Licence,
Occupation,
Preterition,
Prosopopoeia,
Reticence,
Conduplicatio, onis, f.
Traductio,onis,j.
Gradatio, onis, f.
Synonymia.
Synecdoche, es; f.
Adjunctio, onis, f.
Disjunctio, onis, l
Paranomasia,
Pleonasmus.
Ellipsis, is,}:
Syllepsis, is,j.
Figiirre sen ten tiarum.
Allegoria.
Antitheton, i, n.
Apostropha.
Communicatio, onis,)
Concessio, onis, f.
Correctio, onis, f.
Deprecatio, onis, f.
Distributio, onis, [.
Dubitatio, onis, [,
Exclamatio, ·onis.
Gl'adatio, onis, f.
Hypotyposis, is,j.
Imprecatio, onis, J.
Interprotatio, onis, j.
Interrogatio, onis,.f
Ironia.
Licentia.
Occupatio,onis,j.
Prreteritio,onis,!
Prosopopoeia.
Reticentia.
80 \ Guide to Latin. Conversation.
Ii
I
Subjection,
Transition,
Different kinds of
[orations,
Discourse, speech,
Declamation,
Panegyric,
Funeral oration,
Invective,
Epistle, .
Preface,
Dissertation,
Dialogne,
Lesson,
RIVERS, srrREAMS.
Aisne,
Ardeche,
Aube,
Aude,
Aveyron,
Charento,
Cher, '
Correze,
Creuse,
Dordognc,
Doubs,
.Drorne,
Durance,
Ebro,
Subjectio, onis, j.
Transitio, onis, f.
Varia orationumgenera.
Oratio, concio, onis,.t:
Declamatio, onis, [.
Panegyrlcns. [on is, I.
Funebris Iaudatio.
Objurgatoria oratio, j.
Epistola.
Prrefatio, onis, f
Dissertatio, onis, J.
Dialogus.
Prrelcctio, onis, f.
21.
FI.JUl\UNA, AMNES.
Axona,7n.
Ardesca.v»,
Alba, m.
A tax, acis, m.
Averonius,
Carantonus,
Caris.
Curezia, ni.
Crosa, m.
Duranius.
Dubis, is, m•
Druma, 7'11.
Druentia, 'tYL
Iberus.
Vocabularry.
81
Elhe,
Euphrates,
Eure,
Ganges,
Gard,
Garonne,
Gironde,
Guad:' Iuui vi:
Guadiana, ~
Herault,
Indre,
Indus,
Jordan.
Loir, '
Loire,
Lot,
Marne,
Meuse,
Moselle,
Nievre,
Nile,
Po,
Rhine,
Rhone,
Saone,
Sarthe,
ScheIdt,
Seine,
Somnle,
Tagns,
Thanles,
rigris,
6
Albis, IS, m.
Enphriites, ee, m,
, Ebura, Audura, Autura.
Ganges, is, m.
Vardo, onis, m,
Garumna, m,
Girumna, m,
Brotis.
A n a s , ~ , m:
Arauris, is, m.
Jngeris, is, m;
Indus.
J ordiinis, is, m.
LfEd:IS.
. -Liger, eris, m.
Olpus.
Matrona.
Mosa,7n.
Mosella, m;
Nevera, m,
Nilus,
Padns (poet), Eridanus.
Rhenus.
Rhodituns, [m.
Arar, uris, and Araris, is,
Sartha, m,
Scaldis, is, '111,.
Sequana, m.
Samara, m;
'fagus.
Tamesis, is, n:
Tigris, is, or tdis, me
82 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Vistula,
Xanthus,
Yonne,
MOUNTAINS.
Alpes,
An tilibyan,
Apennines..
Ardennes,
Atlas,
Causasus,
Cevennes,
Etna,
Helicon,
Hybla,
I-Iymettus,
Ida,
Jura,
Libyan,
Lozere,
Olympus,
Pamassus,
Pinde,
Pyrenees,
Taurus,
Vesuvius.
Vosges,
.Vistula, m.
Xanthus.
Icauna, m.
22.
MONTES.
Alpes, ium, t: pl.
Antilibanus.
Appeninus,
Arduenna silva,
Atlas, an tis, m;
Caucasus,
Gebennre, arum, fa pl.
00, f.
Ifeltcon, onis, nt.
Hybla, re,f.
Hymettus.
Ida, ee, 'In.
Jura, ee, m:
I..Jibanus.
Ligericinus, Legeritus.
Olympus.
Parnassus,
Pindus.
Pyrenrei montes, rum,
Taurus.
Vesuvius.
Vosgesus, Vosegus,
Vocabulary.
23.
83
·
~ .. '··.····i··.·.····.:· •.
'1.
I
1
'"
t:
I'
DIFFERENT COUNTRIES. VARI.2E REGIONES.
Africa, Afrfca, [Afer.
African, Africanus, .Afrtcus,
America, Amertca,
American, Americanus,
Arabia, Arabia.
Arabian, Arabs, abis; Arabus.
Asia, Asia.
Asiatic, Asiiinus, Asiatfcus,
Assyria, Assyria. /
Assyrian. Assyrius.
Austria, Austria.
Austrian, Austriacns,
Baleares, Baleares, i urn, f. pl.
Barbary, Barbaria.
Belgium, I Belgium.
Belgian, Belgieus,
Bohemia, Bohemia, Boiohemum.
Bohemian, Boiohemus, Bohemus,
China, Sinarium imperium.
Chinamen, Sinee, orum, j: pl.
Denmark, Dania.
Danes, Dani, orulll, m. pl.
Egypt, -tEgyptus, i, f.
Egyptian, .LEgyptius.
England, Britannia, Anglia.
Englishman, Britannus, Anglus,
Ethiopia, -tEthiopia.
,Ethiopian, £thiops, opis,
Europe, Europa.
European, Europeeus,
84 Guide to Latin Conversation.
I
I
Finland,
Finlander,
France,
Frenchman,
Germany,
German,
Greece,
Grecians,
Helvetia,
Helvetians,
Holland,
I-Iollp,nder,
India,
Indians,
Ireland,
Irishman,
Italy,
Italian,
Japan,
Japanese,
Judea,
Jew,
Lapland,
Laplanders,
Malt a,
Maltese,
Mauritania,
Of Mauritania,
Numidia,
Numidians,
Palestine,
Of Palestine,
Finlandia, Finnonia,
Finno, onis, 11'1,.
Gallia, Francia.
Gallus, Francus.
Germania.
Germanlcus.
Gra-cia, [pl.
Grseci, Achivi. orunl, m.
Helvetia.
Ifel vetii, arum,· 'In. pl.
Hollandia, Batavia.
l-Iollandns, Batavus,
India.
Indi, orurp.
Hibernia.
Hibernus,
Italia.
Italus, Italfcus,
Japonia.
J apo, onis j J aponlcus.
Judrea.
Judreus,
Laponia.
Lapones, ium, m. pl.
Meltta, Melite, es, i.
MeIitensis,
Mauritania.
Maurus, Marusius,
Numidia.
Numldre, arum, m; pl.
Palrostina.
Palrestinus.
VOCft bulary. 85
potanel,
Polander,
Portugal,
Portuguese,
Prussia,
Prussian,
Russia,
Russian,
Sardinia,
Sardinians,
Savoy,
Savoyard,
Scotland,
Scotchman,
Sicily,
Sicilian,
Switzerland,
The Swiss,
Syria,
Syrian,
Tartary, .
Tartar, [around),
Thebes (country
Of the Theban
Troy, [country,
Trojans,
OITIES.
,Aix,
Algiers,
Polonia,
Polonus,
Lusltania,
Lusitanus,
Prussia, Borussia,
Borussus,
Russia.
Russus.
Sardinia.
Sardi, 61'noo, m. 'Di.,
Sabaudia.
Sabaudus,
Scotia.
Scotlcus,
Sicilia.
Siculus.
TIelvetia.
Helvetii, ·orum, me pl.
Syria.
Syrus,
Tartaria.
'I'artarus,
'I'hebais, Idis.
Thebatcus.
'I'roas, adis, f.; Dardania,
Trojiini, orum, m. pl.
24.
UREES.
Aquae Sextiae, arllm,j.pl.
Algerium.
86 Guide to Latin Conver8at'ton.
Amiens,
Andrianople,
Autun,
Auxerre,
Avignon,
Bayonne,
Beauvais,
Bologne,
Bordeaux,
Brussels,
Cadix,
Caen,
Cambridge,
Canterbury,
Chartres, .
Chicago,
Clerm0 nt,
Oonstantinople,
Copenhagen,
Corinth,
Cracovia,
Damascus,
Damietta,
Dieppe,
Dublin,
Edinburgh,
Florence,
Friburg,
Gloucester,
Glasgow,
Hamburg,
Hanover,
Jericho,
Anibianum.
Andrianopolis, 8,/.
Augustodfinum.
Antissiod6rum.
Avenio, onis, m.
Lapurdum.
Bellovacum.
Bononia.
Burdigala,
Bruxellae.drumj j; pl.
(jades, iUIn,!. pl.
Cadomus, i,f.; Cadomum,
Cantabrigia.
Cantuaria.
Carmitum, Carnotum,
Chicago, Inis.
Claromonti urn.
Constiintinopolis, is, J.
IIafula, Codania,
Corinthus, i, f.
Cracovia.
Damascus, i, f.
Damieta,
Deppa.
Dublinium.
I ~ r l i m biirum.
Florentia.
Friburgum.
Glovernia, Glocestria.
Glaseovium, Glascovia.
Hamburgum..
Haunovera, Leuphiina.
Hierlcus, uutis, f.
Vocabulary. 87
Jerusalem,
Laval,
Liege,
Lille,
Limoges,
Lisbon,
London,
Lourdes,
Louvain,
Lyons,
Madrid,
Mantua,
Marseilles,
Mayence,
l\1etz,
Milan,
Montpelier,
Moscow,
Munich,
Namur,
Nancy,
Nantes,
Naples,
Narbonne..
New Orleans,
New York,
Orleans,
Padua,
Paris,
Philadelphia,
Poitiers,
Reims,
Rome,
Hierosolyma, ae, j.
Lavalium,
Leodium.
I nsnlae, arum, f. pl.
Lemovicum,
Olisippo, onis, m.
Londinum, Londinium,
Lapurdum.
Lovanium.
Lugdiinu 111.
Mau'Itum.
Mantua.
Massilia.
Moguntia.
Divodiirum.
Mediolanum.
Mons pessuliinus, m;
Mosca, ae,j:
Monachium,
Namurcum.
Nancium, Nanceium.
Namuetes, um, m. pl.
Neapolis, is,!.
Narbo, onis, m.
Nova Aurelia.
Neo-Eboracum,
Aurelia.
Patavium.
Lutetia, Parisii, orum, m.
Philadelphia.
Pictavium.
Remi, orum, m. pl.
Roma,
88 Guide to Latin (}onversution.
Rouen,

Soissons,
Strasburg,
Syracuse,
Toledo,
Toulon,
ToulouEe,
Tours,
Trent,
Valencia,
ValladoI id,
Venice,
Verdun,
York,
l\IATHEMATICS.
Gctrdinal Numbers,
1 Unus, 3, urn,
2 Duo, ae, 0,
3 Tres, Tria,
4 Quatuor,
5 Quinque,
6 Sex,
7 Septem,
8 Octo,
9 Novem,
10 Decem,
Rothomagus.
Caesaraugusta.
Suessiones, urn, m.
Argentoratum.
Syracusae, arum, f. pt.
'I'oletum.
Telo, onis, 111,.
Tolosa.
Turcnes, urn, m; pl.
Tridentum.
Valentia.
Pintia.
Venetiae, arum.}. pic
Virodfinum.
Eboracum.
25.
MATHEMATICA..
Ordinal Numbers.
Primus, a, urn. .
Secundus, 3, urn.
Tertius.
Quartus.
Quintus.
Sextus.
Septfmus.
Octavus.
Nonus,
Declmus,
Undeclmus..
Duodecimus.
Declmus tertius.
Declmus quartus,
Quintus decrmus,
Sextus declmus.
Septimus decrmus,
Octavus decfrnus.
Nonus decrmus.
Vicesrmus, Vigestmus,
Viceslmus primus.
Viceslmus secundus,
'I'rircsfrnus,
Quadrageslmus,
Quinquageslmus..
Sexageslmus.
Septuagesrmus,
Octogesrmus, .
Nonagesfmus.
Centeslmus,
Centestrnus pri.nus,
Centeslmus secundus.
Ducentesfrnns,
Trecentesrmus,
Vocabulary,
11 Undeclm,
12 Duodecim,
13 Tredecim,
14
15 Quindecim,
16 Sedecim, Sex de-
[cim,
17 Septemdecim,
18 Octodecim,
19 Novemdecim,
20 Viginti,
21 Viginti unus,
22 Viginti duo,
30 Triginta,
40 Quadraginta,
50 Quinquaginta,
60 Sexaginta,
70 Septuaginta,
80 Octoginta,
90 Nonaginta,
100 Centum,
] 01 Centum unns,
102 Centurn duo,
200 Ducenti, ae, a,
300 Trecenti, ae, a.
400 Quadringenti,
[ae d, Qundringentestmus,
500 Quingenti, a, Quingentesinlus.
600 Sexcenti. de, a, Sexcentesunus,
700 Septingenti, ae, a, Septingenteslrnus,
800 Octingenti, ae, a, Octingenteslmus,
900 Nongenti, Non- Noningenteslmus,
1000 Mille, [ingenti, Millestmus,
89
90 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Distributives.
1 Singiili, ae, a,
2 Bini, ae, a,
3 Terni,
4 Quaterni,
5 Quini,
6 Seni,
7 Septeni,
8 Oct6ni,
9 Noveni,
10 Deni,
11 Undeni,
12 Duodeni,
13 'I'ernideni,
14 Quaternideni,
15 Quinideni.Quin-
16 Senideni, [deni,
17 Septenideni,
18 Octonideni;
19 Novenideni,
20 Viceni,
21 Viceui singuli,
22 Viceni bini,
30 Triceni,
40 Qnadrageni,
50 Quinquageni,
60 Sexageni,
70 Septuageni,
80 Octogeni,
90 Nonageni,
100 Centeni,
101 Centeni singnli,
Numet'al tidvetbl.
Semel"
BiSo
Ter.
Quater.
Quinquiesl
Sexies,
Septies,
Octies,
Noviesoi
Decies,
Undecies.
Duodeeies,
Tredecies.
Quatuordecies,
Quindecies.
Sexdecies.
Septiesdeeies,
Octi esdecies.
Noviesdecies.
Vicies.
\7icies semel,
\7icies bis.
Tl'icies.
Quadragies.
Quinquagies,
Sexagies.
Septuagies.
Octogies,
.Nonagies.
Centies,
Cellties semel,
JToeabulary.
91
102 Centeni bini,
200 Ducenteni, Du-
[ceni,
300 Trecenteni, Tre-
[ceni,
400 Quadringen-
[teni, geni,
500 Quingenteni,
600 Sexcenteni.Sex-
[eeni,
700 Septingenteni,
[geni,
800 Octingenteni,
[ g e n ~ ,
900 Nongenteni,
[Nongelli,
1000 Milleni,
Centies his.
Ducenties.
Trecenties.
Quadringenties.
Quingenties.
Sexcenties,
Septingenties.
Octingenties.
Nongen ties.
Millies.
The distributives duceni, treceni, quadringeni,
etc., are used mostjrequently.
Arithmetic,
Figure,
Number,
Addition,
To add,
8ubtraction,
To subtract,
Multiplication,
To multiply,
Division,
To divide,
Fraction,
Arithmetfca.
Nota arithmetfca,
Numerus.
Addi tio, onis, f
Addere. '
Deductio, o n ~ s , f. _
Subducere, subtrahere,
Multiplicatio, onis, f.
lVI ulti plioare.
Divisio, onis, f.
Di videre, diducere.
Numerorum partictlla,
92 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Rule of three,
Rule of partnership,
Extraction of the '
[square root,
Extraction of the
Algebra, [cube root,
Algebraic,
Geometry,
Point,
Line,
- straight .line)
curved line,
broken line,
perpendicular,
parallel,
tangent,
secant,
spiral,
diagonal,
circular,
Hypothenuse,
Angle?
- right,
acute,
obtuse,
Triangle,
- equilateral,
right angle,
isosceles,
scalene.
Surface,
- convex,
concave,
oval.
Regula ourea proporti-
Regula societatis. [anum
Quadratae radicis inves-
[tigatio,
Cublcae radicis investi-
Algebra. [gatio
Algebrlcus.
Geometria.
Punctum.
Linea.
--:- recta,
curva.
fracta.
perpendieularis,
parallels.
tangens, entis,
seeans.antis,
spira, ee,f.
diagoniilis,
cireularis,
Hypotheniisis,
Angulus.
- rectus.
aciitus.
obtiisus,
'I'riangtilurn.
- aeouilaterum,
rectangulum.
isosceles, is, 'ft
scalenum.
Superficies.
- convexa.
concave,
ovata.
Voeabulatry. 93
Square,
Parallelogram,
Trapezoid,
Rhomboid,
Polygon,
Circle,
Circumference,
Centre,
Diameter,
Radius,
Segment,
Sphere,
Cylinder,
Cone,
Pyramid,
Prism,
ASTRONOMV.
Astronomer,
Heavens,
Cornet,
Constellation
The Ran),
The Bull,
The Twins,
The Crab,
The Lion,
The \Tirgin,
'l'he Balance,
Quadriitum, quadrum,
Parallelogrammum.
Trapezium.
Rhomboides, is,j.
Polygonum.
Circulus.
Circumductio, onis, j ~
Centrum,
Diametros, i, j.
Semidiametros, i, f.
Segmentum,
Sphaera.
Cylindrus,
Conus.
Pyramis, Idis, j.
Prisma, ntis, n.'
26.
ASTRONOMIA, ASTROLOGIA
Astrologus, [/1/ ,
Coelum ; eoeli, orum, 'II.
Cometes, re, m.
Sidus, eris, 11.; astrum,
Aries, etis, m.
Taurus.
Gemini, orulll, 'In. 1)/.
Cancer, eancri, and
[canceris, u'
Leo, onis, 'In.
\Til'go, lnis,!"
Libra.
94 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
The Scorpion, Scorpius.
The Archer, Sagittarius. [ri, m,
The Capricorn, Capricornus; caper,
The Water Bearer, Aquarius.
The Fishes, Pisces, ium, m. pl.
Bunt Aries. Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo,
Libraque, Scorplus, Arciteueus, Caper, Amphora, Plscis,
Eclipse, Defectus, us, m.; eclipsis
Star, Stella. [is, j,
- falling, - vaga; errans, tis,.!:
Planet, Planeta, re, m. '
Sun, Sol, solis, m,
Moon, Luna.
- Full mOOD, - Plenilunium.
Venus, Venus, (jris,f.
Jupiter, Jupiter, Jovis, rna
Mercury, Mercurius,
Mars, Mars, tis,m.
Saturn, Satnrnus.
Earth, Terra.
Pole, Polus. [septentrro
North, Septentri6nes,' urn, m.j
Meridian, Meridies, ei, m:
East, Oriens, tis, m.
West, Opcidens, tis, m;
27.
Air,
Cold,
PHYSICSo PHYSICA.
Aer, aeris, m.
Frigus, oris, n.
95
,
I
i
Cold, a;
Tepid,
Frost,
Ice,
Snow,
Snowy,
To snow,
Cloud,
Dew,
Flash, spark,
Heat,
Hot,
Fire,
To burn,
Flame,
Of flame,
Smoke,
Lightning,
Thunderbolt,
Thunder,
To thunder,
Rainbow?
Storm,
- rain,
- to rain,
Hailstone,
'" To hail,
Wind,
Breeze,
Zephyr,
Vocabulary.
Frigfdns,
Tepldus.
Gelu, n: imd;
Glacies, ei, j.
Nix, nivis,J:
Nivens,
Ningere,
Nubes, is, [;
Ros, roris, m.
Scintilla.
Calor, oris, m.
Calldus.
Ignis, is, m.
Urere.
Flamma.
Flammeus.
Fumus.
Fulgnr, uris, n.
Fulmen, ·'1nls, si,
Tonitrns, l t s ~ 'nt.; toni...
'I'oniire. [truum,
Arcus coelestis; iris, l'dis,f.
Ternpestas, atis, j.
- Pluvi.a; imber, bris,
- Plucre. ['11,
Grando, Inis, '/0
Grandindre.
Ventus.
Aura.
Zephyrus, favonius.
96 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
28.
ARCHITECTURE.
Architect,
Arch,
Support of an arch,
Arch of a bridge,
Archi trave,
Base,
Capital of a pillar,
COIUllll1,
- twisted,
- fluted,
- Corinthian,
- Doric,
- Ionian,
Consol, bracket,
Coping of a wall,
Cornice,
Counterforts, props,
Denticles,
Frieze,
Modillon,
Moulding,
Niche,
Obelisk,
Pedestal,
Pilaster,
Pile,
Plinth,
Shaft of column,
Traverse,
'Iympan,
ARCHITECTURA.
Architectus,
Arcus, us, m,
Erisma, a t i s ~ n.
- Sublicium.
Epistylium.
Basis, IS,!.; fundamenturr
Capitulum, capitellum.
Columna.
- torttlis,
- striata.
- Corinthia.
--'" Dorfca,
- Ionlca.
. Prothyris, .fdis, [,
l\ientlllu,
Corona.
Anterrdes, urn', /0 pl.
Denticnli, orum, m, pl.
Zoophorus,
Mutulus.
Torus; prostypa, oruln, 'Fit.
Loculamentum.
Obeliscus.
Sty lobata, ae, m;
Parastata, ae, m.
Pila.
Plinthus, i, j.
Coluumae scapus, truucus
I III pit ges, is, f.
'I'ympiinum.
97
I
I
l
\Tault, arch,
Key &f-
Volute,
MUSIC.
Musician ('In.),
Muslcian (f.),
Singer,
Songstress,
Canticle,
Singing,
Song,
Concert,
Musical instrument,
Clarionette,
Flageolet,
Flute,
Lute,
Bow,
Bridge,
String,
Organ,
'I'rumpet,
V i o l i n ~
To play before,
Time,
To beat time,
Beater of time,
Note,
7
Camera; fornix, Icis, 'In.
Camerae conclusiira,
Voliita; helix, Icis, fa
29.
MUSICA.
Musrcus,
Muslca,
Cantiitor, oris, 'In.
Cantrix, cantatrix, icis, f.
Canttcum.
Cantus, us, 'In.
Cantilena, cautio, 6018, f.
Concentus, us, m:
Muslcum instrumentum,
Lituus.
Fistula.
Tibia.
Testiido, Inis, j.; cithara,
Plectrum.
Fidium canteriolus.
Nervus, chorda.
Organum.
Tuba, buccrna, Lf: pl.
1\1in61'i8 1110di f'Ides, i urn,
Praecinere.
Modus. [moderari.
Cantum numerosque
Concentus moderator,
Muslcae nota. [oris, 'In,
100 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Potion,
To take a-
Bandage,
Cautery,
Cataplasm,
Eye-salve,
Diet,
Plaster,
Gargling,
Lancet,
Washing, clyster,
Ointment,
Pill,
Blood-letting,
To bleed,
Leech,
Probe,
Trepan,
Cupping-glass,
Emetic,
Vomiting,
ARTS
AND ARTISANS.
Acrobat,
Baker,
Baker's wife,
Bake-shop,
Kneading trough,
Leaven,
Potio, onis, f.
Medicamentum bibere.
Mitella.
Cauterium.
Cataplasma, atis, m;
Collyrium.
Direta,
Emplastrum.
Gargarizatio, nnis, j.
Scalpellnm.
Clyster, eris, 'In.
Unguen, luis, n.
PiltUa, catapotium.
Sangulnis detractio.
Venam incidere. [siiga,
Iliriido, tnis,· f.; sangui-
Sepecillum,
Abaptistum.
Cucurbitula, [tum
Vomitoriummedicamen-
Vomitivus,
32.
ARTES II.JI.JIBERAI.JES
ET OPIFICES.
Funambrilus.
Pistol', oris, 'In.
Pistrix, icis, J.
Pistrina,
Mar-tra magis, Idis, f.
Fermentum.
101
Bank,
13anker,
Barbel',
Barber's wife,
Barber-shop,
Razor,
To shave,
Black<SInith,
Forge,
Bellows,
Anvil,
Tongs,
If ammer,
R02-tJllan,
Boat,
Oar,
Prow,
Anchor,
Mast,
BODlebinder,
Clippings,
Bottle-Illaker,
Butcher,
Slaughter-house,
Butcher-stall,
Candle-n1akeI' ,
Cap-maker,
Carman,
Carpenter,
Hammer,
Saw,
Pinchers,
Auger,
Argentaria.
1\1ensari us.
Tensor, oris, 'in.
'I'onstrix, icis, J.
'I'onstrina,
.Novacula.
Barbam tondere.
Ferrarius faber, bri, 'in.
UstrIna.
Fo] lis, is, 'in.
Incus, ildis,j.
Forceps, Ipis, 'In. f.
l\1alleus.
Navioularius.
Cymba, navicula.
Remus,
Prora,
.. Anchora,
1\1filus.
Librorum concinniitor.
Praesegmen, 111 is, ?I..
Ampullari us.
Lanius.
Laniena, Ianiarium,
Lanionia mensa.
Caudeliirum artrfex, lcis,1n,
arttfex, leis, 'in.
Carrucari us.
1\1ateriiiri us.
l\lalIeus.
Serra.
I?orceps, cipis, 'in.f.
Terebra.
\02 Guide to Latin Conoereaiion.
Gimlet,
Hatchet, axe,
Plane,
Nail,
Pin, peg,
Coach-builder,
Car
Cart,
Tumbrel,
,vaggon,
Truck,
Carriage, coach,
- two-horse,
three-horse,
four-horse

body, box,
spoke,
felly,
tire,
hub,
axle,
Coachman,
Post..boy,
Coal merchant,
Coal,
Cobbler,
Cook ('In.),
Cook (f.),
Kitchen,
Cooper,
Cask,
Tun,
Terebella.
Seciiris, is, I.: ascia.
J)olabra, runcina.
Clavus.
Fibula, subscus, iidis, f.
Rhediirum arttfex, leis, in;
Currus, us, 1H.
Currus; vehes, is,f.
Plaustrum.
Carrfica.
Traha.
Rheda, carriica,
- bigae, arUll), f. pl.
triga, ae, f.
quadrigae, urulll,]. pl.
temo, onis, '111.
capsus rhedae.
radius rotae.
canthus; aspis, Idis, j
rota.
modiolus,
axis, is, 'in.
Clsiarius, essedarius,
'7eredarius.
Carbonarius,
Carbo, onis, 'In.
Cerdo, onis, 'In.
Coquus.
Coqua.
Culina.
Dol i arius,
Cadus,
Dolium.
Vocabulary.
103
Bunghole,
Hoop,
Coppersmith,
Cauldron,
Cow-herd,
Cutter (of clothes),
Needle,
Scissors,
Thread,
To sew,
Dyer,
To dye,
Embroiderer,
Enameller,
Enamel,
Farmer,
Farmer's wife,
Farm,
Fiddler,
Fowler,
Snare,
Bird-call, decoy,
Glue,
Cage,
Fuller,
Furbisher,
Furrier,
Skin,
Gardener,
G-ilder,
To gild,
Glazier,
- glass window,
- glass,
Obturamentum,
Orbis, vinclnm dolii.
Lebetum faber, bri, m,
Lebes, etis,
Bubulchus.
Sartor, oris, 1n.; vestiarius
Acus, us,!.
Forfex, leis, f.
Filium.
Suere, consuere,
Infector, oris, m,
'I'ingere, coloriire,
Phrygio, onis, m,
Encanstes, re, m.
Encaustum.
Villtcus,
Villl'ca.
Villa, praedium,
Fidtcen, Inis, m.
. Auceps, ctipis, m,
Rete, is, n.; cassis, is, m.•
Ilex, leis, m.
Viscum.
Caven.
Fullo, 5nis, m.
Politor, oris, m,
Pellio, onis, m;
Pellis, is.
Olttor, 3ris, m.
Iriauriitor, oris, m:
Inauriire.
Vitrearius. [lamella.
- vitrea lamina,
- vitrum.
104 G1t'ide to Latin; CO'nVC1'8at£on.
Goat-herd,
Goldsmith,
Grave-digger,
Hatter, hat seller,
Horse dealer,
Juggler,
Laborer,
To plough,
Plough,
Tail of a plough,
Ploughshare,
Coulter,
Harrow,
To harrow,
Laundress,
Laundry,
Lye,
Of lye,
Librarian, bookseller,
Book,
Binding,
Cover
Back ~ f beok,
Title,
Author,
Page,
Chapter,
Section,
Paragraph,
Line,
Mason,
Mortar,
Lime,
Caprarius.
Aurffex, 'leis, tu,
Fossor, oris, in..
Pileorum artlfex, leis; Tn.
11ango, onis.
Histrio, onis, 1n.; Iudius.
Ariitor, oris, nl.
Arare,
Ariitrum.
Stiva.
Vomer, eris, m..
Cnlter, tri, m,
Occa.
Occiu-e,
Lavfitrix, ids, f.
Lavandaria.
Lixivia.
Lixi vius, [rius,
Bibliop6la, ffl, 'in.; libra-
Libel', bri, m,
Coneinnatio, onis, f.
Libri tegmen, Inis, 11.
Dorsum.
'I'ittilus,
Auctor, oris, m.
Pagrna.
Caput, Itis, '11.
Seetio, onis, j.
Paragraphns,
Linea. [muriil is,
Faber lapidarius, strnetor
Areniitnm.
Calx, cis,j.
Vocabulary. 105
\i
Ii
1.. :·' •. ·... ··.
t'
I
Plaster,
Trowel,
Level,
Line,
Rule,

Plummet,
Lever,
Maoon's workman,
l\lerchant,
To buy,
Purchase,
Buyer,
To sell,
Sale,
Seller,
Miller,
Wheat-mill,
Oil-mill,
Mill-stone,
Muleteer,
Whip,
To whip,
To crack a whip,
Paver,
Pavement,
Beetle of a paver,
To pave with ham-
. Road, route, [mer,
Path,
Peddler,
Porter,
To carry,
GYPS1Ull..
Trulla.
Libra:
Amussis, is,f.; linea:
Regllia. [1nv
Norma; gnomon, onis,
Perpendiculum,
Vectis, is, m.
Operarius.
Mercator, oris, m.
Elnere.
Elnptio, onis,j.
Emptor, oris, m.
Vendere.
,renditio, onis, f.
Vcndttor, oris, f.
Molttor, oris, m,
Moletrina, pistrinum.
Trapetus, trapetum.
Mola.
Mulio, onis, m,
Flage11 urn.

Flagello insoniire,
Structor viarius.
Pavimentum,
Fistiica, pa vicula.
Fistucare,
Via, iter, itineris, n,
Semtta, callis, is, 'In.
Circumforaneus propola,
Baj ttl us, gerulus.
Raj ulare, ferre,
106 Guide to Ledin Conversation.
Potter,
Wheel,
Mould,
Printer,
Type,
Press,
Reaper,
Harvest,
To reap,
Reaping hook,
Scythe,
Flail,
Fork,
Small fork,
Rake,
Fan,
Rope-maker,
Rope, cord,
- Bow string,
Violin string,
Rope of a ship,
IIalter,
Line,
Fillet;!
Saddler,
Saddle,
Shepherd,
Scrip or sack,
Crook,
Sling,
Shoemaker,
Shop of-
Figtilus.
Rota figularis. [n.
Typus, proplasma, iitis,
Typographus,
Typus. •
Prelum typographl'cum.
l\Iessor, oris, m, [f·
Messis, is, f. ; seges, etis,
Metere, demetere.
Falcula, seotila.
Falx, falcis, f.
Flagellum.
Furca.
Furcilla.
Rastellus, raster, tri, m.
Vannus, i,j.; ventila-
[brum.
Restiarius, restio, Ollis, 111.
Funis, is,rn.
- Chorda.
Nervus chorda.
Rudens, entis, m.
Laqueus, restis, is, [.
Resticiila,
Funictilus.
Ephippiorum opffex, Icis,
EphippitUll.· [1n.
Opilio, onis, 1n.
Pera.
Pedum.
Funda.
Siitor, oris, m.; calceola-
Sutrina. [rius.
VocabulaTy. 107
Awl,
Paring-knife,
Leather strap,
Thread,
Currier}
Leather,
To curry,
Sheep-skin,
Sower,
Seed,
To sow.
Stone-cutter,
Hammer,
Chisel,
Compass,
Crayon,
Swine-herd,
Tavern-keeper,
'I'avorn,
Upholsterer,
Tapestry,
Vintager,
Vintage,
To gather grapes,
Vineyard,
- Vine dresser,
. Pole,
Spade,
Mattock,
Weaver,
Shop of-
Shuttle of-
Subiila.
Scalprum sutorium.
Lerum.
FihllU piciitum,
Coriarius,
Corium,
- subigere, concinniire.
Aluta.
Sator, oris, m:
Semen, Inis, n.
Serere,
Lapicida, ae, m,
Malleus; tudes, Itis, tn.
Scalprum.
Circlnus.
Carbo Iinearis.
Subulcus, porcarius,
Caupo, onis, m. [na.
Caup6na, popina, taber..
Aulae5rum opifex.fcis, m.
Aulaeum, peripetasma,
[ntis, n.
Vindell1iator, oris, m.
Vindemia,
Vindemiare,
Vinea, vinetum.
- Vinltor,ol'is, 1n.
Ridlca, pedfimen.Inis,
Ligo, onis. [n.
Pastlnum.
Textor, oris, m.
Textrina, textrinurn.
Radius textorius,
108 Guide to Ledin Conversation.
Treadle of-
To weave,
Insilia, ium, n. pl.

33.
GAMES, AMUSEMENTS. LUDI, OB1..ECTAMENTA.
I
I I
Ball,
Billiards,
Billiard table,
Pocket,
Ball,
Cne,
Carousal,
Chase,
I-Iunter,
'Fowler
Killed game,
Snares,
Bird-call, decoy,
Bird-lime, glue,
Cage,
Checker-board,
Checker,
Chess,
Chess-player,
A piece,
Pawn,
Knight,
Bishop,
Castle, rook,
Pila. [cnlfiris.
Ludus nidicuiaris; trudi-
Alea, selum.
Fundiiln, barathrum.
Globlilus, pila.
Clavl'tla, uidicnla.
lndicrum.
\Tenatio, onis, I; venatus,
\Tenator orif:\, m. [(lS,·111,.
Auceps, ciipis, m, [da.
\Tenatio, veniitus, prae·
Plagae, firum, [. 1)1.; cas-
[ses, ium, ni. pl.; retia,
[hun, n. pl.
Ilex, Icis, ni.
Viseum.
Cavea.
Alveus.
Calculus.
Latrunculi, orum, 'In. pl.
Al veolus, alveus Iuso-
I ..atrunculus. [rius.
Pedes, ttis, m:
Eques, ttis, m.
Morio, onis, m,
Turris, is, f.
Vocabulary. 109
Queen,
!{ing,
Check-mate, .
Die (sing. of Dice),
Dice-box,
Cast,
Ace,
D e n c ~
Three points,
Six points,
Double-six,
Fishing,
To fish with a hook,
Fisher,
Net,
Mesh,
Line,
Hook,
Pole,
Foot-ball,
Game of the goose,
Juggler,
Cup,
Ball,
Jump,
Quoit,
Race,
,Horse-race,
Racket,
Riding,
Horse,
Mare,
Ass,
Regina.
Rex, regis, m, [gem.
Vici.regem, teneo re-
Tessera, talns, taxillns.
Fritillus.
'I'esserae jactus.
Monas, adis,./:
Duella ; duplio, onis, 'In.
Ternio, onis, m.
Sernio, onis, m.
J actns Veneris.
Piscatus, 11s, m.; piscatio,
Pieciici hamo. .[onis, J.
Pisciitor, orIS, 'In.
Everriotuum : rete, is, n.
Macula.
Linea.
Hamus,
Arundo, mis, j.
F°IUs, is, m:
Ludus anserum.
Praetigiator, ol-is, 'In.
Acetabulum,
Globulus ; nux, nucis,j:
Saltus, US, tn.
Discus.
Cursus, us, m,
Equestris cursus,
Reticulum. [tio.
Equitdtus, 11S, 'In.; equita-
Equus.
Equa.
Aslnus.
110 Guide to Latin Conoereation-
I
1\,1
I
II
,II
She-ass,
Ass-foal,
Saddle,
Crupper,
Martingale,
Bags,
Bridle, reins,
Curb,
Whip,
Riding-whip,
Spur,
Currycomb,
To trot,
To gallop,
See-saW,
To see-saw,
Stilts,
Top,
To spin a top,
Toys,
Asma,
Asellus.
Ephippitun.
Posti.lena,
Antilena.
Hippopera.
Habenae, arum, j. pl.
Frenum.
Flagellum.
Verber, eris, m.
Calcar, aris, m.
Strig'llis, is, f.
Tohitim ire. [farri.
Cursu incitatisslmo
Oscillum.
Oscillati6ne 11.ldere ;
Grallae, arum, f. pl.
Turbo, Inis, m, [nem,
Agitare, movere turbf...
Crepundia, orum, n. pl.
COMPARATIVA ET SUPERLATIVA A
PROBATISSIMIS AUCTORI·
BUIS US1JRPATA.
LIST OF LATIN COMPARATIVES
AND SUPERLATIVES.
c, comparative alone used.
s, superlative alone used.
* comparative or superlative of doubtful authority.
1
~ I
I
Abjectus.
Abjecte, c.
Abruptus.
Abscissus, c.
Absolfitus.
Absolute.
Abstlnens.
Abstriisus, c.
Absurdus.
Abundans,
Abundanter.
Acceptus.
Aocommodatus,
Accommodate.
.Accumulate, 8.
Aceuriitus.
Accurate.
Acer.
AcrIter,
Acerbus,
Acerbe.
Aoldus.
Aetuosus, c.
Aciitus.
Acute.
Adductus, c.
Adducte, .c.
Adjunctus.
Admiuiculfitus, c.
Admirabflis, c.
Adolescens, c•
*Adoptatus, 8.
111
-----
112 Guide to Latin Conoersationo
Adustus, c.
Adversus, s,
.JEger.
.JEgre.
.£quabilis, c.
lEquabillter, c.
lEquiilis, c.
lEqualIter, c.
lEquus.

8.
£stu5se, c.
Affabllis.
Aflitbillter, 8.
Afleetus, 8.
Afflrm.ite, s.
Afflictus, c.
Affiuens, c.
Affluenter, c.
AgIUs, c.
Agiltter, c,
Agitatus, c.
Agrestis.
Alacer, c.
Alacrtter, c.
Albtdus.
Alienus.
Alsius,
Altus.
Alte.
Amabtlis.
Amabihter, c.
Amans.
Amanter.
Amiirus.
Amiire.
Ambiti5sus.
Ambitiose.
Amens.
Amicus.
Amice.
Amoenus.
Amoene.
Amplus.
Ample.
Augustus.
Anguste.
Animosus,
Animose,
Anterior, us,
*Antel'ius.
Antiquus,
Antique.
Apertus.
Aperte.
Apparatus.
Appariite, e,
Appetens,
Appositus.
Apricus,
Aptus,
A1Jte.
Aquatus, e.
Aquate, c.
Aqu5sns.
Arctus.
Comparatives and Superlatives. 113
Arcte.
Ardens.
Ardenter.
Arenosus.
Argutus.
Argute, e.
Arldus.
*Arrectus, Co
Arrogans.
Arroganter, c.
Artificiosus.
Artificiose.
Asper.
Aspere.
Asseveranter, c.
Assiduus.
Assidue,8.
Assuetus, c.
Astrictus, c.
Astricte, c.
Astiitus, c.
Astute.
Ater, c.
Atrox.
Atroctter.
Attentus.
Attente.
Attenufitus.
Attritus, c.
Auctus, c.
Audax.
Audacter.
Audens.
8
Audenter, c.
Augustus.
Auguste, c.
Auspiciitus,
Auspiciito, c.
Austerus, c.
Aviirus.
Aviire.
Aversus.
Avtdus,
Avrde,
Barbarus, c.
Beatus.
Beate.
Bellicosus.
Bellns.
Belle, s,
Bene, melius, optrme,
Beneffcus,
Benevolens,
Benignus.
Benigno.
Blandus.
Blando.
Bonus, melior, opttmus.
Brevis.
Brevlter.
Csecus, c.
Calamitosus,
Caldus, c.
Caltdus,
114 Guid» to Latin ()onvefsalion
i,
Call1dus.
Callide.
Callosus, c.
*Candens.
Candidus,
Capax.
CapilHitus, c.
Capital.is, c.
Capti6sus,c.
Cariosus, c.
Carnosus,
Caruso
Care.
*Castigatus.
Castus.
Caste.
Cautus.
Caute.
Celeber.
Celeberrfme,
Celebriitus,
Celer.
Celertter,
Celsus.
CeIse, c.
Certus, c.
Cinredus, c.
Circumspeetus.
Circumspecte, c.
Citatus.
Citerior, cittmus,
Cito. .
Citus.
Civilis, c.
Civiliter, c.
Clams,
'lare,
Clemens.
Clementer.
Coaete, c.
Ceelestis,
Cognttus.
Coheerens, .c.
Coloratus, c.
Comis.
* Comtter, s.
Comitatus, c.
Commendatus,
Commodus.
CO:rP--IDode.
Sommotus, c.
Communis.
Comperte, c.
Composttus,
Composite, c.
Compressus, c.
Cornpresse, c.
Comptus, c.
Compte, c.
* Conciliatus, c,
Coneinnus, c.
Coneinne, c.
Concitatus.
*Conei tate.
Concors, e.
Concordfter.
Comparatives and Superlatives. 1.15
,':i
;.',:····1···..
!'
,j,
I
Concretus, c.
*Condecens, c.
Conditus.
Condoctus, c.
Conducibtlis, c.
Confertus.
Conficiens, 8.
Confidens.
Confidenter.
Confirmatus, c.
Confiisus, 8.
Confuse, c.
*Congestus, c.
Conjunctus.
Conjuncte.
Conquisitus, c.
Consideriitus.
Considerate.
Consignanter, c.
*Consonans,c.
Consonanter,8.
Conspectus, c.
Conspirate, c.
Constans,
Constanter.
Constrictus, c.
Consuetus, 8.
Donsultus, 8.
Consulte, c.
Donsummatus, 8.
Contanlinatus,8.
Contemptus.
Contentus.
Contente, c.
Contentiose, c.
Contmens.
Contorte, c.
Contractus, c.
Contracte, c.
Contumax.
Contumeliosus.
Contumeliose.
Conveniens.
Copiosus,
Copiose.
Copulatus, c.
Corpulentus, c.
Correctus, c.
Corruptus,
Corrupte.
Crassus.
Crasse, c.
Creber.
Crebre 01' crebro,
Credibllis, c.
Credibilrter, c.
Criminosus,
Criminose.
Crispus,
Crudelis.
Crudelfter,
Crudus.
Cruentus.
Cruente,
Crustosns, c.
Culpatus, Co
116 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Cultus.
Culte, c.
Cumuliitus.
Cumulate.
Cunctans, c.
Cunctantel', c.
Cunctiitus, c.
Cupfdus,
Cuptde,
Cupiens, c.
Curiitus, s.
Curate, 8.
Curiosus,
Curiose.
Custodite, c.
Damnatus, c.
Damnosus.
Debtlis, c.
Decens.
Decenter.
Decoctus, c.
Dedftus, s,
Deduetus, c.
Deformis, c.
Deliberiitus, 8.
Deliciitus.
Delicate, c.
Demens,
Dernenter, 80
Demissus, Co
Demisse.
Densus,
Delise.
Depressus,
Depresse, c.
Descriptus, c.
Desertus.
Desiderabtlis, c.
Desideratus, s,
Desidiosus.
Despectus, s.
Desperiitus.
Despicatuae.
Deterior, deterrlmus,
Deterius.
Detestabtlis, c.
Devexus, c.
Devinctus.
Devotus. [trmus
Dexter, dexterior, dex-
Dextere, c.'
Dicax,
Difficflis.
Difficfle.
Diffidenter, c.
Diffuse, c.
Dignus.
Digne, c.
Dilectus,
Dihgens,
Diligenter.
Dilucidus, c.
Diluctde, c.
Dihitus,
Dilute, c.
Dulce.
Durus,
Dure, c.
(lomparali oes asul Superlatives. 117
c.
Directe, c.
Diruptus.
Dirus, c.
Disertus. Edax, s.
Diserte. Edttus..
Disjunctus. Effectus, c.
Disposrtus, c. Effeminatus,
DissiIullis. Efferatus.
Dissolfitns. * Effertus, s.
Distentus. Effervens, c.
Distinctus, c. Eff'tcax.
Distincte, c. Efficaclter,
Distortus. Effrenatus,
Distractus. Effreniite, c.
Distribute, c. Effusus,
Districtus, c. Effuse.
Diu, diutius, diutisstme, Egens.
Diuturnus, c. c.
Di versus. Eiate,c.
Di verse. Electue.
Dives, ditior, ditisslmus. Electe, c.
Di vinus. Elegans,
Di visus, c. Eleganter.
Divulgiitns, s, Eloquens,
Doctlis, c. Eloquenter.
Doctus. Eliitus, c.
Docte. Emendiitus,
Dolens. Emendiite, C<
Dolenter, c. Emtnens.
Domfnans. c, Enarriite,
Dotatus, e. Enixus, c.
Dulcis, Enixe, c,
118 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Enodate, c.
Erectus, c.
Erecte, c.
Eruditus.
Erudite, c.
Evldens.
Evidenter.
Exactus.
Exacte.
Exaciitus, c.
Exaggeratus, c.
Excellens.
Excellenter, c.
Excelsus.
Excelse.
Excitatus,
Excitate, c.
Excogitfitus, e.
Excusabflia
Excusiitus.
Excusate, c.
Exercitatus.
Exercitate, c.
* Exiguus, 8.
Exilis, c.
Exiltter,
Exoptatus,
Exorabtlis, c.
Exomiitus.
Expeditus,
Expedite. .
Experiens, s,
* Expertus, s.
Explanate, c.
Explicatus, c.
Explicltus, c.
Exploratus,
Exploriite, c.
Expolitus.
Expressus,
Expresse.
Expugnax, c.
Exquisitus.
Exquisite.
Execrabrlis, c.
Execratus, e.
Exsequens, s.
Exspectatus.
Exsuctus, C•.
Exsultans, 8.
Exsultanter, c.
Extensus.
Extenuatus, 8.
Exter and exterus, ex-
[terior, extfrnus
Exterius.
Exuberans, e.
Fabu15sus.
Fabu15se.
Facetus,
Facete.
Factlis.
FacIle.
Facinor5sus, s,
Facti6sus.
Con'tparative8 and 119
Facundus.
Facunde, s.
Fallax.
Fallactter, 8.
Falsus.
Familiaris,
Familiarfter.
Fanl0sus.
Fastidiosus,
Fastidiose, c.
Favorabtlis, c.
Fecundus.
Fecunde.
Felix.
Felictter,
Ferax.
Feraciter, c.
Ferox.
Feroctter,
FertIlis.
Fertiltter, c.
Fervens.
Ferventer, s,
Fervtdus.
Festinanter.
Festivus,
Festive, c.
Festus.
Fidelis.
Fidellter.
Fidenter.
Fidus.
Fide, 8.
Firmus.
Firme,
Flaccfdus,
Flagitiosus,
Flagitiose,
Flagrans.
Flagranter, e.
Flebrlis, c.
Florens.
Florrdus,
Fluxus, c.
Fccdus,
Frede.
Formidabflis, c.
Formidolosus.
Formosus,
Formose, c.
Fortis.
Farther.
Fortunatus,
Fortunate, c.
Fractus, c.
Fragtlis, c.
Frag6se, c.
* Fragrans, e.
Fraudulentus, e.
Fraudulenter, e.
Frequens.
Frigrdus.
Frigtde.
Fructuosus.
Frugiilis.
Frugaltter, c.
120 G1dde to Latin (lonnereaiion:
Fruticosus.
Fugatus, c.
Fngax.
Fugaclter.
Fulgens.
Fulgentel', c.
Fundatus.
Funestus, c.
Furax.
Furaclter, s,
Furens, c.
Furiosus,
Fuscus, c.
Fusus, c.
Geltdus,
Gener6sus.
Generose, c.
Germanus, s,
Glaher, c.
Glori6sus.
Gloridse.
Glutinosus.
Graerlis.
Grandis.
Gratiosus.
Gratus.
Grate.
Gravis.
Gravtter.
Gypsatus,8.
Gulose, IJ.
Habllis.
Habitus.
Hilaris.
HiHlre, c.
H'irsiitus, c.
Honestus.
Honeste.
Honoratus,
Honorfite.
Honorif'Ieus.
Honoriftce,
Horribflis, c.
Horrtdus, c.
Horrtde, c.
Hospitiilis.
Humiinus,
Humane.
Humtdus.
IIumtlis.
Humillter, s,
*Ignarus, s,
Igniivus.
Tgniive, c.
* Ignitus,
Tgnobflis.
Ignorabtlis, c.
Ignoscens, c.
Ignotus,
Tllecebrosus, e,
Illiteratus, 8.
Illustris.
Conl,pa1'alivcs and Superlaiivee. 121
J
Illustrius, Illustrisslme.
Imbecillis.
I IIIbocilltter, c.
Imitabllis.
ImmuFl.is.
I mmansuetus,
Immature, c.
Irnmerfto, s.
Immitis.
Immobilis, c.
Irnmoderiitus.
Immoderate, c.
Immundus.
Irnparatus, s.
Impatiens, s.
Impatienter,
Impeditus.
Impensus.
Impense,
1mperiosus.
Ilnperiose.
Imperitus.
Impefite.
Impotrabtlis, c.
Implacabiltter, c.
Irnportunus.
Importune.
Importuosus, s,
Impotens.
Impotenter.
Improbus.
Improbe.
Impnidens.
Irnprudenter, c.
Irnprideus.
Impudenter,
Irnpudicus,
Irnpune.
Irnpunitus, c.
*Impuratus, 8.
Irnpurus.
Impure, e.
Inrequalis.
Inamabllis, c.
Iruinis.
Incautus.
Incaute, c.
Incertus.
Incitatus.
, Incivilfter.
Inclemens, c.
Inclementer, c.
Inolinatus, c.
Iricoltimis.
Incommode.
Incomptus, c.
Inconsideriituo.
Inconsiderate, 1
Inconstans.
Inoonstanter, s.
Inconsulte, c.
Incorruptus,
Incorrupte, c.
Incredibtlis, c.
Incultus, c.
Inculte, Co
122 Guide to Latin Conversationc
Indecens,
Indecenter.
Indignans, 8.
Indignus.
Indigne.
Indiltgens, c.
Indiligenter, c.
Indoctus.
Indocte, c.
Indnlgens.
Indulgenter,
Industrie, c.
I neff'Icax, c.
Ineptus,
Inepte.
Iners.
*Ineruditus, s.
Infieetus, c.
Inficete, s,
Infacundus, c.
Infans.
* Infecundus, c.
Infelix.
Infensus.
Infense, c. emus.
Inferus, inferior, inf'I-
Infra, inferius.
Infestus.
Infeste.
Infidelis.
Infirmus,
Inflatus, c.
Inflate, c.
I nfortuniituse
Infrtquenso
Ingeni6sus.
Ingeni6se.
Ingens, c.
Ingratus,
Inhonestus.
Inhumiinus.
Inhumiine;»,
Inimicus.
Inimice..e.
Iniquus,
Inique.
Injucunde, c.
Injuri6sus, c.
Injuri6se,c.
* Injurius.
Injustus.
Injuste, e.
Irmocens.
Innocenter. \
Inordinatus,
Iriquietus.
Inquinatus.
Insalubris,
Insiinus.
Insane, c.
Insatiabtlis, Co
Inscitus.
Inscite, 8.
Insidiosus.
Insidi6se, e:
Insignia.
and Superiaiioee. 123
Irisigntter, c. Inverecundus.
Insignitus, c. Irrvidiosus.
Insipiens. Invidi6se, c.
Insolens, Invisus,
Insolenter. Invite.
* Insperatus, 8. . Irrvitus, 8.
Irisperiite, c. Involfitus, 8.
Instans, C. * Ipse, i psisslmus,
Instanter. Iracundus,
Instructus. Iracunde, 8.
Instructe, C. Iratus,
Insulsus, 8. Irate, c.
t"
Insulse. Irrevocabllis, c.
Integer. Irritatus, c.
Integre,8.
Internperans, Jactans.
Intemperantel', c. Jactanter.
Internperatus. Jejiinus, c.
Iritensus. Jejiine, c.
Intense, c. [mus, Jocose, c.
Internus, interior, intl- J ucundus.
Interne, interius, inttme, Jucunde.
Intestabllis. c. Junctus.
Intolerabtlis, c. Juratus,8.
Intolerans, Justus.
Intoleranter. Juste.
Intorte, C. J uvenilis, c.
111tractabflis, c. Juvenis, c.
Inusitiitus, c.
Inusitate, c. Laborifisus,
Inutflis. Labori6se.
Inutiliter. Leetus,
Invahdus. Leete,
124 GU1·dc to Latin- Oonvereation.
Languldus.
Langulde.
Lanugin6sus, c.
Largus.
Large.
Lascivus.
Latus.
Late.
Laudabllis, c.
Laudabilrter, c.
Laudatus.
Laudate.
Lautus.
Laute.
Laxiitus, c.
Laxus.
Laxe.
Lectus.
Leete,
Lenis.
Leniter.
Lentus.
Lente.
Leptdus.
Leptde.
Levis, c.
Levtter.
Libens.
Libenter.
Liber.
Libere, c.
Liberal is.
Liberaltter.
Libidin6sus.
Liberiitus, c.
Licens, c.
Licentel', c.
Licentiosus, e,
Limiitus, c.
Limate, c.
Limpidus..
Liqurdus.
Liqulde,c.
Litteriitua,
Litteriite, c.
Livtdus, s.
Locuples.
Longinquus, c.
Longinque, c.
Longus.
Longe..
Loquax,
Lucrdus,
Luclde.
Lucrosus,
Luctuosus,
Luctuose, c.
Luculentus.
Lutulentus, c.
Luxuri6sus.
. Luxuriose, c.
Macer.
Madtdus, c.
Magniflcus.
Magniffee,
7
.....-
ana Snperlativeso 125
-- 1
t
I
Magnopere.
Magnus, major, maxi...
[mus, maximopere.
Magis, maxfme, .
Maledicens.
Maleflcus, s,
Malevolens, s.
Malignus,
Maligne, c.
Malitiose,
Malus, pejor, pesstmus.
Male, pejus, pesslme.
Manifestus.
Manifeste.
Mansuetus.
\{- Mansuete, c.
Matiirus,
Mature.
Memorabtlis, c.
Momoriitus, 8.
Mendax,
Mendrcus, 8.
Mendosus, c.
Mend6se, s,
Meriicus, c.
Merrtus. s.
Mer'lto,8.
Minax.
Minaclter, c.
Miniitus,
Minute.
Mi1'abllis.
Mirabiltter, c.
Miriflcns, c.
Miser.
J\1isere.
J\1:iserabllis, c.
Miscrabiltter, c.
Miserlcors, c;
Mitis.
Mite.
MobIlis.
Moderiitus.
Moderate.
Modestus.
Modeste.
Modulatus,
Modulate, c.
Molestus.
Moleste.
Mollis.
Moillter.
Monstruosus, 8.
Moriitirn, c.
Mordax.
Mordacrter, c.
Morosus, c.
Morose, s.
Mortalis, s,
Multus, plus, plurtmus.
Multum, plus, plurtmum.
Mundus.
MunifIcus, 8.
Munitus.
Munite, c.
Muscosus, C.'
126 G 1 ~ i d e to Latin Conve1'sat.zon"
Mutabllis.
Nasiitus.
Nefandus, s,
Neglectus, :
Negltgens, c.
Negligenter.
Negotiosus, c.
Nequam, nequior, ne-
Nequiter. [quisslmus,
Nervosus, c.
Nervose, c.
Niger.
Nitens, c.
Nitrdus,
Nobllis.
*Nobilfter, e.
* Nominatus, s.
Notabilis, c.
Notabiltter,
Notatus.
Notus.
Novus, s,
Nove, e.
Noxius, c.
Noxiosus, s,
Nudus, c.
Numerosus,
Numerose,
Nupel', nuperrnne.
obeeriitus, c.
Obediens,
Obedienter, c.
Obesus, s.
Obfirmatus, c.
<Vbligatns, c.
Obscenus,
Obscene.
Obsciirus.
Obscure.
Obsequens,
Obsequenter, s,
Observans.
Observanter, s.
Obsoletus,
Obsolete, c.
Obstiniitus.
Obstinate.
Obtfisus, c.
Occultus.
Oeeulte.
Oceupatus;
Ocyor, ocysslmus,
Oclter,
Oculfitus, s,
* Ooulissimus.
Odiosus.
Odoratus,
Offensus, c.
Officiosus.
Officiose.
Omissus, Co
Onerosus.
Opacus.
Operosus.
CompaTatives and Superlatives. 127
I
I
,
I
t
j
Operase, c.
Opinlus, c.
Opini6sus, s,
Opportunus.
Opportiine.
Optabllis, c.
Optablliter, c.
Optiitus.
Opulentus.
Opulente.
Ordiniitus.
Ornatus,
Ornate.
Otiosus.
~ a d i t u s .
Pacate, c.
Pallidus.
Paratus.
Parate.
Parcus.
Parce. [mus,
Parvus, minor, mint- ,
Parvum, minus, min-
Patens. [Ime.
Patenter, c.
Patiens.
Patienter.
Pauci.
Pavfdus.
Pauper.
Pauperius.
Pecuniosus.
Penetraliac,
Penttus.
Pensus, c.
Perdttus.
Perennis, c.
Perfectus.
* Perfecte.
Perfidiosus, s,
Perfidi5se, c.
Periculosus,
Periculose.
Peritus.
Perite,
Perj iirus, s.
Perluctdus, c.
Pernici5sus.
Pernici5se, c.
Pernicrter, c.
Persequens, e.
Perseverans,
Perseveranter,
Perspectus, e.
Persuasus, e.
Pertmax.
Pertinaclter.
Perturbjitus.
Pervagiitus.
Perversus,
Pervtcax.
Pervicacrter,
Pervulgiitus,
Pesttlens,
Pettilans,
128 Gaide to Latin Conversation
Petulanter.
Piger.
Pigre, c.
Pilosus,o.
Pinguis.
Pius,8.
Pie, 8.
Placabtlis, c.
Placatus,
Placate, c.
Plaefdus.
Plactde, c.
Planus.
Plane.
Plenus.
Plene.
Plumbosus, 8 ~ '
Politus.
Polite.
Pollenter, c.
* Polhitus, c.
Ponderosus,
Populiiris,
Porrectus, c.
Portentosus,
Portuosus, [tremus,
Posterns, posterior, pos-
Posterius, postremo,
Potens. [postremum,
'?otenter.
Potis.
Potius.
Prrecellens,
Prreeliirus.
Prcx.'cHire, e.
Preefractus, Co
Prrefracte, c.
Prrenobllis, Co
Prrepollens.
.Prresens..
Preestabtlis,
.Prrestans.
Prrestanter, 8.
Pravus.
Prave,8.
Pressus, c.
Presse, c.
Preti5sus.
Preti5se, c.
Probabflis.
Probabiltter, 6,
Probiitus,
Probus.
Probe, 8.
Procax.
Procaetter.
Procerus,
Procere, c.
Proclivis, c.
Proclivrter, Co
Productus.
Producte, c.
Profligiitus, 8.
Profluenter, c.
Profundus.
Profunde,
Con'tparatives and Superlatives. 129
.
*Proffisus,
Proffise.
Projectus.
Prolixus, c.
ProIixe, c.
PrOlulnens, c.
PrOll1ptuS.
Prompte,
Pronus, c. [Ime,
prope, propius, prox-
c.
Propense, c.
Properans, c.
Properanter.
Propinquus, c.
Proptor, proxfmus,
Prosper.
Prospere,
Protectus.
Protervus, c.
Proterve, C.
Provectus.
Provldens.
Providenter, 8.
Prudens..
Prudenter.
Pudens.
Pudenter..
Pudicus,
Pudice, c.
Puerilis, c.
Pugnax.
Pugnaclter,
9
Pulcher.
Pulchre.
Pumicosus, c.
Pumflus,
Purgiitus,
Purus.
Pure.
Putldus,
Putrde, c.
Putus..e,
Qnresitus,
Qurcstuosus,
Qurcstuose.
Quietus.
Quiete,8.
Raeemosns, 8.
Ramosus.
Rancldus.
Rapax.
Raptdus,
Raptde, c.
Rarns.
Rare,
Recens.
Recenter..s,
Recondltus, 8@
Rectus.
Recte.
Reductus, c.
Refertus.
Refuse.
130 Guide to Latin Conversation,
Regalis.
Religiosus,
Religiose.
Remissus.
Remisse, c.
. Remotus.
Remote, c.
Req uietus, c.
Resinosus, B.
Resolutus, c.
Restrictus, c.
Restricte, B.
B.
Retractatus, c.
Retractus.
Reverens.
Reverenter.
Ridiculosus, B.
Rldiculus, B.
Rigfdus, c.
TUg-rde, c.
Robustus,
Rotundus.
Rubens.
Rubel"
Rubicundus, c.
Rufus, c.
Rugosus, c.
Rustfce, c.
Sacer, B.
Sacriitns.
* Sacrilegus, B.
Seepe,
Srevus,
Breve.
Sagax.
Sagactter.
Salax, B•
Salsus.
Salse.
Sahiber,
Salubrlter.
Salutaris.
Sanabilis... c
Sanctus.
Sancte,
Sanus.
Sane, c.
*Sapl'dus.
* Sapfde, 8.
Sapiens.
Sapienter.
Satior.
Satius.
Satur, saturior,
Saturatus, c.
Scaber, c.
Sceleratus,
Scelerfite.
Scelestus.
Sciens.
Scienter.
Scitus.
Scite.
Scrupulosus, e,
Contparatives and Superlatives. 131
Scrupul6se.
Secretns.
Secreto, c.
Secundlls.
Secunde.
Securus, c.
Secure, c.
Sedutns.
Sediti6sns, 8.
Sediti6se.
Seductus, c.
Segnis, c.
Segnlter, c.
Sene x, senior.
Separatim, c.
Sequax, c.
Sequior.
Sequins.
Serenns.
Servans, 8.
Berns.
Sero.
Severns.
Severe.
Siccus.
Signiflcans.
Significantel'.
Silvester.
Simllis.
Similtter.
Simplex.
Simpliclter.
Sincerus.
Sincere, c.
Sinu6se, c.
Socordlter, c.
Solers,
Solerter,
Solfdus. e,
Soltde, c.
Sollicltus.
Solltcite.
Soliitus.
Soliite, c.
Sonans, c.
SordIdus.
Sparsus, c.
Spati6sus.
Spati6se, c.
Speci6sns.
Speci6se.
Spectiitus.
Spectate, 8.
Spinosus, c.
Spissus.
Spisse, c.
Splendens, c.
Splendrdus.
Splendlde.
Spoliiitus.
Spurcus.
Spurce.
Squalldus, c.
Squallde, c.
Stabtlis, c.
Stabiliter, c,
1. 32 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Sterooriitus, s,
Sterllis, c.
Stolrdus.
Stomachosns, c.
Stoillachose, C.
Streuuus.
Strictus.
Strigosus.
Studiosus.
Studiose.
Stultus.
Stulte,
Stupfdus, s.
Suavis.
Suavfter.
Subjectns, c.
Subjecte, s,
SubHitus.
Sublate, c.
Sublestus,
Snhl'in1is
7
c.
Sublime.
Sublimtter, c.
Submissus, c.
Suhmisse, c.
Substrictns, c.
Subtilis.
Subtillter.
Succensns.
Snmmisse, e.
Surnptuose, c.
Superans, c.
Superbus.
Snperbe. (111US.
Superus, superior, supre-
Su per, superior, suprerne
[and supremum.
Supinus, c.
Surdus.
Suspectus.
oX· Suspensus.
Suspieiosus, s.
Suspiciose, c.

Tardus.
Tarde.
Tectus.
Tecte, c.
Temperans.
'I'emperanter, c.
Ternperatus,
Temperate, c.
Tempestivus, c.
Tempestive, c.
Temperi, temperi us.
Tenax.
Tenaclter, c.
Tenebricosus,
Tener.
Tenere.
Tensus, c.
Tenuis.
Tenufter.
TepIdus.
Teptde, c.
Cornparatives and Superlative8. 136
Teres, teretior. Valde.
Tt>rribl'lis. Valens.
* Tersus, s, Valenter, c.
Testat us, c. '7alfdus.
Teter. Vallde.
Tetre. Vanus.
Turbiitus, c. Vastus,
Turbl'dus. Vaste.
Turbulentus. Vecors.
Turbulente, c. Vegetus.
Turpis. Vehemens.
Turplter. Vehementer,
Tutus. Velox.
Tute. Veloclter.
Vendibl'lis, c.
Uberior, 8. Veneniitus, c•.
TJberius and uberrlme. Venerabtlis.
Ulterior, ultfrnus. Venosus, c.
Ultra, ulterius, ultlme, Ventosus, s.
[Ultllll0 and ultunum. Venustus.
Umbrosus. Venuste.
Unctus, c. Verax, c.
c. Verbosus,
Urbanus. verbose, c.
Urbiine, c. Verecundus,
Usitiitus. Verecunde, c.
Usitiite, c. Verisimflis,
Utens, c. Versii tus,
Utflis. Verus.
UtIliter. Vere.
*Vestitus.
Vaeuus, 8. Veternosus, 8.
Vafer, s, Vetus, 8.
134 Guide to Latin Oonversatio1t.
Vetustus.
Vetuste.
Vieinus, c.
Vigllans.:
Vigilanter.
Villis.
Vihter,

Vin6sus.
Violentus.
Violenter.
Viridis.
Virtde.
Virillter.
Viti6sus.
Viti6se.
Vivax.
Vivldus, c.
Vivlde, c.
Vocabtlis, c.
Vociilis.
*Voluptu6sus, SG
* Voluptu6se, So
Vorax, c.
Vulgatus.
VERBA QUORUM PRlETERITA ET
SUPINA TIRONIBUS DIFFICUL-
TATIS ALIQUID AFFERRE
POSSUNT.
VERBS WHOSE PRETERITES AND
SUPINES MAY PRESENT DIFFI-
CULTIES TO BEGINNERS.
Abscondo, abscondi,
abscondltum, abscon-
dere, to hide.
Adipiscor, adeptus
sum, adipisci, to acquire.
Adolesco, ado levi,
adultum, adolescere, to
ql'olV ui),
. Affiigo, affiixi, afflic-
tum, aftligere, to ooer-
throw.
Ago, egi, actum, agere,
tocondnct, to do.
Algeo, alsi, alsum, al-
gere. to be cold.
A.llicio, allexi, allec-
tum, allicere, to seduce,
to auraet,
Allido, allisi, allisum,
allidere, to come in con-
tact with.
Alo, alui, alttum and
altum; alere, to nourish,
Amicio, amicui, and
amixi (rare), amictum,
amicire, to cover, to
clothe.
Ango, anxi, angere, to
choke" to suffocate.
Annuo, annui, annu-
ere, to accord, to consent
to.
Aperio, aperui, aper-
tum, aperire, to open.
Arceo, arcui, arcere,
to ward off, to remove.
135
136 Guide to Latin (kmoereation.
Arguo, argui, argii-
tum, arguere, to p?'ove,
t» accuse.
Aspicio, aspexi, as-
pectum, aspicere, to be-
Iwl(i.
.Aveo, avere, to desire
eoge1'ly.
Augeo, auxi, auctum,
'augere, to increase.
Bibo, bibi, bibitum,
bibere, to drink.
Cado, cecldi, casum,
cadere, tofall.
Credo, cecidi, cresum,
osedere, to suike, to cut.
Caleo, calui, calescere,
calere, to be uiarm,
Cano, ceotni, cantum,
canere, to sin.g.
Capio, cepi, captum,
capere, to take.
Carpo, carpsi, carp-
tum, carpere, to tear
away.
Caveo, cavi, cautum,
cavere, to take e-ire.
Cedo, cessi, cessum,
cedere, to go, to qice way.
Censeo, censui, cen-
sum, censere, to think:
Cerno, crevi, eretum,
cenere, to see.
Claude, clausi, clan-
sum, claudere, to sltui:
Coalesco, coalui, co-
alttum, coalere and coal-
escere, to g1'OW up.
Ccepio,coepi, ceeptum,
co-pare, to begin.
Coerceo, coercui, co-
ercttnm, coercere, tocou-
fine, repress.
Collide, collisi, colli-
sum collidere, to dash
again. st.
Colo, colui, cultum,
colere, to culiieaie.
Comminiscor, com-
mentus sum, commin-
isci, tn iureu,
Como, comsi and
compsi, comtum and
comptum, comere, to
comb.
Comperio, comperi,
compertum, comperire,
to discover, to learn.
Compesco, compescui,
compescere, to contain.
Compingo, compi'gi,
compactum, cornpin-
gere, to thrust, to drn»,
Concresco, eoncrevi,
concretum, concreFcere,'
to [/1010 f0.'Jcthe7·.

!
Concupio, concuprvi,
concup'itum, concupere,
to cooci; to long
Condo, condtdi, con-
dltllll1, condere, to hide.
Condio, condii, and
ivi, conditum, condire,
tv season.
Confligo, oonflixi, con-
.flictUll1, confligere, to
fight.
Congruo, congrui,
congruere, to come to-
gether.
Consto, consttti, cons-
tatum and constltum,
constiire, to slop, to be,
to cost,
Consulo, consului,
consultull1, consulere, to
lOn::;l1lt.
Consiimo, consnmpsi,
conSulnptunl, consu-
mere, to consume.
Contingo, oontrgi, con-
tactum, contingere, to
arrire (It, to attain.
Coquo, coxi, coctum,
eoquere, to cook.
Corrtgo, eorrexi, cor-
rectum, corrigere, to
chastise.
Corripio, corripui,
correptum, corripere, tv
seize.
Credo, credidi, credl-
tum, credere, to believe.
Crepo, crepui, crepl-
tum, erepare, to crackle;
to resound:
Cresco, crevi, cretum,
crescere, to
Cubo, enbui and eu-
biivi, cubltum, cubiire, to
lie in bed.
Cudo, eudi, cusum, eu-
dere, to beat, toforge.
Cupio, cupii and cu-
pivi, cupitum, cupere, to
desire.
Curro, eucurri, cur-
sum, currere, to run.
Do, dedi, datum, dare,
to give.
Decerno, decrcvi, de-
cretum, decernere, to de-
cide, to decree.
Deferveo, defervui,
defervere and deferves-
cere, to cease to boit.
Deleo, delevi, dele-
tum, del ere, to efface, to
destroy.
Demo, demsi and
dempsi, demtum and
138 Guide to Latin Oonoersaiion.
demptum, demere, to re-
move, uiithdroso.
Deprtmo, depressi, de-
pressum, deprimere, to
depress, to sink.
Descendo, descendi,
descensum, descendere,
to descend.
Desmo, desivi and de-
sii, desltum, desinere,
to cease.
Desisto, destlti, destt-
tum, de-istere, to desist.
Diltgo, dilexi, dilec-
tum, di ligere, to cherish.
Dirlmo, diremi, di-
remtum and diremp-
tum, dirimere, to part,
to separate.
Diripio, diripui, di-
reptum, diri pere, to lew'
asunder.
Diruo, dirui, dirti-
tum, diruere, to demol-
'ish, to destroy.
Disco, didfci, dicttum
(ra.re), discere, to learn.
Divtdo, divisi, divi-
sum, dividere, to dioide.
Doleo, dolui, dolttum,
dolere, to be in pain.
Doceo, docui, doctum,
docere, to teach.
Domo, domui, domf-
tum, domiire, to tame.
Duco, duxi, ductum,
ducere, to lead.
Duresco, dnrui, du-
rere and durescere, to
grow liard.
Edo, edtdi, esum and
estum, edere, to eat.
Edo, edtdi, edltum,
edere, to publish, to say.
Elicio, elicui, eliot-
tum, elicere, to dras» out.
Elido, elisi, elisum,
elidere, tobruise,togrind.
Ellgo, elegi, electum,
eligere, to choose, to elect.
Eluceo, eluxi, elu-
cere, to shine, to qliiie:..
Emo, emi, emptum,
emere, to buy.
Emungo, emunxi,
emunctum, emungere,
to blowthe nose.
E n ~ c ~ enecui, eneca-
tum and enectum, enec-
are, tofill.
Eruo, erui, erntum,
eruere, to draw out, to
subcert.
Eviido, evfisi,evasum,
evadere, to go out, to es-
cape.
Verbs.
1 3 ~
Excello, excellui, ex-
eellere, to excel.
Expergiscor, exper-
rectus sum, expergisci,
to awake.
Expleo, explevi, ex-
pletum, explere, to fill
again.
Explode, expl6si, ex-
plosnm, explodere, to
hiss, to disapprove-
Exprlmo, expressi,
expressuID, exprimere,
to express.
Exquiro, exquisrvr,
exquisitum, exquirere,
to seekagain, to enquire.
Exsero, exserui, ex-
serttnu, exserere, to put
forth.
ExsiIio, exsilii and
exsilui, exsultum, ex-
silire, to leaip forth, to go
out."
Falla, fefelli, falsum,
fallere, to deceive.
Farcio, farsi, fartum,
farcire, to stnj]' tofill.
Fateor, fassus sum,
fateri, to confess.
Faveo, favi, fautum,
favere, tofavor.
Ferio, ferire, to strike.
Fero, tuli, latum,
ferre, to bear.
Fido, fisus sum, fi-
dere, to confide.
Figo, fixi, fixum, fi-
gere, tofix, to plant.
Findo, fidi, fissum, fin-
dere, to cleave.
Fingo, finxi, fictum,
fingere, tofeign, to fl'ep1'e-
sent. to make.
Flecto, flexi, flexum,
flectere, to curb, to bend.
Fleo, flevi, fletum,
flere, to 'Weep.
Floreo, florui, florere
and floreseere, toflourish,
FIno, fluxi, 11uxum,
f uere, toflow.
Fodio, fodi, fossum,
fodere, to dig.
Foveo, fovi, fotum,
fovere, to inflarne.
Frango, fregi, frae-
,tUl11, frangere, to break,
Fremo, fremui, freml-
tum, fremere, to tremble.
Frendo and frendeo,
frendere and frendere,
to gnash the teeth.
Frieo, frieui, frica-
tum and frietum, f1'i-
care,"to rub.
140 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Fruor, fruttus and
fructus sum, frui, to en-
joy.
Fugio, fugi, \ugltu:m,
fugcre, to
Fulcio, fulci, fUltUIU,
fulcire, to1J1'op. to stay.
Fulgeo, fulsi, fulgere,
to shine, to briqhien;
Fnndo, fudi, fusum,
fundere, to pOU1'.
Gemo, gemui, gemt-
tum, gelllere, to groan.
Gero, gessi, gestum,
gerere, to ca1'ry on, to
produce.
Gigno, genui, genf-
tum, gignere, to bring
[orth,
Gradior, gressus sum,
gradi, to'walk, to advance.
Heereo, heesi, hresum,
hrerere, to stick; to hesi-
tale.
Haurie, hausi, hans-
tum, haurire, to drawup.
Horreo, horrui, hor-
rere and horrescere, to
stand on end.
leo, iei, ietum, icere,
to st1'ike, to uoumd.
Ignosco, ignovi, ign6-
tum, ignocere, topardon,
Impingo, impegi, im-
pactum, impingere, to
throw.
Iricfdo, inctdi, inci-
dere tofall.
Incido, incidi, inci-
sum, incidere (ccedo), to
cut.
Incumbo, incubui, in-
cubnum, inCU1l1bere, to
lie on, to exert ouesel].
Indulgeo, indulsi, in-
dultum, indulgere, to be
indv}geut touard, .
I ngruo, ingrui, in-
gruere, to attack, to fall
'LtpOIl.
I ntueor, intuftus SUIll,
Intueri, to look with at-
tention.
Irascor, iriitus, sum,
irasci, to get a1lfJ1'y,
J aceo, jacui, jacere, to
lie doum, to reclime, etc.
Jacio, jed, j actum,
jaeere, to throui, to cast.
Jubeo, jnssi, jUSSlUl1,
jubere, to order.
J uvo, juvi, jutum, ju-
Yare, to aid.
Labo, l)SUS sum, lad
bi,- tofoll,
Lredo, Iresi, Isesum,
lredere, to wound.
Lambo, Iambi.. lam-
bere, to lick.
Langneo, langui, lan-
guere, to lang!t£sh. _
Lateo.Jatui, latere, to
Idde.
Lavo, lavi, lautum
and lotum, lavere and
lavare, to wash.
Lino, levi and livi,
Iitum, linere, to smear,
to cover.
Linquo, liqui, lin-
qnere, to leaoe.
Luceo, luxi, lucero,
to siiine.
Ludo, lusi, lusum.Ju-
dere, to ploy.
Lugeo, luxi, luetum,
lugere, to 'Weep.
Mando, mandi, 111an-
stun, mundsre, 10 chew.
Maneo, mansi, 111an-
sum, munere, to dwell.
Medeor, mederi, to
cure. to carefor.
Mergo, mersi, mer-
sum, mergere, to pltiJnge.
Meto, messui, mes-
sum, metere, to harvest,
Metior, mensus sum,
metlri, to measure.
141
Metno, metui, metti-
tum, metuere, to[ear,
Misceo miscui, mix-
bun and mistum, mis-
cere, to mix, to join.
Misereor, misertus
sum, misereri, to lunie
pity.
Mitto, misi, missum,
mittere, to send.
Mcereo, mrestus sum,
mcercre, to aff!ict.
Malo, 1110lui, molt-
turn, molere, to qrind,
Mordeo, memordi,
1110rsum, mordere, to
bite.
Moveo, movi, motum,
movere, to mope.
Mulceo, mulsi,mul-
sum, mulcere, to caress.
Mulgeo, mulxi and
mulsi, mulctum and
mulsum, mulgere, ,to
milk.
Nanciscor, .nactus
SUIll, nancisci, to find.
Neco, necni and ne-
ciivi, neciitum and nee-
turn (rote), necare, to
1(, ill.
Necto, nexui, nexum,
nectere.uo knot.
142 Guide to Laii'n Ooncereotion.
Negllgo; neglexi, ne-
glectum, negligere, to
neglect.
Nitor, nisus and nixus
sum, niti, to
Noceo, nocni, noci-
tum, nocere, to harm.
Nosco, novi, notu111,
noscere, to know.
Nubo, nupsi, nuptum,
nubere, to marts).
Obltno, Ifni, livi, evi,
oblttnm, oblinere, to
omoini.
Obllnio, oblinivi, ob-
Iinire, to layover,toerase,
Obliviscor, oblitus
sum, °blivisci, to forget.
Obsideo, obsedi, ob-
obsidere, to be-
Sl.egl'. '
Obsoleo, obsolevi, ObM
soletum, obsolere and
obsolescere, to be obso-
lete.
Occtilo, oecului, 6C-
cultum, occulere, tohide.
Oleo, olui, olere, to
spread an odor.
Operio, operui, oper-
tum, operire, to cover.
Ordior, orsus sum, 01'-
diri, to begin.
Orior, ortus sum,
oriri, to be born.
Paciscor, pactus sum.
pacisci, to treat.
Pando, pandi, pan-
sum and passum, pan-
dere, to extend.
Pango, panxi 01' pe-
plgi, pactum, pangere,
tofasten in.
Parco, peperci and
parsi (old), parcttum
and parsuID, parcere, to
spare.
Pareo, parui, part-
tum, parere, to obey.
Pario, peperi, par-
tum, parere, to bring
forth.
Pasco, pavi, pastum,
pascere, to nourish.
Pateo, patui, patere
and patescere, tobeopen,
evident.
Paveo, pavi, pavere,
to be afraid,
Pecto, pexi and pexui,
pexum and pectltum,
pectere; to comb.
Pello, pepuli, pulsum,
pellere, to push, to strike.
Pellicio, pellexi, pel-
lectum, pellicere, to at-
tract.
Verbs. 143
Pendeo, pependi, pen-
dere, to hang, to be sus-
pende(/. .
Pendo, pependi, pen-
SUIll, pendere, to weigh.
Percello, perculi, pel'-
CUISUlll, percellere, to
st'l'ike.
Percutio, percussi,
perCUSSUll1, pereutere,
to beat.
Perdo, perdtdi, pcrdt-
tum, perdere, to lose.
Peto, petii, and pe-
tivi, petitum, petere, to
seek, to ask.
Pingo, pinxi, pictum,
pingere, to paint.
Pinso, pinsui, pin-
sum, pinsitum and pis-
tum, pinsere, to qritui,
to poumd,
Plaudo, plausi, plau-
sum, plaudere, to ap-
plaud.
Plecto, plectere, to
~ ( ) h 1 : P , to punish. .
Polio, polivi and po-
Iii, politum, polire, to
polish.
Polleo, poll ere, to "be
powmf
u1

Polluo, pollui, polhi-
tum, poll uere, to spoil;
Pono, posui, posttum,
ponere, to rest, to place,
Posco, pop asci, poscl-
tum, poscere, to ask.
Poto, potavi, pota-
tum and potum, po-
tare, to drink.
Prtesto, pnestiti, prres-
tttum and prrestatum,
prtestiire, to surpass, to
excel,
Prandeo, prandi,
pransum, prandere, to
breokfast.
Premo, pressi, pres-
SUIll, premere, to press.
Prodo, prodtdi, prodt-
tum, prodere, to discover.
Proficiscor, profectus
sum, proficisci, to depart.
Promo, promsi and
prompsi, prorntum and
promptum, promere, to
drtuofrom,
Proripio, prortput,
proreptum, proripere,
to lake off, to drag alotu],
Pungo, pupngi and
punxi, punctum, pun-
gere, toprick, to stiug.
144 Guide to Latin Conuersaiion.
Putreo, pntrui, putrcre
and putrescre, to rot
Qusero, qurosivi, qure-
situIn, qurerere, to «cek.
Quatio, quassum, qua-
tere, t0 ke.
Queror, questus sum,
queri, to compluin:
Quiesco, quievi, quie-
tUIH, quiescere, to rest:
Rado, rasi, rasum, ra-
to SC1'(/pe off.
Rapio, rapui, rapturn,
ra pere, to beur away.
Recrdo, rectdi, recii-
sum, recidere (caelo), to
relapse.
Recido, recidi, reci-
sum, recidere (creJu), to
cut. to ('U/ (df:
Reddo, reddfd i, rcddt-
turn, reddere, to g1've
buck.
Refello, refellere, to

Rego, rexi, rectum,
regere, to reiqn,
Heminiscor, reminis-
ci, to recoiled:
Repo, repsi, reptum,
rep ere, to CTO'l,Cl.
Reor, ratus sum, reri,
to think, to believe.
Resipio, resipui, resi-
pere and resi piscere, ((J
fee'.
Respicio, respexi, res-
pectum, respicere, to
look at.
Respondeo, respondi,
responsum, respondere,
to
Respuo, respui, res-
puere, to reject, to repel.
Retundo, retndi, retii-
sum and retunsum, 1'e-
tundere, to blunt; to re-
pulse.
Rideo, risi, risum, ri-
dere, to Iauph.
Rigeo, rigui, rigere
and rigescere, tofreeze.
Rodo, rosi, rosum, 1'0'"
dere, to g'l/CLW.
Rumpo, rupi, rup-
tum, rumpere, to break,
to se]Jurate.
Ruo, rui, ruftum and
rutum, ruere, to rusls
forth, tofull doum.
Salio, salii and salui,
saltum, salire, tojU1np.
Sallio, saIii and sa-
Iivi, salitum, salire and
sallire, to salt.
Verbs.
145
Sancio, sanxi, sanci-
tum and sanctum, sane-
ire, to establish, to sa1.
LC
-
tion.
Sapio, sapivi and sa-
pui, sapere, to hate a rel-
ish, to be ioise.
Sarcio, sarci, sartum,
aarcire, topiece, torepair.
Satilgo, satac-
tUlH, satagere, to sat/sly·
Scindo, scidi, scissum,
in deuue.
Sciseo, sci vi, sci tum,
tu decree, to de-
cide.
Seeo, secui, sectum,
seeare, fo C11Jt, to cut oj:
Sedeo, sedi, sessum,
sedere, to sit down.
Senesco, senui, se-
nere and senescere, to
grow •
Ssntio, sensr, sensum,
sent ire, to perceive, to
think, to {eel.
Sepelio, sepelii and
sepeEvi, sepultum, sepe-
lire, to burs}.
Sepio, sepsi, septum,
sepire, to surround.
Sero, sevi, satum, se-
rere, to sow.
10
Sero, serui, sertum,
serere, to interlace.
Serpo, serpsi, serp-
tum, serpere, to creep.
Sido, sidi and sedi,
sessum, sidere, to sit
down.
Singultio, singultire,
to sob, to groan.
Sino, sivi, situm, si-
nere, to permit.
Sisto, stiti, statum,
sistere, to stop.
Soleo, solrtus sum, so-
lere, to beaccustomed.
Solvo, solvi, soliitum,
solvere, tountie, to break.
Sono, sonui, sonttum,
soniire, to sound, to rimq:
Sorbeo, sorbui, sorp-
tUlTI, sorbere, to moalloio.
Sperno, sprevi, spre-
tUIU, spernere, todeepise.
· Splendeo, splendui,
splendere, to shine, to
glisten.
Spondeo, spopondi,
sponsum, spondere, to
solemnlypromise.
Spuo, spui, SputUIU,
spuere, to spit.
Sto, steti, statum,
stare, to stand.
146 Guide to Latin Coniereaiion.
I
Sterno, stravi, stra-
tUITI, sternere, to spread.
Sterto, stertui, ster-
tere, to snore.
Strepo, strepui, strept-
tum, strepere, to resounui:
Strideo, stridere, tore-
echo, to resmuid,
Stringo, strinxi, stric-
tUI11, stringere, tobind, to
draw together.
Struo, strnxi, struc-
tum, struere, to construct.
Studeo, studui, stu-
dere, to st'udy.
Suadeo, suiisi, suasum,
suadere, to persuade.
Sugo, suxi, suctum,
sugere, f0 suck.
SUIno, sumsi and
sumpsi, sumptum, su-
mere, to take.
Surge, surrexi, sur-
rectum, surgere, to rise.
Tabeo, tabui, tab ere,
to melt away.
Taceo, tacui, taottum,
taeere, to be silent.
Tango, tetlgi, tactum,
tangere, totouch.
Tego, texi, tectum,
tegere, to cover.
'I'exo, texui, textum,
texere, to weave.
'I'emno, temsi and
tempsi, temtum and
tomptum, temnere, to
despise.
Tendo, tetendi, ten-
tum, tensum, tendere, to
Sl1'etch out.
Teneo, tenui, tentum,
tenere, to hold.
Tergeo and tergo, ter-
si, tersum, tergere and
tergere, to rub, to clean
Tero, trivi, tritum, te-
r ~ r e , to grind, to poundo
Timeo, timui, timere,
tofear.
Tingo, tin xi, tinctum,
tingere, to dye
Tollo, susttili, sublii-
tum, tollere, to bear
U'way.
Tondeo, totondi, ton-
sum, tondere, to sheor~
Tono, ton ui, tonttum,
tonare, to thumder.
Torpeo, torpui, tor-
pere, to be torpid.
Torqueo, torsi, tor-
sum and tortum, tor-
quere, to twigt.
Torreo, torrui, tos-
tum, torrere, to d1'y, to
1'0(18t.
VerOs. 147
;-
:0
Traho, traxi, trae-
tum, rrahere, to draw.
Transilio, transilivi,
transilii and transilui,
transultunl, transilire,
to leap.
Tremo, tremui, tre-
JIlere, to tremble.
Trudo, trusi, trusum,
trudere, toshove foruxird,
Tueor, tultus SUIll, tu-
eri to amsider, toprotect.
Tundo. tutiidi, tun-
sum and tusnm, tun-
dere, to strilce. . _
Turgeo, tursi, turgere,
to swelt.
·Uleiseor, ultus sum,
ulcisei, to avenge.
Dngo, unxi, un ctuIll,
ungere, to an?int.
U1'0, USSI, ustum,
urere, to burn.
Urgeo, ursi, ursum,
urgere, to urqe, to p r e " ' ~ ' 4
Utor, usus SUIll, uti,
to use.
Valeo, valui, valere,
to be strong, well.
Veho, vexi, veetum,
vehere, to draw.
Vello, velli and vulsi,
vulsum, vellere, to dros»
forth.
Vendo, vendidi, ven-
dttum, vendere, to sell.
Veneo, venii and ve-
ni vi, venttum, venire,
to be sold.
Verro verri versum
verrere, 'to swe;poff. ' .
v erto, verti, versum,
vertere, to turn.
Veseor, vesei, to feed
on.
Veto, vetui, vetrtum,
vetare, toforbid,
Video, vidi, visum, vi-
dere, to see.
Vineo, viei, vietum,
vincere, to conquer.
Vineio, vinxi.. vine-
tum, vincire, to tie, to
knot.
Visa, visi, visum, vi-
sere, to examine, to visit.
Vivo, vixi, vietum,
vi vere, to live.
V010, volui velle, to
wish.
Volvo, vol vi, volii-
tum, volvere, to turn
round:
Vomo, vomui, vomr-
tum, vomere, to vomit.
Voveo, vovi, votum,
vovere, to 1'OW, to make a
vow.
DE RATIONE INTERROGANDI ET
SPONDENDI PRlECEPTA
QUlEDAM.
GRAMMATICAL' CONSTRUCTION OF
QUESTION AND ANSWER.
I.-QUESTIONS.
1. There are two kinds of questions: the di-
rect and the indirect, The indirect question is
al ways expressed by a subordinate proposition. In
the seutences ; 'leUme 'Who you are, I wish to know
what he do,:ng, WHO YOU ARE, WHAT HE IS DO-
ING, are indirect questions. The direct question
is put thus: WHO ARE YOU? WHAT IS HE DO-
ING?
I.-DIRECT QUESTIONS.
2. The following pronouns and adverbs are
often used in direct questions: QI1';S, quienani ec-
quie, ecqu,isnmn,
l
uier, for two persons or things;
1 Eequi«, eequisnam, ecquo, ecquando, expect an affirmat.ive
-
Qwid, subject or object of a verb of asking, is used alone
or is followed by a substantive in the nominative, the ac-
cusative, or the genitive case. Quid tibi videtnf? (Oie.) How
148
Question and Answer. 149
does it look. to yf)?t? Quid Ubi nomen. est? (Plaut.)lVhat is
YOU?' namer QllId tn hnminis es t (Ter.) lV!l.at man art thmt?
Quodis always followed by a substantive in the same ease.
Quodscelus commtstt? What crime has he committpd? In-
terrogative pronouns are used only with nouns which ate
e;x:pressed,in the eases which have the same form for the
masculine and neuter. 'rhus we say: Qui rei stlldesf de
qua re lnq/f,e1'is? and not Oti stude.,;? de quo loqueris If
2 With how, why, in Latin, we always employ in prose It
personal mood, as Ow Simulas? (Tel'.) TVlzy d'issimulate '!
(Ju,?' me excrucio t (Cie.) WIlYtorment me?
quoli.s, for quality; quantus, quantum, qU(i1n. for
dhnensions, quantity; quanti, for price, value;
ql.LaJlto, in comparisons; quot, quoties, quotus, 'I'!":
teni, quotuplex, quotuplus, for number; cuju«, for
possession; cujae, for country; ubi,. quo, f.cqno,
unde, qna, quorsUdn, quoreus, utro, uirobi, uirubi, for
place;- quando, ecquando, quamdiu, quamdsulum, for
time; CW', quw'e, quamobrem, quin, for cause, mo-
tive; quomodo, quemadmodum; ut, qui,2 for man-
ner and instrument,
Tel'.
Ter.
Tel'.
Quis hie loquitur?
Tfho speaks lieret
Qui tu es hOlUO?
Who are you?
Quis hie est homo?
Who is this momhere?
Qurenam audiam?
What am I to hearif
Quidnam ineepturus est?
What 'is he to undertake.
dJ
Quid tibi vis? Quid feci?
What do you wish.re What have I done?
Quid est? Quid rides? Quid taees?
What is us Why lct1/,gh.
6l
Why silent?
Ex duobus uter dignior? Quint.
Which is the uiorthier .re
Quanti emisti? Tel'.
How much have you poid fo» it?
Hora quota est? HoI'.
What time is it?
Oujum peeus? .';/ Vir.
Whoseflock?
Cujates estis? Plaut.
Front 'what couni?'y are you?
Ubi vidisti? Ubi qureram? Tel'.
Whe?'e have you seenit? Where shall I seeklit?
Quo hine te agis?
Whither a1'e you going!
Tel'.
all d .Answer. 151
Unde egreditur? Unde id scis? Tel'.
Whence does he depart? fVhence did you learn. that
Quorsum heeopertinent? Cic,
What is the d1'ift of this talk?
Quando gentium? Plaut.
When then?
Quandiu nos eludet? Cic,
Bowlong shall he make sport of 'Us P
Cur simulas igitur? Quin taces? Tel'.
Why dissimulate? fVhy are you not silentP
Quamobl'em id non facis? Tel'.
Why do you not do this?
Ut vales? Qui sciam ? Tel"
Howdo you do? I-Iow may 1 knowitl
Mrecenas quomodo tecum? Hor,
How is 1:t with you, Mrecenus?
3. When the pronouns and adverbs just enu-
merated are not used, the particles ne, au, numquul,
numna?n, nonne, ammon, utrum, may be employed.
When the answer to a question is doubtful, ne
or an is used; ne is always placed after a word,
Tel'.
Plaut.
T:
I
I
152 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
and an. ordinarily begins a subordinate proposi..
tion.'
Novistine Euclionem ?
Do you knowEucl£on?
Obsecro, an non civis est?
Tell me, I p1'ay you" is he a citizen?
4. If the answer expected is to be negative,
num, 11 uniquid, nUrJ11Ie, ?IUrJ11Ulm, are used, in the
beginning of the sentence." -
Nurn cadit in virum bonum mentiri ? Cic,
Is it permitiedti goodman to lie?
Numquid vos duas habetis patrias? Cie.
Have you two courdries f.
Numne Deum ipSUIU vidistis? Cic.
]-lmle you seen Godf.
5. If the answer expected is to be affirmative,
nonne, annon, n ihilne, are used.
Nonne id satis erat?
Was not that enough?
Tel'.
1 An and anntm serve to announce the second part of an
Interrogation which has two members, and correspond to
or. They begin a proposition which stands as an explana-
tion or as an answer to another; we could not sayan no-
visti Eucb"onpm? .
2 Numquiii is stronger than num;
Question and A.nswer. 153
Pater ejus rediit, annon? Tel'.
Has hi»[allier returned 01' not '!
Nequidquam liberum te dicis, annon est metus
omnis servitus? Cie,
In oai» do you call yourselffree ; is not every jew' a
hondage?
6. When the question regards two things or
two persons, u[7'U7n or meis used in the first mern-
bel', and an before the second.
1
Guatulerne tibi, an timeam? Cic.
Should I congratulate, or should I fear you?
Uter popularis est tune, an ego? Cic,
Who of the two is popular, you or I!
Utrum ea vestra, an nostra culpa est?
ls it your fault 01' ours!
Utrum taceam, an prrodicem? Tel'.
Should I remain silent, should I speak.?
1 Ne, utrum, are sometimes understood: Eloquar an si-
learn? (Virg.) Shall I speak or shall I remain silent? Non
mihi respondes if (Ter.) YO'll do not answer me?
Ne is always used after a word.
An is sometimes replaced by ne : prius mirer
beU'lne Iaborusn. (Hellen. p. labores)? (Virg.) Must Frather
admire thy justice than thy martial deeds? Q71,id refert
clamne palamne ,'oget If (Tib.) What matters it whether he ask
in secret or openly'
154 Guide to Ledin Conversation.
7. When we ask whether a thing exists or not,
whether an event has taken place or n,ot, the sen-
tence is expressed as a simple affirmation, necne 01'
ammon. being placed at the end.
I:
Sunt haec tua verba necne?
A1'e these your words or not ?
Bellum indicimus annon?
Shall we declare war 01' not?
Pater ejus rediit, annon?
Hue hisfather returned. or not?
Cic
Cici
Tel'.
2.-INDIRECT QUESTIONS,
In indirect questions, as in direct, the pro..
nouns and adverbs qui, qual-is, CUI', etc., are. used.t
1 Indirect questions generally follow the verbs scire,
»e-cire, ignora1'e, quaerere, inte1'1'oga1'e, videre, deuberare,
d1judlca're, decernere, etc. The relative pronoun should
not he confounded with the interrogative pronoun. .The
relative pronoun bas an antecedent expressed or under-
stood, and is construed with the indicative; the interro-
gative pronoun is always followed in indirect questions by
the subjunctive. Thus, Seio quae tu nesci« signifies 1
know tll,ings which you do not know, while Scio quae tu nes-
cias signifies I know what the things are which you do not
know. Likewise, Dicam. tamen quod sentio signifies 1 will
tAU neoerthetes« that which (id quod) the thing which
Lthink; and Dicam. tamesi quid sentiam, 1 will tP.lI neoertheles«
(what?) what Lthink, what my thought is, what thing Ithink.
Quid ::;entiam is here the object of the verb dicam,
Question and Answer. 155
Nescio quid egeris. Cic.
I know not what YOM have d o n ~ .
Quis ego sim cognosces, SaIl.
You knowwho I am.
Ausculto, loquere quid velis. Tel'.
I listen) set!! what YOM will.
Quid est causae cur repudietur?
What reason. is there for rejectinghim?
9.. When these adverbs and pronouns are not
used, ue, num,. an, nonne, annon, utrum, etc., are
usedinstead. If the interrogative sentence con-
sists of but one member, ne, 71JUm, and sometimer
an may be used.
Quaeritur idemne sit pertinacia et perseverantia
, [Cic.
It is askedif obstinewy and perseoeramce are one and
the same thing.
Quaeritur an siccari palus Pomptina possit..Quint.
It is asked·ifthe Pontine marshee can be drained.
Interrogavit hove an esset latior. Phaed.
Sheasked if she uia« not laroerthan the ox.
1.56 Guide to Latin Conversation.
10. If the question has several members,
ulrunn, ne, 'I/'U1n are used in the first member, and
an at the beginning of the others.'
Quis scire possit unusne mundus sit, an plures?
[Cic.
IVho can tell whether therebe one or many uorlds.
Quaero a te utrum illa verba an portenta sint ?
[Cic.
Tell me are these simple words or prodigies?
11. I f the interrogation refers to the existence
or to the non-existence of a thing, neeneor annon
is used.
Dii utrum sint necne sint quaeritur. Cic,
It is asked whether or not the gods exist.
1 Utrum, ne, num. are sometimes understood: Stellarum.
numerus lJal' an impar sit incertum est (Cic.). JVe know not
'If the nusuber of the star« be £)ddor even.
An is sometimes replaced by ne : Hominibus prodesse
natura [uba ; serui liberine sisu, quid 1'eje1't'l (Cie.) Nature
imposee on us the duty of assisting men; what maurrs it
'IV/If-the/' theN be slaoes 01' freemen r
An is repeated before every proposition when there are
several of them: Quaeritur an atomorum conCU1'SU mundus
sit effectus, an Prouidentio; regatur, an sit aUquando casurus
(C.)-An, anne are often used for aut.· Postulo mihi respon-
deat, qui sit iste verutius: mercator, an erator, an pecuarius r
(Cic.) Sometimes the meaning of the sentence demands
aut: An, ille, tempus aut in poetis eootoendt«, aut in musicis
contereret (Cic.). '
Question and Answer. 157
3.-THE VERB IN QUESTIONS.
12. In indirect questions the verb is always
put in the subjunctive: 1 in direct questions it is
put in the indicative.
In direct questions the verb is put in the sub-
junctive: 1st. When the tense isconditional :
Quem te appeUern.
re
(Cic.). How should I call you?
-- Utrum plus aesiimemue pecuniam Purrhi, an con-
tinentia-In Fabricii i (Cic.). Which. should we
estee'Jn the more, the treasures of 01· the dis-
interestedness of 2nd. When there
arises an idea of· doubt, of possibility: Quul
faciam?QliJid faceremt (Cic.) What am I to
do? What could I do?
If.-AN8WERS.
Answers to questions are made in Latin, 3,S in
English, by a noun, an adjective, a pronoun, a
verb, an adverb, or by a combination of some of
these parts of speech. Ellipses are freq aent in
answers to questions, and they should be always
taken into consideration when we construe the
words expressed.
I.-THE N0UN, ADJECTIVE, A.ND IN
ANSWERS.
Qui vocare ?-Geta.
What is your name ?-Geta.
Tel'.
1 Neseio qu
1s
stands for aliquis and the verb which fol..
lows is put in the indicative.
Nescio quis teneros oculus mihi fascinat agnos.
Some evil eye or other bewitches my tender lambs.
1 ~ ~ - -
158 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Eequis hie est?-Ego sum, Chremes, Tel'.
Who is this ?-It is 1, Chreme».
Quid meritus es ?-Cl'ueem (meritus su?n). Tel',
What have you deserved?-The cross.
Ubi vidisti illam?-1n via (vidi illa?n). Tel'.
Where did you see her?-On the street:
Ubi ea est ?-Domi, apud me. Tel'.
Whm'e is she?-In my house at home.
Quanti emisti ?-Viginti minis (emi). Tel'.
How much did you pay for it ?-Twenty pounds.
Abiitne solus ?-Solus (abiit). Tel'.
Did he depart olonet-s-Alone:
Audivistine ?-Omnia (audivi). Tel'.
Hare you heard?- Evm'ything.
2.-THE VERB· AND PARTICIPLE IN ANSWERS.
Estne Simo intus ?-Est (intus Simo). Tel'.
Is Simon limP-He 1'S.
Estne frater intus ?-Non est (frater intus). Tel'.
Is my brother in ?~ He is not.
f
I
· Question and Answer. 159
Virgo cuja est?-Nescio. Tel'.
Whose daughter is she?-I knownot.
Numquid meministi ?-Id qurero. Tel'.
JJo younot recollect it ?-I am trying to.
Civis Glycerium est ?-Ita prredicant, Tel'.
Is Glyceriurn o. citizen ?-1
1hey
say that sheis.
Detraxitne tibi vestem?-Factum (est hoc). Tel'
H<1s hecarried. away your clothes ?-Yes.
Quid HIe, quseso ?-Perditus (sum, dix'it). Ter.
What did he say, tellme?-I am lost.
3.-THE 'ADVERB IN ANSWERS.
Norasne eum prius?-Non (eumn01'am). Tel'.
Did youknow him bef01'e?-No.
Pro tehuc deductus est ?-Ita (deductus est). Tel'.
Was heconducted hitherinstead of you?-Yes.
Intellexistine ?-Pl'obe (intellexi). Tel'.
Did you it?- Very well.
Aperte visne loqui ?-Sane quidem. Tel'.
Do youwishme to speakclem'ly ?-Yes,
· 160
Guide to Latin (kmmersaiion,
Numquid vis?-Etiam ('volo). Tel'.
.Po yon wish ?-l
Tes.
Num 'pudet vanitatis ?-Minime (pudet). Tel'.
Do you not blush at YOU?' levity?-No.
Mene q,urerit ?-Verum, Tel'.
Is he looktng for me ?-Yes.
4.-ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS MADE 'VITH
Quantus, ETC.
Q'ual'is? .
Quant'l.ts!
Quot?
Quotus?
Quoties?
Quotenif
Quotuplex?
Quotnplus?
Quotennis?
Ovjus?
Oujas?
-ou»
Bonus, peritus, imperitus, etc.
Parvus, longus, brevis, etc.
Unus, duo, tres, quatuor, etc.
Primus, secundus, tertius, etc.
Semel, bis, tel', quater, aliquoties,
etc.
Singuli, bini, terni.
Simplex, duplex, triplex, etc.
SimpIus, duplus, triplus, etc.
Biennis, triennis... Anniculus,
bimus, trimus, quadrimus.
Meus, tuus, suus, noster, vester,
01' the gen1:tive of a noum : Cujurn
peeus? Meum 01' JEgonis.
Names of cO/J,ntry, of sect, qf fum-
ily: Italus, Romanus, Stoicus,
Ibi, hie, istie, illie, ubique, ibi-
dern, alibi, nusquam, alicuhi,
usquam, foris, etc.
Question and Answer. 161
A,
ts,

m
1)/-
is,
Ji-
iii,
I
I
I
t
II
I
Unde!
Qua!
Quorsu
m!
Utro!
Utrobi! utrubi?
Quando!
Quandiu?
Quantopere ?
Quantum?
Quatenus?
Qilomodo?
11
Eo, hue, istuc, i llue, quovis,
quolibet, eodem, alio, ali quo,
quoqualll, quopiam, foras, etc.
Inde, hinc, istinc, illinc, un-
dique, indiedem, aliunde, ali-
cunde, oeelitus, etc.
Ea, hac, istac, illac, qualibet,
eadem, aliq ua, usquequaque,
recta, dextra, etc.
Sursum, deorsum, introrsum, ali-
orsum, etc.
Utroque, utroque versus, neu-
tro, etc.
Utrobigue, neutribi, etc.
Hodie, heri, eras, nudius, tertius,
perendie, pridie, postridie,
mane, vespere, noctu, interdiu,
etc.
Aliquandiu, diu, tandiu, semper,
paulisper, pammper, etc.
valde, ornnino, par-
tim, etc.
AJiquantum, rnultum, parum,
pauIum, plus, minus, etc.
Hactenus, eaten us, magis, satis,
nimium, etc.
Sic, ita, item, pariter, gratis,
frustra, etc.
V ARliE COLLOQUENDI FORMULlE.
DIFFERENT FORMS OF CON-
VERSATION.
1.
FOR GREETING.
Good-day.-Good-day.
Good-day, J ohn.-And
you, Paul.
Good-day, my good fel-
low, good-day my
dear Curcul ion.
I am glad to see you
well.-I know that,
what is going on ?
We rej oice in seeing
you well.
To greet anybody.
To greet one another.
How-do -you-do?
I wish you good-day.
He came to pay me his
respects.
162
AD SALUTANDUM.
Sal ve.-Salve et tu.
Salve Joannes.-Et tu
Paule.
o salve, bone vir, Cur-
culio exoptiite, salve.
Venire te salvum vo-
hipe est.-Credo, quid
agitur?
Salvumte advenire gau-
dermis.
Alfquemsalutare ; salii-
tern alieni dicere
dare, ferre,
Consalutare inter see
Sal vus sis.
Multam tibi salfitemim
portio.
Venit ad me salutatum
Forms of. Conversation. 163
2.
tu
ir-
re.
ro-
lid
ui-
lfi-
.re,
.m-
rm,
I
i
I
Give my regards to
Peter.
He has sent me his re-
gards through you.:
Gi ve him my regards.
Cicero sends his re-
gards.
My son Cicero wishes
to be remembered to
you. .
He greets you with his
best wishes.
After interchanging
O'reetingos I set about
~ y studies.
Good-bye, farewell.
CONCERNING THE
HEALTH.
How are you getting
along?
Have you been well all
the time?
What is your ailment?
How did you contract
that disease?
I am well.
I am a little better.
Petro meis verbis sahi-
tern adscribe.
A te mihi sal iitem di xi t.
Sal vere Illum jube meo
nomfne.
Salvere te jubet Cicero.
Salvebis a meo Cicerone.
Impertit tibi multum
salfitis.
Ubi salutatio defluxh,
litteris me imolio..
Vale, multumvale; bene
vale.
DE VALETUDINE.
Ut vales?
Usque val uisti ?
. Quis te morbus habet?
Unde istum morbum
contraxisti?
Bene mihi est.
Melius, meliuscnle mi..
hi est.
164 Guide to Latin Conversation.
I am not yet well.
I am not very well.
I never felt better.
How is your brother?
is he well?
How is he? what is he
doing?
Is everyone well at
horne ?
He is well.
He is not well.
My father is well.
He is in good health.
He has the fever.
He is subject to the
fever.
The fever has entirely
left him. '
I have no desife to
vomit.
I have the colic, the
gout, the podagra.
He has the nose bleed.
He has sore eyes.
My tooth aches.
Non plane a morbo con-
valui,
Ninus belle me habes.
Sic valeo ut nunquam
melius.
Quid frater? sal vus est?
Ut valet? quid agit?
Rectene apud vos? TIi
valetur domi vestrre
Est i psi recte; belle SE
habet; recte valet.
Minus valet.
Pater comrnoda utttu:
valetndtne.
Valetudme optlma es
affectus.
In febrim incidit.
Procltvis ad febrim,
Febris ex toto quievit
evasit,
Nausea plane abiit.
Ex mtestinis, ex rent
bus, podagra laboro
Sanguis ei nartbus ma
nat, fluit, Nartbu
sangutnem emittit
Laborat ex ocnlis,
Dens dolet, dolores me
vet.
---
Forms of Conversation. 165
est
Dt
n-
un
Magnas artioulorum do-
lores habet.
Valetudtni consulere
servire.
Emorbo emergere, rec-
reiiri ; a morbo rec-
reari.
Mcliusctile est.
Perdtta erat valetudtne ;
illi erat infirma vale-
tudo.
Tenet eum morlms ;
regrotat ; morbo la-
borate
..LEger gravi morbo de-
cumbit.
In morbum delapsum
est, morbo eorreptus
est.
Ingravescit morbus,
He is sick.
His sickness beCOlTIeS
worse.
He suffers a great deal
from the gout.
To take care of the
health.
To recover from a sick-
ness.
He is very sick abed.
He fallen sick.
He has fainted. Defecit eum anfrnus.
lIe is cured of his sore Ab ociilis valet.
eyes. .
He is a little better.
His health was very
poor.
vit,
'I
I
lur 1
i.1
I
e
se
;t?
3.

'0
na-
bus
110-
TO GO, TO PART.
Where are you going?
I was going to see you.
Where were you going
from here?......... N0-
where; I know not
where to go.
IRE,
Quo te agis?
Ad te ibam.
Quo te hinc agis? quo
tibi est iter?-Nns-
quam; nescio qunr-
sum earn.
166 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Whi ther are you going?
what way are you
going?
Where are you going in
such a hurry?
Where are you going?
I am going home.
Where are you running?
Wait awhile.
Wait a minute.
I will return immedi-
ately.
I have been waiting a
long time,
I do not know the way.
What road shall I
take?
Did he go this way or
that way? .
Which road did he
take?-That to Paris.
Go your way; continue
as you have begun.
Let me go.
Go, I am not prevent-
ing you.
Make haste and go
there.
Leave this place.-
Wherefore?
Leave my presence.
Quo tendis? quo te pe-
des ducunt? quor-
sum is?
Quo te rapis? quo te
eorrlpis, prorlpis?
Quo te capessis ?-Ca-
pesso me dOlTIUm.
Quo eursum, gradum
corrlpis?
Paulisper mane.
Opperire me parun1per.
Ego mox hue revertor.
J amdudum expecto.
Non novi viam,
Quam viam insistam?
Hac aut illac iter insti-
tuit?
Quam tenet cursum?-
Lutetiam versus in-
tendit.
Perge viam; perge quo
ecepisti.
Arnitte me.
Transi, nihil te moror.
Matura illuc ire.
Egredere hinc.--Quam-
obrem?
Apage te a me.
Forms of Conoersaiion. 167
4.
r.
r.
n-
10
m-
I
I
Begone hence.
Depart as quickly. as
yoU can,
Get thee gone; with
all speed.
Do you still linger ?
Are you here yet?
TO COME, TO RETURN.
Whence come you?
I come from the judge's
office.
I will come presently.
I often come to the
Senate.
We arrived a long time
ago.
'ViII you come i-:Yes.
Will you come or not?
Will you come to-mor-
row? - Yes, but to-
ward evening.
What day will you
come?
Te hinc amove; facesse
hinc; istinc recede.
Facesslte hinc ocyus :
vas hinc ocyus amo-
limlni.
I-linc avola : abi quam-
primum ; move te
ocius,
At etiam restftas, cessas?
Etiam nunc hic stas?
VENIRE, REDIRE.
Unde advenis.
A judfee venia.
Quam mox veniam,
Veni freq uens in sena-
tum,
Jamdiu factum est cum,
postquam ventmus.
Veniesne ? - Etiam;
numnam venies?-
(erte.
Veniesne an non?
Veniesne cras? - Ego
vera, sed sub vespe-
rum.
Ad quem diem redibis?
Ad quae tempera ve..
nies?
168 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Corne 'when you will.
Have you just come?
He met me very conve-
niently.
You come on time.
You have come a little
late.
Your absence delays
me.
What brought you here?
I went to meet you.
I-Iasten, return as soon
possible.
lIe retnrns from Rome,
from the vicinity of
Rome.
l-Ie comes from Africa.
l-Iow long is it since he
returned?
.He met me not long ago.
Why did you not have
hirn come in?
I shall conduct him
hither
When will he return?
He will return to-mor-
row at the latest.
Who rapped at my
door?
Ubi vis, accede.
Advenis modo ?
Commodum obvianllni-
hi venit.
Per tempus venis.
'I'ardiuscule, justo tar-
dius venisti.
Mihi morse est quod
non adsis.
Quae te causa impiilit
ut hue venires?
Ego obviam tibi conii-
bar.
Propera, aetiitum hue
redi,
A Roma redit, ab Roma
redit.
Adest ex Afrfca,
Quampridmll rediit?
Non ita pi-idem me con..
venit.
Quidni eum intro mis-
isti ?
Hue coram addiicam il-
lum,
Ecquando redibit, redi-
tiirus est, revertet ?
Ut tardissime eras r-di..
bit.
Quisnam a me pepulit
fores?
a
For1ns of Conversation. 169
He is waiting at the Ad januam spectate
door.
Corne in. otherwise I Jngredere, sin altter oc-
Rhall close the door. cl iidam fores,
This often happens. Hoc s ~ p e . usuvenit.
5.
it
i-
1C
lS-
ll-
li-
li-
lit
ON GOOD AND BAD
'VEATHER.
\Vhat is the state of the
weather?
The weather is beauti-
ful.
The weather is very
glooIny.
Th-eweather is splendid.
The weather isuncer-
tain.
The weather is unfavor-
able to setting out.
The weather was never
so bad.
The weather is always
good here.
It rains a great deal
here.
It began to get very
cold.
The climate of these
regions is very cold.
DE TEMPESTATE.
Queenam est tempestas?
Coslo sereno utemur ;
SUdU111 erit ccelum.
Tenebric6sum est tem-
pus.
Dies luculentus est.
Dubium est coelum.
Tempus discessiis ab-
surdum est.
Nullus unquam dies
tam magna turbulen-
taque tempestate fuit.
Hie non interrnittit cce-
Ium nitescere,
Valde pluvium est hoc
ecelum.
Frigus impendebat
maxfmum,
FrigorYbus horrent haec
loca.
Conglaciat frigorlbus
aqua.
Glacies mcllitur tepe-
facta, ca16re tabescit.
Nives diffunduntur,
Ventus increbescit.
170 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
The water is freezing
on account of the cold.
The icc j s melting from
the heat.
Snow falls.
The wind begins to
blow.
It rained all night, Tota nocte compluit,
I shall depart if the Proficiscar si sudum
weather is good. erit.
I t was never any warm- Calet ut cum maxtme.
er.
His head is uncovered, Nullo frigore adducltur
no matter how cold ut capite operto sit.
it is.
6.
AGE, CONDITION,
MANNERS.
]ETAS, CONDITIO,
MORES.
Whose child is that? Puer hic unde' est?
l-Ie resembles his fathes. Respondet patri; oris
similitudtne patrem
refert.
You do not resemble Natiira te prorsus a sim-
your father. Ilitudfne parentis ar-
ripuit.
What is your name ? Qui vociiris ? Quod
nomen tibi est?
I have forgotten the Nomen perdrdi,
name.
He resembles you vAry Tui simtlis est probe.
much.
Forms of Conversation. 171
I
Howald is he?-He is
ten years old.
He is more than ten
years old. .
I am not yet SiX.
He is nineteen years
old.
I am of your age.
lie is of rny age.
He is older, younger.
Where do you live?
My house is opposite
the college.
lIe lives very near us.
lIe Iives n e a ~ Maubert
Square.
He lives in the upper
story.
When will you be 'wise?
He is not very wise.
He is not at ~ l l wise.
You are too wise.
He has begun to study.
He is lazy.
This is no time to be
lazy.
Quotum agit retatis an-
num?-Decimum
Excessit egressus est
annos decem.
Nondum sextum a-tii-
tis annum egressus
sum,
Undeviginti annos na-
tus,
Ego te ~ t a t e consequor.
.fEquiilis est meus.
Natu major, provectior ;
natu posterior, infe-
rior.
Ubi habttas?
Respondet domus mea
huic gymnasio.
Propinque, nostris redl-
bus, accolit nostras
redes.
Habet se propter aream
Mauberti.
Summis in redtbue hab-
Hat.
Quando sapies?
Parum admodum sapit.
Nihil sapit.
Preeter modurn sapis.
Disciplinas, litteras pri-
mis labiis attlgit.
Pigritia lab6rat.
Nihil loci est segnitire,
desidiro,
172 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Wisdom increases with
veal's.
I I ~ has good natural
talent.
IIe has but little talent.
I-Ie studies with ardor.:
Ratio cum retiite ado-
lescit.
Multis natfirre munerr-
bus. dotibus orniitus ;
plurtmumingenio va-
let.
I ngenio parum potest.
Contento studio Iitteras
arrrpit.
7.
J acent rationes.
Arno te, et non neglex-
isse habeo gratiaIn.
Hoc mihi gratius facere
nihil potes.
Teneri non potui quin
declararem.
Versiitur mihi in labiis
primorlbus.
What have you to say Qure habes dicere de
about him'? illo ?
Fear has
tongue.
There is nothing to say.
I thank you for having
thought of it.
You can do nothing
more acceptable to
111e.
I could not keep from
telling it.
I have it on my lips.
TO SPEAK., TO TELL. LOQUI, DICERE.
Do I speak to you or Tibi ego dico, an non?
not ?
Do you not wish to an- Dicisne, an non?
swer ?
I know not what to say. Quod dicam non re-
perio.
tied his Lingua heeret metu,
----.__1 1 1 1 " ~ - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - - -
For'ms of Conversation. 173
Aliud dicit atque sen-
tit; aliud dicit, aliud
cogItat.
Dicam tibi tum demum
cum usus poscet.
Quid istuc verbi est?
Dico ut res est.
Quod ad fratris obltum
atttnet, quid circum-
fertur?
Secreta hoc audi, tecum
habeto.'
Vel ipsi hoc dicat licet.
Scite et diserte loquitur.
Expedite, articulatim,
distincte loquttur.
Satis commode Latine
Ioquftur.
Perbene Latine Ioqut-
tur.
Latino admodum in-
quinate loqueris.
Mihi usquequaque lo-
quttur.
Belle omnino, belle
sane.
Did yon ever hear tell Nurn hoc ex uIlo audi-
of that? visti aliquando?
You add this of your De tuo illud addis.
own accord.
He does not say what
he thinks.
That's well said.
1 shall tell you when
there will be need of
it.
'VVhat does he mean by
that?
I tell the thing as it is.
What do they say con-
cerning the death of
my brother?
This is a secret, tell it
to nobody.
You may tell it to him-
self if you wish.
He speaks well.
He speaks distinct!y.
He speaks Latin quite
well.
He speaks Latin ele-
gantly.
You speak Latin badly.
He talks to me every-
where.
I
174 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
I am not able to speak
a word
Enough of words.
I heard him say it a
thousand times.
He is anxious to talk
with you.
My father wishes to
speak with you.
It is necessary to speak
with John.
Desist from speaking
badly. .
Enough is said, this is
enough on the sub-
ject.
Let us cease speaking of
these things.
Let us speak of other
things.
That is no longer spoken
of.
I shall say no more.
No one spoke a word.-
At length he became
silent.
Are you serious or are
you joking?-I am
in earnest.
Nullum verbum pro-
loqui potui.
Satl's jam verborum est.
Ex eo millies audivi.
Cupit te conventum.
Vult te conventum pa-
ter.
Convento Joanne opus
est.
Mitte male loqui.
Satis jam verborum est,
satis superque dictum
est. I
De his dicere desista-
muse
Sermonem . alio trans-
feramus.
J acet istud in tenebris ;
haec obvohita sunt
silentio.
Hie jam plura non di-
cam.
Verbum nemo facit.-
Tandem aliquando
conticuit.
J ocone an serio?-Ex-
tra jocum. remote jo-
co, bona fide, ex ani ..
mo.
8.
Forms of Conversation. 175
i
I
TO ASK, TO ACCORD,
TO REFUSE•.
To permit, to grant per-
'mission.
Grant us a thing.
Permit me, I pray you,
to...
Suffer yourself to be
prevailed upon.
I shall not go far, I
shall return directly.
I permit you to go.
I grant this according
to your request; the
demand is reasonable.
I t is not allowed to do
that.
I will permit you to do
that.
Who gave you permis-
sion?
. I will not allow that to
be done; I'll not tol-
erate it.
If you do it, you will
be punished.
You refuse me that
which is of little
value.
PETERE, CONCEDERE,
ABNUERE.
Dare copiam, f a c u l t a ~
tern, potestatem, Ii-
centiam.
UnUIn sintte a nobis ex-
oriiri ; .. unum conce-
dtte, date nobis.
Date mihi, queeso, ve-
niam ut ...
Sine te exorari.
Non longius recedam ;
jam hie adero,
Per rne ut abeas Iicet.
Hoc preclbus tuis con-
cede: tequum pos-
tulas.
Fllicltum est hoc agere.
Tibi permissiirus sum
ut hoc facias.
Quis tibi potestatem fe-
cit?
Non committam ut hoc
fleri possit; non pa-
tiar, non feram.
Hoc si eg2ris, non feres
in tacltum.
Mihi denegas, quod tan-
ti non est.
176 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Do not ask again.
He has never refused
me.
I-Ie received' naught
from him but a re-
fusal.
I will see that you ob-
tain what you de-
mand.
He has permission to
do anything.
As much as the teacher
has allowed him.
Ne quid ultra requiras.
Nihil unqualn ruihi ab-
nuit, denegavit.
Nihil ab ina nisi repul-
sam tulit.
Tibi quod postulas im-
petrabo.
Omnium rerum Iiber-
tiitem tenet.
Quantum pneceptoris
voluntas tulit.
9.
TO DO A. FA.VOR, TO
GIVE T H A N I ~ S .
Do me this favor.
IIelp me, I pray you.
(Jan you do me this fa-
vor?
Do me this kindness.
Who has helped you?
How have I done you
a favor?
Can I not be of use to
you in any way?
Nothing will I do more
willingly.
OFFICIUlvr ADHIBERE)
GRATIAS AGERE.
Adhtbe erga me istud
beneficium,
Id, amiiho, adjiiva me
Potesne THe ad illud ad-
juvare ?
Hoc beneficium adlube ?
Quem adjutorem .habu-
isti ?
Quid de te merui, C0111-
merui?
Numquid est quod op-
era mea vo l is opus
sit?
Nihil est reque quod fa-
ciam Iubens.
Forms of Conversation. 177
I
i
[ am completely at
your disposal.
Everything is at your
disposal.
I am wholly at your
service.
I anl much obliged to
you for that.
I am under great obli-
gations to you ..
I return you SIncere
thanks.
rshall never forget it.
He has often done me
a favor.
He has tendered me his
services.
He is the most oblig-
ing man that I ever
met.
Tuus sum mancipio et
nexu
Omnia tibi patent.
Totus tuus sum.
Amo te de hac reo
PIUrlnlU111, magnopcro,
tibi debeo
PI UrIlTI U111 tibi gratias
habeo, ago. refero.
Nunquam illius me-
moria efHuet discedet;
nulla hnjus rei me-
moriam 0 bli vio 0 b-
scurabit ' -
Multis me beneficiis
complexus est, de-
vinxit.
.A.. d hoc operam suam
professns est.
Est omnium quos qui-
dem noverim officio-
sissnnus,
DIFFERENT USES OF
THE VERB TO DO.
10.
VAUIl usus VERBI
FACERE.
How will you find a Quam inibis viam ut id
means to accomplish perficias?
it?
12
17& Guide to Latin Conversation.
Would you dare do
that ?-Certainly.
Which of you would
dare do that?
If you do this you will
be punished.
I have been punished
enough, more even
than I deserved.
It does not concern you.
I am not sorry for hav-
ing done it.
What! you dared do
that?
At whose. solicitation
did you do it?
He did that without
thinking.
But we, what have we
done?
As for the rest, I will
know what to do.
What must be done?
What must I do?
Tell file what is to be
done?
J well know what I must
do.
t Did you do it? Yes,
Ausisne hoc facere ?
Plane, omnino pror-
sus, ausim equfdem
Quotusquisqne vestrum
hoc audeat?
Hoc si egeris, non feres
tacttum.
Satis superque pcenii-
rum dedi.
Nihil tua refert,
Haud muto factum.
Quid? tu ausus es ?
Cujus hoc hortiitu fe-
cisti?
Non fecit hoc de indus-
tria, per impruden-
tiam hoc fecit, im-
prudentia ab eo pec-
ciitum est.
At vera nos quid .com.
mistmus '?
Sciam de reltquo quit
agendum sit.
Quid facto opus est?
Quid me par est facere
Prrescrihe mihi qui:
facto sit opus?
Recte ego meam ren
sapio
ldne fecisti? Admodurr
FOl'1ns of Conversation. 179
11.
Istud ergame benefi-
cium adhtbe.
Qui pro tuo desiderio
dicam?
Faciam illud anlmo li-
benti prolixoque; fa- .
ciam Illud ex aUl1110
lubens.
Judicio tuo rem per-
mitte.
Vide etiam atque etiam
quid sis factiirus.
Vide quid agas.
Res tibi erit cum rLen-
tulo.
Quid tibi agis? Nihil
aliud qualn Iudis.
'Vill you do it? Cer- Faciesne id? Maxtme.
tainly.
You do well. . Facis commode.
ldid it in consideration Merlto tuo feci.
of you.
Do me this favor.
What shall I say to
I please you?
I shall do it with all
my heart, most wil-
lingly.
Do it according to your
judgment.
Consider well what JTOU
are about to do.
Look to what you are
doing.
You will have to deal
with Lentulus.
What are you doing?
You are doing noth-
ing but playing.
Lll
lid
111-
lS-
m-
m-
ec-
~ l -
es
~ ?
r-
~ r e
uid
'em
1m.
TO THINK, TO HAVE A. SENTIRE, SENTENTIAM
THOUGHT. AGITARE.
What is your intention? Quid tibi consilii est?
. This is my resolution. Mea sic est ratio.
This is' rooted in his Hoc ejus ammo insldet,
mind.
180 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Consilii res est.
Tu vero quid sentis ?
Quid sentis? Siccme
est sententia?
Age vero, agedum qui
censes?
Quid mihi auctor es '?
Quid mihi suades ?
Evoca antmum au his
negotiis?
Cogitationem Illam toto
pectore amplectere,
Id tantisper cogna,
Ita censes, sentis ; tibi
ita videtur,
Mea quidem sententift,
quaritum ego angti-
ror.ut rneafert opinio.
Nostri sensus con-
grnunt.
Tibi assentio, tecum
sentio, eo in tuam
sententiam, ture sen-
tentire faveo.
Nec Celso aeceo.
We are of the same
opinion.
I am of your opinion.
The affair is worthy of
attention.
But you, what think
you of it?
What is your opinion?
Are you of this opin-
ion? .
Now then, what think
you of it?
What advice do YOU
give me? .
Think no more of those
things.
Think seriously of that.
Think a little of that.
This is your opinion.
In my opinion.
I am not of Celsus's
opinion.
-Add my opinion to that Adscribe me sententire
of Ceesar. C ~ s a r i s .
They have been of dif- Distracti sunt, ahierunt
ferent opinions. in diversas sententias.
Forms of Conversation. 181
The opinions agree.
The opinions are con-
°trary.
This subject merits our
attention.
Consider it, I pray you.
I think of it day and
night... .
I shall give .It my sen-
ous attentIon.
It came to me when I
wasnot thinking of it.
You rsmind me of my
duty.
Did he impart to you
anything concerning
his intention?
Sententire constant, ad
unum idem sentiunt
omnes
°Tendunt in di versum
sententire.
. Consilii res est, res ista
habet deliberati6nem.
Considerate cum annnis
vestris velim.
Cura haecapud 111e ex-
eubat,
De hoc valde videro.
Id nec opinanti accldit,
prreter opinionem.
Me admones officii mei.
Nihilne impertiit tibi
sui consilii ?
12.
ON BANQ,UETS,
REPASTS.
Have you dined ?-No,
not yet.
How long have you
been fasting ?
I promised to t ~ k ~ sup-
per with Cresar,
DE coxvrvrrs SEU
EPULIS.
Prandistine? - Non-
dum, minfme, nequa-
quam,
Quam pridem, quam
dudum non edisti?
Ca?sari condixi, promi-
si ; Cresari coenamcon-
dixi, ad ccenam pro-
misi.
182 Guide to Latin Conversation.
I shall take supper and
then go to bed.
He went away without
taking dinner.
He went to bed without
his supper.
To invite anyone to din-
ner.· ,
To invite anyone to
supper.
To prepare dinner, a
repast.
After dinner, breakfast.
To begin the repast.
To eat mutton.
To partake of partridge,
With these victuals you
whet my appetite.
To appease hunger.
To eat something with
one's bread.
What kind of bread do
you wish?
To quench thirst.
This makes one thirsty.
To give drink to any-
one, to pour out wine.
Coenaho, post demum
ibo cubttum.
Impransus abiit.
Inecenatus'deeubuit.
Aliquem in prandio ac-
cipere ; prandio, men-
see adhibere.
Altquem invitiire, vo-
care ad ccenam.
Prandium curare, appa-
rare, epnlas, eonvivi-
urn instituere, pariire.
A prandio, a jentaculo,
Irruere, invadere in of-
fam,
Ovillam edere,
Perdice vesoi.
His cibis renovas mihi
integram famem,
Famern roplere
Adhibere aliquid ad pa-
nem, adjicere aliquid
pani.
Qualem vultis panem?
cujusmodi panern vul-
tis?
Explere, extinguere, se-
dare, Ieviire sitim.
Hoc sitirn aecendit.
Potum alieni miscere,
administriire ; vinum
infundere.
Forms of Conversation. 183
Exiquo utltur potu,ab-
stemius est.
Meracius vinum su-
mere, adhibere.
Dilutius potare.
Propiniire salutem ali-
eni.
See that Iny dinner be Vide mihiprandium,
got ready.
lIe drinks sparingly, he
never drinks wine.
To drink wine that is
too pure, too strong.
To drink wine much di-
luted.
To drink one's health.
J-
c-
1 ~
a-
i-
e.
o.
f-
EVENING, NIGHT,
SLEEP.
13.
VESPER, NOX, SOMNUS.
a-
ld
e-
e,
n
The sun is set.
At sunrise; at sunset.
At the close of evening.
It is 'getting late; night
is coming on.
The nights are less long
in summer than in
winter.
There's a new moon.
To study far into the
night.
Occtdit sol, sol ad ocei-
sum abscessit.
Oriente sale, Rub .ortum
solis; occidente sale,
sub occasum solis,
Nocte concubia.
Advesperascit; declinat,
inclinat ad vesperu In
dies, nox appetit, in-
stat.
No c t e s contraetiores
sunt restate quam hi-
erne.
Luna ad initium recur-
rit.
Ad multam noctem stu-
dere,
184 Guide' to Latin Conoereation.
, -,
He stays awake whole
nights; he passes
sleepless nights.
He set out during the
night.
Have all gone to bed?
Let us go to bed.
Sleep has taken hold of
me.
Sleep has made him
drowsy.
You must not go to
sleep.
To cause one to arise.
Arise, the sun is already
high.
He sleeps undisturbed.
This induces, invites
sleep.
This wards off sleep.
I have not slept a wink
this night.
I arose, it was still night.
I slept longer than is
my custom.
Pervigllat noctes totas ;
noctes insomnes du-
cit.
In noctem se conj ecit,
multa de nocte pro-
fectus est.
Decubueruntne omnes ?
Cubitum discediimus;
quieti nos tradiimus
Me complexus est'S0111-
nus.
Oppressit eum SOlTIn us.
'I'ibi dormitandum non
est.
Excitiire e lecto.
Surge, dies est, diei 111ul-
tum j am est,
Seeiirus dormit.
Hoc SOlIlnU111 indiicit,
facit, conciliat, ex cl-
tat.
Hoc somnum prohlbet,
hoc somnum adrmit.
Hac nocte non qui-vi,
somnum non vidi
nullam partem noc-
tis requievi,
De nocte multa, concu-
bia nocte exsurrexi.
Arctior quam sol-bat
me somnus tenuit,
complexus est.
For11'ts of Conversation. 18.5
TO-1110rrOW I shall sleep
. to Illyheart's content.
To sleep late in the,
Illorning and to sit
up far into the night.
lIe sleeps during ... the
day and remains
awake at night.
Crastma die 111e S0111110
replebo,
Ad multum diei, ad
multam diem dor-
mire; ad multam In-
cern stertere et au
multam noctem vigi-
Hire.
De diedormit et de
nocte vigtlat.
14.
TO SELL, TO :BUY,
TO PAY.
To sell at auction, at
public sale.
To ask the price of any-
thing.
How much do you wish
for that?
What is the price of
that?
How much did he sell
this for?
IIow much has that
cost you?
Th9.1 is beyond price.
That costs me nothing,
that coste IDe ~ . great
deal.
VENDEHE, EMERE,
SOLVERE.
Per prrec6nem, auctione
vendere,
Mercis pretium exqui-
rere,
Quanti hoc judfcas, a?S-
ttmas ?
Quanti est hoc?
Quanti hoc veniit ?
Quanti hoc venit, con-
stat?
Hoe extra pretium est.
Hoc mihi gratis con-
stat; mihi magno
constat.
186 Guide to Latin Oonoersaiion:
He bought a book very
cheap, very dear.
He gave me the price I
demanded.
He sells cheaper than
the others.
Provisions are cheaper.
I-Iorses are selling
cheap.
It is for you to say what
it is worth.
These apples sell for a
cent apiece.
· They have come to an
agreement.
He did not stand to the
agreement,
This has put me in
debt.
He is much in debt at
Rome.
He is able to pay his
debts.
To pay on time.
Pay me what you owe
me.
You are paid.
I shall institute a process
against you, we will
. go before the judges.
Librum comparavit vi..
Ii, impenso.
Meo pretio emit,
Vendit minoris ceeteris,
Laxiivit annona.
J acent equorum pretia.
Tua judicatio est.
Poma hoc teruntio res-
tirnantur, adaquato
singillatim pretio.
Venerunt ad pactidnem.
Non stetit conventis
pactis.
Hoe mihi res alienum
attulit,
Multa Romre nomlna
contraxit,
Solvendo est.
Ad tempus, ad diem
dictam, responders,
solvere.
Dissolve mihi quod de-
bes.
Rabes tibi res soliitas.
Tibi scribam, dicam ;
ad judices veniemus,
Forms of. Conversation. t87
To deulnnd payment,
to pay one's debts.
Nomfna exigere.-Sol-
vere, dissolvere res
alienum, nomtna,
15.
ON VARIOUS GAMES.
Do you wish to play?
I et us play together.
How· nUlch do you wish
to wager?
To win the wager.
I accept the terms.
I give yon the game.
To give an opportunity
to retaliate.
Come then, let the con-
test be renewed.
To challenge anyone to
play.
I am not afraid of him
at playing ball.
I-Iunting and foot-ball
refresh me a great
deal.
'ro play at foot-ball.
Heis teaching him how
to play. at foot-ball.
DE VARIIS LUDIS.
Placetne tibi ludere ?
Inter nos ludiimus.
Qua sponsione vis Iu...
dere.
S p 0 n s ion e vincere ;
sponsionem vincero.
Conditionem non res-
puo, conditionem se-
quor.
Tibi cedo.
Reddere certamtnis po-
testatem; lusus. repe-
tendi copiam facere.
Age, certiimen instaure-
tur.
Ludo aliquem poscere
De pila palmaria non
eum metuo.
Antmum meum mire
recreat, refIcit, oblec-
tat, afftcit venationis
usus et pila.
Ludere pila,
Docet eum pila.
10.
188 Guidf 1,() Latin Conversation.
Cursu ad metas conten
dere.
'I'runculis Iudere.
Latruncrilis ludere,
Versiire, agitiire, rotsr«
torquere turbmem.
Calculis ludere.
Solea detrita ludere.
Ludere par impart
Discere rudtbus.
Rudfbus el iidit, digladi..
atur.
Batuere cum allquo 1U·
drbus,
ALTERCATIO, ACCUSA-
TIONF:S.
Quorsum, quorsus haec
disputatio, indignatio'!
Quid est argentum
quer-ilre ?
Altercantur inter se mu-
Iierum ritu.
Omitte lacrymas.
Habet ·lacrymas in po,
testate.
Quid tibi injurise fac-
tum est?
Quis hoc tibi nomen im-
/posuit, indtdit?
To play prisoners' base.
To play at skittles,
To play chess.
To spin top.
To play at draughts.
To play at hunt the
slipper.
To play at odd or even.
To learn fencing.
lie fences.
To fence with anyone'.
Why this dispute 1
What is the question G.L
issue?
They quarrel like
women,
Do not cry.
lie crieswhenever he
wishes.
What wrong has he
done you?
Who gave you ·that
name?
For'ins of Oonversation. 189
Quod scelus admisit,
patriivit, commisit?
Meritone mea id acct-
dit?
Uti res gesta est?
Voca ill 11m meis verbis,
illum, nomlne : meo
accerse
How have I done Quid, qua in re pecciivi ?
wrong?
\Vhat wrong have I Quid offendi?
done?
What great fault have Quid tantopere deliqui !
I cornmi tted ?
.vVhatcrinle has he com-
mitted '!
.Did it happen through
any fault of mine ?
How did the affair come
off?
What happened then? Quid tum postea?
He drove me from Iny Extriisit me de loco.
place.
I-Ie struck me with his Pugnos mihi impegit,
fist. infregit, inflixit,
lie tripped up Iny heels. Me supplantavit.
.Call him in my name.
17.
TO LISTEN ATTENTIVE- ATTENTE AUDIRE, ANh
LY, TO BE ATTENTIVE. MUM ATTENDERE.
Listen attentively. Eriglte aures, anlmum
attendlte, advertfte.
Lend your ear and lis- Admove aurem et sub-
ten. ausculta.
You are paying atten- Alias res agis.
tion to somethingelse.
] 90 Guide to Latin Conversation-.
You are not listening.
Listen. I want to say a
word to you.
Listen without saying a
word.
You interrupt me! you
reply to me !
What is your reply?
Without reply.
Be quiet and calmly
listen.
Be attentive.
Wake up, be attentive.
Pay attention to what
"'am going to tell you.
Keep this well in mind.
Look out for what fol-
lows.
Pay attention to what I
ask.
You speak too long and
too much.
HOe is a little 0 dull of
hearing.
Take a higher tone.
Lower your voice.
You speak too freely.
Ture peregrinantur au-
res.
Adesdum, paucis te vola.
Silentio, attento ammo
adesse, audire,
Mihi interloqueres ! mi..
hi obloqueris !
Quid repones ?
Dicta cit.ius, abjecta OU1"
nicunctatione.
Favete, adeste [€quo an-
Imo.
Antmum et aures ad-
hfbe.
Expltca atque excnte
intelligentiam tuam.
Attende, adverte anf-
mum ad ea qure die-
.tfirus sum.
Haec in memoria ves-
tra penttus insideant.
Attendlte anlmos ad ea
q u ~ sequuntur.
Quid petam, antmo at..
tendtte.
Nimis diu et nimium
Ioqueris.
Aures habet hebetiores,
Intende, attolle vocem.
Remitte vocem.
Liberiore uteris lingua.
Forms of ·Oonversation. 191
t\ccustom yourself to
... speak Latin.
Listen to what I say.
Stand erect.
He threw stones at me.
He makes everyone
laugh.
You do nothing but tell
untruths.
Beware of lying to me.
There is no reason why
I should lie to you.
Have you done it?-
Yes.
Do you deny it ?-Yes,
I deny it. .
What excuse have you?
will he offer his age as
an excuse?
It is not my fault, I am
innocent.
It is your fault.
Row long is it since you
began to reform?
You have .rendered
yourself guilty of a
serious offense.
Excuse me.:
Excerce te Latino ser-
mane, Latine loq ui.
Attendlte me dicentern.
Rectus assiste, sta recto
corpore, sta in pedes.
Appetiit me .lapidrbus.
Risum omnibus movet,
concrtat.
Nullus tibi mentiendi
modus est.
Cave mihi mendacii
quidquam.
Causa nulla est cur
apud te mentiar,
lane fecisti ?-Adlll0d-
urn.
Negasne ?-Nego enim-
vero.
Qua excusatione uteris ?
-An retatein afferet ?
Culpa vaco, sum extra
culpam, abest a me
culpa.
A te pecciitum est, penes
te cuIpa est, resfdet
ej us rei in te culpa,
Ecquando te ad bonam
frugem reci pies?
Gravi te scelere devinx:-
isti.
Exousatum me habeas.
T
192 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
I accept your excuse.
I will let your father
know of your laziness.
Aceipio, admitto, capio
tuam cxcusationem.
Deferam nomen tnU111
ad patrem de prigri-
tia.
18.
TO OBSERVE, TO SEE,
TO PERCEIVE.

VIDEHE.
Ociilos nabet aciitos.
Converte ora et ociilos
in me, ad me.
Vide quid agas.
Admove vultum ad au-
dit6res.
Vide ut incedat,
Ecquid non animadver-
tis?
Id non observaveram.
Hoc 111e pnetervolavit,
non hoc observiivi.
Quid agltur? Mihi
enim tencbrre sunt.
Look at me.
What is going on? I
am wholly in the
dark.
I shall put it before Rem subjiciam oculis
your eyes. vestris, ponam vobis
ob octilos, in conspec-
tu vestro collocabo.
Show' him to us. Exhtbe i llum nobis.
Does not my father sus- Numquid patri subolet ?
pect it ?
He has sharp eyes.
See what you are doing.
'I'urn your face to the
audience.
See how he walks.
Did you not observe it?
I had not perceived it.
I did not notice it.
Forms of Oonversation. 193
He looks at us askance.
Pupils have their eyes
continually on their
teacher.
I have never been able
to discover their
tricks.
Perversis, mal is, obli-
quis, torvis ocrilis nos
intuetur.
In vultu pneceptoris
habltant discipulor-
urn oculi.
Hlornm fallacias nun-
quam prresensi.

TO EXPLAIN, TO CLEA.R
UP A DIFFIUULTY.
What is the meaning
of that word?
What does that word
signify?
Let us examine that
word.
That word is not in use.
This word has changed
its meaning.
That word means many
things.
13
EXPLANARE, DIFFICUL-
TATEM
Quid valet, sonat i lla
vox? Qusenam est
hujus voeabuli notio?
Qure notio subjecta est
huie voci, quid istud
verbi est'?
Explicemus illud ver-
bum et excutiiimus.
Verbum istud est inso-
lens, inusitiitnm, tri-
tum non est illud vo-
cabnlum.
Recessit hoc verbum a
veteri sui significati-
one.
H uie verba multrplex
subj ecta est signifiea-
tio
194 Guide to Latin Conoersaiion.
This word can have two
meanings.
These two words have
the same meaning.
What is the interpreta-
tion of this passage?
I do not thoroughly un-
derstand this passage
from Cicero.
Do you understand what
I say?
Did you understand
that? or, Do you not
understand it yet?
Yes, very well.
He doer; not understand
a word of it.
I do not quite under-
stand what you wish
to say.
I . do not quite under-
stand what that word
means.
I will make the difficul-
ty clear to him.
To clear up a difficulty.
To explain anything to
children.
Verbum istud in duas
sententias acclpi po-
test.
Haec duo verba unum
sonant, eamdem ha-
bent sententiam, noti-
onem
Queenam est hujus loci
sententia f
Parum intclltgc, minus
locum istum a Cice-
rone accipio.
Tenes quod dicam?
Hoc intellextin' ? an
nondum etiam? Irno
calltde.
Nihil in eo videt,
Nondum tuam cogitati-
onem assecutus sum,
percepi,
Parum intelllgo, minus
capio, non satis novi
quid haec vox sonet,
IlIum ad intelligentiam
hujus difficultatis ad-
diicam.
Aperire difficul tiitern.
Aliquid pueris preele-
gere, exponere, ex-
planare, interpretari.
Forms of Conoersation: 195
To interpret a passage
from Cicero.
To translate word for
word.
'I'o give a free transla-
tion.
Locum Cieeronis expla-
niire, aperire, ill us-
trare.
TotIdem verbis inter-
pretari.
Diffusius, enodatius ex-
plicare ; dicere latius;
plenius exprimere :
uberius explanare,
20.
TOSTUDY,TO READ,TO
LEARN BY HEART.
I study as much as I can.
To give oneself up to
work, to study.
To labor in vain.
He did not labor long.
He studies zealously.
He studies with as much
ardor as ever.
He loves study very
much.
He has an insatiable
love for reading.
They all study as best
they can.
STUDUS VACARE, LE-
GERE, MEMORTJE MAN-
DARE,
In studiis pro mea parte
versor.
Dare se labori ; tradere
se stud Us,
Laborem inlinem . susci-
pere ; Iaborem pro-
fundere,
Lab6rem diutius non
tulit.
Ad, in studia incumbit.
Studet ut CUIn maxtme,
Satis exardet ad Iitteras,
Est in eo inexhausta avi-
dttas Iegendi.
Omnes certdtim, alius
alio diligentius stu-
dent.
196 Guid» to Latin Conversation.
Discere memortter ; me-
morire tradere, man-
dare, perci pere,
Discendi voluntiitem
abj ecit, deposuit.
Lectionem memorise
commendare, man-
dare.
Frigent nunc litteree.
Pomeridiiinum tempus
lectione Vergilii tra-
duxi, transmisi,
Non habes Maronem
p r ~ mantbus.
Poetas evol vere, vol-
vere, percurrere,
Prsecepta crebro regus-
tare.
Calent litterro Grseca,
Nunquam Ciceronem
de manfbns deponit,
demittit.
Interpretandi Ciceronis
provinciam suscepit,
He no longer desires to
learn.
To learn one's lesson.
lie has begun to trans-
late the complete
works of Cicero.
I employed the after-
noon in reading Vir-
gil.
y-ou have not Virgil in
your hands.
I'o read the poets.
I'o read th e rules over
and over.
They study Greek with
ardor.
But little study is being
done now.
To learn by heart.
Nihil mihi temporis a
legendo vacat.
I employ all my spare Otium in legendo Cice-
time in reading Ci- rone consumpsi.
cero.
Cicero is continually in
his hands.
I read all the time.
-----"......._ ~ - - - - - - - - - - - -
Forlns of Conversation. 197
Ordire lecti5nem ab in-
tegro.
Nihil admodum sciebat.
Neque mihi succure-
bant verba.
Apud me non sum.
Cursius lecti5nem reci-
tare.
Tres versus reeitando
preetervolasti, pra-ter-
misisti, 0 misisti.
Memoria lapsus est.
To recite anything.
His memory has failed
~ m .
Begin your lesson over
from the beginning.
He knew hardly any-
thing.
The words did not come
to me.
I 'm not myself.
Aliq uid reddere sine'
scripto, memortter,
ex memoria .pronun-
tiiire, reci tare.
To recite intelligently Sensim et lente recitare.
and slowly.
To recite one's lesson
in haste.
You have skipped three
verses in reciting.
~ ' ;
Ii
R
it
I
' ~ i '
;J
••' . ~ •. 1.,.' .. '·' .•..•'•• ,
',I
1' ...•....', ·.,
.• ~
,
21.
INTERPRETARI, SCRIP-
TO TRANSLATE, TO COM- TIONI ANIMUM ADHI-
POSE, TO WRITE. BERE.
To translate into Latin. Latine reddere, inter-
pretari ; in Latinum
sermonem transferre,
vertere.
Totranslate Greek word Ad verbum de Greecis
for word. Iitteris exprimere.
198 Guide to Latin Oonoersaium.
AlIquid summa cura et
diligenter recognos-
cere.
Hic aratoria, facultiite,
HIe pnestat poettca.
Verbum verbo expri-
mere, reddere ver-
bum pro verbo.
Opus elaborare, perpo-
Iire, perficere,
In eo vehementer desu-
davi.
Stricta oratione scribe-
mus, soliita orati6ne.
Converte, adhfbe anf-
mum ad scriptionem.
Scriptionem accurare,
elaborare, polire, Ii-
mare.
A scripti6ne nullus mi-
hi dies vacuus est.
Ultima lima defuit
scriptioni tuee.
for
This student excels in
prose, and that one in
poetry.
You have made the Idem peccasti ac HIe.
same rnistake as he.
How much time have Quantum temporis
you given to your scripti6ni tribuisti ?
composition?
To win prizes. Preemia consequi.
He understands Greek Luculente, lnculenter
very well. Grrece novit,
I write a theme every
day.
Your theme has not
been corrected thor"
oughly.
To review and correct
anything diligently.
To write' an exercise.
To render word
word.
I have worked hard
over this exercise.
We compose in verse
and in prose.
Apply yonrself to. your
.theme,
To write one's compo-
sition with care.
Forms of Conversation. 199
He is not acquainted
with Latin.
I-Ie has not translated
that passage well.
To this passage he has
given an entirely dif-
ferent meaning.
Latino nescit.
Hanc sententiam male
interpretatus est.
Hune locum in contra-
ri um sensum detorsit.
22.
CALAMUM CONFOR-
MARE, SCRIBERE.
Calamumapparare, con-
formare.
Hunc mihi oalamum in
aciitum mueronem,
ilIum vero in latio-
rem' conforma.
Calamum experiri.
In aversa charta scri-
bere.
Pura charta. --,
Non suppetunt : mihi
chartee,
Transmittit Iitteras pa-
pyrus mea.
Mendum scripturre litii-
ra tollere, delete, ob-
Iiterare.
t 'am pleased with the Placet mihi Lentuli
writing of Lentulus. manus.
My paper allows the
writing to be seen on
the other side.
I'o make an erasure.
TO MAKE A PEN,
, TO WRITE.
Tomake a pen.
Make this. pen pointed
and that one blunt.
To see if a pen be good.
To write on the back of
the paper.
Blank paper.
I have no paper.
200 Guide to Latin Oonversation.
Wri te this in your note- Refer hoe in adversaria.
book.
You have blotted my Atramenti effusione
book with ink. ehartam meam infe-
eisti.
To stain one's book with Atramento librum mac-
ink. uliire inquinare, fee-
dare.
To write what he die- Ejus dietata scribere ;
tates. excipere.
Lend me that book. Commoda mihi librum,
da mihi utendum
hune librum.
Give me my papers, Cedo tabulae, hane ehar-
that paper. tam.
23.
ON LETTERS,' AND HOW
r'1HEY SHOULD BE
SIGNED.
To fold a letter.
To seal a letter.
To open a letter.
To address a letter.
To send letters to any-
one.
He has delivered letters
to me unopened.
DE EPISTOLIe, ET IN EX-
TREMIS EPISTOLIS Q 1 J O ~
MODO VALEDICENDUM
SIT.
Epistolam complicare.
Obsigniire litteras, epis-
tolam sigillo munire,
signo Iitteras 0 bsig-
niire,
Epistolam resigniire, re-
solvere, explicare,
Epistolam inscribere.
Litteras ad alfquem
scribere, mittere, dare.
Litteras integra signa
mihi reddldit,
Forms of Conversation. 201
To intrust letters to any...
one.
We hear no longer from
you.
I have not received a
letter from you for a
long time. .
Why did you not write
to me'?
Write to me as often as
you can.
Not a bit of news from
Cappadocia.
I shall write often to
you, do not forget to
answer my letters.
I shall not write to you
again; I shall be less
long.
I shall write to you
more at length when I
shall have more time.
Trul v I had not a word
ofnews to tell you.
I had no news to send
you.
Irecei ved your short let-
ter; your letter gave
me mnch pleasure.
I thank you for your
lettors ; they gave me
great pleasure, especi-
ally that of Sextius.
Alicui litteras commit-
tere.
Conquiescunt Iitterae
tum.
Litteras tuas jamdiidum
desidero.
Cur conticeseunt tua-
Iitterse ?
Ad me quam seepisslme
scribas.
E Oappadocia ne hilum
quidem.
Scribam ad te srepe,
vide ut pa,r mihi sis.
Litterre mere- conquis-
cent; longiore epis-
tala supersedebo.
Pluribus verbis ad te
scribam quum plus
otii nactus era,
Plane nihil erat quod
ad te scriberem.
Nihil habebamquod di-
cerem.
Accepi perbreves tuas
Iitteras ; gratre mild ,
tum Iitterre fuerunt.
Gratum quod mihi de-
disti epistolas, quae
quidem me delecta-
runt, in primis Sextii
nostril
202 Guide to Latin Conversation.
Tell me as soon as pos-
sible what you are
doing and what you
intend to do.
Brutus is expecting a
letter from you.
Tu velim, et quid agas
et quid actiirum te
putes, facias me quaill
diligentisslme certi6-
rem.
Tuasjamlitteras Brutus
expectabat,
Vale.
Da operam ut valeas, hoc mihi gratius faeere nihil
poles.
TUJ me d i l ~ g e s ei valebis.
Cura si me amos ut ualeae.
Vale, ei matremmeosque tibi commendatos hobe.
Me velim, ui fads, diligas, valetudinique tnu» et tran-
quillitat-i animi seroias.
Valebis, meque, ui a puerofecisti, omabis,
Ama nos ei vale.
Gura ut valeas; et me, ut amas, ama.
Bene vale et me dilige.
Fac valeas, 1neque mutuo diligas.
Valete, mea desideria, valete.
Etiam. atque etiam vale.
'l'u oelim. tuam et Tulliolre valetud1:nem cures.
Va.letudinem tuam cura d1:ligenter.
Fac ut tuam et Tullirevaletudinemcures.
Maxisne autemdate operam ui valeatis, si nos vultis
oalere.
OU1'a ut valeas, et ita fib1: persuadeas, mihi te charius
ni:hil esse, nequeunquamfuisse.
Reliquum est 'itt te O1'e1n, uf valetudini tsue, si me et
tuos ommes valere 'i}is, diligentissime servias.
Forms of Conoersaiion; 203
Oura, mi fraier, ut oaleas;
Eac, mi frater, ui »uleas.
Vale, mi optime et optatissime frater,
JYfi frater, vale.
Te 01'0 etiamatque etiam, mi frater, ut »aleas.
Oura, mi suavissime et charissimefraier, ut valeas.
Vale, mi suavissimeet optimefraier,
(hira. 'ut valeas ei nos ames, et tibi persuadeas te a me
[ruierne amari.
(lura ui valeas etiam aique etiam, Tiro noster.
Quant'um me diligis, tamtumfo» ut valeas, vel quan-
tum te a me sc,is diligi.
Ama nos et vale.
Cura te etiam aique eiiam diligenter.
Oura, mi Tiro, u ~ oaleas.
Salvebis a Oicerone, salve a Petro,salutat te Oieero
meus.
Oicero bellissimus tibi salutemplurimam dicit.
Tullia tibi plurimam salutemadacribit.
Terentia te salcerc jubet, Oicero te salutat.
Terentia tibi saluf-em, Terentia tibi impe1'tit multam
sahuem,
Domus te nostra tota salutat.
Tulliolre et (Iicerimis salutemdieito.
Multam saluteni Pdio:
DionyBw plurimoim soluiem:
Attica plurimam. salute1n velim dieas.
Dionysium velim salvere [ubeas.
Jubebis meonomine saloere Poulum;
• Ex me saluiaioprceeeptorem. tuum.
Saluta meis uerbi« Joannem.
Salutem Marcello.
Salutemdie Petro meo'nomine, quemegoin oculisfero.
204 Guide to Latin Oonoersoiion:
Molinio meo multam salutem.
Salutem quibus videbitur, Oontm'elloprredpue, et Ge-
rardo.
Oommunibus amicis a. me multam salutem.
24.
Ex anlmi sententia.
Bona venia' tua dixtr-
im, pace tua dixerim
Ex anfmi tui sententia,
Pro re, pro re nata.
Pro mea parte, pro vi ..
rili parte.
Pro portione, pro rata
portione.
Plena manu.
VARLiE LOCUTIONES
FAMILIARES.
Verbi causa, verbi gra..
tia, exempli causa.
Dich; causa.
Suspenso pede.
.tEquo Marte.
Suo Marte.
In propria persona.
the Pro cceli conditione. to
With the whole hand-
liberally.
In person.
According
weather.
According to your pleas-
ure.
In earnest, seriously.
I will say it with your
permission.
I n proportion.
VARIOUS FAMILIAR
EXPRESSIONS.
For example.
For form's sake.
On tiptoe.
With equal chances.
Single-handed· - by
one's self.
For a special business;
as occasion serves.
As far as I am able.
Forms of Oonversation. 205
Ut par erato
Quoad ejus fieri potuit.
Quoad ej us facere po-
teris,
Ut verum Ioquar, ne
dicam dolo. .
Nequid mentiar,
Tuse sunt partes docere
Mere nunc partes sunt.
Sua quisque vice, suo
quisque ordtne.
Tua res est, tua res agr-
tur,
Res habet moram.
Bene habet, est.
Quiesse melius erit 1
Aufer nugas,
Pro eo ac debui.
be Ne tu frustra sis.
It is your affair.
Not to lie.
It is your duty to teach.
It is now n1Y duty.
Each one in his turn.
The business is not
pressing.
He did it without think- Per imprudentiamfecit.
ing, .
Neither this nor that. Neve hoc, neve illud.
For that is all nonsense. Quippe leve est totum
hoc.
it is finished. Actum est.
Well done! 0 factum bene!
I am vexed at it. Nollem factum,
I do not repent of what Haud muto factum.
has been done.
It goes well.
Evi1to him who wags.
Leaving joking aside.
As was my duty.
That you may not
deceived.
Contrary to what he Contra ac dicit.
savs,
Since it was convenient.
As much as possible.
As muchi.as you are
able.
To tell the truth,
206 Guide to Latin Coniereation,
How is that possible?
Let me alone.
Will you not let me
alone?
Will you soon have fin-
ished?
He finds a great deal of
fault with it.
They are not numerous,
I am at work on abook.
The affair has turned
out to my liking.
We should take men as
we find them.
I want nothing to do
with you.
I wish to have a word
with you.
It is useful, important,
To live but for the pres-
ent.
To take note of.
To speak from the man-
uscript.
He is certainly much
mistaken.
What else could he do ?
After the fashion.
To tell the truth, you
are genteel.
There is nobody who
does not like you.
To behave according to
one's fancy.
Qui potis est?
Ql3n omitte me.
Non omittis ?
Potin' ut deslnas?
Accerrune illud vitu..
perat,
Non ita multi sunt.
Liberestin mantbus.
Res obtrgit atque optii..
bam.
Ut homo est, ita 11101'em
geras.
Extranumerummihi es.
Paucis te vola.
Opei'R1 pretium est.
In diem vivere. '
Ad memoriam notare.
De scripta dicere.
Nre HIe vehementer er-
rat.
Quid fecisset aliud?
Ut novus fert usus.
Extra jocum, homo bel..
Ius es,
Unus nemo te dilrgit,
Suo nutu regie
For1ns of Conversation. 207
Everyone after his man-
ner.
To read tecto t0710.
Seeing the time it is.
As near as I can re-
member.
This is easy.
The matter is not clear.
My account agrees,is
right.
Right or wrong it mat-
tel'Slittle to us.
H0 asks for you at the
door.
There is nothing in the
world that I would
do more willingly.
I am not at all anxious
about that.
I-Ie cares nothing for
what they say of him.
All things are turning
out as I would wish.
Believe me, you will re-
joice at having done
it.
Everything goes well
with him.
There's not so much in
it as is reported.
The labor has been ex-
pended with profit.
Suus cuique mos.
Uno tenore Iegere.
Ut diei tempus est.
Ut mea memoria est.
Hoc in promptu est,
jacet,
Non liquet.
Constat mihi ratio.
Recte an secns nihil ad
nos.
A janua te queerit,
Nihil est.seque quod fa-
ciam libens.
Nihil isthrec moveo ac
curo.
Serrnones homtnnm de
se factle sustinet..
Mihi omnia voto corn-
petunt.
Gaudebis facto, crede
mihi.
Res illi omnes ad votum
fluunt, succedunt,
Non tantum est in re
quantus est sermo.
Constat operse fructus.

,CoPYRIGHT\> 1892, BY JOHN MURPHY &

Co,

'i·:
I I

:'1

{J tl I

I·')

UTILITY AND GENERAL DIVISION OF THE BOOK.
Some colleges are trying to revive the custom of speaking Latin in the classroom. The success that has attended these efforts has fully justified the method pursued and brought into relief the real need of elementary books to supplement the endeavor. The desire of forwarding this movement in fa VOl' of more solid studies, and of seeing the scope of a method becorne more extended which has already borne such good fruit in .Italy and in many colleges of France, has prompted us to write this Guide to Latin. Conversal£on. We have reunited in a convenient and handy volume, a vocabulary of ordinary words, a list of comparatives and of superlatives, the principal irregular verbs, choice familiar phrases, dialogues, proverbs, choice sentences and quotations. A single volume contains, the phrases and dialogues of Erasmus, of Vives, of Cordier, of Alde- Manuee, of Fathers Pontanus, Van Torre and Champsneups,

3

4

Guide to Latin Conversation.

The vocabulary, distributed under different headings, contains in alphabetical order the nomenclature of such words as are most in use. We have been careful not to introd uce in this dictionary any word of uncertain Latinity. Sorne ecclesiastical terms, names of rank, of sciences, and of modern inventions, do not belong to the language of the Augustan age, and will be easily recognized. In the list of comparatives and of super- ' latives we w rre more desirous of giving positive indications than of wishing to make the list complete. The gender of nouns and the quantity of incrernents and penultimates which do not follow the rules of position, will be found designated. A collection of idioms and Latin expressions follows the vocabulary. We have grouped them under general titles, which embrace the circle of ideas most familiar to students. Most of these phrases are taken from the letters of Cicero: others from Terence. A few are extracted from the writings of Titus Livius, of Caesar, and of Plautus. There are eighty dialogues, thirty of which ha~e been taken from the conversations of Father

General Division of the Book.

5

Van Torre, a Belgian J esuit.' In the latter part of the book we have given an idea of the kind of dialogue that should be used by the pupils of more advanced studies. All the other dialogues are those of the Pvoqummasmaia. Latisiuaiie of . Pontanus.f which the Protestant gymnasiums of . Germany did not hesitate to accept even at the hands of a born adversary of the Reform. The dialogues only are not translated. We were compelled to lessen their number, and many professors were of the opinion that it would be more advantageous to have the pupils translate them for themselves. The sentences and choice thoughts come after the conversations. With a few proverbs from
1 Anthony Van Torre was born at Alost, in 1615,became a religious in 1632, and passed his life in teaching belleslettres, and in supervising classes. He died in 1677, at the college of Courtrai. His dialogues, wrttte n for the college. of Anvers, were published for the first time in 1657. The .same Father published, in 1674, A Ccllection of Latin Phrases. 2 James Pontanus, a Bohemian Jesuit, taught bellesIottres for a long time and with great success in Germany. He died at Augsburg, in 1626, at the age of eighty-four years. He was the author of Poetical Precepts, Commentaries on Virgil and Ovid, several Greek Translations, and many other writings in prose and verse.

6

Guide to Latin Conversation.

Publius Syrus are grouped noted sayings from J uvenal, Terence, Seneca, Ovid, Virgil, and Horace, all of which we have inserted as happy remembrances of a solid and varied literary education. The book ends with tables, abbreviations, notations, the Roman calendar, all )f which cannot but be useful for easy reference.

MANNER OF USING GUIDE TO LATIN CONVERSATION. The following method seems to us the most useful to follow: (a.) In the sixth class the principal articles of the vocabulary may be learned, some paragraphs of Latin phrases, and the dialogues of the first part. The dialogues of Father Pontanus, being more erudite and elegant, are more appropriate for the higher classes. In the learning of the vocabulary it is necessary that the pupil be able to give the Latin word in answer to the English word. This exercise may be taken up once a week with profit, by having the pupils interrogate each other on some particular subject designated in ad vance by the professor. The proper accentuation of every Latin word should be insisted on from the first lesson. A habit of pronouncing words" badly is corrected only with great difficulty. (b.) In the fifth class, the vocabulary may be revipwBd~ t.he collection of Latin phrases taken 7

8

Manner of Using Guide.

up, and the colloquia of the second part begun. The dialogues should be committed to memory and recited. The professor may appoint two or three on each side, to converseon a given subject and name some special day for the dialogue. This will also answer for a review. Examinations may also be held on the subject matter seen by each class. (c.) In the fourth class, the students should exercise their minds by rendering into Latin, sentences such as are in the book, but with this difference, they should strive to change the verbs, . the case of the nouns, the number, the tense, and even go so far as to introduce new phrases. They should make a special study of all the dialogues. When a certain number shall have been learned, they should seek to converse with one another, or answer in writing questions put to them by the professor. The book is suitable for any class arid may be made useful in a thousand ways which will snggest themselves to the conscientious professor or student.

VOCABULARY. VOCABULORUM INDEX.

1.
GOD, THE INHABITANTS OF HEAVEN, HELL. :pEDS, COELICOLJE, INFEHI.

Deus. God, The Holy Ghost, Spirftus sanctus. The Holy Trinity, Sancta Trinrtas, atis,! Jesus Chrisms. Jesus Christ, The Lord, Dommus. Ccelum ; pl. Cosli, orum, rJ1. Heaven, The Blessed Virgin, Sancta Virge, Inis, f. The Angels, Angeli, arum, m. pl. The Archangels, Archangeli, arum, 'In. pl. Seraphim, n, plo indo The Seraphim, . A. postol us. An Apostle, Patriarch, Patriarcha, ~, 111., Prophet, Propheta, 00, m. Martyr, Martyr, yris, m. j. Confessor, Confessor, oris, m. Saint, m., Saint,j. Sanctus, m ; sancta, f. I'nferi, arum, m: pl. n-n, Infernus. Infernal, Diabolus, The Devil,

9

10
T~

Guide to Latin Conversation.
Demon,
Da-mon, onis, m. Satanas, ::e, m:

Satan,

2.
TIME, DIVISION OF TIME. TEMPUS, DIVISIO TEMPORIS.

Age,
Century, Lustrum, Year, l\,{onth, January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December, Week

}Etas, atis, j.; reVUID. Seculum. Lustrum. . Annus. Mensis, is, 'In. Januarius.

~y,'

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday,

Februarius, Martins, Aprilis, is, m; Mains. Junius. Julius. Augustus. September, bris, m: October, bris, 'In. November, bris, 'In. December, bris, 'In. Hebdornada, Dies, ei, m. j. Lunre dies. Dies Martis. Dies Mereurii. Dies J'ovis. Dies \Ten~ris

Daybreak. Mane. Pridie. Perendie. Vespertinum tempus. Pomeridianum tempus. veris. Vespere. ei. Winter. emis. Spring. 1Autumnus.. n. Postridie. In the evening. n. The day before yes[terday. [illis. Meridiano tempore. noetis. [. m. Morning. Autumn. arum. Night. I-Ieri. Meridies. Twilight. Dawn. Quadrans. flour. After to-morrow. f. Quarter-hour. Darkness. Cras. Hicms. The Seasons. ' At night. f. To-morrow. iitis. Saturday. Midnight. 'I'empora annie Ve1'. Light. Tenebrse. Hora. Yesterday. Evening. lucis. m. In the morning.Vocab1llary. Half-hour. Media noxa Lux. Sunday. Diluenlum. pl. The day after. No x. antis. Noon. Semih6ra. The day before. . Tempus matutinum Aurora. At noon. Iumen. 11 Dies Saturni Dominica dies. f. Noetu. Crepusctilum. JEstas. Nudi us tertius. lIodie. Afternoon. To-day. Summer.

12 Guide to Latin (lonoereaiion.thin. flumen. Billow. . .tenuis. en tis. .insalubre. PI uctus. 'in. •JER.dense. is. Mare. ventus. . us. Aer. 'in.UA ET IGNIS. . Stream.healthy. Water To flow. Torrens. Stagnum.erassus. Air. m. Current. River. AIR. Aqua. Humidus. . m. Brook. Fans. Lake. Rivulus. Fluvius. WATER AND FIRE. Amnis. us. inis. . Sea. wave. 3. Scatebra. Fountain.: Rivus. Fluere.unhealthy. Gulf. Wet. Pond. n. fontis. Gushing fountain. Unda. Madefacere. Strait. Madldus. Puteus. To gush out. To make wet. Ccelurn sal ubre. Rivulet. n. . AQ. Aura. Well. 1h. Laeus. Fretum. Sinus. Damp. Surge. Fluentum. m. \Vind. . spring. Scaturire. is. Torrent. us.

Candle. Bitumen. Ripa. Incendium. Agate. 13 ::~ Littus. Fire. Succln um."!L !~ i'(~' ~. Hearth. Asp hal ti urn. strand. us. MINERALS. [lnis. Treda. n. n. . I. To emit light. Torch. Fire. Warm. is. lucis. j. Alum. Al timen. Lucere. Shore. Arsenlcum. Candela. Alabastrites. Luctdus. ii. Channel. Light. ee.Flame. Ignis. ortis. To set fire to. Inis. Flamma. Alveus. 111. m. . Vocabulary. f. re. Bank. Incendere. n Urere. Pluvial Statio. n. Port. Alabaster. To burn. electrum. Antimony. Bitumen. Arsenic. lumen. Luminous. m. Calor. Lux. m. Inis. I-Iarbor. J-Ieat. Stibium. 11. Asphalt. Calefacere. oris. Portus. Caltdus. Amber. f. fax. Rain. oris.. A chates. Focus. MINERALIA ET FOSSIL lA. To warm. . facis. m. 4.

.. Aureus. Eburneus. [. Brass (bi-metal). Silex. GUIn. indo Gypsum. Idis. Marga. Later. Enarrlelled. Brick. Gummi. boris. Made of copfler. thuris.. Laterciilus.4 _ • 14 Guide to Latin Oonversation. Enamelled picture. Ebur. eeris. m. n. Ivory. antis. Smaragdus. Bituminous. Smaragdfnus. Carbunculus. Adamantmus. [stone. Gypsum. Of ivory. f. Argil laceus. testaceus. Crystal. Enarnel. Thus. Of emerald. '11. Clayey. n. Aurum. a-ris. Elnery. eneaustrcus.. [111. Eneaustus.. Camphora. Darbuncle. Diamond.. FI int-stone. lEneus. Crystalline.. . Encaustlce. eris. G-olden.f. eereus.t:Es. n. cuprum.fEriigo.. £s. testa. Elnerald. Ferrum. crystallum. Copper ore. Iron. Of diamond. Crystallus. lapis) Id is. es.. Crystalltnus. m. Bituminous. Saxetum. 111. Camphor. Inis. Place full of flintGold. m. Latericius.•. l -LEris fodina. Incense. Of brick. Chalk. Adamaa. Encaustum. eburnus. Icis. Rust of copper~ Mine of copper. Small brick. . Clay. Argilla. Smyris. . n.

Ruby. . onis. Porphyry. Pyrites. Pearl. m. Rupes. Of lead. Nitre. . Mine of salt. j. j. f. Iaspideus. fe. Marmoreus. Resinous. Lead. Rock. Mercury. Of marble. Sal factitius. Sandaraca. Marmoratus. Magnes. Nitrous. Natural salt. Ochra. f. pyrites. Iaspis. Piceus. Pitch. Grain of salt. Rubigo. Resinosus. Saltpetre. pl. Salinse. Porphyrites. Artificial salt. rdis. mis. Marble.Vocabulary. j. Sandarach. Carbunculus. Opal. Sea salt. 'In. Ochre. Sal. Sal nativus. Of pitch.. 00. Plumbeus. margarita. etis. Adorned with marbl e. Mixed with lead. Marmor. Plumbum. Salis mica. Opalus. arum. Salt works. Pix. petra. n. Nitre-bed. fOf jasper. Plumbosus. i. Nitrosus. Loadstone. j. Resina. Sal marinus. Salifodina. m. 15 Jasper. IIydrargyrus.Nitrum. Salnitrum. Sal t. m: Resin.. oris. salis. plcis. U nio. Nitraria. Rust. is.

Soot. Icis.f. pl. Sapphirus. 'Vhite lead. Sulphur. m. FLOWERS. [lead. Pumice stone. 5. \ Sulphureus. Cereus. TREES. PJ. Painted with white Cerussat us. Cerinus. FulIgo. arum. Verdigris. PLANTS. Chalcantum.JANTJE. Full of stones. Sapphire. m. j. Of sapphire. Vitriol. Iehis. Precious stones. psiInmythium. uris. Of silver. Illis. lcis. Idis. m. . Sardonyx. Acacia. Cera. Saxum. Ge1111nre. Sealing wax. Lapideus. Blackened by soot. Sapphirmus. Argenteus. Small stone. n. Of wax. Fullginosns. Silver. Stone. Abraham's-balm. Lapidosus. m. Acacia. Argentum. FRUITS. Pumex. Color of soot. . Cera signatoria.. Vitex. Sardonyx. FR UCTtJ'S. Of the color of wax. Cerussa. Sulphurous. Wax. Lapis. Stony. FLORES. Large stone. Scolecia. Sulphur.- 16 Guide to Latin Conversation. j. Fuligineus.. i. ARBORES. Lapillus.

anicetum. Arlena. Arbute. Acanthus. Malus. Amaranth. . amygdala. Artichoke. Head of artichoke. i. Bean. Banana. Balsam. f. Anise.1. Armeniaca. Of an apple-tree. Anemone. Apple. f. Arbutus. Aconite. Almond-tree. Hordeaceus. Of beech. Fagus. I-Iordeum. j. Apricot-tree. es. . es. Arbutum. Anemone. Asparagus. Aconitum. fagi . i. Of ash.Armeniacum. Basilisk. OcIIDum. Cinara. Beech -tree. Malrnns. Faba. Fraxiniitum. [neus 2 . Alnus. Cinarre strobflus. Apple-tree. Wood of ash. Alder-tree. Malum. i. Aloes. . Arbute-berry.j. Apple-orchard. Asparagus. Fraxlnus. Amygdalum. Balm-mint. Pomarium. Fraxinens. Anisum. Aloe. Apiastrum. Apricot. Balsamum.Vocabula1·Y· 17 Acanthus. Amarantus. Amygdalus. Barley. Almond.. fagmus.f. Ash-tree. i. f. Of barley. i. Fageus.

18 Guide to Latin (kmocreation. Fagea glans.}: Ocellus. caulis. Basket made of bulCabbage. f. Rub-tum. Blite. Betula. Chervil. Buglossus. Cedrus. [rushes. Blttum. J'uncetum. Anthernis. Juncosus. Buxeus.. i. Camomile. Box-wood. Of bulrush. Box-thorn. Carnation. Bind-weed. scirpus. [nux. Beet-root. f. Borage. Centaureum. Thicket.Iunceus. Cerasum. Castanetum. . Cork-tree. Rubus. Broom. eris. f. buxum. Centaury. Chestnut-plot. Place where bul[rushes grow. Brassica. m~ Suber. Chestnut-tree. i. m. Castanea. Castanea. Cserefolium. Cherry. n. Of box-wood. Full of bulrushes. . i. Birch-tree. Buxus. is. Vepres. rdis. Chestnut. is. Cerasus. G enista. Place planted with Brier. Cherry-tree. fagfna Betaceus (pes).. Cedar. i. J uncus. Convolvulus. Sporta. . j. 'In. j Cab~~ Beech-nut. Cinnamon. Chicory. Intuhua i. Bulrush. Buxetum. [box-wood. 'in. spartum.

llignus. Date. and US. Cucumber. Ficus. Ilex. 19 Spica. The beard of corn. Cress. marathrum Filix. cytlsum. Icis. Ulmous. Dog. Elder-tree. i. Of cork. Grossularia. Of the elder-tree.i Vocabnlary. Elm-seed. acinus Cupressus. Cytfsus. Cumin. Fern. Samera. Fig-tree. iligneus. Ebony-tree. Ebony. Linum. fl> Cornum. Palma. Filictum. Palmula. Fig. i. Cuciimis. [evergreens. Llicetum. f. Date-tree.. Arista. Dog-berry. Corn. Subereus. Flax. Elln. i. Of evergreen. Ficus. Fern-plot. Icis. Sambiioaus. Marathrus. Grossulariss. and us. Oynosbatos. Sambucus. Evergreen. i. j. . Of elm. Ear of corn. m. uf. j. is and el'is. Frumentum.berry-tree. j. Cornus. Currant. Ebenus. Darnel (or coole). Cypress-tree. Cumi 11urn. Nasturtium. Ulmus. j. Cytisus. f. Place planted with Fennel. Lolium. Curran t-bush. Ebenum. Eglantine.

lentis. I-lemlock. Carbaseus. Colurnus. Myrica. Laurens. Lactfica. Lineus. Lens. veratrum. Furze. and US. tamarisk. i. Ciciita. cannabus Aquifolia. Hazel-tree. Leek. pl. .f. Lauretum. {-lolly. Avellana. Allium. Larix. 'ire. Lettuce.. Lentil. porruln. Icis. Lentiscus. es. f. Garlic. I-Iemp. Seed of ivy. Hazel-nut.20 Guide to Latin Conversation. stica.f. Lentisctn us.. Place planted with [laurel. j. Fumitory. Lentisk. lenticula. Of hazel. Larignus. N ucleus alii. Capnos. f. House-leek. Corylus. carbaslnus. Of laurel. . Crowned with laurel. Cannabis. Galla. Lemon-tree. Helle bore. Of fine flax. i. Citrus.. f. Ivy. Citreum. laurinus. f. Saliunca. I-lyacinthus. Laureatus. i. i..!. Of flax. Hederre acinus. [larch. aquifalium. I-Iedera. Of lentisk. Hyacinth. is. . Laurus. pard. Lemon. Clove of garlic. Lavender. Of ivy. Gall-nut. Porrus. Larch-tree. citrea. Digitell urn. Hederaceus. Helleborum. myrice. Of the wood of the Laurel.

Grain of myrrh. Maple-tree. Licorice. Lilii bulbus. Madder. j. Marsh-mallow. Like to the mallow. Lucern-grass.m. Myrrh. Myrt6sus. Morum. i. Of myrrh. i. Lily. Pepo. Mulberry. m. Muscus. Medlar-tree. Acer. Lilietum. Lupine. Morus. Lupinus. Mespllum. Linden (or lime-tree). and us~. Malva. Garden of lilies. eris.j. Marigold. orum. Modica.]. Myrrhre globule. Milium. i. Mallow. Bulb of the lily. Place planted with [myrtle. Althrea. Melon. Moss. Marjoram. Full of myrtle. n. Mal vaceus. pt 21 . Glycyrrhiza. Mistletoe. Myrtus. Myrrheus. Mesptlus. Myrta. Sorbum. Lilium. Mountain-ash. Amaracus. i. Viscum. Myrrha. Iupinum. hibiscum.Vocabula1"y. n: Caltha. Myrtle-tree. Bays of myrtle. Fruit of medlar-tree. Tilia. Rubia. boletus.J: Myrtetum. Sorbus. Mulberry-tree. Fungus. onis. Sorb apple. lVlillet. Mushroom.

. Persicus. Pinus. Palmarius. Persicum. Glans. Palmetum. Date. Quercctum.J' Of nard. rna Nettle. nardus. Nardum. Pisum. Place planted with Palma. i. m. [palms. palmula. f. Ol ivetum. tri. Periwinkle. dis. i. Peach. Vinca pervinca. ouve-tree. Cepula. ' Place planted with Olea. Oleaster. Parsley.Nardlnus. . Of the osier. Nard. Osier-tree. o liva. n: Gray pea. Pirus. Csepa or CH'pe. Wild-olive. Palm. and us. [olive. Urtica. eris. Pea. pamula. Pine. Quercus. Cicer. Patetre. Pavonia.f. n. Inis. Of palm. Acorn. i. Oak. P each-tree. i. indo Green-onion. Oak-grove. i.j: pl" Apium. Narcissus. Pirum. Virninetum. oli va. Peony. f. Pear-tree. Vimineus. Orange-tree. Vimen. i./. arum. Olive. Orange. Pear. Olea. j. Aureum malum. Onion. Aurea malus.22 Guide to Latin Conversation. Dried dates. Palma. Narcissus. Osier-plot.

f. . Scorpus papaveris. Arundo. [i. f. Populeus. Cucurbita. Serbus. 'Radish. Rind of pomegranPoplar. Pomegranate. Liban5tis. Rose-mary. Place planted with Pineapple.Vocabulary. Of pine. Of poplar. t . Place planted with Poppy. Populetum. Of poppy. Arundineus. Prune. es. Bed of radish. Populus. Alburnum. luis. Prune. Oryza. Punlca. Plane-tree.!. Prunus. Rose-laurel. Plum-tree. Prunum. Sage. Rye. Raplna. Pomegranate-flower. Rhododaphne. Balaustium. is. u]. Prunum. [poplars. Reedy. Papaver. Convolvulus. Rapum. Place planted with Rice. [ate. Reed. . [reeds. Rope-wood. Pinetum. t: Plataninus. Papavereus. Stein of poppy. or graniita malus. Arundinetum. Sap-wood. j. pistaceum. [pines. Of a plane-tree. tdis. Granatum. Pumpkin. i. Pineal Pistacium. Pistachio. Service-tree. Platanus. n: Salvia. 23 Pineus. i. i. Mali pU111ci corium. Pomegranate-tree. fSecale.

Of vetch. Inis. Thistle. Nux. Sarmentum. 11. Rubetum. Vine-branch. f. Of thyme. Stock -gillyflower. Vine-dresser. Walnut shell. Fruit of service-tree. Spina.f. Viciarius.f.. tnis. Walnut. Pampineus. [Itis. palmes. Sesamum. es. Sorrel. Truffle.24 Guide to Latin Oonoereaiion. n: pl. Thyme. Vitis. Thymlnus. Fraga. nucis. N apus. Vervain. Ascalonia. j. Thymum. rn. Tuber. Turnip.j" Putamen. Vicia. Thorn. m. [andis. Violet. Vimen. Of a branch. . n: Strawberry. Leucoion. Viela. Sesamum. Tendril. Vinltor. eris. ii. ianthis. Verbeniica. Walnut-tree. Vinetum. Thicket. ceepa. Heliotropium. . vitiarium. n. Shallot. Vetch. J uglans. j. tdis.. is. Clavicula. . n. Twig. Leafy branch. Carduus. orum. Oxalis. nucis. Sorbum. oris. Sunflower.Vine. Nux. Pamptnus. . Viburnum. 'I'amarind. Vineyard. Viburnum. 'I'amariee.

Ofa beaver. Young ass. Adder. 7n. Beaver. Carinee. apua. Galla. Wild thyme. Labrusca. aphye. Asmus. [vine. Castor. J: pl. CEnanthe. Nucleus. is. Wormwood. f. [. is. Basilisk. Wild vine. Of the yew.j. Salignus. ANIMALIA. Yew-tree. arum. saligneus. simius. u f. Wheat. Badger. serpullum. castoreus. Ant. [me Apis. J. bri. m. Coluber. Ass." I.Vocabulary. 'In.. Asellus. Ape. onis. Aspis.. es. Anchovy.es. . Apnm examen. Bat. ' Flower of the wild Willow-tree. 'fl. Idis. V espertilio. {. Inis. Kernel. Gall-nut. Simia. Formica. Serpyllum. . 25 ANIMALS.j. oris. Cub. Meles. The two shells. Aphya. Swarm of bees. Ursa. Of willow. Absinthum. Bear. Fibrinus. taxa.. Salix. Bee. Asp. 6nl. Taxeus. bri. libel'. D rsre catulus. Icis. Basiliscus. Taxus. 'I'ritrcum.

Crocodile.j. 'In. or feles. gry Ilus. Eriica. 'In. Bug. Cantharides. She-colt. m: Felis. Verres. Camelus.. Bison. Icis. Frigilla. Crocod il us. Astaeus. Caterpillar. Grus. Vitulus. onis. Blackbird. Colt. Chamreleon. es. Equulus. Craw-fish. Idis. Alveus. Of a camel. Bustard. Chamois. is. m. Butterfly. Bison. I Bee-hive. Cock. . f. Otis. Taurus. ontis . Buffalo. rn• . Cow. Crow. [onis. Cornicula. f. Chameleon. j.«e to Latin Conversation. Little crow. Capus. carope. Crista. Cantharis. Equula. fringilla. Icis.t' Mertila. Grillus. rdis. Calf Cardel. al vearium. on tis. Gallinaceus pullus. • Cat. Small bee. Bull. capo. Vacca. Gallus. . Capon. Crane. f. Camelinus. Urus. Cuckoo. equinus pullus. OuciiIus and cucnlus.26 (i!u. gruis. and' Rupicapra. Ohicken. Ohaffinch. onis. is. 'in. j.. Boar. Papilia. Comb of cock. Aploula. Cricket. Oornix. Cimex.

]. Capreolus. m. Ieis. m. Columba. Pup. m. eris. V ulpes. 'm.. inis. Dormouse. m. fAnsel'. Culex. Viverra. Cicada. Caprinus. delphin. 27 Dama. Goldfinch. is. Grasshopper. is. Goat. Glis. Of a goat. Eel. n. Canis. Fucus. Anas. Dog.}:' [tis. . f Falco. Ferret. Carduelis. Mergus. Gyrinus. Capra. m. Trunk. Proboscis. g l iris. is.' [1n. capella. Drone-bee. Falcon. Anguilla. Eagle. Gnat. Caprile. f. m.. Dolphin. Nitedula. is. Fox. elephas. ldis. Duck. Frog. Catulus. I-Ioedus. Field-mouse.t . Dove. an . Aqutla. Deer. leis. Rubeta. Elephantus. Delphinus. onis. Wild-goat. Diver. Musca. Tadpole. Flea. Bush-frog. atis. Aurata. Dorce (gold-headed). Elephant. Pulex. Eaglet. nitela.Goose. Fly. fRana.Vocabulary. Kid. Goat-house. Aqullte pullus.

Hircinus. capri. Gobio. Asilus. m. Of a he-goat. Agnus. m. Locust. suis. Lacertus. Lamb. Porcus. j. Alauda. m. j Porcellus. Inis. Leech. onis.28 Guide to Latin Conversation: Vertagus.. Lizard. Lerena. Caper. Icis. Heifer. Mane. Lap-wing. m.. Graculus. m: Equus. Little hog. sus.Iuba. onis. Agnellus. . Jackdaw. Herinaceus. Water-hen. herici us. Lion. Lark. Lepus. cestrus. Hydrus. Lepuscnlus. lIydra. . Hedgehog. Fultca. Gallina. Upupa. Juvenca. Pardus. Hare. He-goat. Milvus. Turkey-hen. Hornet. oris. Cerna. Kid. Kite. Le6nis cattilus. Gudgeon. Crabro. onis. gabius Alcyon. lacerta. f. Fulix. 'In. Leopard. Horse. Greyhound. hircus. f. Horse-fly.Hirudo. I-Ialycon. j. Lioness. alcedo.. Locusta. . Young hare. I-Iog. Hen. Young lion. Hind. m. Inis. Leo.

Mula. m. f. Horned-owl. Oyster-bank. Louse. ostreum. Talpa. Mullet. Ostrich. simius. icis. Ictis.].]. Sore x. m. bovis. Ox. Partridge. strigis. Moth. Equa. Mullus. Ostrearium. Lariat. Mare. Martinet. Pelican. Strix. Psittacus. Peacock. cornua. Monkey. barb us. Simia. m. Noctua. Merlin. Mackerel. She mule. Paro. Bubo. f Bos. Pelicanua . Perdix. Panthera. . pl. Pica. Screech-ow White-owl. US. m.]. Ostrea. bri. m: Mulus. f. m. Lutra. onis. m. IIoI'n. Mule. Magpie.. Oyster. rdis. Panther. cis. 29 Galbula$ Pediculus. Stru thiocamelus. Lynx. Perdicis pullus. m. m. Tinea. Mole. Icis. Marten. Mouse. Young partridge. Mura-na.Vocabulary. Parrot. j. n. Lynx. Cornu. Cypselus. cypsellus. onis. Owl. Otter. Scomber. onis.. 1. onis. 111. Murrena.£salon. Bu bo.

l~at. is. Salamandra. Porcus. Cochlea. Scarabreus. Salmo. Tursio. onis. Mus. onis. aranea. Small spider. Columba. 'I1~. . Salamander. sus. Coturnix. m. Sparrow.hawk. [ctilus Araneus. Pony. Sheep. J Scolopendra mul ti p~da. I-~abbit. Rail. onis.f. Scorpio. Palurnbes. Of a ring-dove. eris. P alumbes. 'In. Idis. Sardina. Scarabee. Aries. Rhinoceros.. otis. Sow.j. columbus. j. Spider.. Cuniculus. Pig. 111uris. j. araneola. m. Polypus. Rhinoceros: Ring-dove. m. onis. Scorpion. Glottis. Pike. Salmon. Raven. j. Porcupine. etis.30 Guide to Latin Conversation. suis. Hock-dove. Mannus. ?n. Quail. entis. Pigeon. sarda. tcis. m.. Pheasant. Ram. Hystrix. tris. Palumbinus. Passer. Sus..•/ Ovis. scorpius Serpens. Scolopendra. f. is. suis. Porpoise. Sardine. Phasiana (avis). m. Polypus. passel' Acci prter. leis. [. 111. . f. Rubell io. m. f. m. po rca. l~oach. Araneolus. Sparrow. Corvus. Snail. Serpent. is. Lucius.

Rusticiila. Ciconia. Lupee catulus. Stag. m: Turtle. Hinnuleus. Squirrel. TItmouse. She-wolf. Vulture" Motacilla. Swallow. Inis. Cub. Starling. Ficedula. Doe. Cervus. Phalangium. Toad. Tigris. onis. m. Trout. Wasp. £glthus. Turbot.. Aper. f. 31 Seiurus. Lupa. Weasel. cycnus. . tigress. Bufo. Swan. Hirundo. Vipera. To unharbor a stag. or Idis. Stork. Tarantula. m. f. Wagtail? Vespa. m. Tinea. Thrush. Turdns.Vocabulary. Woodeook. Of a stag. Thunny. Wolf. Vultur. Testiido. Wild boar. Querqued ula. m. Cervinus. Mustela. Sturnus. · Excitare cervum. . Titlark. 'I'ortoise. Turtur. m. Thynnus. trueta. pri. Viper. is. Whale. Inis. uris. Teal. OIOf? oris. thunnus. hinntilus. Tench. fa Tiger. Tructus. Lupus. Baleena. Rhombus. uris.

Trochtlus. Small worm. t Picus.ire Baliire. Lumbricus. Inis. strepere. VOCES ANIMALIUM. ycis. Balbutire. ' [susuriire. Cockcrows. Pipire. Bat whizzes. Oossus . Bear gTuni$. stri[dere. Camel. Grilliire. Wren. Worm. Barrire. Crow crooks. m. Vermis. Rudere. Tape worm.s. Verrnicnlus. Cuculfire. teredo. srevire EOlubiHire) b 0 In bit are. CRIES OF ANIMA r. Elephant 1'Oa1'S. blater. 7. T~nia. Dog burke. Goat bleats. Cuckoo sings. garrire. Woodlouse. Bee buzzes. Blackbird whistles. regaliolus. . Chicken pips. Mugire. bau bari. oncare. ul uliire. belare. . Bull bellows. stridere. stridere. Earth worm. canere. Grub worm. W oodpecker. W oodfretter. B0111byx. Ass brays. Coaxiire.32 Guide to Latin Oonversationo Multipcda. Stridere. is. Silk worm. Cucurire. Gemerc. Necydalus. Fox yelps. Blateriire. Frog croaks. m. Latrare. canere. Gannire.

UluHire. Boiirc. Grunnire. Gemere. ------. Wood-pigeon COO8. Lion roars. Pig grunts. Vagire. Locust chirps. Pipare. Weasel. Swallow chirp«. Baliire. Gemere. Garrire. 3 . Fripinnire. Ifen cackles. Ululare. Partridge eriee. ranciire Turtle-dove si[jlt. Mouse squeaks. Rug'ire. Grasshopper chirp«. Leopard mews. rudcre. Rudere. ca[nere. Kid. beliire. Owl hoots. Stag bells. Rictare. stridere. strid ere. Tiger growls. Sibiliire. Bubnliire. Ocoinerc. uIuEire Ox bellows. Rat equeaks. Kite cries.-~-- Vocabulary. glocitare. Pipilare.'1. Monkey chatters. 33 ( Clangere. Stridere. Screech owl hoots. shrieks. Vagire. can ere. strepere. Goose gabbles. Cacabare. Glocire. clamare. Rauciire. Fritinire. Serpent hisses. frendere. Stridere. Swan sinos. Dintrire. Frendere. Jugere. Rabbit squeals. clamiire. Canere. pipiire. Mintr ire. quirritiire. Nightingale uiarblee. gannire. Ifawk screeches.-. mugire. werr hoiole. "Friguliire. canere. Wild-boar s177ljJlrp. Sparrow pil es. Jackdaw cajoles. Lamb bleats.

is. . Breast. Cilia. Bosom. SuperclH~"i)rum. i. Sanguis. Entrails. Back. Pnecordia. Bile. Arm. Auris. Eye-lid. Inis. m. Chin. Cerebrum. lacertus. Sura. Auriscalpium. PARTES CORPORIS HUMANI. Bladder. Ear Ear-pick. oris. n. cubttum. f. Genre. Elbow. Brain. Os. Alvus. Cubrtns. f. 8. Oculus. pl. Cartilago.. Pupilla. f.34 Guide to Latin OonversatioTh. Inis. Mentum. pl. n. is. ala. pt. Pilus. Cartilage. Cheeks. m. Down. ossis.:Y. Bilis. PARTS OF THE HUMAN BODY. j. Diaphragm. n: pl. Arteria. Blood) Bone. Beard. Eye. Palpebra. Sinus. Axilla. n. Barba. us. arum" f. f. rt. Eye-lashes. Calf of the leg. I Brachium. Belly. Pectus. Dorsum. 'no pl. Artery. Arm-pit. viscera. Eye-ball. arum. Vesica. Eye-brows. arum. Exta.

Sole of foot. -Iaeva. Open-hand. cis. Top of head. Palma. tcis. Flanks. Calx. Hind part of head. . Digitus. Finger. Heel. m. 11. . ei.:-dextera. arum. Gustus. Closed-hand. Little-finger. fell is. Gullet. f. Taste. cordis. Itis. mala. carnis. ltis. j. j. Right-hand. Capillus. 35 Nictare. Palma. Icis. Left-hand. f. Index. Index-finger. Ieis. n. crinis. Pugnus. J.. Hair of the head. Front part of head. m. I-Ieart. Auditus. Pollex. Medius. Ring-finger. pl. vola. I-Iair. m. pedis. Pes. Planta.Jaw. n. I-Iead. Middle-finger. Guttur. Ilia. jugulum. us. Hip. Icis. Foot. uris. m. n. is. ii. sinistra.. Manus. Coma. Coxendix.l{ocabulary. n. ceesaries. Caro. m. us. Intestina. Vertex. Poples. Palm of hand. n. Flesh. Auricularis. Thumb. Ham-string. ilium. n. Itis. m: Occipitium. I-Iearing. Annularis. To wink. Cor. Maxilla. . I-Iand. m. Gall. Fel. Caput. n: pl. Sinclput. Intestines.

f. Lap. Nasus. liru m. scapulae. Knee. Side. Collum. Musculus. 'I'o curl up the nose.blades. n. UmbilICUS. Rib. ids. ium. Lac. Spuere. n. Mouth. Kidneys. Nerve. Vibrissae. Omoplatae. Unguis. Upper-lip. Palate Phleg:n. gell ua. Pituita. Mucus.36 Guide to Latin Conoersaiion: Renes. Milk. Calva. pl. Medulla e dorsa. 711. l p'. Shoulder. Superius. Nose. lactis. Nervus. Latus. Navel. Crus. as. Labrum. pl. Palatum. oris. arum. Genu. is. Humerus. SpUtUlTI. Muscus. Under-lip. Leg. Nostrils. Nares. m. Medulla. Muscle. us. . f. Spittle. Saliva. Gremium. Skull. labium. pl. Marrow. labia. Lip. Saliva. Spinal-marrow. 1/. 1rail' of nostrils. Costa. cervix. Smell. To spit.. n. n: pl. n. Shoulder. Inferius. Neck. arum. [J l d. ' Odoriitus. (gener[ally) labra. uris. urn. [arum. lIS. f. eris. "Bucca. Nail. Corrugiire nares. 1)1. n.

Tooth-pick. QUALITIES AND DE. US. oris. CORPO RFECTS OF 'l'HE HUIS HUMANI. To clean the teeth. Dens. Tempus. oris. facies. 9.i. Dentes primores.. Apoplexy. n. VUJ~NERA. Incisors. Windpipe. us.Vocabulary. Temple. Alopecy. m. n. 37 Sudol'. Lacrtma . Dentes maxillares. Vena: Vertebra. arum. used in pl. Vertebra. Coxa. . The sight. lcis. Inward thigh. Alopecia. MAN BODY.nL . Tongue.m. n: Femur. stomachus.. Touch. Visage. Visus. Sweat. m. Abscess. MORB:. tis. Molars.DOTES ET VITIA. Lingua. [pl. Tear. n. Ruga. Perfodere dentes. face. Gula. DISEASES. Apoplexia. f. hip. oris.. lacrlmae. . To pick the teeth. vomlcn. cium. plural used. Vein. In is. A bscessus. DEATH. Dentiscalpi urn. Tooth. Throat. Vultus. Wrinkle. Toe (great). Fauces. Femen. m. f. pl. Outward thigh. inus. us. Pollex. us. Thigh. '111. e. Pergiire dentes. MORS. Tactus. WOUNDS.

Bump. Furunculus. ntis. f. Cold. Bandy-legged. incisio. Gibbus. gramiosus. Convulsio. Blear-eyed. Crisis. f. eris. plaga. Asthma. [atis. Chilblain. onis. and eeris. ei. Ictus. Crippled. Catarrh. ouis. Lippus. m.. 'I'ussire. m. Cal vi ties. Caecttas. n: Cancer. Blindman. Blearedness. Cough. Tussis. Bald~eaded. eris. onis. is. Blow. Claudus. lame. Tusses concoquere. n. To suffer from colic. hump. Ex intestine Iaboriire. ouis. j. Convulsion. To have a cold. Cut. lema. atis. f. Corpse. Crisis. To cough. Boil. Caecus.38 Guide to Latin Conversation. n. Contusion.. Contusio. Pulchritiido. venustas. Colic. m. luis. Cadaver. Baldness.f. Aposteme. I-: de" [cor. Varus. Caesio. f. m: Club-foot. m. Scaurus.. Calvus. US. oris. j. Anhelatio. Beauty. Epiphora. Pernio. Epiphora. f. Valgus. Aposteme. ranis. is. Intest'ini morbus. /. . Bow-legged. Gramia. suggillatio. i. Blindness. tuber. cri. Cancer.

Epilepsy.. Gargarizatio. Deafness. rtis. atis. . Dysentery. onis.. m. Dislocation.in the feet. . Luxatus. j. Feebleness. Gangrene. mole. Pumilio. fcedttas. Surdus. [tis. Eruption. Flat-nosed. Hydrops. Luxatiira. is. Chiragra. rash. infirmltas. To gape. Dandruff. is. Gaping. hydro [pfsis. Diarrhoea. atis. Simus. tdis. (tout. Deformity. US. Erysipelas. m. Fever. Dysenteria. H ydroprcus. Dropsical. Ortigo. Mol's. j. Inis. Podagra. articu[lorum dolor. Dumb. obttus. Oscitiire.f. 39 Porrigo. Death. Inis. j. f. onis. elinguis. Debilitas . f.]. n. f. Gangraena. Gargling. Fistula. Dwarf. Gargarizare. f. Arthritis. Fistula. Deformed. sontfous morImpetigo. Naevus. [f. . Debllis. Freckle. atis.. Febris. lnis. Oscitatio.on the face. [f. To gargle. . Dislocated.Vocabulary. foedus. Comltialis . 'infirmus. Erysipelas. Dropsy.. Deaf. rll. Deformis. f. Surdttas. [bus. 6pi13. Deformltas. onis.in the hands. Mutus. Feeble. Diarrhrea.

infirma. Pestis. santtas. Lepra. era. f. Paralysis. Jaundice.. era. Hemicranium. Rheumatismus. Crudftas. Obesus. Valetiido. lVI ucus. ei. Phthisis. Obesity. luis.bona. onis. secunda. . f. Leprosus. Macies. Ischias. -:. crum. -bad. Scabi6sus. adis. Haemorrhagia.40 Guide to Latin Conversation. incommoda. Lethargy. [.. atis. Rheu In atis Ill. m. Inis. Hunch-backed. . Quinsy. Headache. Lippitiido. f. j. Pleurisy. affected with. [iitis. Pest. Phthisis. Mutilated. Obesttas. Hemorrhage. -good. i. Fetldae naris homo.f. m. m. ei. Inis Palpitatio. Indigestion./. Hemorrhoids. Icterus. Sciatica. is. Mucus. f. Scabby. Leper. . Scabies. Mancus. One-handed. Gibbus. Obese. tHunger. [. Palpitation. i.). Ozoena. gibber. Fames. Angina. Pleuritis. Lethargus.1: . 'I'runcus. erum. Macer. Idis. Paralysis. Idis. i. Health. f. Scab. Ophthalmia. f. f. Leprous. Leanness. ntis. f. iR. Lean. pestilentia. is. Hyrnorrhois. itch.. IS.

Apron. us. Vomere. t. Inis. oris. Vestiarium. pl. n. onis. 'Thirst.. Sitis. Plaga. [tus. 'J11. vires. m. 17. ii. m. arum. VESTES VIRILES ET MULIEBRES. Small bonnet. Stature.. spasmus. ' Robur. })ileus.. Wart. Inis. 10. Spasma.. \Vound. Pileolus. us. [eris. zona. is. Tumor. Vomitio. luscus. Strong. Belt. onis. Squin1t-eyed. oris. .. Statura. Snivel. Bonnet. Stiria. Verruca. leis. Sternuere.. To sneeze. pileum. Cingulum. Binding. Paronychia.Vocabulary. [1. Singultus. pl. Vertigo. l Firmus. Sob. Varix. fimbria.. Strength. Vomiting. panus. eris. ium. Strabo. tuber.. fortitude. Spasm. f. valfd us. Vertigo. Limbus. n. ~Ten 41 ~ThitIow. Ulcus. vomf. n. Sneezing. Ganglion. atis. To vomit. n. f. Ulcer.f. Varix. m. APPAREL OF MEN AND OF WOMEN. Tumor. Sternutamentum. '11. 1n.

. Fissura. Petasus. Pecten.. Colus. G10bnl us. mis. Fringe. To spin. coarse cloth. Fibula. f. uncinus. aureus. Distaff. Buskin. . us. Bracelet. Small chain. m. Vestire. Ocrea. Box. Pentila. Ear-rings.. Cloak. Cothurnus. Flax. Button-hole. Infibulare. Clothing: To clothe. To clasp.. onis. To comb. Caput aperire. vesntus. Button. Cap. pl. dis. Caput operire. vilis. Clasp. Comb. Linum. Fimbria. Crista. vestimentum. Pectere. I naures. Boot. . f...crassus. j. Rim of. Pallium. [via. rimula. Petasi marglnes. us. Pero. Fusus. is. Egrett. Chain.42 Guide to Latin Conversation. Spindle. Armilla.. Carella. Fan. Nere. To take off. Theca. Vestis.. Weather-cloak) Cloth.. '11. impluPannus. and i. glans.. ium. f pl. Flabellum.of gold. . Gaiter. To put on. Catena. f. [m. . Iacerna.

Digitalia. Annulus. Pantaloons. m. Perula. Crumena. Shoe. Bezel of ring. Purse. Hehuet. sertcum. Bornbyx.. is. lapillus. n. Shirt. is. Linteolum. Calceus. j. calceamentum. monile. 43 Periseelis. aru m. Nodare. is) 111.f. --. Ann uli pala. Emungere. Linen-cloth Tela. Femoralia. Overcoat. . Necklace. subucula. Pin.f. toga muRobe. pl.Vocabulary. Ribbon. Linen. To blow one's nose. m. j. Small scissors. ium. Gemma. Acicula.. [no . ycis. Scissors. [lie bris. Garter Glove.of precious stones. Forficilla. Needleful. Acia. Tndusiurn. arum. taenia. marsupium. . Handkerchief. Knot. Laeerna. Silk. Mirror. Galea.gemmiitum. To knot.baccatum. . . Torques. Ring. Sandaliumvsolea. mant[cae. spinametalltca. Linteum. Sandal.. Acus. Speculum. Vestis. Forfex. Jewel. us. Idis.. 11s.of pearls. Icis. n. f. Pocket. Sin us. m. Needle. Plait. re. Vi tta. Nodus.

Ambitiosus. manulea. 11 .rrogantia. Affable. THE PASSIONS.! Ambitio. atis. DE ANIMA. OF THE SOUL. n. Spindle. Wool. tumere. Audacity. Veil. Lana. . . Assassin. Arrogans. ?1. Affabflis. Anxietas. Sleeve. FECTS OF THE INrrELLIGENCE. Assassination. Starch. QUALITIES AND DE. Affability. comltas. Anxiety. Crepfda. ' Fusus. VIRTUTES ET vrriA JUDICII. Brevior subuctila. Ambitious. Slipper. G-alericulnm. f. is.. Spur. Waistcoat. Mantee. Irasci. Affabilltas. aris. Angry. Calcar. onis.. Audacia. Anger. VelU111.A. Ambition. OF THE WILI-l. antis. f. Tibifile. VOLUNTA'rIS. Arrogance. amulum. Arrogant. To get angry.-- . mylum. Iriitus. J ra. is. Wig. avfdus. atis..44 Guide to Latin Oonversation. Cae des. f. MorruS ANIMI. COITlis. Stocking. . Sicarius.A. iracundia.

. f Aviirus. Cheerful. f. onis. Auda x. Loquax. f. [onis. Candor. Candor. Circumspection. Benevolence. ei. Clean. Miserrcors. Calumniator. Inis. mundiCleanliness. orip. eomis. Mundities. [atis. Barbaria. ' To have compassion. Civility. Avarice. Civil. Brave. acis. Bravery. f. Alacrttas. is. Mundus. Miseratio. Benignitas. ere. oris. garrulltas. acis. To dare. Candrdus. ' Obtrectator. f.varitia. atis. f. f. f. Babbling. ordis.Vocabulary. atis. m. m. f. f. cautus. atis. f. Loquacttas. Calumny. f. 45 I I Audacious. Fortitiido. [tia. Benignus. obtrectare. cris. To calumniate. ei. onis. Barbarus. Avaricious. U rbanttas. atis. Circumspect.. Candid. Miserere. Benignity. Benefrcus. Babbler. Barbarity. animosus. Chastity. Compassionate. Chaste. Cheerfulness. barbaries. pudicus. Circumspectio. Character. [oris. Benevolent. garrnlus. Strenuus. Barbarous. Obtrectatio. Benign. Castus. AIacer. Tndoles. Beneficentia. Audere. pudor. m. Castttas. A. Urbanus. commiseratio Compassion. Iiberalttas. Consideratus.

Cruelty. Diligens. Invidia.46 Guide to Latin Oonversation. Cruel. Docility. onis. Constant. festinatio. EbriosHas. f. facflis.. Docile. entis. Decency. fallacia. entis. atis. Deceit. atis. Aemulus. f. m.t~ DOCllis. f. atis. Constantia. Constancy. Ebrietas. Peoulatus. Continentia. . 'decorum. vexation. Emulation. Irivfdus. antis. Confident. To deceive. Confidere. Continens. Fraudulentus. Emulous. Extortion. livor. Diligence. Constans. Deceitful. Courage. Confidens. Given to drink. Confidence. oris: m. confidentia. Extortioner. Audacia.. Continence. aerumna. Desperatio. entis. Molestia. decorus. Fiducia. Decent. festinus. U. . Drunkenness. entis. Decens. To envy. subdolus. Diligentia. Despair. saevus. onis. Fallere. onis. Crudelis. Courageous. Continent. Andere. Envy. . Decentia. Envious. Drunk. To have confidence. US. To be courageous. Peculator. Diligent. Crudelttas. trickery. Ebrius. oris. Audax. Docilttas. Dolus. Desperiire. To despair. Aem ulatio. Irrvidere. saevitia. Displeasure.f. m. vinolentus. vinolentia. acis.

Adulator. Glorious. Generous. fidelis. Adulatio. Timor. delirus. oris. Furious. metus. venustus. Good. f. Astutia. lIS. Deliratio. Folly.. ven ustas. m. Fides. Leptdus. ei. 47. callfdus. dernens. dis. Fidus. Friend. Munificentia. Fury. Fraus. . f. Delirare. Adulari. entis. Finesse. Timere. atis. f. Fides. oris. ei. Gluttony. onis. m. 'I'imtdus. oris. [. onis. Friendship. Gluttonous. Furens. [atis. Insanus. furiosus. Gentility. Glory. callidftas. Desipiens. Bonl'tas. To fear. Fidelity. atis. Astute. Adulatorius. Furor.Vocabulary. metuere.l Munifrcus. Faith. dementia. insanity. Lepos. m. Fraud. Extravagance. Gula. To be extravagant. f Bonus. Goodness. Fool. Flatterer. Glori6sus. Astutus. Extravagant. Flattery. j~ Amicitia. entis. Faithful. entis. oris. blandiri. Fear. [m.. pavrdus. Amicus. [atis. Flattering. Generosity. To flatter. Iiberalrtas. Fearful. Insama. Genteel. m. Gloria. r. Gul6sus. f.

Immortalis. Grave. spei. molestia. Honor.}. Importunity. To hate. ae. Immortal. [on is. . j fallacia. Immodestia. To kill. Invisus.. ends. atis. caedes. Haste. eagerness. 'In. Gravltas. 'I'o be ignorant. I [dus. Humiinus. Honor. Imposture. Gravis.f Hasty. Deceptor. Honorable. Festinatio.. iitis. Gravis. Hornicida./: Humanity. severttas. Humane. To honor. 'Ignorantia. Hope. Importunate. in verecun. Neciire. oris. To hasten. 'In. Spes. Honorific. Gravity. Immodesty. Ignorant. Impatient. nescire. atis. Festiniitus.48 Guide to Lat1:n Oonversation. f. 'In. Irnpatientia. Irnmodestus. Hatred. in verecundia. IIateful.j. HonorifIcus. Odisse. Humanttas. Impatiens. Honorary. is. Honorariu«. interficere. Ignorance. r.. Odium. Immodest. oris.f Homicide. murderer. properiire. Honorabtlis. scverus. Irnmortalftas. I mportunitas. properatio. molestus. Homicide. Imposter. Impatience. fraudis. Fraus. Festinare. murder. . Ignarus. Honorare. Ignoriire. Immortality. Homicidium.

Indecorum. Industrius. Inurbanus. Injustus. petnlans. Inconsultus. [mobll is. arrogantia. Impudentia. Ungrateful. Incontinent. f. f. Incontinentia. Inhuman. Ingenuttas. Innocence. rusticltas. Inconstant. Inhumanltas. I nul' banltas. [. Unfaithful. insons. Impudence. Irnpudens. Inhumiinus. rusticanus. Injustitia. atis. atis. Impudent. candidus. Ingenuous. [temperans. Insolence. ertis. Inconstancy. iniquus. Unjust. I ngenuus. in . solertia. [nant.f. Indignus. entis. Uncivil. Infidus. 4 . antis. f.. Imprudentia. [ontis. Innocens. entis.t: Inconstans. Indecency. Indigniiri. Imprudence. in verecundus. atis. entis. Insolent. Ingratus. Indecorus. solers. Industrious. Infidelity.Vocabulary. Innocent. Inhumanity. Incontinency. Injustice. atis.gIndustry. Inconstantia. levis.. Indignant. To become indi. (antis. Industria. durus. entis. Indignation. Insolens. Indignatio. antis. Incivility. Incontinens. Infidelrtas. infldelis. Ingenuousness.levitas. Ingratitude. iniq urtas. onis. Insolentia. Innocentia.. Indecent. atis. Ingratus antmus. Imprudent.

Intemperantia. Larceny. N ugatorius. Laetus. Libertas. m. ei. Mendax. Amare.. nugiitor. Laetari. N ugax. Love. Cavillare. antis. Intemperance. A joker. gaudens. f Liber. erum. f. To judge. Laetitia. Irrvidcre. Levity. Liberalttas. aequus. To love. Justice. Intemperate. j. Pigritia. iicis Amor. Liar. Free. Justus. Liberty. Levis. judicium. Lazy. gaudere. Laziness. Piger. Intemperans. onis. Furtum. Mens. Levitas. Guide to Latin Oonversation. entis. f.joculatorius.50. iicis . Lie. ntis. Judicare. Invidia. To be joyful. atis. Irrvfdus. Joke. entis. Light. f. . To be jealous of. Justitia. Intelligent. segnis. Ingenium. ntis. Joyful. obtrectatio. Cavillatio. I 11telligens. Jesting. Just. 111telligere. To free. entis. Judgment. iitis. Joy. onis. segnities. Intelligence.era. intelligentia. j. Jealousy. oris. Liberare. gaudium. Jealous. f. . Liberalis. aequltas. Liberality. To joke. Mendacium. To understand.}. Liberal.

f. malignltas. [onie. Magniflcus. Deriders. Magnificent. Indillgens. Mockery. Dolens.j. en tis. Acerbus. Occidere. obstinatus. Negligent. [entis. is. Magnificentia. Oblivion. Misertcors. Magnificence. Dolor. Moderatus. Obedire. Neg ligence. Obedience. strages. Moderatio. Pain.. temperatus. To suffer. splendtdus. is. onis. Caedes. miseratio. [oris. Massacre. f.Vocabulary. onis. j:. oris. Irrisio. Misericordia. To neglect. Moderation. Negligentia. Pertfnax . Obstinacy. malitiosus. Mercy. To obey. Mocker. Malignant. j. j.. Obedient.. j: To massacre. Magnantmus. j. gravis. incuria. Modest. Doleful. Obli viosus.' Negligere. m. Obediens. . ludibrium. To forget. modus. m. Obstinate. negltgens. Pati. [occisio. Obedientia. oris. [ficis . Derisor . Obstinatio. irrisor. atis. Modestus. [strong. dolere. Oblivisci. onis. 51 . ~n.. Moderate.. Oblivium ~ obli vio. Painful. Magnanimous. Malice. entis. ordis. Modestia. Merciful. onis. head.j: Malignus. Malitia. pervtcax. Modesty. splendor. onis. Oblivious. To mock.

Parcus. on is. Religion. Pious. Reverentia . Respect. cavillatio. A parricide. Punishment. f. [ptdus. j. Raillery. Patiens. Prudent. Rabies. Respectable. Prudence. affectus. Piety. Pietas. Prodigal. atis. onis. J oculator. entis. Parcimonia.. cautus. [veneratio. Prudentia. Parricide. ei. Patience. Thrifty. Banterer. Probus. Probity. Pius. Irnpotens. Venerandus. infidelttas. Religiosus. j. Probttas. j: \ Prodtgus. ntis. munditia. Effusa Iiberalftas. Rabtdue. Propriety. ei. Patient.. ' Proper. Perfidy. Perfidia. matricide. \ Mundities. Proud. Mundus. Prodigality. Religio. Perfidious. 011 is. . Superbia.~ [effusio. Religious. observant i». Rage. Parsimony. Pcena. Snperbus. Enraged. atis. Paruicida.. Anfrni motus..f. pius. cuPatientia. atis. f.j. J ocatio. onis. Passionate. rabiosus. Passion.52 Guide to Latin Ikmoereoiion: Parricidiurn. Pride. Prudens. j. cavilliitor. entis. IIonest.~ Perffdus.

Temperans. entis. atis. f Simple. Silliness. Ruse. f.. Latro. atis. 5& Reverens. Ineptire. m. antis. 'I'emorarius. 'I'emerttas. Robbery. j. onis. Mollitia. US. m. m. astiitus.. Respectful. Slanderer. Seditious. 'I'erribflis. Sadness.. Terror. Sanctltas. Silly. litis. Simplicity. mollities. Tristitia. f Callidus. Slander. "onis. prredo. f Softness. Terror. 8acrilege.Vocabulary. Soft. obtreetatio.. Sacrilegious. [onis. f. Icis. Sanctns. Sad. 'I'emperance in Sobrietas. Sacrilegi um. Theft. Temperance. ei. Mollis. Maledictio. pl. atis. timere. Latrocinium. Dolus.. arum. Subtle. atis. j. Insulsus. calli[dttas. Simpllcftas. Sedition. Terrible. Pavere. Furtum. Seditiosus. [maledicns Maledicere. oris. j. Robber. j. 6ris. Temperate. . Seditio. Sanctity. Temperantia. Temerity. To be afraid. r .111. Tristis. Sacrilegus. Rash. Obtrectiitor. astus. ineptus. '{drinking. Simplex. Holy. To slander.

Vigilance. atis. prudentia. m: Furiiri. j.f. furis. Abbey. antis.. Arms. Tyrannical. pravltas. To steal.54 Thief. arum. Vigllans. atis. f. Vigilant. senten[tia. Bow. 12. Wicked. Timldus. j. . Inis.. Fur. Fallacia. Glans. Ba1l1 Boar-spear. Venabulum. US. Arma. Fortis. Sapientia. j. Fallax. Wickedness. dis. onis. Tyrannis. Trickery. globus. -n. Sapiens. entis. Wisdom. Abbatia. Timid. Timidltas. m. Idis. Arsenal. consilium. Guide to Latin Oonversation. Academy. To be vigilant. pl. Academia. strenuus. Wise. Arcus. Lf. prudens. sedulus Vigllare. Valor. sedulttas. Malus. OF A CITY AND OF ITS PARTS. Timidity. virtus. Tyrannlcus. Valiant. Thought. Deceitful. [f Improbltas. Tyranny. ati'":.. acis. Armamentarium. DE CIVITATE EJUSQUE PARTIBUS. Cogitatio. improbus. Vigilantia. . Fortitiido.

castrum. Camp. Quiver. Diversorium.J. Cuniculus. Episcopi palatium. clypeus. Church. Poniard. Market. fdis. Tormentum. orum. Ecclesia. tri. Dart./: Castra. pugio. onis. Fortification. Telum. Castle.. Machfna. Mine. Macellum. bellfcum. Gymnasium. m. m. n. Javelin. Aoinaces. Basilica. f. f. Disci pulus. Cannon. School. Citadel. m. [Iud us. Buckler. Pike. Hostelry. spear. Cuirass. onis. Pharetra. is. litterari Us Schola. Helmet. Cross-road. Lorica. is. . Galea. Lance. Ensis. Hasta. Ludimagister. pl. Master of. Castellum. Arx. Palisade. Sabre. Butcher-shop. Jaci1lum~ Lancea.Vocabulary. Fossa. Bishopric.. Ditch. Sword. Machine. arcis. trivium. College. 55 Scutum. Sica. gladius. Pupil. arrow. Vallum. Compttum. Porta. Basihca. Laniena. Gate. Munitio. School-mate. Condisoiptilus. cassis.

Belfry. To.. Alley. Chapel. eris. To pay. Square. Monumentum. Walls. Sacristy. Venditio. Warden. Emptio. us. Pulpit. is. Purchase. FOrUlTI. Tabernacle. Career. Pluteus. mercis. Campanile. Turris. n. altare. Ara. oris.. Sacrarium. arum. Suggestum : suggestus. m. n: pl. Vendere. is. [us. . Solvere. oris. Palace. Emere. f. Lectern. Taberna. Sale. Career is custos.56 Guide to Latin Oonversation. m. Bell. Vicus. JlL. Price. Cathedra. m. Pretium. Proanus. via. m. Sacellum. Altar. Chorus. 'I'abernaculu Ill. Shop. Angiportns. Temple. Merchandise. Amphitheiitrum. Buyer. Street. odis. prison. lvlercator. Palatium. onis. Templum. Choir. Tower. t Merchant. is. pulpttum. n: Campana. f.. f. Amphitheatre. f. custodia. Theatrum. Moenia. onis. To sell. Emptor. Merx. Monument. 111. Parvise. Theatre.buy. Gallery.

geometra. Scriptor. oris. Scriba. 111. Imperium. m. OF THE INHABITANTS OF A CITY. m. Empire. Comedian. 11t. onis. Astronomer. Accensus. Freedman. Medfcus. ~.. Clerk. Farmer. Doctor. Door-keeper. Ieis. Doctor. Carntfex. Imperator. Grammatious. [n1. Executioner. I-listo rfcus. is. oris. [tus J urisconsultus. oris. jurisper"i- . Comedienne. Civis. Emperor. Historian. Icis. tabularius. Mirna. m: Cancellarius. Dean. 'In. Judge. Hawker. Icis. Grammarian. oris. apparttor. Artisan. Arch i tectus. DE INCOLIS 57 CIVITATIS. m. Decanus. His. optfex. Prreco. I-Iost. Icis. Geometres. ?n. re. Geometrician. Li bertus. Empress. mimula. Astrologus. Corncedus. Chancellor. Artlfex. Imperfitrix. Jurisconsult. Rustrcus. Hospes. Citizen. Judex. onis.. Astro loger. histrio. Architect. Doctor of medicine. 13. f. Author. m. m. m.Vocabulary. ['lll. Astronomus.

Physician. Lawyer. oris. Magistrate. onis. Physlcus.. Domtnus. 'tn. . Prefect. Sub-deacon. Will. Pope. otis. Orator. [ chus Curio. Archdeacon. Painter. m. oris. Concionator. Antistes. f. Archbishop. Poeta. Kingdom. m. Notary. Mathematlcus. Libellio. Canon. Sermon. patronus King. Musfcus. Cardiniilis. Inquilinus. Regnum. Preefeotus. is. Diaconus. Magistratus. Mathematician. Philologist. Philosopher. Oration. ee. Papa. Deacon. regis. CausidIcus. Concio. otis. Oratio. onis. Parish-priest. Episcopus. paroVicarius. m. Itis. Sub-diaconus. m. Priest. Queen. Canonlcus. Master. Bishop. . Saeerdos. Poet. Regina. Pictor. Cardinal. m.58 Guide to Latin Oonversation. Preacher. Philolog us.us. Archdiaconus. m. Orator. m. j. Prelate. 00. m. onis. Musician. Testamentum. Vicar. onis. Lodger. Philosophus. herus. m: Archiepiscopus. m. Rex. m.

m. excubrtor. m. atis.. librarius. eri. Scriba. Speculator.ltis. Chiliarchus. Sculptor. Calis. Servus. Ensign. Rei marittmae praefec. General Colonel ~f infantry. Clertcus.Vocabulary. tri. m.} Monacha. Lieutenant. ru. Rhetorician. Captain. Rector. Centurio. Beggar. monk. Admiral. Clerk. Abbess. Professor. oris. [tus. m. Disciptilus. Miles. is. onis. 'in. m: Dives. Sculptor. m. Religious. Rich man.. £dituus. m. alumnus. . Religieuse. Pauper. Rector. m. Abbas. Princeps. exactor. Sacristan. Secretary. Receiver. sanctimoniRhetor.. Sentinel. Soldier. ducis. Ipis. Coactor. Corporal. di vftis. Acolyte. Foot-soldier. onis. Abbot. Abbatissa. Mendicus. oris. Decurio. Poor man. 00. Pupil. Cavalier. m: Pedes. oris. [oris. Dux. Slave. Monachus. eris. Itis. 'in. Iegionis [tribiinus. Signrfer. m: Legiitus. m: Magister. m. vexi l[larius. Itis. Prince. oris.m. 59 Acolythus. Eques.

Cousins (children of [two brothers). Atavi. Woman-servant. Infans. Surveyor. Adolescens. [of 7 yrs. / . puellula. m. Young woman. Adolescentula.j.). Childhood. m. m. orum. More advanced. Young man. Aunt (nlother'ssister). Brother-in-law. Iri. Ancestors. m: Mensor. pl.. Adolescentia. Adolescence (from 14 [to 28 years). Le vir. f. Matrimus. Child (with father [alive). Famula. Famiilus. antis. Patrimus. Aunt (father's sister). Infant. Brother. Theologian. 'in.. Aerarii tribiinus. Sophista. REI. Puellus. m. j. 14. Child (up to the age Child (up to the age [of 14 yrs. Ohild (with mo th er [alive). entis. COGNATIO ET AFFINITAS. Iufautia. Patrueles. Matertera. puella. oris.). pl. Treasurer. Pueritia. j. Puer. Theologus. f. Valet. ae. 'in. AGE. tris.. m. 'in. attendant. 'in.60 Guide to Latin Conversation. ae. AETAS.lATIONSHIP. Sophist. Amtta. Fvater.

us. amitinae. Great-grand[daughter. Mother. eri. patris. j. j. [ter). Proneptis. Pater. Vir maturre ootiitiB. Granddaughtel'. niece. Icis. 'In. tii tis. Mother (step). Father. Cousins (children of [brother and of sisDaugh tel'. Filia farnil ias. Mater. nutricula. us. Father-in-law.. Daughter (minor). Paterfamilias. . Great-great-grand[father. Husband. m: Avus.j. Abavus. N utrix. is.j. conjux. abneptis. Great-great-grand[mother. Cousins (children of [two sisters). m. Neptis. sororis.Vocabulary. rn.fl N urus. jugis. Amitini. f. 61 Consobrini. Socer. Proavus. filia fratris. Filius. Filia adoptiva. m. }:. Daughter (adopted). Daughter-in-law. Proavla. Old age. Nephew. Grandfather.. Mother-in-law. m. is. Grandmother. Great-grandfather. Noverca. f. Socrus. Privigna. Man of ripe age. Filia. nata. Maritus. Avia. Abavra. Mother of family. f. oonsobri[nae. Great-grandn10ther. Mater familias. Father of family. Man of advanced age. Daughter (step). H01I10 retiitis provectee. Nurse. Senectus.

Uncle (father's Uncle (mother's Virgin. Inis. is. Vir. oris. n. Wife. Air-hole./. gloris. Ward (girl). Soror. 'Great-grandson. Anus. Old man. oris. Sister-in-law (wife of [brother). Sister. Patruus. spiracii[lum. f. Arch. Son.62 rsruide to Latin Conversation. j.f. Senex. . Glos. Homo. Old woman. Son-in-law. lcis. [gis. Avuncnlus. Nepos. eris. Ward (boy). Man. Pupilla. Fratria. generi. J uventus. Uxor. Woman. Spiramen. Son (minor). Youth. [m Pronepos. otis. m. m. f. [brother). m. f. Filius adoptivus. Filius familiae. Stepson. viri.. Virgo. natus.. luis.. Privignus. Mulier. Son (adopted). litis. m. m. conjux jii. Sister-in-law (sister [of husband). Camera. Filius. Pupillus. [woman). m. Young man. f. OF A HOUSE AND OF ITS PARTS. Man (opposite of 15. abnepos. us. DE DOMO EJUSQUE P ARTIBUS. Grandson. fornix. mis. t J'uvenis.. oti~ Gener. [brother).

n. ium. is. Valet de chambre. Chamber. Cella. Casa. pl. Balcony. Castellum. Goat house.house" 63 Area.Vocabulary. is. Supercilium. pt. Chimney. Closet. Scapi cardiniiles. J.. Stabulum. Meenianum. fores. Cabin. m. False door.. Castle. n. turgurium. septum. Lower court. Door. aula.. Pistrina.house. is. Bolt. Portula. j. Small door. Chors.}: Area. Focus. Caprile. is. Circuitio. Front door.bubile. chortis. is. Antepagmenta. Postieum. · Ox stall. Cubicularius. is. ostiolum. . Balustrade. Cow. Small cabin. Caminus. Horreum. n: Porta. n. Pseudothyrum. arum. . Cross. Ovile. n: Suile. n. Bakery.. Antica. Door case. Sheep cot. Bench. orum. Back door. Pessulus. Barn. Court. Casnla. Dove. Clathri. Uprights.piece. Corridor. Sleeping-chamber. room. podium. Oubicnlum. Bovile. Columbarium. Sedile. Area. Chimney-place. Hog sty. n. onis. Conclave.

Contabulatio. pl House. Demus inf'Ima pars. Coqua. arum. n: Landing-place.im. pt Gutter.olitorius. . n. Floor. Furnua m. Diazoma. arum f.. Domus. . Partition. is. [. Coquus. Lowest floor.. Sepimen. Plutcum. ium. Palace. Hortus.. assare. Culina. Valetudinarium. acis. Edifice.f. ti'urnace. ium. Palatium. Garden. onis. 'I'abulatum. Four storied house. Oven. Farm. Fenilia. . Cook (m. Praediolum. f. Domus tabulatorum Fornax. Domnnciila.! pi Country house.. Ground floor. Kitchen. Colliquiae. Floor. ntis. Entry. Praedium.). Domus suprema pars. Cook (1). f. [arum. Highest floor. Floralia. m. tabula.j. Hay-loft. Aedificium. Park. Pali. To plank a floor. Axis. m. aediculae Small house. pl. Septum. Small farm. pi" Palisade. Board. n. Parapet.64 Guide to Latin Oonversation. [quatuor Solum.. story. Kitchen-garden. Infirmary. Parterre. Villa. Ambulacrum. aedes. pl. Constabuliire. valli. ium.

Cella lignaria. Columna. Vestibulum. Capitulum.striata. Tectum. Wainscot. Clathri .Stylobata. pl.clathrfita.1n. inm. . 5 . Portico. pl. m. .. cancelli. Log. etis. ae. n. Stipes. Fluted pillar. f. Equile. Ridge.reticuliita. Paries. Gallinarium. uncis. Stairs.tortflis. m. is. 65 1 I . ae. Wall. Wine cellar. Pedestal. . Parastata. Inis. Laciinar. Pillar. Roof. f. m. US. Portfcus. Codus. Refectory. pl. Wood-shed. Window. aris. Podium. Twisted pillar. mcenia. [1'1'1. Foricula. m. Murus. 11. Pilaster. Quincunx. n.Vocctbulary. triclinium. Steps. Fenestra. Vinaria cella. . fastigium. Quincunx. arum. laequear. Itis. . arum. Scalae. Poultry-bouse. Cask. Stable.with bars. m. Rail. Dolium. .of a house. Coenaculum. Oulmen. piazza. ceiling.with blinds. . Barrel. Shutter. Cap of pillar. Vestibule.

Scopus. Ansa. Sucula. crepitaoulu-Follis. Basket. DE PRJECIPUIS DOMUS SUPELLECTIBUS. is. . sparta.. . Bench. Bell (small). Lanx. statera. Bottler Small bt>\\. Tree ofBeam ofEnds ofNeedle ofPlate ofBasin. Panarium. Lectus. Libra.~e. is. Zothecula. n. jugum. Bolter. Balance. Bath-tub.. Bellows. Ianciila. PRINCIPAL ARTICLES OF FURNITURE OF A HOUSE. Corbis. Laguncnla. capita. Battledore./. Solium. Bowl. Paved. is. f. cis. Brick pavement. pelluvia. Amphora. Gabata. Farinee incerniculum. Pelvis. Scabellum.Tnis..Sarctna. trutma. SmaB basket. f. 'In. Bag. Baggage. Small bench. Exiimen. Bobbin. Sportella. piseina. Alcove. Lagena. Pavimentum. Large bottl.66 Guide to Latin Oonversation. 16. Pavimentatus. Cymbalum. 'Scamnum. Bed. J ugicornua. Palmula.

hypcaustum. penicillum.of well. 11otCloset. luis. Muscarium. Chafing dish. -of bed. 'I'egumen. eris. Candle. Brush. Fly protector. Candela. Umbella. m. Sellula. Lumen. n. arum. Duster. Bushel. bookcase. Desk. Broom. . Candelabrum. f. Sella. Flame. Canopy. armarium.!. Scoptila. Carpet. Casket. Tapestry. [n. Cinders. Drawer. alis. Flabellunl. Burning of coal. Penieulus. alis. . luis. Bucket of a well. n. Obturamentum. Cover.Vocabulary. Sittila. Covering. Small chair. Light.n. 67 Fan. Scopes. Aqufilis. . toral. Favil1a. lid. capsula. Haustrum. etis. m: Peripetasma. Stragulum . Operculum. Fax. capsa. acis. Tapes. Arcula. Vaporarium. Puteal. Chandelier. Focnlus. Bucket. Drying-pan. Cinis. Pluteus. pl. Cymhium. Penicillus. is. Pruna. sitnlus. Chair. teeda. m. Earthen-pan. Cork. Area. Modius. Ewer.

Ink-stand. hamus.handled vessel. Cutellus. Calix. step. Furniture. Knife. Two.I. Laguncula. I-Iydria. m. Gradus. torris. Urnula. Uncinus. onis. urceolus. Tubulus..f. Colum. Fire. m. Kettle. Small handle. lcis. Ansula. Grater.~I-~ 68 Guide to Latin Conversation. Scintilla... Gratings. Uncus. Fly-flap. Clavicula. Lamp.~ Scobina. Supellex. Craticula. ahenum. is. Filter. CuI tel'. ecttlis. Ladder. is. Scrinium. tri. Jar. Small jug. is. 'In. Sartago. pociilum.. urna. I-Iook. is. Key. . Sudarium. Titio. . Jewel-box. I-Iandkerchief. Flagon. Small key. . Iychn us. 'In. Muscarium. Cortina.. Spark. Handle. Clavis. 'In. j. Goblet. Faucet. Scobis. . f. lnis. large. Ignis. Obserare. Hydria urna.. scintillrila. Ansa. Small knife. Flame. Lucerna. To lock. Jug. Frying-pan. Atramentarium. Dicta. Grid-iron.. Fire-brand. . Flamma. rasper.small.

Mortarium. Salt-cellar. Pillow. Portmanteaus. Lantern. Salad -dish. scrinium. Napkin.. baeulur Sudarium. muscipnlum. Cervical. · WIck. aUs. Sorex. Cacabus. Saccus.. plate. 'Ireniola indicina. gultnlus. Mantile. l\1ouse-trap. 69 Ellychnium. Razor. Salillum. ' Pot. Reed. Rad lila. Mat. Matta. Small salt-cellar. sn: Clavus. n. vasis. pocketbook. n. Hippopera. Latch. olla. Scutella. Milk pot. Laterna. Pan. Pump. Olitoria lanx. .Novactila. is. gabata. leis. Marker. Capsa. n. is. m. M uscipnla. Manger. is. Gultus. Lip of a vessel. Versatrlis pestilus. Rake. Sack. . Butter pot. Inis. Small pot. f. mappa. Mouse. crib. m. 01'11111. rallum. Lyohniichus. Bird-crib. ancis. vasa. pra-sepium..pulvinu3 Escarius orbis. Vasetilum. Sacculus. is.VocalJulary. Base of lamp. Preesepe. Small sack. Nail. Rubbing-cloth. Vas.: Arundo. Mortar. f Salmum. m: Antlia. Sinium Mulctrale.. myxus.

. orum. Spoon. Vasa. Straw-mat. pl. storia. us. Argentea. pl. £nea paropsis. forcrpis. n. Seal. Spindle. Silver. orum. Earthenware. Forceps. signum. Seat. pl. Cremium. Vern. n. Socket of candlestick. St. Aurea. j. forficula. Side-board. Pultarius.70 Guide to Latin Oonversation. n. Sella. aris. Sedecala. selhila. n. Statua. [menslons. arum. Cucumella. Cribrum incernici11um. Table. Forfex. Scraper. Snuff-box. Fictilia. Sigillum. Small seat. Radiila. abacus. Pot-ladle. f. Small wood. Shovel. orum. Lecti linteum. Spit. Tea-pot. pala. n: pl. Armarium. sedes. StrickIe. Putellum. Epistomium. Mensa. Batillum. Scalae.. Candelre receptaculum. Snuffers. Skillet. pl.:ttue. Small statue. Tonge. arum. sedile. . Tabaci pixidicula. Gold. Sieve. Stool. Scales. Rhombus. Cochlear. Table of small diTable utensils. Sauce pan. Icis.Monopodium. f. m: j. Sellula. Storea. Sheet. Sigillum. Spout. n: Trulla. rdis..

Beer. Aspergere. Vidnlus. To sprinkle water. eptilre. Focus. Apple. Amygdala. trichila. Cake. repast. Warming-place. Urn. Valve. Bottle. To take breakfast. Butter. Almond. ampulla. Malum. f. serial Panis. m: J entaculum. Banquet. conspergere. Licera. pl. MENSA. Malum armeniacum. Urna. TABLE VIOTUALS. Apricot. 17. Pergnla. Parma. Convivium. Vine-arbor. Umbrella. ium. Utensils. Valise. Ulna. Utensilia. Watering-pot. CIBARIA. Ignitabulum. Umbella. 71 Alveus. labrum. Trunk. Wash-basin. Malluvium. Bread. Butyrum. Breakfast. Alveolus. J en taculurn semere. pl. . Crustum.Vocabulary. Writing-desk. Vitrea ampulla. Abacus. Vial. Area. or copsa sarcinaria. [arum. . Tray. Lagena. n. Yard. Tub. is. Cupa. Warming-pan.

. Hunger. .large and deep. j.agnina.suilla. Sitire.vitulina. comedere Esurire. is. m. . Veal.f. Edere. Fusciniila. Decanter. is. Paropsis. Drink. Crumpet. Poculum. j. -long. calix. is. catinus. To be hungry. To dine. . tdis. Pork. -large. or esse. Meat. To sip. Glass. onis. Caro. . Gabata. [.72 Guide to Latin. Egg.. m. Oherry. To be thirsty. Potus. Fames. Beef. ·Cerasum. potare. Magis. Uva.. Potator. eatillum. Fork.. Lamb.ius. m. Cheese. Placenta. To eat. Dinner. Conversation. m. Sorbillare. Caseus. Drinker. . Fig. To drink. Dish. Prandere. m. Gallipot.small. Thirst. Oatillus. Prandium. . Grape. fusefna.. ICnife. I-Iam. m. m. Petaso. Ficus. CuI tel'. Idis. onis. bubiila. j. [leis. Ovum. beverage. scyphus. Pultarius. Lanx. Bibere. -. i. Aq ualis. carnis. f. tr i. cis. Sitis.

mantelium. Oleum. Saccharum. l\tIustard -bottle. Sal t-cellar.rudum. n. pl. Sea-biscuit. Batura. Scutella.' Salinum. . (is. Sweet-meats. Avelliina. Salt. Assum. Placenta. Supper. . . vasis. ~ris. Water. salis. Piper. orum. Milk. Lac. n. Pirum.. mantele.coarse. Porringer. is. 71. u. Plum.. To take supper. Malum perstcum. uris. Tomacma. Acetum. Olearium. t Peach. p ul tis. n. Cosna. i. [mantilium.Vocabulary. Piper. . m. . Orange.c. -. eris. Nut. Oil. Orbis. . Coenare. Sinapi. Pear. n. Iactis. m: Prunum. Vinegar. Sugar. n. Roast. Medley.I: Sinapeddchos. Mustard. Malum aureum. Sausage. PuIs.-I. Napkin.thick. n. 73 ! i ":. Vinegar-bottle. vas. I. sinapis. Bellaria. Spoon. Pepper. Oil-bottle. Cochlear. tomaclum. ind. Acetabulum. Plate. is. Mantile. Aqua. . Sal. Pepper..

Ablative.fermented. .. . Dualis. Vowel. 18. Mustum. Plurdlis. eris. Syllable. Geni ti vus casus. GRAMJ\-IATICA. Accusati ve. Number. Numerus.f. patri us. Declension. Genitive. Feminine. antis. substantive.74 Guide to Latin Conversat·ion. Masculine. Neuter. Wine. Parts of a discourse. vocabulum Partes orationis. n.f. N ominativus. Vocativus.. Dictio. Case. Diphthongus. Nomen. Genus.paltry.. . N ominative. Vocative. G-ender. . Consonans. Letter. Singular. 1'1. m. Declinatio. Plural. Littera. Accusati vUS. Ablatlvus. onis.unfermented. Femininum. . mis. GRAMMAR. Diphthong. Singularis. Masculinum. Dative. SylHtba. Casus. Vocalis. Dativus. Vinum. Dual. Noun. Vappa. nomen [subst~ntivuln. Neutrum. onis. Consonant. 118. Word. Villum.

Indicativus. Anomalum. Substanti vum. Subjunctive. l\iodus. Pluperfect. Perfectum. Tempus. Imperati ve. Mood. Comparativus. Perfect. Deponens. Optative. Impersonale. Neutrum. Relative. Regular. Inis. entis. Personale. oris. Positivus. Nomen adjectivum. Demonstrative. n. Superlative. Future perfect. irregulare. Irnperativus. Optativus. Partieipi um. Irregular. Activum. Neuter. Futurum exactum. Passive. n. Pronomen. entis. Gradus comparationis. Subjuneti vus. Defective. Possess! vum. Deponent. Future. ReguHire. Verbum. Grades of comparison. Impersonal. Possessive. Verb. Imperfectum. Substantive. Positive. Participle. ' Comparative. . Personal. Present. Indicative. Pronoun. Prsesens. PI usq uam perfectum Futurum. 75 I I I I I 1 Adjective. Demonstrativum. .Vocabulary . Tense. Relativum. Active. Defectivum. Passivum. Superlativus. Imperfect.

Iambus. COlllU10l1. Pentameter. Iamblcum. . Iambic.Pentallletrul~1. Longa. Number. 19. Dactylus. Verse. Dualis. Communis. Foot. pedis. . ' Amphibrach. Conjugation.76 Gtttide to Latin. Pyrrhtcum. atis. Dual. onis. Amphibriichus. Pluralis. Person. Meter hexameter. P<ETICA. . us. Trocheeus. Pyrrhic. Conve-i's(Lt'ion.j: SylHiba. Gerund. Numerus. Short. A naprestns. m. Versus. Persona. Trochaic. m. Dactyl. Spondee. Quantity. 'I'ribrach. Auapeest. Pes. Iambus. Lyrfcum. Tribrachus. Metrum hexametrum. Qnantrtas. Lyric. Singulfiris. Syllable. Trochee. Singular. 'I'rochaicum. Brevis. Spondeus. Lncrementum. Plural. Conjugatio. f. Long. Gerundium. Increment. POETRY.

Phalencic. Disttchon. Alcaic. Enlblem. Elegy. Adonium. Apologus. Orator. Enigma. f. RIIETOHIC. Apologue. n. Sylva. f. fabella. I Poem. Anuprestic. Disposition. Ode. [atis. Adonic. Oda. :H'abula. Alcatcum..A~nlgma. n. f. Eclogue. es. Intrinsic loci. Distich. n.: Memorin. i Choriambfcum. RHETOHICA. I nventio. ... Glyconium. Argumentum. Satyra. Phalencium. Sylva. Satire. m. Strophe. Orator. Sapphic. Pronunciation.' es. Memory. Emblema. pOe01[\. inis. onis. on is. Glyconic. ~Epigral~ I?a. Ecl()ga. Elocution. Al1apl£~tJ?Um. [. on is. atIs. orulll. n. Elegia. i. n.77 Choriam bie. oris. ode. Epigram. Loci in trinseci. litis. Invention. I )isposi tio. Sapphfcum. Strophe. LUis. m. 20. n. Pronunclfitio. . Fable. onis. Carmen. Argnment. Elocutio.

pl. Consequentia. Definition. Contraries. '11. Causre. n. f. orum. Loci extrinseci. Dissimilitude. Extrinsic loci. arum. n: pl. Confirmatio.78 Guide to Ledin Conoereation. orum. onis. f. f. 1)1. orum. mis. on is. Peroration. . pl. Testis. Narratio. n: pl: Antecedentia. n. [no pl. f. onis. arum. Effects. Complexio. J usjurandum. J. Documents. Figures of words. Refutatio. is. eris. Etymology. Torment. n: pl. J udgments formed [beforehand. Conversio. Complexion. Adjuncts. Adjuncta. Effecta. Report. Prrejudicia. J. orum. Witness. Contraria. pl. Definitio. j. Confirmation. 'In. n. pi. Peroratio.f Orati6nis partes. ei. onis. f. Refutation. orum. Oath. Consequents. Figu ree varborum. Species. onis. Comparatio. Conjugata. onis. arum. Dissinrilitudo. Enumeration. Parts of a speech. Repugnantia. FaIlla. Tormentum. j. n.onis. n. Comparison. f. Con version.J. j. urn. Narration. Species. Similitude. onis. pl. Enumeratio. Antecedents. Similitude. Contradictions. Inis. onis. Genus. 'I'abnlse. Exordium. Exordium. urn. Genus. Etymologia. Derivatives. f. Causes. um. pl.

is.onis. Hypotyposis. on is. onis. Dubitatio.onis. J. Communicatio. on is. Dubitation. Prreteritio. i. f. Figures of thought. Antitheton. Translation. Irony. Interpretation. Prosopopoeia. Licentia. Adjunction. Apostrophe. Disjunction. Syllepsis. is. . Adjunctio. Climax.Vocabula1'Y· Conduplication. Occupatio. is. f. f. Licence. onis. Deprecation. Interprotatio.j. onis. Reticence. Gl'adatio. Imprecation. Ellipsis. Synonymia. Imprecatio. f. f. Gradation.j. f. Concession. n. Pleonasm. Interrogatio. Synecdoche.f Ironia. Disjunctio. onis. Correction. CO 1111Uun ication.) Concessio. 79 Conduplicatio.onis. es.j.j. Gradatio. onis. onis. onis. Hypotyposis.. Exclamation. onis. Occupation. l Paranomasia. Preterition. [. j. Distributio. [. Paranomasia. Correctio. Synonym. Synecdoche. Traductio. Figiirre sen ten tiarum. onis. Distri bution. f. Allegoria. f.! Prosopopoeia. onis. Deprecatio. on is. ·onis. Ellipsis. Allegory. Reticentia. Pleonasmus. onis. Apostropha. Exclamatio.}: Syllepsis. Interrogation. Antithesis.

j. onis. Aisne. onis.t: Declamatio. Discourse. Transitio. Caris. Carantonus. f Dissertatio.JUl\UNA. [. is. Duranius. Subjectio. Dubis. J. Epistola. onis. Charento. Different kinds of [orations. AMNES. Dialogne. m.v». acis.80 \ Guide to Latin. RIVERS. Dissertation. Varia orationum genera. Conversation. on is. Oratio. Panegyrlcns.. Aveyron. Transition. Ebro. m. onis. Funeral oration. Dordognc. Alba. Durance. onis. Aube. Lesson. m. . Panegyric. Druen tia. speech. Ardesca. f.7n. srrREAMS. Preface. m• Druma. Funebris Iaudatio. [on is. Axona. A tax. ni. f. 7'11. . Ardeche. concio. j. Dialogus. FI. onis. Invective. . Doubs. Crosa. Cher. ' Correze. Objurgatoria oratio. 21. Curezia. Declamation.Drorne. Creuse. Ii I Su bjection. Prrelcctio. 'tYL Iberus. Averonius. Epistle. Aude. I. Prrefatio.

Garonne. Scaldis. Nevera. uris. Elhe. ee. Guad:' Iuui vi: Guadiana. me 6 . m.7n. Enphriites. and Araris. m. Marne. is. m. Nievre. rigris. [m. Eure.. onis. Olpus.Vocabularry. Nilus. Jordan. Saone. m. Tamesis. Samara. . Euphrates. n: Tigris. m. Girumna. Gard. Moselle. Lot. Padns (poet). Brotis. Mosa. ScheIdt. Loir. Tagns. m. Seine. is. 'fagus. is. Arar. Autura. m. Ganges. is. Audura. Somnle. . m. Nile. m. Rhenus. Meuse. Po. Gironde. or tdis. Thanles. IS. Sartha. Mosella. Sarthe. J ordiinis. m: Herault. Arauris. Anas. '111. ~ 81 Albis.~. Indre. -Liger. m. m. Rhine. Vardo. LfEd:IS. m. Indus. m. m. Matrona. Indus. Rhodituns. Rhone. is. Eridanus. is. Sequana. Garumna. ' Loire. is. Ganges. eris. is. Jngeris. m. Ebura.

Ifeltcon. Cevennes. Appeninus.. V osegus. Antiliban us. Hybla. I-Iymettus. an tis. ee. Pamassus. Pinde. Alpes. Libyan. Ida. t: pl. Apennines. f. Ligericinus. 22. MONTES. MOUNTAINS. Alpes. Legeritus. ee. f. Helicon. Caucasus. re. 00. Jura. . Hymettus. Lozere. m: I. m. Vesuvius. arum.Jibanus. Xanthus. Olympus. Hybla. Pyrenrei montes. Jura. Ardennes. Vistula. Atlas. ium. Etna. V osgesus. An til ibyan. Yonne. 'In. Gebennre. Xanthus. Pindus.Vistula.. fa pl. Olympus.82 Guide to Latin Conversation.A~tna. Vesuvius. Parnassus. m. A tlas. rum. Vosges. m. Causasus.. Icauna. Arduenna silva. . nt. Ida. Taurus. Pyrenees. '11~ Taurus. onis. .

2E REGIONES. i urn. Belgium. Anglus. orum. Anglia. Asia. Africanus. DIFFERENT COUNTRIES. 23. Austria. j: pl. -tEgyptus. Dani. Barbaria.Vocabulary. [A fer. Britannus. Americanus. f. m. Sinarium imperium. Egyptian. f. . . Denmark. Englishman. .·. African. Sinee. ·. Asiatfcus. Assyrian. Asiiinus. 83 '" 1 I' t: ·~ I '1.'·. Belgieus. Austria.····i Africa. £thiops. Europa. Assyria. Assyria.LEgyptius.:·•. opis. Britannia. . Egypt. Asia. Arabs. Arabia. . Arabia. Barbary. America. European. Belgian. orulll. American. Baleares. Belgium. Austrian. Amertca.Afrtcus. I Afrfca. abis. Bohemia. Europe. / Assyrius. Asiatic. Danes. Ethiopia. Bohemia. Arabian. pl.Ethiopian. Bohemus. Chinamen. VARI. Europeeus. Bohemian. Baleares. England. Dania. China. A ustriacns. i.····. ··. Boiohemus. -tEthiopia. Boiohemum. pl. Arabus.

Jew. Indians. Numidia.· 'In. Indi. Italy. Achivi. orunl. Judreus. i. Of Palestine. Italfcus. Irishman. Holland. 11'1. Ireland. arum. France. pl. Of Mauritania. Gra-cia. Hibernus. orurp. Lapland. Germania. Italus. Laponia. pl. Mauritania. l-Iollandns. Batavus. Grecians. Japan. Palestine.. ium. Hibernia. Helvetia. M alt a. Italia. Numidia. m. Maltese. es. arum. Finlander. Palrostina. Francus. India. If el vetii. onis j J aponlcus. Japanese. Marusius. German. Frenchman. Hollandia. Judea. Japonia. Lapones. onis. Finnonia. [pl. Greece. Palrestinus. Gallia. Finland. India. Helvetians. pl. . Finlandia. Judrea. Melite. Numldre. Germanlcus. Italian. Helvetia. Francia.84 Guide to Latin Conversation. Finno. m. Me I itensis. J apo. m. Batavia. Mauritania. Germany. Maurus. Meltta. Laplanders. I-Iollp. Numidians.nder. Gallus. Grseci.

Hel vetii. Algerium. Syria. Sardinians. Russia. Russian. Aquae Sextiae. Syrian.j. Prussia. Sabaudus. . Tartary. Syria. potanel. . 'Di. Scotlcus. Thebes (country Of the Theban Thebatcus. Scotchman. Scotia. Trojiini. [country. Tartar. TIelvetia.VOCft bulary. Siculus. Sicilia. f. 'I'artarus. Pol an der. [around). Tartaria. Scotland. Syrus. 'I'roas. orum. UREES. Troy. m. Sardinia.Aix. Borussia. Sicilian. Sardi. 85 Polonia. Sabaudia. Borussus. Polonus. arllm. Sicily. Algiers. Portugal. me pl. Lusltania.. adis. Lusitanus. Portuguese. 61'noo. OITIES.. Savoy. The Swiss. Russia. 24. Prussia. pl. 'I'hebais. Trojans. . Savoyard. ·orum. Idis. Switzerland. Dardania. m.pl. Russus. Prussian. Sardinia.

Beauvais. IIafula. onis.. Hamburgum. Hanover. Burdigala. iUIn. f. pl. . Cracovia. pl. Cle rm 0 nt.86 Guide to Latin Conver8at'ton. Antissiod6rum. Bruxellae. Glaseovium. i. Codania. Avenio. Lapurdum. Caen. Carmitum. (jades. Canterbury. uutis. Friburgum. Brussels. Amiens. m. Constiintinopolis. Copenhagen. Deppa. Hamburg. 8. Hierlcus. Damietta. Florence. Jericho. Inis. Corinth. Damascus. Corinthus. Damieta. Chartres.f.. Glocestria. f. Chicago. i./. Bononia. . Bayonne.!. Dublinium. Friburg. f. Cadomum. Oonstan tinople. Dublin. is. Florentia. Claromon ti urn. Cantuaria. Autun. Cadix. Edinburgh. Leuphiina. Chicago. Cambridge. Dieppe. Augustodfinum. Bologne. Glascovia. Damascus. Bellovacum. Carnotum. Cracovia. Glovernia. Avignon. i. Auxerre. Glasgow. Haunovera. J. Anibianum. Cantabrigia. Cadomus. Andrianople. Gloucester.drumj j. I~rlimbiirum. Bordeaux. Andrianopolis.

onis. m. Louvain. Namur. Nantes. arum. Lourdes. Lugdiinu 111. Namurcum. Mediolanum. Lapurdum. Mantua. orum. Nancy. Philadelphia. Leodium. Lovanium. Londinium. Naples. Munich. Neapolis. Moscow.!. Philadelphia. 87 Hierosolyma. Liege. Nova Aurelia. Milan. N arbo. m. Parisii. orum. Remi. pl. Poitiers. Orleans. pl. Lemovicum. Lille. pl. Mons pessuliinus. m. Londinum. Lavalium. f. Patavium. Divodiirum. Laval. Montpelier. ae. Pictavium. New York. . m. um. Marseilles. Mantua. is. I nsnlae. Olisippo. Narbonne.j: Monachium. N amuetes. Aurelia. Lisbon. N eo-Eboracum. Moguntia. Jerusalem. N ancium. Massilia. m. Mayence. Limoges. New Orleans. Rome. N anceium. Mau'Itum. Roma. ae. Lutetia. onis. Madrid. Mosca. Reims. Padua. j. l\1etz.. m. London.Vocabulary. Lyons. Paris.

111. Guide to Latin (}onversution. urn. Rothomagus.88 Rouen. V enetiae. 3. 3 Tres. Soissons. Strasburg. Quintus. Syracuse. Trent. Sextus. urn. Caesaraugusta. Quartus.. 10 Decem. Verdun. m. m. Declmus. Septfmus. 9 Novem. Turcnes. Gctrdinal Numbers. . 4 Quatuor. Toledo. p~ Argentoratum. pt. ae. Toulon. urn. Nonus. . pl. Primus. f. l\IATHEMATICS.}. York. a. Tours. urn. Valentia. Octavus. Tria. Pintia. Sarago~sa. 3. Suessiones. arum. Tolosa. 1 U nus. pic Virodfinum. 8 Octo. Syracusae. Eboracum. 2 Duo. Tertius. urn. 0. ToulouEe. Venice. Secundus. ValladoI id. 25. Ordinal Numbers. 6 Sex. arum. onis.. Tridentum. Telo. MATHEMATICA. 'I'oletum. 5 Quinque. 7 Septem. Valencia.

~e. Declmus tertius. 90 N onaginta. 900 Nongenti. 19 Novemdecim. 200 Ducenti. ae. 600 Sexcenti. ] 01 Centum unns. 17 Septemdecim. 102 Centurn duo. Declmus quartus. Centeslmus secundus. Sexageslmus.. Sextus declmus. 300 Trecenti. Septimus decrmus. N onus decrmus.. Quinquageslmus. a. ae. Qundringentestmus. 80 Octoginta. Quingentesinlus. Septingenteslrnus. Undeclmus. 50 Quinquaginta. Octavus decfrn us. 11 Undeclm. [ingenti. Viceslmus secundus. Duodecimus. . Quintus decrmus. Octogesrmus. Vigestmus. Centestrnus pri. 89 13 Tredecim. 14 Quatuordecim~ 15 Quindecim. N onagesfm us. Septuagesrmus. 400 Quadringenti. a. Non1000 Mille. Sexcentesunus. 22 Viginti duo. a. Sex de[cim. 700 Septingenti. Noningenteslmus. 30 Trigin ta.Vocabulary. Ducentesfrnns. Quadrageslmus.nus. a. ae. 800 Octingenti. 40 Quadraginta. . ae. 18 Octodecim. a. Trecentesrmus. 100 Centum. 20 Viginti. 'I'rircsfrnus. 12 Duodecim. de. Octingenteslmus. Vicesrmus. [ae d. Millestmus. 21 Viginti unus. 500 Quingenti. Viceslmus primus. a. Centeslmus. 70 Septuaginta. 60 Sexaginta. 16 Sedecim.

30 Triceni. 100 Centeni. Septuagies. Numet'al tidvetbl. 90 N onageni. 10 Deni. 70 Septuageni. 80 Octogeni. 20 Viceni. 6 Seni. Centies. Sexagies. 14 Quaternideni. Semel" BiSo Ter. Sexdecies. Distributives.90 Guide to Latin Conversation. a. 22 Viceni bini. 2 Bini.Nonagies. Tl'icies. Quinquiesl Sexies. 21 Viceui singuli. Octogies. 18 Octonideni. . 19 N ovenideni. a. 4 Quaterni. Duodeeies. \7 icies bis. Quatuordecies. \7 icies semel. 13 'I'ernideni. Quater. Septies. 15 Quinideni. [deni. 12 Duodeni. Noviesoi Decies. Septiesdeeies. Octies. ae. 60 Sexageni. Quinquagies. . ae. Vicies. 40 Qnadrageni. 9 Noveni. Quindecies. 3 Terni. 8 Oct6ni. Undecies. Tredecies. 11 Undeni. 101 Centeni singnli. Quadragies. N oviesdecies. Octi esdecies.Quin16 Senideni. 1 Singiili. 50 Quinquageni. 7 Septeni. 17 Septenideni. 5 Quini. Cellties semel.

are used mostjrequently. Nota arithmetfca. Septingenties.JToeabulary. diducere. N umerorum partictlla. Du[ceni.Sex[eeni. Ducenties. To divide. The distributives duceni. Sexcenties. 600 Sexcenteni. To add. [geni. onis. Addition. N ongen ties. Divisio. . 200 Ducenteni. To multiply. 400 Quadringen[teni. f. _ Subducere. Quadringenties. Multiplicatio. Millies. Fraction. 700 Septingenteni. f. ' Deductio. Di videre. Arithmetic. Octingenties. geni. Addi tio. f. lVI ulti plioare. Numerus. Tre[ceni. subtrahere. Arithmetfca. To subtract. 800 Octingenteni. treceni. [Nongelli. 91 Centies his. 102 Cen teni bini. on~s. 300 Trecenteni. f Addere. Number. 900 Nongenteni. 1000 Milleni. onis. Trecenties. Multiplication. etc. Figure. Quingenties. [gen~. onis. quadringeni. 8ubtraction. Division. 500 Quingenteni..

Extraction of the ' Quadratae radicis inves[tigatio. ovata. concave.aeouilaterum.convex. . . parallels. isosceles. tangent. seeans.equilateral. spira. . Cublcae radicis investiExtraction of the [gatio Algebra. Geometry. [anum Rule of partnership. Triangle. Algebra. [square root.line) --:. Algebrlcus. ee. Superficies. Punctum. tangens.right. Point. concave. Hypothen iisis. rectangulum.antis. scalenum. spiral. 'I'riangtilurn. cireularis. curva. aciitus. Regula ourea proportiRule of three. . Surface.f. obtiisus.convexa. acute. Algebraic.rectus. Line. diagonal. oval. isosceles. parallel. perpendicular. right angle. Angle? . [cube root. . curved line. entis. broken line. circular. Linea. perpendieularis.straight . Angulus.92 Guide to Latin Oonversation. secant.recta. diagoniilis. . obtuse. Regula societatis. Hypothenuse. 'ft scalene. is. fracta. Geometria. .

ASTRONOMV. The Twins. ntis. Gemini. Circumductio. Cone. Square. Constellation The Ran). Pyramis. j. eancri. Radius. i. eris. i. f. 'l'he Balance. Cylindrus. orum. Heavens. The \Tirgin. re. Sphere. Diameter. Circle. Sidus. m. Semidiametros. . is.Voeabulatry. The Lion. j. Cometes. ASTRONOMIA. Circulus.!" Libra. 'In. orulll. Pyramid. Sphaera. Polygonum. 11. n. The Crab. Cancer. Segment. Rhomboides. \Til'go. 93 Prism. Cylinder. Centre. Diametros. Quadriitum. Parallelogram. etis. q uadrum. onis.' 26. onis. 'In. Circumference. astrum. Prisma. j~ Centrum.j. eoeli. u' Leo. [/ 1/ . Coelum . Rhomboid. ASTROLOGIA Astronomer. Parallelogrammum. m. Aries. Idis. 1)/. and [canceris.. Taurus. lnis. Segmentum. Conus. Polygon. Cornet. 'II. Trapezoid. The Bull. Astrologus. Trapezium.

East.vaga. The Scorpion. Cold. Plscis. tis. Venus. Meridian. [is. PHYSICSo PHYSICA. The Archer. Terra. West. ' Sol. Arciteueus. m. rna Mercurius. re. m. Luna. Scorplus. Aer. . Septentri6nes. Scorpius. oris. Pisces. Cancer. Virgo. Amphora.Plenilunium. m.' urn. tis. Frigus. m. North. Opcidens. Planet. Pole.!: Planeta. The Capricorn. . Leo. tis. m. Satnrnus. [ri. aeris.Full mOOD. Libraque. The Fishes. Mercury. n. ium. Saturn.f. Sagittarius. m. Venus. Capricornus. 27. Jupiter. eclipsis Stella.. Aquarius. Sun. m. Mars. m. Earth.94 Guide to Latin Oonversation. Caper. Taurus. pl. [septentrro Polus. . Defectus. Jupiter. . Gemini. Mars. tis. m: Oriens. (jris. Air. solis.. us. errans.m. Eclipse. The Water Bearer. m. . Star. Bunt Aries. j. Jovis. caper.j Meridies. Moon. ei.falling.

to rain. is. ·'1nls. Nubes. Smoke. I Ice. nivis. toni. .Pluvi. Ternpestas.Vocabulary. si. Ros. '" To hail. atis. Urere. Snowy. Inis. a. m. Ignis. Ventus. ['11. Dew. Snow. oris. imber. To snow. Fulmen. l'dis. Tepldus. n. Scintilla. To burn. m. Tepid. Breeze. Fire.. i Frigfdns. j. .a. favonius. Nix. ei.J: Nivens..rain. Gelu.f. Arcus coelestis. Thunderbolt. Zephyr. 'I'oniire. Frost. Thunder. Flammeus. 95 . uris. . Tonitrns. iris. . Wind. To thunder. Ningere. Fumus. Flame. Glacies. [truum. '/0 Grandindre. j. is. Hailstone. Calor. spark. Hot. bris.Plucre. . Zephyrus. m. Flash. Rainbow? Storm. Of flame.. Grando. n: imd. [. Calldus. roris. Heat. Aura. Flamma. Fulgnr. Cloud. Cold. Lightning. lts~ 'nt.

m.fluted. j. atis~ n. pl. . Obeliscus. Frieze. Arch of a bridge. m. us. Cornice. IS. A rchi trave. bracket.Corinthian. . Base. Niche. 28. Zoophorus. Pile. 'I'ympiinum. capitellum. COIUllll1. Moulding. .Sublicium. Coping of a wall.Corinthia. truucus I III pit ges. Prothyris. orum.. Denticnli.96 Guide to Latin Oonversation. Consol. ae. . m. prostypa. . Sty lobata. l\ientlllu.Ionian. Obelisk. props. Shaft of column. [. --'" Dorfca. Pilaster. Capital of a pillar. Modillon. . oruln. fundamenturr Capitulum. . Traverse.fdis. /0 pl.striata.Doric. Coluumae scapus.twisted. Pila. Plinth. . Counterforts. . Torus. Erisma. Architectus. Plinthus. Parastata. f. urn'. Arcus. Basis. Pedestal. 'Fit. is. Loculamentum.Ionlca. Mutulus. Denticles. . ae. Epistylium.!. i. . ARCHITECTURA. Columna. 'Iympan. . . Architect. ARCHITECTURE. Support of an arch. Arch. Anterrdes.torttlis. Corona. m.

'In. Cantrix. icis. Note. Singer. Bow. Organ. Tibia. oris.97 \Tault. i urn. MUSIC. us. 7 . fa 29. Cantum numerosque Concentus moderator. [moderari. To beat time. Nervus. 6018. arch. Lute. cautio. Lituus. Cantiitor. Concentus. 1\1in61'i8 1110di f'Ides. String. helix. M uslcae nota. Modus. Inis. Beater of time. us.). Cantilena. fornix. Camera. Lf: pl. 'In. buccrna.. Camerae conclusiira. Flute. MUSICA. chorda. Canttcum. To play before. Songstress. 'In. Concert. Cantus. Icis. Voliita. Muslcian (f. f. Praecinere. Fidium canteriolus. Musical instrument. cantatrix. 'I'rumpet. f. Bridge. Singing.). Flageolet. cithara. j. m: Muslcum instrumentum. Song. Canticle. Muslca. [oris. 'In. Violin~ Musrcus. Plectrum. Key &fVolute. Testiido. Time. Organum. Tuba. I I l Musician ('In. Clarionette. Fistula. Icis.

.

.

100 Guide to Latin Conversation. PiltUa. ARTES II. To bleed. j. To take a Bandage. Baker's wife. 32. catapotium. 'In. Gargarizatio. m. Idis. Collyrium.JI. Iliriido. J. atis. Bake-shop. Mitella. Blood -letting. . Direta. Baker. Unguen. Eye-salve. Cupping-glass. Acrobat. Cataplasma. Probe. Cauterium. Plaster. luis. Potio. Kneading trough. Sangulnis detractio. Potion. Mar-tra magis. f. Cucurbitula. Ointment. Leech. onis. Clyster. Pistrina.JES ET OPIFICES.JIBERAI. Pill. icis. Emetic. Abaptistum. eris. [siiga. Trepan. Gargling. Washing. Venam incidere. Pistol'. Pistrix. Emplastrum. Medicamentum bibere. n. tnis. Cataplasm. Leaven.· f. clyster. [tum V omitorium medicamenVomitivus. oris. :MECHANICAJ~ ARTS AND ARTISANS. Funambrilus. Fermentum. Diet.. f. sanguiSepecillum. Lancet. Cautery. Scalpellnm. Vomiting. 'In. nnis.

111 is. Barbam tondere. Barber-shop. Hammer. 'In. Ipis. Ampullari us. Bottle-Illaker. 'in. Ianiarium. arttfex. 'in. Remus. Serra. Laniena. 13anker. Carman. BODlebinder. f. . 'in. Prow. l~ile6ruln. cipis. oris. Tongs. l\1alleus.j. Librorum concinniitor. bri. lcis. Ferrarius faber. 'I'onstrina. Clippings. Oar. Candle-n1ake I'. If ammer. Tensor. nchora. l\lalIeus. Butcher-stall. 'I'onstrix. leis. Forge.. Pinchers. Forceps. I?orceps. Terebra. Anchor. . A 1\1filus. Navioularius. ?I. Barber's wife. Incus. 1\1ateriiiri us. R02-tJllan. 'in. Slaughter-house. Saw. . Boat. Mast. Razor. UstrIna. Carrucarius.. Praesegmen.101 Bank. ildis. Bellows. Cap-maker. Carpenter. Butcher. Black<SInith. Lanius. 'in.1n. Argentaria.Novacula. Lanionia mensa. Caudeliirum artrfex. Cymba. J. To shave. Fo] lis. Prora. 1\1 ensarius. f. Anvil. Barbel'. is. Auger. navicula. icis.

'In. temo. Kitchen. Truck. Rheda.. Nail. Post. Tumbrel. Dolium. Idis. j rota. Coachman. Coquus.v body. urulll. Carrfica. Coal merchant. onis. 'in. modiolus. coach-pol~. Seciiris. peg. Cerdo. f. Terebella. Carbonarius. three-horse. pl. is. onis. essedarius. Carbo.). felly. vehes. Rhediirum arttfex. J)olabra. in. is. Cooper. Coqua. Cobbler. Dol i arius. Cook (f. Cook ('In. Currus. Plaustrum. pl. axle. . radius rotae. Coach-builder. leis.: ascia. canthus. Fibula. axe. eredarius. triga. subscus. quadrigae. Traha. runcina. Clavus. f. I.bigae. box. '111. Carriage. iidis. Cadus. coach. onis. . Car Cart.boy. four-horse . is. ae. carriica. 1H. spoke.two-horse. Coal. f. aspis. Cask. f. Clsiarius. Hatchet. Plane. tire. Pin.\02 Guide to Latin Conoereaiion.). Culina. Currus. capsus rhedae. aggon. us. '7 Tun. hub. . 'In. axis. Gimlet.]. arUll).

Encaustum. n. Vitrearius. Orbis. G-ilder. Enameller. Fiddler. To sew. . coloriire. Suere. Politor. Lebes. To dye. 5nis. Thread. Bunghole. Rete. Farmer's wife. Embroiderer. m. Bubulchus. leis. etis. oris. m. m. Farmer. Pellio. Coppersmith. m. Inis. Olttor. Caven. is. m. Cutter (of clothes). cassis. .vitrea lamina. Forfex. us. Fuller. Villl'ca. oris. Encanstes. oris. Enamel. oris. ctipis. . Cage. Furbisher. Scissors. onis. . Lebetum faber.glass. bri. m. leis. Cow-herd. Pellis. Skin. 'I'ingere. m. onis. Farm. Needle. m.Vocabulary. 103 Obturamentum. Furrier. Phrygio.. m.. .glass window. Sartor. Infector. f. m: Inauriire. . Glue. 3ris. Hoop. vestiarius Acus. decoy. vinclnm dolii. m. Villtcus. Glazier. praedium. Fullo. re. Auceps.!. Fowler. 1n. consuere. Iriauriitor. is. Villa. Dyer. To gild. Viscum. Filium. Fidtcen. Cauldron.• Ilex. Gardener. Bird-call. Snare. m. is. [lamella.v itrum. m.

104

G1t'ide to Latin;

CO'nVC1'8at£on.

Goat-herd, Goldsmith, Grave-digger, Hatter, hat seller, Horse dealer, Juggler, Laborer, To plough, Plough, Tail of a plough, Ploughshare, Coulter, Harrow, To harrow, Laundress, Laundry, Lye, Of lye, Librarian, bookseller, Book, Binding, Cover Back ~f beok, Title, Author, Page, Chapter, Section, Paragraph, Line, Mason, Mortar, Lime,

Caprarius. Aurffex, 'leis, tu, Fossor, oris, in.. Pileorum artlfex, leis; Tn. 11ango, onis.

Histrio, onis, 1n.; Iudius. Ariitor, oris, nl.
Arare,
Ariitrum.

Stiva.
Vomer, eris, m.. Cnlter, tri, m, Occa. Occiu-e, Lavfitrix, ids, f. Lavandaria. Lixivia.

Lixivius, [rius, Bibliop6la, ffl, 'in.; libraLibel', bri, m, Coneinnatio, onis, f. Libri tegmen, Inis, 11.
Dorsum.

'I'ittilus, Auctor, oris, m. Pagrna. Caput, Itis, '11. Seetio, on is, j. Paragraphns, Linea. [muriil is, Faber lapidarius, strnetor
A reniitnm.

Calx, cis,j.

Vocabulary.
Plaster, Trowel, Level, Line, Rule,
Squar~,

105

Plummet, Lever, Maoon's workman, l\lerchant, To buy, Purchase, Buyer, To sell, Sale, Seller,
Miller, Wheat-mill,

Ii

\i

I

1·.t'•:. ·. ·'

Oil-mill, Mola. Mill-stone, Mulio, onis, m, Muleteer, Flage11 urn. Whip, Flag~IHire. To whip, Flagello insoniire, To crack a whip, Structor viarius. Paver, Pavimentum, Pavement, Fistiica, pa vicula. Beetle of a paver, Fistucare, To pave with ham. Road, route, [mer, Via, iter, itineris, n, Semtta, callis, is, 'In. Path, Circumforaneus propola, Peddler, Baj ttl us, gerul us. Porter, Raj ulare, ferre, To carry,

GYPS1Ull.. Trulla. Libra: Amussis, is,f.; linea: Regllia. [1nv Norma; gnomon, onis, Perpendiculum, Vectis, is, m. Operarius. Mercator, oris, m. Elnere. Elnptio, onis,j. Emptor, oris, m. Vendere. enditio, onis, f. Vcndttor, oris, f. Molttor, oris, m, Moletrina, pistrinum. Trapetus, trapetum.

,r

106

Guide to Ledin Conversation.
Figtilus. Rota figularis. [n. Typus, proplasma, iitis, Typographus, Typus. • Prelum typographl'cum. l\Iessor, oris, m, [f· Messis, is, f. ; seges, etis, Metere, demetere. Falcula, seotila. Falx, falcis, f. Flagellum. Furca. Furcilla. Rastellus, raster, tri, m. Vannus, i,j.; ventila[brum. Restiarius, restio, Ollis, 111. Funis, is,rn. - Chorda. Nervus chorda. Rudens, entis, m. Laqueus, restis, is, [. Resticiila, Funictilus. Ephippiorum opffex, Icis, EphippitUll.· [1n. Opilio, onis, 1n. Pera. Pedum. Funda. Siitor, oris, m.; calceolaSutrina. [rius.

Potter, Wheel, Mould, Printer, Type, Press, Reaper, Harvest, To reap, Reaping hook, Scythe, Flail, Fork, Small fork, Rake, Fan, Rope-maker, Rope, cord, - Bow string, Violin string, Rope of a ship, IIalter, Line, Fillet;! Saddler, Saddle, Shepherd, Scrip or sack, Crook, Sling, Shoemaker, Shop of-

VocabulaTy.
Awl,
Paring-knife, Leather strap, Thread, Currier} Leather, To curry, Sheep-skin, Sower, Seed, To sow. Stone-cutter, Hammer, Chisel, Compass, Crayon, Swine-herd, Tavern-keeper, 'I'avorn, Upholsterer, Tapestry, Vintager, Vintage, To gather grapes, Vineyard, - Vine dresser, . Pole, Spade, Mattock, Weaver,

107

Shop ofShuttle of-

Subiila. Scalprum sutorium. Lerum. FihllU piciitum, Coriarius, Corium, - subigere, concinniire. Aluta. Sator, oris, m: Semen, Inis, n. Serere, Lapicida, ae, m, Malleus; tudes, Itis, tn. Scalprum. Circlnus. Carbo Iinearis. Subulcus, porcarius, [na. Caupo, onis, m. Caup6na, popina, taber.. Aulae5rum opifex.fcis, m. Aulaeum, peripetasma, [ntis, n. Vindell1iator, oris, m. Vindemia, Vindemiare, Vinea, vinetum. - Vinltor,ol'is, 1n. Ridlca,pedfimen.Inis, [n. Ligo, onis. Pastlnum. Textor, oris, m. Textrina, textrinurn.

Radius textorius,

108

Guide to Ledin Conversation.
Insilia, ium, n. pl.
Tex~re.

Treadle ofTo weave,

33.
GAMES, AMUSEMENTS. LUDI, OB1..E CTAMENTA.

Ball, Billiards, Billiard table, Pocket, Ball, Cne, Carousal, Chase, I-Iunter, 'Fowler Killed game, Snares, Bird-call, decoy, Bird-lime, glue, Cage, Checker-board, Checker, Chess, Chess-player, A piece, Pawn, Knight, Bishop, Castle, rook,

Pila. [cnlfiris. Ludus nidicuiaris; trudiAlea, selum. Fundiiln, barathrum. Globlilus, pila. Clavl'tla, uidicnla. l~qnestre lndicrum. \Tenatio, onis, I; venatus, \Tenator orif:\, m. [(lS,·111,. Auceps, ciipis, m, [da. \Tenatio, veniitus, prae· Plagae, firum, [. 1)1.; cas[ses, ium, ni. pl.; retia, [hun, n. pl. Ilex, Icis, ni. Viseum. Cavea. Alveus. Calculus. Latrunculi, orum, 'In. pl. Al veolus, alveus IusoI ..atrunculus. [rius. Pedes, ttis, m: Eq ues, ttis, m. Morio, onis, m, Turris, is, f.

Vocabulary.
Queen, !{ing, Check-mate, . Die (sing. of Dice), Dice-box, Cast, Ace,

109

Regina. Rex, regis, m, [gem. Vici.regem, teneo reTessera, talns, taxillns. Fritillus. 'I'esserae jactus. Monas, adis,./: Duella ; duplio, onis, 'In. Denc~ Three points, Ternio, onis, m. Six points, Sernio, onis, m. J actns Veneris. Double-six, Piscatus, 11s, m.; piscatio, Fishing, To fish with a hook, Pieciici hamo. .[onis, J. Fisher, Pisciitor, orIS, 'In. Everriotuum : rete, is, n. Net, Macula. Mesh, Linea. Line, Hamus, Hook, Pole, Arundo, mis, j. Foot-ball, F IUs, is, m: Game of the goose, Ludus anserum. Juggler, Praetigiator, ol-is, 'In. Acetabulum, Cup, Ball, Globulus ; nux, nucis,j: Jump, Saltus, US, tn. Quoit, Discus. Cursus, us, m, Race, ,Horse-race, Eq uestris cursus, Racket, Reticulum. [tio. Riding, Equitdtus, 11S, 'In.; equitaHorse, Equus. Mare, Equa. Ass, Aslnus.

°

110

Guide to Latin ConoereationAsma, Asellus. Ephippitun. Posti.lena, Antilena. Hippopera. Habenae, arum, j. pl. Frenum. Flagellum. Verber, eris, m. Calcar, aris, m. Strig'llis, is, f. Tohitim ire. [farri. Cursu incitatisslmo Oscillum. [~scilHiri. Oscillati6ne 11.ldere ; Grallae, arum, f. pl. Turbo, Inis, m, [nem, Agitare, movere turbf... Crepundia, orum, n. pl.

She-ass, Ass-foal, Saddle, Crupper, Martingale, Bags, Bridle, reins, Curb, Whip, Riding-whip, Spur, Currycomb, To trot, To gallop, See-saW, To see-saw, Stilts, Top, To spin a top, Toys,

COMPARATIVA ET SUPERLATIVA A PROBATISSIMIS AUCTORI· BUIS US1JRPATA. LIST OF LATIN COMPARATIVES AND SUPERLATIVES.

1
I
~I

c, comparative alone used .

* comparative or superlative of doubtful authority.
Abjectus. Abjecte, c. Abruptus. Abscissus, c. Absolfitus. Absolute. Abstlnens. A bstriisus, c. Absurdus. Abundans, Abundanter. Acceptus. Aocommodatus, Accommodate. .A ccumulate, 8. Aceuriitus. Accurate. Acer. A crIter, Acerbus, Acerbe. Aoldus. Aetuosus, c.

s, superlative alone used.

Aciitus.
Acute. Adductus, c. Adducte, .c. Adjunctus. Admiuiculfitus, c. Admirabflis, c. Adolescens, c• *Adoptatus, 8.

111

--T~

-----

112

Guide to Latin Co noersatio no
Amanter.
Amiirus. Amiire. Ambiti5sus. Ambitiose.

Adustus, c. Adversus, s, .JEger. .JEgre. .£quabilis, c. lEquabillter, c. lEq uiilis, c. lEqualIter, c. lEquus.
.A~rulnn5sus.

Amens. Amicus. Amice.
Amoenus.

A~stu5sus, 8.

£stu5se, c. A ffabll is. Aflitbillter, 8. Afleetus, 8. Afflrm.ite, s. Afflictus, c. Affiuens, c. Affluenter, c. AgIUs, c. Agiltter, c, Agitatus, c. Agrestis. Alacer, c. Alacrtter, c. Albtdus. Alienus. Alsius, Altus. Alte. Amabtlis. Amabihter, c. Amans.

Amoene. Amplus. Ample. Augustus. Anguste. Animosus,

A nimose,
Anterior, us, *Antel'ius. Antiquus, Antique. Apertus. Aperte. Apparatus. A ppariite, e, Appetens, Appositus. Apricus, Aptus, A1Jte. Aquatus, e. Aquate, c. Aqu5sns. Arctus.

Comparatives and Superlatives.
Arcte. Ardens. Ardenter. Arenosus. Argutus. Argute, e. Arldus. *Arrectus, Co Arrogans. Arroganter, c. Artificiosus. Artificiose. Asper. Aspere. Asseveranter, c. Assiduus. Assidue,8. Assuetus, c. Astrictus, c. Astricte, c. Astiitus, c. Astute. Ater, c. Atrox. Atroctter. Attentus. Attente. Attenufitus. A ttri tus, c. Auctus, c. Audax. Audacter. Audens. 8

113

Audenter, c. Augustus. Auguste, c. Auspiciitus, Auspiciito, c. A usterus, c. Aviirus. Aviire. Aversus. Avtdus, Avrde, Barbarus, c. Beatus. Beate. Bellicosus. Bellns. Belle, s, Bene, melius, optrme, Beneffcus, Benevolens, Benignus. Benigno. Blandus. Blando. Bonus, melior, opttmus. Brevis. Brevlter. Csecus, c. Calamitosus, Caldus, c. Caltdus,

c. c. c. Circumspecte. c. Capax. e. Cito. Compressus. c. Celer. Celertter. c. Callosus. Citatus. Carnosus. Clams. c. c. Cariosus. Call1dus. Circumspeetus. Callide. c. Certus. Comitatus. c. CO:rP--IDode. Celsus. Coneinne. Celeberrfme. 'lare. . Coheerens. Concors. Clementer. Concordfter. Comis. c.114 Guid» to Latin ()onvefsalion Civilis. Composttus. cittmus. Citus. Sommotus. Compte.c. c. Comperte. Concitatus. Composite. Castus. c. Caruso Care. Candidus. c. * Conciliatus. Commendatus. Cinredus. *Candens. Celeber. c. c. c. s. Cornpresse. Coneinnus. Capti6sus. . c. Comptus.is. Communis. c. c. * Comtter. CapilHitus. Capital. Caste.c. Ceelestis. Caute. i. c. . Citerior. CeIse. Commodus. Celebriitus. Coaete. * Conei tate. Civiliter. Coloratus. c. * Castigatus. c. Cautus. Clemens. Cognttus.

Conveniens. Confiisus. Confirmatus. Constrictus. 8. Con tracte. Conspectus. Corrupte.15 *Condecens. Constan s. . c. Crasse. Contorte. 8. Consulte. c. 8. c. Criminose.8. Confertus. Conquisitus. Confuse. Crudelis. Condoctus. c. c. c. Crispus. . c. c. Creber. Contractus.8. Contentus. c. * Consonans. Consignanter. * Congestus. Conjunctus. Crustosns.. Constanter. Contentiose. . c. Credibllis. Contanlinatus. Conficiens. Considerate.':i . 8. c. Donsummatus. Consuetus. Crebre 01' crebro. c. Co I .Comparatives and Superlatives. Criminosus. Correctus. Concretus. Cruente. Crudus.:····1··· . c. 8. Corpulentus. Conspirate. Crassus. Consonanter. Contente. Copiose. c. Credibilrter. c. Confidenter. Conditus. c. 1. Consideriitus. Cruentus. Confidens.'. c. Crudelfter. Contmens. c. Conducibtlis. Contumeliose. c. c.c. Corruptus. c. Contumeliosus. Conjuncte. Copulatus. c. Donsultus. c. c. !' Culpatus.j. c. Copiosus. Contemptus. Contumax.

Dihgens. Cunctantel'. c. c. Desideratus. Cumuliitus. Curiose. s. Desperiitus. Delise. Dignus. Decenter. Dilectus. Decoctus. c. Deliciitus. Depressus. Digne. Dilucidus. c. c. Delicate. Dihitus. Cultus. [trmus Dexter. Despectus. 8. c. Damnosus. c. Cupfdus. Deliberiitus.' Dicax. Custodite. Cu piens. Deduetus. Cumulate. Detestabtlis. Culte. c. c. Dernenter. Desiderabtlis. c. Desertus. Cuptde. Dilute. Curate. Curiosus. c. Co Demisse. Difficfle. Cunctans. Diluctde. Diffidenter. Decens. Devotus. Depresse. Desidiosus. Deterius. Difficflis. Damnatus. c. Cunctiitus. c. c. s. Debtlis. c. s. dexterior. c. Despicatuae. Densus. Curiitus. s. Dedftus. Descriptus. Diligenter. Diffuse. . c. c. 80 Demissus. c. Devexus. 8. Demens. Devinctus. Deterior.116 Guide to Latin Conversation. c. c. Deformis. dexDextere. c. c. c. deterrlmus.

c. Effrenatus. c. Dirus. Dulce. Disposrtus. c. Di versus. Disjunctus. Egens. c. c. c. Emendiite. Effectus. diutius. Distentus. '~Hitus. Eleganter. Divulgiitns. Effuse. DissiIullis. Dolens. c. Efficaclter. Eloquens. Effeminatus. c. c. Dotatus. diutisstme. DiI'ect~s. c. Di verse. c. Edax. Doctus. ditisslmus. Eiate. Di vin us. Distribute. Dure. c. s. C< Dolenter. e. Dissolfitns. c. Electue. Diu. c. Distractus. * Effertus. c. Emtnens. c. c. c. Efferatus. Directe. c.(lomparali oes asul Superlatives. Eliitus. Dulcis. Edttus.c. c. c. Elegans. Durus. c. Electe.. Distortus. ditior. Enixus. :~ Domfnans. Distincte. . s. Districtus. Effreniite. Emendiitus. Disertus. Effusus. Doctlis. Eloquenter. Diruptus. Dives. Diuturnus. Enarriite. Effervens. Distinctus. Di visus. Enixe. Docte. 117 Diserte. s. Eff'tcax.

8. c. Exsuctus. c. c. Facete. Excusabflia Excusiitus. . Exercitatus. C•. Erudite. Exactus. Execratus. Excitatus. Expressus. FacIle. Exiltter. Facetus. c. Extensus. Evidenter. Exercitate. Erectus. 8. extfrnus Exterius. Explanate. Enodate. Facti6sus. c. Exploriite. c. Extenuatus. * Expertus. Evldens. c. Excellens. s. e. s. Fabu15se. c. Exorabtlis. Exaciitus.118 Guide to Latin Conversation. c. Expugnax. ex[terior. Exsultanter. Exsultans. Exilis. Expedite. . Eruditus. c. Exaggeratus. Exploratus. Exquisitus. Erecte. Excitate. Experiens. Exomiitus. Facinor5sus. Exacte. Exquisite. Exspectatus. Excellenter. Expolitus. * Exiguus. c. Exuberans. Explicatus. Excelsus. c. c. e. Exsequens. s. Exoptatus. c. Excusate. c. Expresse. Explicltus. s. c. Excogitfitus. c. Factlis. Excelse. c. Fabu15sus. 8. c. e. Execrabrlis. Exter and exterus. Expeditus.

8. c. Festus. Frigtde. Fastidiosus. Flagrans. Feroctter. Frugaltter. Feraciter. c. FertIlis. Florens. c. Fidus. * Fragrans. s. 8. Fertiltter. Formose. Formidabflis. e. Favorabtlis. Flebrlis. Festive. Formosus. Fanl0sus. Flaccfdus.Con'tparative8 and Facundus. Fastidiose. Fervens. Firme. Fallax. Fortis. c. c. Farther. c. Fortunatus. Fraudulenter. Felix. c. e. Festivus. Fractus. Ferventer. Fructuosus. Fortunate. c. Fragtlis. . Fidelis. c. Fraudulentus. Flagranter. Fidellter. Facunde. 119 Firmus. Ferox. Fallactter. Frugiilis. Sup~rlative8. Frequens. Frag6se. c. Fecundus. Frede. Flagi tiose. c. Fecunde. Fccdus. s. Ferax. e. c. Flagi tiosus. Fidenter. Familiarfter. e. Fluxus. Falsus. Frigrdus. Fervtdus. Florrdus. Felictter. Festinanter. Familiaris. Formidolosus. Fide. c. c.

Glaher. c. c. Gulose. Furax. s. Grate. s. Illiteratus. Honoriftce. Honoratus. Grandis. Gypsatus. s. Fngax. Honorif'Ieus. HiHlre. G lutinosus. Gratus. Gener6sus. 8. e. Fugaclter. Tllecebrosus. Humane. Humillter. Horribflis. IJ. * Ignitus. Generose.120 G1dde to Latin (lonnereaiion: Habllis. Igniivus. c. c.8. Funestus. Fusus. Honeste. Habitus. c. *Ignarus. Honestus. c. Horrtde. Fundatus. c. Gravtter. Ignotus. H'irsiitus. Glori6sus. c. c. Gratiosus. c. c. Tgniive. Fuscus. Humtdus. . c. s. Illustris. Humiinus. Honorfite. Hilaris. Fugatus. Geltdus. IIumtlis. Furiosus. c. Fulgens. Tgnobflis. Ignorabtlis. Graerlis. Fulgentel'. Hospitiilis. c. Gravis. Ignoscens. Horrtdus. c. Fruticosus. Furens. Germanus. c. Furaclter. Gloridse.

ImmuFl. Irnportunus. Implacabiltter. Irnmerfto. Improbe. s. Iruinis. Incautus. Immoderate. 1m periosus. c. Impense. Inconsiderate. Immitis. Irnprideus. Inclemens. Incorruptus. Inamabllis.Conl. Irnprudenter. c. s. c. Impotens. Impatienter. Impotrabtlis. c. Importune. c. Incomptus. Impefite. Improbus. Immobilis. Imitabllis. Incultus. Impnidens. Impensus. Illustrisslme. Irnpunitus. Incommode. Irnpurus. Impeditus. c. Irnparatus. Inconsideriituo. Immundus. c. c. Immature. Iricoltimis. c. 121 Illustrius. Imbecillis. c. c. Irnpudicus. s. 1 Inconstans. Inconsulte. e. c. Co J . Impudenter.pa1'alivcs and Superlaiivee. Inolinatus. Importuosus. Incivilfter. * Impuratus. c. Imperitus. Impure. Inoonstanter. c. Incaute. c. s. Impotenter. c. I mmansuetus.is. c. Inculte. 8. s. Inclementer. . Inrequalis. Incitatus. Incorrupte. Incredibtlis. Impatiens. c. Ilnperiose. Irnpune. I III bocilltter. Irnmoderiitus. Incertus.

c. Infacundus. Infieetus. I neff'Icax. Inflate. Ingeni6se. Injuri6se. \ Inordinatus. Insidi6se. c. Injustus. * Ineruditus. Inscite. Infelix. Iniquus. Inimice. inf'IInfra. Indecens. emus. Injuste. Indiltgens. Inquinatus.e. 8. s. Indoctus. Infans. c. Ineptus. Industrie. Inficete. c. Inhonestus. Co Inscitus. Indigne. Insiinus. Innocenter. c. c. c. Injucunde. c.». Indignans. s. e: Insignia. c. Infense. Injuri6sus. Infeste. Indignus. Iners. Inhumiinus. * Infecundus. Indiligenter.. Insalubris. Irmocens. Infensus. . c. inferior. c. Inhumiine. Ingens. 8. c. Infirmus. Ingratus. Insidiosus. Inflatus. e. Insatiabtlis. Indecenter.c. Insane. Indnlgens. c. c. Infidelis. Inepte. Indocte. Indulgenter. Inimicus. Inferus. inferius. Inique. c. Infestus.122 Guide to Latin Conversationc I nfortuniitus e Infrtquenso Ingeni6sus. Iriquietus. * Injurius.

c. c. Internperatus. Intolerabtlis. Intestabllis. c. c. Labori6se. 8. Intorte. c. Integer. Justus.8. Irisperiite. Integre. Inutiliter. Intemperantel'. Jejiine. c.C01nparat~ves and Superiaiioee. 8. Insolenter. Interne. Jactans. c. inttme. Invahdus. Insipiens. J uvenilis. Invite. Insignitus. Juste. interior. Insulse. Irisigntter. 8. Instructus. Junctus. Intolerans. Jucunde. C. . c. c. Inusitate. Irate. . Iritensus. Iracunde. Inutflis. Irrvitus. Irrevocabllis. c. intl.J ucundus. 111tractabflis. Involfitus. Iracundus. 8. Jocose. interius. Juratus. Iratus. 123 t" Inverecundus. C. c. c. Instanter. Irritatus. Insolens. Intoleranter. c. C. 8. c. * Insperatus. i psisslmus. Instructe. Jactanter. c. Intern perans. Leete. Irrvidiosus. Invidi6se. c.8. c. Jejiinus. Instans. c. [mus. c. Juvenis. Internus. * Ipse. Intense. Laborifisus. Invisus. Inusitiitus. Leetus. Insulsus.

Laxe. e.Oonvereation. Langulde. Liqurdus. Longinque. Leniter. Liberaltter. Longus. Languldus. Leptdus. Longe. Late. Magniflcus. Luctuosus. Levis. Laudabilrter. Licentel'. Livtdus. c. Lenis. c. Laute. c. Laudate. Laxus. Libere. Liber.. c. c. Lectus. Leete. Lautus. Liberiitus. Lanugin6sus. Macer. Madtdus. Magniffee. Lascivus. Liberalis. Litteriite. Libidin6sus. Licens. Lucrosus. c. c. Lutulentus. . Licentiosus. Largus. Loquax.124 GU1·dc to Latin. c. Longinquus. Liqulde. s. Litteriitua. . c. c.c. Luxuriose. Luculentus. Laudabllis. Limpidus. c. Lucrdus. c. Limate. Levtter. c. c. c. Luxuri6sus. c. Laxiitus. Large. Limiitus. Laudatus. Locuples.. Libenter. c. Latus. Libens. Leptde. Lente. Luctuose. c. Lentus. Luclde.

M uscosus.. J\1isere. c. Mendrcus. Modulatus. Malitiose. Mundus. Malevolens. Mer'lto. C. Magnus. \{. Mollis. c. Mendosus... Mirabiltter. Moriitirn.7 ana Snperlativeso I t 125 Magnopere. maximopere. pejus. Meriicus. s. J\1:iserabllis. 8. c. pesslme. Morose. maxi... Malignus. Mi1'abllis. plus. c. [mus. c. 8. c. 8. 8. Miserlcors.. Modestus. Merrtus. pesstmus. s. Momoriitus. Modulate.Mansuete. c. major. Maligne.' . Mite. s. Mansuetus. Maleflcus. Morosus. plurtmus. Miser. s. Minaclter. c. Miniitus. maxfme. Minute. Male. Molestus. Manifeste. MunifIcus. Maledicens. Mend6se. Miriflcns. Memorabtlis. Miscrabiltter. Mature. Mitis. c. c. Munitus. Mortalis. . plus. s. Mordax. Modeste. c. Moderiitus. pejor. Moleste. Minax. Multus. Moderate. c. plurtmum. Manifestus. Multum. Malus. MobIlis. s. c. Magis.8. c. Mendax.1 Oon~parative8 . Matiirus. Moillter. c. Monstruosus. Munite. Mordacrter. c.

e. s. c. N egligenter. Obtfisus. Nobllis. Mutabllis. Negltgens. c. Offensus. Obesus. Obstiniitus. c. Oeeulte. c. Obscenus. N upel'. Niger. Officiose. Obsoletus. Oculfi tus. Obfirmatus. Nudus. N ominatus. Numerosus. Omissus. Notus. Obsciirus. s. neNequiter. c. Oceupatus. s. c. s. obeeriitus. : Obscene. s. c. N otabiltter. N efandus. [quisslmus. Odoratus. No bilfter.zon" * * Obedienter. s. Obediens. * Ooulissim us. c. N otabilis. c. Nasiitus. Obstinate. <Vbligatns. Co Onerosus. . Opacus. s. Occultus. Novus. Oclter. c. e. Nove. c. Nitrdus. Noxiosus. ocysslmus. N egotiosus. nequior. Observans. Odiosus. Nitens. Nequam. Numerose. Nervose. Obsolete. Obsequenter. c. Ocyor.126 G1~ide to Latin Con ve1'sat. Obscure. nuperrnne. s. c. Officiosus. N ervosus. N eglectus. c. Noxius. Notatus. Observanter. c. Obsequens. Operosus.

Perj iirus. Parvus. Pacate. e. Pesttlens. minus. Patens. Pecuniosus.Pertmax. s. Perennis. Perseverans. Persequens. s. Patienter. Perturbjitus. Perluctdus. c. Otiosus. Pettilans. Parce. c. Pervicacrter. Parcus. Paratus. Opinlus. Periculosus. Pallidus. min. c. Ornatus. ~aditus. 127 I I . Optabllis. c. Parvum. Penttus. Perdttus. Patiens. Persuasus. Pauci. Pervulgiitus. [mus. Opulentus. Pertinaclter. c. Pervtcax. s. c. Perseveranter. Perfidi5se. e. Patenter.CompaTatives and Superlatives. c. Perfectus. j . Optablliter. Pauper. Parate. [Ime. Ornate. Opportiine. Peritus.. Periculose. Perite. Perversus. mint. e. Pensus. c. Pernicrter. c. c. Pavfdus. Pernici5sus. Ordiniitus. Perfidiosus. Pervagiitus. Penetraliac. I t Operase. Opulente. Perspectus. Optiitus. minor. Opini6sus. Pauperius. * Perfecte. Pernici5se. c. c. Opportunus.

Placate. c. Pius. Pressus. Profundus. Probe. Plaefdus.Procli vrter. e. c. postremo.8. Prrenobllis. Pilosus. Populiiris. 8~' Politus. Plactde. c. Plane. 8. c. Planus. Co Prrefracte. Portentosus.'cHire. Procere. Procax. Porrectus.128 G aide to Latin Conversation Prreeliirus. . c. . Presse. Probus. Probabflis.Prresens. Profligiitus. Posterns. . Portuosus. c. 8. c. Co Prrepollens. Co Productus. Plene. c. Polite. * Polhitus. Potis. Piger. c. Preestabtlis. Placabtlis. Pravus. Prave.Prrestans. Profluenter. [postremum. Prrecellens. c. c. '?otenter. Procaetter. c. 8. Proclivis. 8. Probiitus. Potius. Ponderosus. Preti5sus. Petulanter.8. Pigre. Potens. Procerus. [tremus. Prcx. 6. Preefractus.o. Prrestanter. pos. Pollenter. Plumbosus.. c. Pinguis. Plenus. Profunde. Preti5se. Producte. Placatus. c. Posterius. posterior. Probabiltter. Pie. c.

Qurcstuose. proxPropensus~ c. Projectus. Recens. 9 . Recte. Pumflus. Pudenter.s. Putus. Protectus. [Ime. 8. Quietus. Pugnaclter. c. Purgiitus. Qurcstuosus. Quiete. * Proffisus. Providenter. Raeemosns. c. ProIixe.Con'tparatives and Superlatives. Ramosus. c. 8@ Rectus. Propense. c. Proterve. Proffise. c. Prompte.. c. PrOll1ptuS. . c.. prope. 8. Pugnax. Pudens. Puerilis. Putldus. proxfmus. Propinquus. propius. PrOlulnens. Pronus. Prudens. Refertus. Pumicosus. Properans. Raptde. Pulchre. Rapax. Purus. Prosper. Rarns. Prudenter.e. c. c.. Recondltus.. Pure. Properanter. Refuse. Pudicus. Rare. Recenter. Proptor. Prospere.8. c. Qnresitus. Raptdus. Reductus. Prolixus. 129 Pulcher. c. C. c. c. Protervus. Pudice. c. Putrde. Provectus. Provldens. Rancldus.

Sane. c. Scienter. Scelestus. Rigfdus. Resinosus. Ridiculosus. Retractatus. Sagax. Breve. Scelerfite. Remisse. B. Sahiber. Scite. Salubrlter. Rubens. saturior. Restricte. Sancte. Resolutus. Rugosus. Sapiens. Srevus. B. Retractus. Salutaris. c. c. Sciens. Satior. . Remotus. c. c.130 Guide to Latin Conversation. Saturatus. B. Satius. Reverenter. Sapienter. Satur. Sanabilis. Remissus. Rustfce. Scitus. Salse. Sanus. Sceleratus. c. Robustus. Sagactter. B. * Sacrilegus. *Sapl'dus. TUg-rde. Salax. Rufus. Sacer. B. Religiose. Reverens. c. Ret'i'~~~~lS. c. c. c. Remote. c. Restrictus. Req uietus. Rubel" Rubicundus. Scrupulosus. c. B. * Sapfde. Scaber. B• Salsus. c. 8. Sacriitns.. Regalis. c. c Sanctus. B. c. Rldiculus. Seepe. . e. Rotundus. Religiosus.

Contparatives and Superlatives. c. c. Serenns. c. c. SordIdus. Secundlls. Sincerus. Solfdus. Spoliiitus. Secretns. Splendrdus. Sero. 8. c. Sequax. Soliitus. c. Solerter. Simplex. c. Sonans. c. Sollicltus. Speci6sns. c. Seductus. Spectiitus. Similtter. Spurcus. Solers. Scrupul6se. 8. Segnlter. Spissus. Squalldus. Spectate. Simpliclter. senior. Separatim. e. c. Severe. c. Splendlde. Sinu6se. c. Sparsus. c. c. Spati6se. Signiflcans. Sequins. 131 Soltde. c. Sedutns. c. Silvester. Secreto. Siccus. Secunde. c. Sediti6se. Stabtlis. 8. c. Sene x. Severns. Spinosus. c. Socordlter. . Sequior. Splendens. Soliite. Segnis. Secure. c. Significantel'. Squallde. Stabiliter. Servans. Berns. Spati6sus. Sediti6sns. c. Securus. Spisse. Solltcite. Spurce. Speci6se. Simllis. c. c. Sincere.

C. Strigosus. c. Snmmisse. c. c. Studiosus. c. Substrictns. Tardus. c. c. Tempestivus. Subtillter. Succensns. Tenere. c. s. Tenax. s. T~citurnus.Strictus. SubHitus.1. Superbus.Streuuus. Tensus. Temperi. c. c. temperi us. Stolrdus. c. Subjecte. Superus. 'I'emperanter. c. c. Suspieiosus. Suspectus. c. Temperans. Temperate. Stupfd us. Tenaclter. (111US. Submissus. Suavfter. Sublate. Teptde. Suhmisse. 32 Guide to Latin Conversation. Stoillachose. c. Surnptuose. Tener. superior. Snhl'in1is7 c. Tenuis. Tectus. s. superior. c. Tecte.Sublestus. Tarde. Sterooriitus. ~{. Superans. Stulte. Tene bricosus. Stultus. c. Supinus. Sublimtter. Suavis. Tenufter. oX· Suspensus. c. c. Snperbe. TepIdus. Suspiciose. Tempestive. ~{. ~{. Sterllis. e. Tern peratus. Studiose. su prerne [and supremum. . Stomachosns. Subjectns. supreSu per. Subtilis. s. Sublime. Surdus. c. c.

* Tersus. c. c. Vegetus. Utflis. c. Tute. s. 136 '7 . Vere. Veneniitus. Vafer. Valde. Usitiitus. Valens. c. Usitiite. Vallde. c•. s. Uberior. [Ultllll0 and ultunum. Umbrosus. verbose. Verecunde. Turbulentus. Verisimflis. 8. c. Vehemens. Tutus. Venustus. c. Venosus. 8. Vanus. Unguino~us. Verecundus. Turbl'dus. Te stat us. c. Turpis. ulterius. V ersiitus. Veternosus. Utens. Vecors. 8. Vaste. c. ultlme. 8. Venuste. Verbosus.Cornparatives and Superlative8. Turbiitus. Teres. Urbiine. c. Turplter. c. Veloclter. U tIliter. Venerabtlis. ultfrnus. Valenter. Ulterior. Vaeuus. Teter. TJberius and uberrlme. alfdus. Vendibl'lis. Verus. c. Urbanus. s. *Vestitus. c. Turbulente. c. Tt>rribl'lis. Vera x. Vehementer. c. Unctus. Ultra. teretior. Ventosus. Velox. Vastus. Vetus. Tetre.

c. SG * V oluptu6se. Vivax. Vetuste. Violenter. Vetustus. Villo~:. Vulgatus.134 Guide to Latin Oonversatio1t. Viridis. Villis. c. Virillter. Vigllans. Vieinus. . V ocabtlis. c. Vociilis. Vin6sus. Virtde. Vivldus.: Vigilanter. c. Violentus. Vivlde. *Voluptu6sus. So Vorax. Vihter. Viti6se. Viti6sus. c.us.

al. to be cold.to. to ql'olV ui). alttum and altum. Algeo.clothe. to ward off. to auraet. aftligere. amictum. annui. arcui. allicere. to cover. tum. abscondi. afflic. allexi. apergere. and amixi (rare). A perio. abscondltum. to consent to condnct. Affiigo. Annuo. anxi. to 135 . to accord. adolescere. A bscondo. to choke" to suffocate. adipisci. affiixi. VERBS WHOSE PRETERITES AND SUPINES MAY PRESENT DIFFICULTIES TO BEGINNERS.VERBA QUORUM PRlETERITA ET SUPINA TIRONIBUS DIFFICULTATIS ALIQUID AFFERRE POSSUNT. to do. to come in contact with.llicio. Arceo. amicire. to hide. annuAgo. abscondere. to acquire. tum. to nourish. . to seduce. agere. to ooerAngo. allec. allisi. allidere. arcere. aperui. alere. to open. ad ultum. adeptus sum.egi. to remove. Adipiscor. throw. alui. actum. A. ado levi. Adolesco.tum. amicui. alsi. Amicio. Alo. allisum. angere. alsum. Allido. aperire. ere.

repress. compescere. censum.'Jcthe7·. Cano. colere. to take e-ire. captum. carpsi. censere. coalui. Como. cessum. eoncrevi. Coerceo. Bibo. claudere. to sltui: Coalesco. compi'gi. Comminiscor. to beIwl(i. cessi. Arguo. Ccepio. . aspexi. comsi and compsi. Comperio. calere. cautum. to culiieaie.g.136 Guide to Latin (kmoereation. to tear away. to contain. t» accuse. eretum. comtum and comptum. to drink. collisi. cresum. Claude. compactum. avere. Cedo. osedere. concretum. canere. aspectum. Cado. to drn». comminisci. casum. ceeptum. to thrust. Caveo. Aspicio. compertum. comperi. to begin. to comb. cantum. cavere. to p?'ove. coercui. auxi. Augeo. capere. commentus sum. to suike. crevi. to discover. collisum collidere. auctum. to learn. Censeo. cenere. to think: Cerno. bibi. coalere and coalescere. Compesco. . Credo. argui. st. cadere. censui. co-pare. concreFcere. coercttnm. cecidi. calui. Carpo. cedere. to qice way. calescere. tn iureu. to fall. bibitum. bibere. carptum. cecldi. to cut. coercere. colui. to go. 'augere. argiitum.coepi. to coufin e.Aveo. compescui. ceotni. to be uiarm. to g1'OW up. arguere. coalttum. clausi. Collide. Concresco. clansum. carpere. Capio. to desire eoge1'ly. cepi. comere.' to [/1010 f0. Compingo. Caleo. to sin. comperire. cavi. cultum. aspicere. to see. to dash again. to take. cornpingere. to increase. Colo.

eoquere. Consiimo. cere. eucurri. cretum. to come to. tv seize. cupii and cuconstiire. to run. Cudo. to Deferveo. to consume. coctum. crescere. delevi. condltllll1. Do. conditum.'. condere. eorrexi. consttti. consului. arrire (It. defervere and defervesCoquo. to give. cubltum. eugether. Deleo. concuprvi. concup'itum. crepltum. to cooci. crevi.tum. cubiire. Crepo. credere. congrui. to sum. datum. defervui. cretum. to deContingo. cor. to resound: Cresco. to hide. Condio. credidi. contingere. eudi. to cost. deleCorrtgo. cupitum. to Concupio.cide. condii. demsi and dempsi. decrcvi. dedi. corrigere. correptum. Credo. pivi. Consulo. con. corripere. to g1~OW. biivi.l1lt. to beat. Cupio. to be. consuDecerno. condire. Curro.dere. to decree. cons. to slop. to rectum.Corripio. conSulnptunl. concupere. to attain. confligere. Demo. crepui. tatum and constltum.flictUll1. tactum. lOn::. Consto. to believe. Confligo. currere. consnmpsi. oontrgi. chastise. con. Congruo. dare. and ivi. to cease to boit. corripui.· Condo. demtum and :I·". to cook. cupere. to forge. consulere. Cubo. to destroy. tv season. del ere. condtdi. cusum.~·\: ! . to congruere.lie in bed. to crackle. enbui and eufight. decernere. demere. oonflixi. curconsultull1. erepare. to efface. credltum. to long f01~. coxi. to desire.

descensum. domftum. edere. docui. docere. divisi. to publish. Doceo. elegi. duxi. emunxi. Desmo. dividere. emungere. emi. edtdi. descendere. diremtum and diremptum. Diruo. edltum. Descendo. Edo. dirimere. emptum. depressum. di ligere. to lead. evadere. Divtdo. to cherish. esum and estum. Edo. diri pere. elicui. . edtdi. divisum. Diripio. to grow liard. dilexi. to learn. uiithdroso. erui. emunctum. to shine. desltum. to subcert. destlti. Disco. Eruo. to choose. direptum.. Duresco. domiire. dolere. Eluceo. Elicio. to go out. doctum. eligere. to es- cape. eruere. elisum. Dirlmo. dnrui.evasum. ductum. Deprtmo. to dras» out. to separate. Elido. Ellgo. to be in pain. Emungo. to say. to destroy. to depress. to part. discere. enecare. eluxi. de-istere. didfci. elisi. to sink. enecatum and enectum. Duco. demptum. to dioide. to qliiie:. electum. eliottum. Doleo. to descend. dolttum. to eat. deprimere. ducere. to blow the nose. dilectum. to teach. to draw out. edere. durere and durescere. elucere. to buy. desivi and desii. to desist. to elect. Domo. descendi. tofill. diremi. domui.138 Guide to Latin Oonoersaiion. dicttum (ra. En~c~ enecui.re). desinere. to tame. Diltgo. Emo.to grind. dirui. Eviido. Desisto. to demol'ish. elidere. dirtitum. emere. dolui. diruere. tobruise. demere. to cease. destttum. diripui. to lew' asunder. evfisi.depressi. to remove. elicere. ern tum.

Findo. finxi. flectere. Figo. explevi. ferire. fremere. to strike. to tremble. to 'Weep. Explode. fidere. Expleo. experrectus sum. findere. Fremo. to disapproveExprlmo. Expergiscor. flevi. frae. exeellere. expressi. fodi. florui. expletum. to cleave. . to excel. to fl'ep1'esent. to break." to rub. fingere. fotum. to awake. exprimere. favi. to leaip forth. expergisci. to flourish. to express. to hiss. to deceive. explodere. to curb. fregi. to confess. to make. florere and floreseere. expressuID. Farcio. figere. latum. to enquire. fassus sum. explere. fictum. ExsiIio. expl6si. farsi. fletum. fremui. Exquiro. to plant. to confide. fremltum. fovi. Exsero. Fingo. exquisitum. fissum. Fido. to seek again. fixum. Foveo. Ferio. frieui. fluxi." Falla. Fodio. to feign. to stnj]' to fill. exserui. to go out. flexi. exquirere. excellui. Faveo. fodere. ferre. Flecto. to favor. flexum. Frendo and frendeo. 11 uxum. to fix. exserere. 13~ Fero. fovere. to fill again. exsilii and exsilui. f1'icare. fateri. to put forth. to gnash the teeth. tuli. farcire. Excello. exquisrvr. f uere. to bear. exsultum.tUl11. Fateor. fautum.Verbs. fisus sum. Frango. Frieo. fallere. to inflarne. to dig. frendere and frendere. exsilire. fartum. to bend. fefelli. fidi. explosnm. flere. frangere. fossum. fricatum and frietum. toflow. exserttnu. favere. Fleo. Floreo. falsum. fixi. FI no.

to . genftum. to 1J1'op. gerere. indultum. fugcre. incidere (~ado). fusum. horrere and horrescere. Haurie. jutum. gessi. icere. hanstum. juvi. impingere. Heereo. j actum. to draw up. to reclime.. Impingo.~. Incido. gelllere. to fall. to st1'ike. impegi. to stick. to lie on. incubui. in tuftus SUIll. J aceo. fulci. Gemo. to'walk. jacui. iriitus. to look with attention. to throui. to pardon. indulsi. Fulgeo. ignovi. gemttum. Indulgeo. inctdi. to fall 'LtpOIl. fulgere. . fulsi. horrui. to get a1lfJ1'y. iei. jed. Jubeo. J uvo. Gradior. Fnndo. Incumbo. irasci. \ugltu:m. fulcire. haurire. ingrui. to cast. to attack. etc. to throw. . to groan. Ignosco. lad bi. hresum. to pOU1'. to ca1'ry on. to order. to exert ouesel]. to enjoy. to stay. Horreo. hausi.fron~. ignocere. Irascor. fudi. to bring [orth.'I. l~ l)SUS sum. indulgere. I ngruo. jubere. heesi. incubnum. hrerere. to shine. Fulcio. to advance. jacere. Gero. to cut. fugi. J acio. gressus sum. to be indv}geut touard. to hesitale. incidere (ccedo). to produce. gradi. sum. gestum. ign6tum. to briqhien. incisum. leo. jUSSlUl1. frui. I ntueor. Intueri. to aid. genui. ietum. Labo. gignere.to foll. Gigno. Fruor. jaeere. fUltUIU. to stand on end. juYare. to lie doum. gemui. Fugio. ingruere. to uoumd. inCU1l1 bere. jnssi.140 Guide to Latin Conversation. fruttus and fructus sum. incidi. impactum. fundere. Iricfdo.

to siiine. messui. metuere. to wound. to Idde. . mensus sum. linqnere. to mope. misertus sum. moltturn. langui. mulcere. Maneo. movere. missum. neciitum and neeturn (rote). metlri. to harvest. Misereor. . memordi. nectere.. to lick. mordere.Jatui. to mix.mulsum. 1(. 10 chew. lucero. nexum. lredere. metere. 1110 rsum . misi. Lino. nexui. liqui. luxi. Iitum. movi. lavi. Lambo. 111an- Misceo miscui. to wash. linere. Mando. Medeor. to SUIll. . necare. mittere. Moveo. to [ear. N ecto. mixbun and mistum. Metno. N anciscor. lautum and lotum. Mordeo. to cover. Mergo. Linquo. to lang!t£sh. to measure. molere. Mcereo. to ploy.141 Lredo. to carefor. to pltiJnge. Lavo. to 'Weep. munere. 111ansum. Luceo. N eco. mettitum.to milk. mulgere. Mitto. lambere. Malo. Langneo. Mulgeo. levi and livi. to bite. mersum. to aff! ict. luxi. to send. mulsi. to leaoe. to cure. miscere. to lunie pity. to qrind. necni and neciivi.uo knot. Ludo. languere. to join. to dwell. to find. mersi. mergere. mederi. luetum. mansi. lavere and la vare. mulxi and mulsi. mrestus sum. Iresi. lugere. mandi. to smear. stun. mundsre. _ Lateo. mcercre. latere. Meto. ill. lusi. messum. Lugeo. Metior. Iambi. Isesum. Mulceo. lusum. metui. mulctum and mulsum. misereri.nactus nancisci.Judere. to caress. motum. 1110lui.

evident. Pango.toerase. Operio. parcere. pexum and pectltum. parttum. pacisci. Ifni. to marts). Obllnio. pactus sum. to know. to be obsolete. obsedi. to bring forth. nubere. pulsum. opertum. blivisci. obsidere. to begin. parere. parui. novi. Obliviscor. to cover. to ~t1'ive. orsus sum. negligere. nuptum. pactum. evi. obsolevi. operui. to be born. oblinere. nupsi. pellere. obIinire. Ordior. pepuli. Paciscor. peperi. to be- ° Sl. to strike. Nosco. Pando. to hide. to forget. to extend. pellexi. to N egllgo. to treat. partum. to comb. pandere. ortus sum. pandi. to beopen. pectere. ' Obsoleo. Pello. Pario. olere. livi. Obsideo. occulere. Occtilo. Orior. oriri. notu 111. to spread an odor. peperci and parsi (old). olui. pexi and pexui. neglexi. . pangere. to obey. Paveo. pa tui. to fasten in. Pasco. to layover. spare. ObM soletum. pellectum. nisus and nixus sum. pavi. to nourish. nocere. neglectum. Oleo. to harm. pascere.142 Guide to Laii'n Ooncereotion. to neglect. pansum and passum. nocni. Pareo. to omoini. Pateo. obS~SSU11l. noscere. pastum. oblinivi. panxi 01' peplgi. pavere.egl'. Obltno. operire. niti. oecului. parere. Nitor. obsolere and obsolescere. patere and patescere. pavi. Pecto. Noceo. oblttnm. 01'diri. 6Ccultum. nocitum. pellicere. to be afraid. parcttum and parsuID. to push. Nubo. oblitus sum. Parco. Pellicio. to attract.

pictum. percellere. poscltum. to be suspende(/. posttum. to poumd. prtestiire. proripere. polire. pinsitum and pistum. Perdo. petitum. pcrdttum. petere. potatum and potum. poscere. poll ere. perCUSSUll1. plausum. petii. pinsui. to ~()h1:P. pop asci. to beat. Percutio. pransum. poll uere. Posco. . pinsere. to drag alotu]. Proripio. to rest. to discover. prodttum. pingere. Pono. premere. Poto. to breokfast. Peto. pnestiti. to prick. profectus sum. Prodo. to weigh. to drtuofrom. pinxi. to surpass. proreptum. potare. to press. Plaudo. to ask. ponere. prrestttum and prrestatum. Proficiscor. . to hang. and petivi. perdere. politum. Prtesto. Polleo. pollui. plaudere. Pendeo. Polio. prodere. Plecto. pependi. promsi and prompsi. to place. punctum. pendere. to spoil. Pinso. polhitum. to applaud. prortput. potavi. to seek. prorntum and promptum. promere. plausi. plectere. percussi. to punish. pinsum. to paint. perculi. pependi. pungere. pendere. to polish. to stiug. to st'l'ike. Prandeo. to drink. to depart. Promo. pel'CUISUlll. to ask. Pungo. to lake off. to qritui. .Verbs. penSUIll. perdtdi. polivi and poIii. to "be 143 powmfu1• Polluo. to lose. proficisci. prandi. Premo. posui. Percello. prandere. pressi. Pendo. Pingo. presSUIll. pereutere. prodtdi. to excel. pupngi and punxi.

ruftum and rutum. Queror. to full doum. to blunt. rep ere. to Iauph. to recoiled: Repo. quatere. respexi.144 Guide to Latin Conuersaiion. rapui. to compluin: Quiesco. Rodo. Quatio. to freeze. ruere. Resipio. Respuo. to think. to (J'J1~'u:eT. reptum. to look at. 1'etundere. 1'0'" dere. rumpere. rectdi. to g'l/CLW. recidere (creJu). repsi. recidere (caelo). to CTO'l. risi. Retundo. to reiqn. rosi. respondi. refellere. recisum. to break. to g1've buck. ridere. to 1'~f1Jt('. Rapio. to beur away. reddere.Cl. to «cek. rexi. to Rego. risum. reddfd i. to repel. quietUIH. to SC1'(/pe off. Respondeo. q uestus sum. ((J fee'. pntrui. Respicio. rapturn. respectum. salire. reciisum. Reor. Rigeo. recidi. responsum. putrcre and putrescre. salitum. regere. salii and salui. tojU1np. Recido. respuere. rectum. qurerere. resipere and resi piscere. queri. Heminiscor. Ruo. to rusls forth. rasi. to ('U/ (df: Reddo. Rumpo. rui. respicere. Salio. Recrdo. to se]Jurate. Refello. rigere and rigescere. to relapse. rasum. Putreo. to reject. Rideo. quievi. saIii and saIivi. reminisci. to rest: Rado. quresitu In. resipui. . to salt. to rot Qusero. ruptum. ratus sum. respondere. to repulse. Sallio. quassum. cut. rigui. respui. reri. qurosivi. t0 ~J/(( ke. saltum. salire and sallire. to believe. rad~re. rosum. retndi. ra pere. q uiescere. rupi. rcddtturn. retiisum and retunsum.

serptum. singultire. • Ssntio. to moalloio. senere and senescere. sessum. stare. aarcire. senui. Singultio. Spuo. to perceive. to sat/sly· Scindo. solvi. sistere. Sepio. sprevi. to grow (}l~. sed ere. to decide. solvere. soliitum. to creep. spui. sorbui. Soleo. satum. Serpo. sertum. to permit. to rimq: Sorbeo. sonui. Senesco. septum. serui. Sarcio. sancitum and sanctum. to deepise. seisc~re. steti. to groan. Sono. solere. fo C11Jt. . to cut oj: Sedeo. sepelire. sartum. Sciseo. to sit down. Solvo. Sido. sevi. to untie. spuere. splendui. serpsi. sivi. sectum. · Splendeo. secui. to repair. Sto. spopondi. serere. saU~gi. Seeo. to stand. satactUlH. statum. to surround. stiti. sonttum. Sepelio. scissum. sarci. sidere. sessum. sci vi. Sisto. to spit. sorbere. sedi. statum. to stop. soniire. Sero. solrtus sum. scidi. Satilgo. serpere. seeare. sensum. to interlace. to solemnly promise. to hate a relish. Sapio. to sa1. to {eel. topiece. sapere. sinere. scitum. to be accustomed. tu decree. sepelii and sepeE vi.LCtion. sensr. spondere.Verbs. to establish. SputUIU. Sperno. in deuue. to sob. sorptUlTI. situm. to burs}. serere. scind~l'e. to sound. sanxi. Sancio. to break. spernere. to sit down. to think. Spondeo. to glisten. 10 145 Sero. sent ire. satagere. to shine. to sow. splendere. sidi and sedi. sepsi. sapivi and sapui. sepultum. Sino. saneire. sponsum. sepire. to be ioise. spretUIU.

textum. suasum. tondere. Stringo. strnxi. Struo. tendere. tabui. torsi. surrectum. Tondeo. Tango. suctum. torsum and tortum. to melt away. timui. tectum. surgere. to be silent. sumsi and sumpsi. tergere and tergere. to persuade. tonsum. to resmuid. to reecho. structum. susttili. to bear U'way. torrui. to thumder. to hold. tonare. Surge. temtum and tomptum. to weave. Torreo. Strepo. to d1'y. tangere. to snore. tensum. tingere. taeere. Sterno. texui. to despise. SUIno. to sheor~ Tono. totondi.146 Guide to Latin Coniereaiion. to draw together. strinxi. temsi and tempsi. tersi. tetlgi. ter~re. sumere. to st'udy. to resounui: Strideo. strepui. tetendi. tonttum. tenere. tactum. strictUI11. stertui. to clean Tero. to spread. Tingo. strepere. tin xi. to fear. strepttum. surrexi. subliitum. tollere. texere. suiisi. to 1'0(18t. Sugo. Sterto. to be torpid. sternere. Torqueo. to twigt. tenui. torrere. tacui. taottum. stratUITI. to rub. Tendo. 'I'exo. to construct. suxi. torpere. texi. torpui. to dye Tollo. studui. . Tabeo. tostum. stertere. to rise. Studeo. Taceo. to Sl1'etch out. Tergeo and tergo. to poundo Timeo. to bind. Suadeo. tentum. Torpeo. trivi. ton ui. studere. suadere. tritum. temnere. stringere. sumptum. 'I'emno. tegere. timere. to take. stridere. tinctum. f0 suck. to touch. torquere. tentum. tersum. struere. to cover. sugere. to grind. stravi. tab ere. Tego. Teneo.

Video. ursum. venttum. to swelt. vomrtum. vendttum. to be strong. Veto. Transilio. to 1'OW. tutiidi. to an?int. votum. 147 to Vendo. USSI. volvere. to sell. v erto. to strilce. vi vere. Vineio. visum. to conquer. ursi. vellere. Verro verri versum verrere. avenge. to vomit. veni re. to knot. to shove foruxird. Veneo. trusi. vietum. . Vineo. D ngo. to examine. tursi. to draw. Volvo. vulsum. to urqe. vinxi. turgere. to tremble..p off. ' . volui velle. traxi. vendere. to dros» forth. vol vi. vidi. vomui. vomere. V 010. to visit. vinetum. to use. 'to swe. Vivo. Valeo.VerOs. to see. tultus SUIll. vetui. to wish. ungere. to feed on. trudere. . to protect. to burn. usus SUIll. to make a vow. to turn round: Vomo. trusum. to draw. vehere. transultunl. Tueor. Traho. to pre"'~'4 Utor. _ Turgeo. to be sold. to live. vetare. V oveo. Urgeo. uti. ultus sum. videre. visum. vixi. Tundo. tueri to amsider. ulcisei. Trudo. rrahere. to tie. Veho. vietum. versum. ·Uleiseor. viei. vincere. transilire. verti. tunsum and tusnm. visere. visi. Vello. vexi. to forbid. ustum. valui. vetrtum. urgere. valere. voliitum. veetum. well. vertere. U1'0. urere. to turn. vendidi. Visa. tundere. unxi. velli and vulsi. transilii and transilui. vovi. un ctu Ill. to leap. vincire. Veseor. Tremo. venii and veni vi. transili vi. vesei. treJIlere. traetum. vovere. tremui.

for two persons or things. I wish to know what he . eequisnam. ecqu. expect an affirmat.DE RATIONE INTERROGANDI ET SPONDENDI PRlECEPTA QUlEDAM. quienani ecquie.-QUESTIONS. I. The indirect question is al ways expressed by a subordinate proposition. RE~ GRAMMATICAL' CONSTRUCTION OF QUESTION AND ANSWER. The following pronouns and adverbs are often used in direct questions: QI1'. There are two kinds of questions: the direct and the indirect. subject or object of a verb of asking.isnmn.:ng. or the genitive case. 2. l uier.:. 'leU me 'Who you are. 1. The direct question is put thus: WHO ARE YOU? WHAT IS HE DOING? ~ I. WHO YOU ARE. Quid tibi videtnf? (Oie.ive - 148 .S. WHAT HE IS DOING. In the seutences .) How Eequi«. is used alone or is followed by a substantive in the nominative. the accusative. are indirect questions. 1 answe~ Qwid. ecquo.-DIRECT QUESTIONS.~ do. ecquando.

ut.Question and Answer. quantum. uirubi.?' me excrucio t (Cie. for price. quemadmodum.) TVlzy d'issimulate '! (Ju. quamdsulum.LaJlto. quo. quoreus.s. 'I'!": teni. qui. for dhnensions. unde.)lVhat is YOU?' namer QllId tn hnminis es t (Ter. qna. we always employ in prose It personal mood.in the eases which have the same form for the masculine and neuter. Tfho speaks lieret Qui tu es hOlUO? Who are you? Quis hie est homo? Who is this mom here? Qurenam audiam? What am I to hear if does it look. motive.cqno.. ql. ecquando.. quotuplex. uirobi. cuju«. utro. for possession. for time. 149 quoli. value. quorsUdn. in comparisons. for country. Ter. est? (Plaut. to yf)?t? Quid Ubi nomen. quot. quomodo.. quantity. f. quotus. for quality. cujae.2 for manner and instrument. quotuplus. quantus. for place. for cause. quamobrem. Tel'. Quodscelus commtstt? What crime has he committpd? Interrogative pronouns are used only with nouns which ate e.? de quo loqueris If 2 With how.e1'is? and not Oti stude. why. as Ow Simulas? (Tel'.x:pressed. quanti. for number. qU(i1n. CW'. quamdiu. ubi. quoties.) WIlY torment me? . Quis hie loquitur? Tel'. quw'e. 'rhus we say: Qui rei stlldesf de qua re lnq/f. quin.. in Latin.) lV!l.quando.at man art thmt? Quodis always followed by a substantive in the same ease.

/ Whose flock? Cujates estis? Front 'what couni?'y are you? Vir. Plaut.dJ Quid tibi vis? Quid feci? What do you wish.re Quanti emisti? How much have you poid fo» it? Hora quota est? Quint.Quidnam ineepturus est? What 'is he to undertake. .gh.'. Tel'. Ubi vidisti? Ubi qureram? Tel'. W hat time is it? Oujum peeus? .6l Why silent? Ex duobus uter dignior? Which is the uiorthier . HoI'. Whe?'e have you seenit? Where shall I seeklit? Quo hine te agis? Whither a1'e you going! Tel'.re What have I done? Quid est? Quid rides? Quid taees? What is us Why lct1/.

When the answer to a question is doubtful. au. nonne. 3. Mrecenus? Tel'. When the pronouns and adverbs just enumerated are not used. may be employed. Whence does he depart? fVhence did you learn. that ~ Quorsum heeopertinent? Cic. What is the d1'ift of this talk? Quando gentium? Plaut. 151 Unde egreditur? Unde id scis? Tel'. Tel'. ne or an is used. When then? Quandiu nos eludet? Bow long shall he make sport of 'Us P Cur simulas igitur? Quin taces? Why dissimulate? fVhy are you not silent P Quamobl'em id non facis? Why do you not do this? Ut vales? Qui sciam ? How do you do? I-Iow may 1 know itl Mrecenas quomodo tecum? How is 1:t with you. Tel" Hor. numquul. Cic.QHestioJ~ all d .Answer. the particles ne. ne is always placed after a word. utrum. numna?n. ammon. .

. . tion. and correspond to or. They begin a proposition which stands as an explanation or as an answer to another. Cic. Is it permitied ti good man to lie? Numquid vos duas habetis patrias? Cie.' Plaut. 5." - N urn cadit in virum bonum mentiri ? Cic. Tel'. num. and an. If the answer expected is to be affirmative. 11 uniquid. Have you two courdries f. ?IUrJ11Ulm. are used. are used. an non civis est? Tell me. N onne id satis erat? Was not that enough? 1 An and anntm serve to announce the second part of an Interrogation which has two members. 4. N ovistine Euclionem ? Do you know Eucl£on ? Obsecro. nonne. in the beginning of the sentence. we could not sayan no- visti Eucb"onpm? 2 Numquiii is stronger than num. N umne Deum ipSUIU vidistis? ]-lmle you seen God f. .152 Guide to Latin Oonversation. nUrJ11Ie. If the answer expected is to be negative. I p1'ay you" is he a citizen? Tel'. n ihilne. annon. ordinarily begins a subordinate proposi.

an nostra culpa est? ls it your fault 01' ours! Utrum taceam. Uter popularis est tune. and an before the second. annon? Has hi»[allier returned 01' 153 Tel'.t/~titimne prius mirer beU'lne Iaborusn. Utrum ea vestra. p. Pater ejus rediit.) Must Frather admire thy justice than thy martial deeds? Q71.? 1 Ne. An is sometimes replaced by ne : JI. you or I! Cic. not '! Nequidquam liberum te dicis.'oget If (Tib. (Hellen. an prrodicem? Should I remain silent.) Shall I speak or shall I remain silent? Non mihi respondes if (Ter. is not every jew' a hondage? 6.) What matters it whether he ask in secret or openly' Tel'.) YO'll do not answer me? Ne is always used after a word. an timeam? Should I congratulate. 01~ should I speak. are sometimes understood: Eloquar an silearn? (Virg. utrum. . an ego? Who of the two is popular. 1 Guatulerne tibi. or should I fear you? Cic.id refert clamne palamne .nswer. When the question regards two things or two persons. labores)? (Virg.Question and A. annon est metus omnis servitus? Cie. u[7'U7n or me is used in the first mernbel'. In oai» do you call yourselffree .

annon? Hue hisfather returned. the interrogative pronoun is always followed in indirect questions by the subjunctive. and is construed with the indicative. and Dicam. decernere.. what my thought is. t 1 Indirect questions generally follow the verbs scire.-INDIRECT QUESTIONS.. nouns and adverbs qui. etc. the thing which Lthink. ignora1'e.ings which you do not know. qual-is. quaerere. The relative pronoun should not he confounded with the interrogative pronoun.lI neoertheles« (what?) what Lthink. inte1'1'oga1'e. or not? ~ 2. whether an event has taken place or n. tamen quod sentio signifies 1 will tAU neoerthetes« that which (id quod) It1~ink. d1judlca're. Dicam.entiam is here the object of the verb dicam. »e-cire. 7. being placed at the end. as in direct. . deuberare. used. etc. what thing Ithink. 8~ In indirect questions. 1 will tP. Sunt haec tua verba necne? A1'e these your words or not ? Bellum indicimus annon? Shall we declare war 01' not? Pater ejus rediit. When we ask whether a thing exists or not.ot. Likewise.The relative pronoun bas an antecedent expressed or understood. CUI'. necne 01' ammon. tamesi quid sentiam. Quid ::.154 Guide to Ledin Conversation. while Scio quae tu nescias signifies I know what the things are which you do not know. the sentence is expressed as a simple affirmation. . the pro . are. videre. Cic Cici Tel'. Thus. Seio quae tu nesci« signifies 1 know tll.

I know not what YOM have don~. and sometimer an may be used.. ue. etc. Quid est causae cur repudietur? What reason.. nonne. Quis ego sim cognosces. When these adverbs and pronouns are not used. is there for rejecting him? 9. are used instead. Quaeritur idemne sit pertinacia et perseverantia . Interrogavit hove an esset latior.Question and Answer. num. Ausculto.Quint. It is asked if obstinewy and perseoeramce are one and the same thing. Tel'. It is asked ·if the Pontine marshee can be drained. an.. SaIl. She asked if she uia« not laroer than the ox. Nescio quid egeris. I listen) set!! what YOM will. 71JUm.. annon. Phaed. loquere quid velis. [Cic. ne. utrum. You know who I am. 155 Cic. If the interrogative sentence consists of but one member. . Quaeritur an siccari palus Pomptina possit.

serui liberine sisu.). aut in musicis contereret (Cic. ille. and 10. an pecuarius r (Cic. an plures? [Cic.' Quis scire possit unusne mundus sit. tempus aut in poetis eootoendt«. IVho can tell whether there be one or many uorlds.) Sometimes the meaning of the sentence demands aut: An. an erator. Cic. Dii utrum sint necne sint quaeritur. regatur. what maurrs it 'IV/If-the/' theN be slaoes 01' freemen r An is repeated before every proposition when there are several of them: Quaeritur an atomorum conCU1'SU mundus sit effectus. Tell me are these simple words or prodigies? 11. 'I/'U1n an at the beginning of the others. num. An is sometimes replaced by ne : Hominibus prodesse natura [uba .) Nature imposee on us the duty of assisting men.56 Guide to Latin Conversation.· Postulo mihi respondeat. ne. ' . numerus lJal' an impar sit incertum est (Cic. ulrunn. quid 1'eje1't'l (Cie. anne are often used for aut. 1 Utrum. It is asked whether or not the gods exist. are used in the first member. I f the interrogation refers to the existence or to the non-existence of a thing. If the question has several members. are sometimes understood: Stellarum. an Prouidentio. ne.1. neene or annon is used. qui sit iste verutius: mercator.)-An. Quaero a te utrum illa verba an portenta sint ? [Cic.). JVe know not 'If the nusuber of the star« be £)ddor even. an sit aUquando casurus (C.

) What am I to do? What could I do ? If.~ 01· the disinterestedness of . In indirect questions the verb is always put in the subjunctive: 1 in direct questions it is put in the indicative. a verb..re (Cic. should we estee'Jn the more. Ellipses are freq aent in answers to questions. . Qui vocare ?-Geta. by a noun. ADJECTIVE. lows is put in the indicative.).Question and Answer.-AN8W ERS. How should I call you? -. a pronoun.). and they should be always taken into consideration when we construe the words expressed. an adverb. Answers to questions are made in Latin. When the tense isconditional : Quem te appeUern.~? 2nd. Tel'. 157 12.F'ab1·iciu. or by a combination of some of these parts of speech. an adjective. When there arises an idea of· doubt. ~ 3.-THE VERB IN QUESTIONS. Nescio quis teneros oculus mihi fascinat agnos. 3. Some evil eye or other bewitches my tender lambs. A. What is your name ?-Geta. I.-THE N0UN. In direct questions the verb is put in the subjunctive: 1st. an continentia-In Fabricii i (Cic. 1 Neseio qu 1s stands for aliquis and the verb which fol. of possibility: Quul faciam?QliJid facerem t (Cic. the treasures of PY7'1"hn.S in English.ND PRO~OUN IN ANSWERS.Utrum plus aesiimemue pecuniam Purrhi. Which.

Whm'e is she?. Estne frater intus ?-Non est (frater intus). Tel'. Tel'. Chreme». Tel'. 2. Tel'. Tel'. Did he depart olone t-s-Alone: Tel'. Is my brother in ? ~ He is not. Who is this ?.Evm'ything.-THE VERB· AND PARTICIPLE IN ANSWERS. .It is 1. Abiitne solus ?-Solus (abiit). Chremes. How much did you pay for it ?-Twenty pounds. apud me. Quanti emisti ?-Viginti minis (emi). Ubi ea est ?-Domi.In my house at home. Where did you see her ?-On the street: Tel'.~~-- 158 Guide to Latin Oonversation. What have you deserved?-The cross. Tel'. Quid meritus es ?-Cl'ueem (meritus su?n). Hare you heard? . Eequis hie est?-Ego sum. Ubi vidisti illam ?-1n via (vidi illa?n). Audivistine ?-Omnia (audivi). Is Simon limP-He 1'S. Estne Simo intus ?-Est (intus Simo). Tel'.

· Question and Answer.
Virgo cuja est?-Nescio. Whose daughter is she?- I knownot. Numquid meministi ?-Id qurero. JJo you not recollect it ?-I am trying to.

159
Tel'. Tel'.

Civis Glycerium est ?-Ita prredicant, Tel'. Is Glyceriurn o. citizen ?-11hey say that sheis. Detraxitne tibi vestem ?-Factum (est hoc). Tel' H<1s he carried. away your clothes ?- Yes. Quid HIe, quseso ?-Perditus (sum, dix'it). What did he say, tellme?-I am lost.
3.-THE 'ADVERB IN ANSWERS.

f I

Ter.

Norasne eum prius?-Non (eum n01'am). Tel'. Did you know him bef01'e?-No. Pro tehuc deductus est ?-Ita (deductus est). Tel'. Was he conducted hitherinstead of you ?- Yes. Intellexistine ?-Pl'obe (intellexi). Did you under~tand it?- Very well. Tel'.

Aperte visne loqui ?-Sane quidem. Tel'. Do youwishme to speak clem'ly ?- Yes, certa~nly.

· 160

Guide to Latin (kmmersaiion,
N umquid vis?-Etiam ('volo). Tel'.

.Po yon wish al1yth/~ng ?-lTes.
N um 'pudet vanitatis ?-Minime (pudet). Do you not blush at YOU?' levity?- No.
Mene q,urerit ?-Verum, Tel'. Tel'.

Is he looktng for me ?- Yes.
4.-ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS MADE 'VITH Qn((li~5

Quantus, ETC. Q'ual'is? . Quant'l.ts! Quot? Quotus? Quoties? Quotenif Quotuplex? Quotnplus? Quotennis? Ovjus? Oujas?
Bonus, peritus, imperitus, etc. Parvus, longus, brevis, etc. Unus, duo, tres, quatuor, etc. Primus, secundus, tertius, etc. Semel, bis, tel', quater, aliquoties, etc. Singuli, bini, terni. Simplex, duplex, triplex, etc. SimpIus, duplus, triplus, etc. Biennis, triennis... Anniculus, bimus, trimus, quadrimus. Meus, tuus, suus, noster, vester, 01' the gen1:tive of a noum : Cujurn peeus? Meum 01' JEgonis. Names of cO/J,ntry, of sect, qf fumily: Italus, Romanus, Stoicus, Ibi, hie, istie, illie, ubique, ibidern, alibi, nusquam, alicuhi, usq uam, foris, etc.

-ou»

Question and Answer.

161

I

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II

I I

Eo, hue, istuc, i llue, quovis, quolibet, eodem, alio, ali quo, quoqualll, quopiam, foras, etc. Inde, hinc, istinc, illinc, unUnde! dique, indiedem, aliunde, alicunde, oeelitus, etc. Ea, hac, istac, illac, qualibet, Qua! eadem, aliq ua, usquequaq ue, recta, dextra, etc. Sursum, deorsum, introrsum, aliQuorsum! orsum, etc. Utroque, utroque versus, neuUtro! tro, etc. Utrobi! utrubi? Utrobigue, neutribi, etc. Hodie, heri, eras, nudius, tertius, Quando! perendie, pridie, postridie, mane, vespere, noctu, interdiu, etc. Aliquandiu, diu, tandiu, semper, Quandiu? paulisper, pammper, etc. Ma~uopere, valde, ornnino, parQuantopere ? tim, etc. AJiquantum, rnultum, parum, Quantum? pauIum, plus, minus, etc. Hactenus, eaten us, magis, satis, Quatenus? nimium, etc. Sic, ita, item, pariter, gratis, Qilomodo? frustra, etc.

11

V ARliE COLLOQUENDI FORMULlE.

DIFFERENT FORMS OF CONVERSATION.

1.
FOR GREETING.

AD SALUTANDUM.

Good-day.-Good-day. Sal ve.-Salve et tu. Good-day, J ohn.-And Salve Joannes.-Et tu Paule. you, Paul. Good-day, my good fel- o salve, bone vir, Curculio exoptiite, salve. low, good-day my dear Curcul ion. I am glad to see you Venire te salvum vohipe est.-Credo, quid well.-I know that, agitur? what is going on ? We rej oice in seeing Salvum te advenire gaudermis. you well. Alfquem salutare ; saliiTo greet anybody. tern alieni dicere dare, ferre, Consalutare inter see To greet one another. Sal vus sis. How-do -you-do? Multam tibi salfitem im I wish you good-day. portio. He came to pay me his Venit ad me salutatum respects.

162

Forms of. Conversation.
Give my regards to Peter. He has sent me his regards through you .: Gi ve h im my regards. Cicero sends his regards. My son Cicero wishes to be remembered to you. . He greets you with his best wishes. interchanging After O'reetingos I set about ~y studies. Good-bye, farewell.

163

Petro meis verbis sahitern adscribe. A te mihi sal iitem di xi t. Sal vere Illum jube meo nomfne. Salvere te jubet Cicero. Salvebis a meo Cicerone. Impertit tibi multum salfitis. Ubi salutatio defluxh, litteris me imolio.. Vale, multum vale; bene vale.

i
I

I

2.
CONCERNING THE HEALTH. DE VALETUDINE.

you getting Ut vales? along? Have you been well all U sque val uisti ? the time? What is your ailment? .Quis te morbus habet? How did you contract Unde istum morbum that disease? contraxisti? I am well. Bene mihi est. I am a little better. Melius, meliuscnle mi.. hi est.

How are

164

Guide to Latin Conversation.
Non plane a morbo convalui, Ninus belle me habes. Sic valeo ut nunquam melius. Quid frater? sal vus est? Ut valet? quid agit? Rectene apud vos? TIi valetur domi vestrre Est i psi recte; belle SE habet; recte valet. Minus valet. Pater comrnoda utttu: valetndtne. Valetudme optlma es affectus. In febrim incidit. Procltvis ad febrim, Febris ex toto quievit evasit, Nausea plane abiit. Ex mtestinis, ex rent bus, podagra laboro Sanguis ei nartbus ma nat, fluit, N artbu sangutnem emittit Laborat ex ocnlis, Dens dolet, dolores me vet.

I am not yet well.
I am not very well. I never felt better.

How is your brother? is he well? How is he? what is he doing? Is everyone well at horne ? He is well.

He is not well.

My father is well.

He is in good health.

He has the fever. He is subject to the
fever. The fever has entirely left him. ' I have no desife to vomit. I have the colic, the gout, the podagra. He has the nose bleed. He has sore eyes. My tooth aches.

-------,,-""""""'----~-------

---

Forms of Conversation.

165

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i.1
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He has fainted. Defecit eum anfrnus. lIe is cured of his sore A b ociilis valet. eyes. . Mcliusctile est. He is a little better. His health was very Perdtta erat valetudtne ; illi erat infirma valepoor. tudo. Tenet eum morlms ; He is sick. regrotat ; morbo laborate ..LEger gravi morbo deHe is very sick abed. cumbit. In morbum delapsum He h~s fallen sick. est, morbo eorreptus est. His sickness beCOlTIeS Ingravescit morbus, worse. He suffers a great deal Magnas artioulorum dolores habet. from the gout. consulere To take care of the Valetudtni servire. health. To recover from a sick- Emorbo emergere, recreiiri ; a morbo recness.

reari.

3.
TO GO, TO PART. IRE,
PROFICI~CI.

us

0-

Quo te agis? Where are you going? I was going to see you. Ad te ibam. Where were you going Quo te hinc agis? quo from here?......... N 0tibi est iter?-Nnsquam; nescio qunrwhere; I know not where to go. sum earn.

166

Guide to Latin Conversation.

Whi ther are you going? Quo tendis? quo te pedes ducunt? quorwhat way are you sum is? going? Where are you going in Quo te rapis? quo te eorrlpis, prorlpis? such a hurry? Where are you going? Quo te capessis ?-Capesso me dOlTIUm. I am going home. Where are you running? Quo eursum, gradum corrlpis? Paulisper mane. Wait awhile. Opperire me parun1per. Wait a minute. I will return immedi- Ego mox hue revertor. ately. I have been waiting a J amdudum expecto. long time, I do not know the way. Non no vi viam, What road shall I Quam viam insistam? take? Did he go this way or Hac aut illac iter instituit? that way? . Which road did he Quam tenet cursum?Lutetiam versus intake?-That to Paris. tendit. Go your way; continue Perge viam; perge quo ecepisti. as you have begun. Arnitte me. Let me go. Go, I am not prevent- Transi, nihil te moror. ing you. Make haste and go Matura illuc ire. there. Leave this place.- Egredere hinc.--Quamobrem? Wherefore? Apage te a me. Leave my presence.

Forms of Conoersaiion.
Begone hence. Depart as quickly. as yoU can, Get thee gone; with all speed. Do you still linger ? Are you here yet?

167

I
I

Te hinc amove; facesse hinc; istinc recede. Facesslte hinc ocyus : vas hinc ocyus amolimlni. I-linc avola : abi quamprimum ; move te ocius, At etiam restftas, cessas? Etiam nunc hic stas?

4.
TO COME, TO RETURN. VENIRE, REDIRE.

Whence come you? I come from the judge's office. I will come presently. I often come to the Senate. We arrived a long time ago. 'ViII you come i-: Yes. Will you come or not? Will you come to-morrow? - Yes, but toward evening. What day will you come?

Unde advenis. A judfee venia. Quam mox veniam, Veni freq uens in senatum, Jamdiu factum est cum, postquam ventmus. Veniesne ? - Etiam ; numnam venies?(erte.

Veniesne an non? Veniesne cras? - Ego vera, sed sub vesperum. Ad quem diem redibis? Ad quae tempera ve.. nies?

168

Guide to Latin Conversation.

Corne 'when you will. Have you just come? He met me very conveniently. You come on time. You have come a little late. Your absence delays me. What brought you here?

Ubi vis, accede. Ad venis modo ? Commodum obvianllnihi venit. Per tempus venis. 'I'ardiuscule, justo tardius venisti. Mihi morse est quod non adsis. Quae te causa impiilit ut hue venires? Ego obviam tibi coniiI went to meet you. bar. I-Iasten, return as soon Propera, aetiitum hue redi, possible. lIe retnrns from Rome, A Roma redit, ab Roma redit. from the vicinity of Rome. l-Ie comes from Africa. Adest ex Afrfca, l-Iow long is it since he Quampridmll rediit? returned? .He met me not long ago. N on ita pi-idem me con.. venit. Why did you not have Quidni eum intro misisti ? hirn come in? I shall conduct him Hue coram addiicam illum, hither Ecquando redibit, rediWhen will he return? tiirus est, revertet ? He will return to-mor- Ut tardissime eras r-di.. bit. row at the latest. Who rapped at my Quisnam a me pepulit fores? door?

Corne in. Hoc s~pe. SUdU111 erit ccelum. The weather is very Tenebric6sum est tempus. Ad januam spectate 169 Jngredere. able to setting out. DE TEMPESTATE. sin altter occl iidam fores.Tempus discessiis absurdum est. good here. here.Coslo sereno utemur . regions is very cold. The climate of these FrigorYbus horrent haec loca. The weather is unfavor. Queenam est tempestas? weather? The weather is beauti. cold. Th-eweather is splendid.Dubium est coelum.For1ns of Conversation. glooIny. \Vhat is the state of the . Dies luculentus est. 5. otherwise I Rhall close the door. The weather isuncer. usu venit. tain. impendebat It began to get very Frigus maxfmum. taque tempestate fuit. ful. He is waiting at the door. It rains a great deal Valde pluvium est hoc ecelum. ON GOOD AND BAD 'VEATHER. The weather is always Hie non interrnittit cceIum nitescere. The weather was never Nullus unquam dies tam magna turbulenso bad. This often happens.

Snow falls. Nullo frigore adducltur ut capite operto sit. He resembles you vAry Tui simtlis est probe. Whose child is that? l-Ie resembles his fathes. MORES. I t was never any warmer. ]ETAS. 6. Proficiscar si sudum erit. Ventus increbescit. Conglaciat frigorlbus aqua. MANNERS. oris similitudtne patrem refert.170 Guide to Latin Oonversation. ca16re tabescit. The wind begins to blow. What is your name ? Qui vociiris ? Quod nomen tibi est? I have forgotten the Nomen perdrdi. His head is uncovered. It rained all night. You do not resemble Natiira te prorsus a simyour father. . Tota nocte compluit. Nives diffunduntur. CONDITIO. I shall depart if the weather is good. The icc j s melting from the heat. no matter how cold it is. Puer hic unde' est? Respondet patri. The water is freezing on account of the cold. Calet ut cum maxtme. AGE. CONDITION. Ilitudfne parentis arripuit. much. G lacies mcllitur tepefacta. name.

lIe Iives nea~ Maubert Habet se propter aream Mauberti. N ondum sextum a-tiiI am not yet SiX.fEquiilis est meus. lie is of rny age. younger. story. litteras primis labiis attlgit. bus. This is no time to be Nihil loci est segnitire. Preeter modurn sapis. You are too wise. He lives in the upper Summis in redtbue habHat. Disciplinas. Parum admodum sapit. provectior . . He is older. inferior. lazy. the college. He is nineteen years Undeviginti annos natus. Square. When will you be 'wise? Quando sapies? He is not very wise. He is not at ~ll wise. He is more than ten Excessit egressus est annos decem. I am of your age. Propinque. nostris redllIe lives very near us. Ego te ~tate consequor. . . tis annum egressus sum. natu posterior. N atu major. years old.Forms of Conversation. Pigritia lab6rat. desidiro. He is lazy. Ubi habttas? Where do you live? My house is opposite Respondet domus mea huic gymnasio. old. accolit nostras redes. Nihil sapit. 171 I Howald is he?-He is Quotum agit retatis annum ?-Decimum ten years old. He has begun to study.

Contento studio Iitteras arrrpit. TO TELL. Versiitur mihi in labiis primorlbus. Teneri non potui quin declararem. J acent rationes. Wisdom increases with veal's. an non? Dicisne. I have it on my lips. What have you to say Qure habes dicere de illo ? about him '? . TO SPEAK. DICERE.: 7. Fear has tied his tongue. I could not keep from telling it. You can do nothing more acceptable to 111e. Do I speak to you or not ? Do you not wish to answer ? I know not what to say. et non neglexisse habeo gratia In. Tibi ego dico. Ratio cum retiite adolescit. I ngenio parum potest. plurtmum ingenio valet. LOQUI. I I ~ has good natural talent. There is nothing to say. Hoc mihi gratius facere nihil potes. I thank you for having thought of it.. dotibus orniitus . Arno te. Lingua heeret metu. an non? Quod dicam non reperio. M ultis natfirre munerrbus. IIe has but little talent.172 Guide to Latin Oonversation. I-Ie studies with ardor.

tecum habeto. That's well said. . He speaks Latin ele. He speaks distinct!y . He speaks Latin quite Satis commode Latine well. Did yon ever hear tell of that? You add this of your own accord. Latino admodum inquinate loqueris. Aliud dicit atque sentit. N urn hoc ex uIlo audivisti aliquando? De tuo illud addis. Quid istuc verbi est? Dico ut res est. What do they say concerning the death of my brother? This is a secret. He speaks well. 1 shall tell you when there will be need of it. belle sane.Perbene Latine Ioqutgantly. You may tell it to himself if you wish. distincte loq uttur. He talks to me every. You speak Latin badly.' Vel ipsi hoc dicat licet. articulatim. Ioquftur. I Scite et diserte loquitur. aliud cogItat. tur. 173 Belle omnino. He does not say what he thinks. Expedite._ _ 1111"~------~-------~------------ For'ms of Conversation. 'VVhat does he mean by that? I tell the thing as it is.Mihi usquequaque lowhere. quid circumfertur? Secreta hoc audi. tell it to nobody.--. quttur. Quod ad fratris obltum atttnet. aliud dicit. Dicam tibi tum demum cum usus poscet.

ex ani . Satis jam verborum est. I heard him say it a thousand times. No one spoke a word.. satis superque dictum est. bona fide. .174 Guide to Latin Oonversation. this is enough on the subject. Let us speak of other things. Are you serious or are J ocone an serio?. Ex eo millies audivi. Cupit te conventum. He is anxious to talk with you. Mitte male loqui. Desist from speaking badly. Vult te conventum pater. Hie jam plura non diI shall say no more. silent.Tandem aliquando At length he became conticuit. J acet istud in tenebris . That is no longer spoken of. Nullum verbum proloqui potui. cam. Enough is said. I am not able to speak a word Enough of words. I De his dicere desistamuse Sermonem . My father wishes to speak with you.. in earnest. alio transferamus. It is necessary to speak with John. Let us cease speaking of these things. haec obvohita sunt silentio. Satl's jam verborum est. remote joyou joking?-I am co. mo.Verbum nemo facit. Convento Joanne opus est.Extra jocum. .

demand is reasonable.. I shall not go far. Dare copiam. I'll not toltiar. I pray you. To permit. U nUIn sintte a nobis exoriiri . unum concedtte.. non feres in tacltum. date nobis. .. that. I grant this according Hoc preclbus tuis concede: tequum posto your request. Date mihi. erate it. quod tanti non est. TO REFUSE•.. to . I permit you to go. veniam ut .Forms of Conversation. to grant per'mission. jam hie adero. which is of little value. the tulas. 175 8. Per rne u t abeas Iicet. Suffer yourself to be prevailed upon. I Non longius recedam . faculta~ tern. Grant us a thing. i I Permit me. Who gave you permis. shall return directly. CONCEDERE. TO ACCORD. Sine te exorari. ..Quis tibi potestatem fecit? sion? . potestatem. If you do it. queeso. I will not allow that to Non committam ut hoc fleri possit. I t is not allowed to do Fllicltum est hoc agere. I will permit you to do Tibi permissiirus sum ut hoc facias. Iicentiam. ABNUERE. non pabe done. You refuse me that Mihi denegas. TO ASK. PETERE. that. non feram. you will Hoc si eg2ris. be punished.

Nihil ab ina nisi repulsam tulit. 9. He has permission to do anything. Quantum pneceptoris voluntas tulit. IIelp me. Who has helped you? How have I done you a favor? Can I not be of use to you in any way? Nothing will I do more willingly. adjiiva me Potesne THe ad illud adjuvare ? Hoc beneficium adlube ? Quem adjutorem . Omnium rerum Iibertiitem tenet. TO GIVE THANI~S. C0111merui? Numquid est quod opera mea vo l is opus sit? Nihil est reque quod faciam Iubens. Id. FA. Ne quid ultra requiras. (Jan you do me this favor? Do me this kindness. Do me this favor. Nihil unqualn ruihi abnuit.VOR. I pray you. OFFICIUlvr ADHIBERE) GRATIAS AGERE.habuisti ? Quid de te merui. He has never refused me. As much as the teacher has allowed him. amiiho.176 Guide to Latin Oonversation. I-Ie received' naught from him but a refusal. I will see that you obtain what you demand. Adhtbe erga me istud beneficium. Tibi quod postulas impetrabo. denegavit. Do not ask again. TO DO A. .

177 Tuus sum mancipio et nexu Omnia tibi patent. [ am completely at your disposal. He is the most obliging man that I ever met. I anl much obliged to you for that. I am under great obligations to you . Totus tuus sum. Nunquam illius memoria efHuet discedet. . nulla hnjus rei memoriam 0 bli vio 0 bscurabit ' Multis me beneficiis complexus est. i He has tendered me his services. refero. VAUIl usus VERBI FACERE. devinxit. Everything is at your disposal.. tibi debeo PI UrIlTI U 111 tibi gratias habeo. Amo te de hac reo r I He has often done me a favor. Est omnium quos quidem noverim officiosissnnus. How will you find a means to accomplish it? Quam inibis viam ut id perficias? 12 .A. DIFFERENT USES OF THE VERB TO DO. I return you SIncere thanks. shall never forget it. I am wholly at your service. ago.. PIUrlnlU111. d hoc operam suam professns est.Forms of Conversation. magnopcro. 10.

know what to do. per imprudenthinking. mistmus '? done? As for the rest. I am not sorry for hav.17& Guide to Latin Conversation. solicitation Cujus hoc hortiitu fecisti? did you do it? He did that without N on fecit hoc de industria. Nihil tua refert. tiam hoc fecit. ausim equfdem Which of you would Quotusquisqne vestrum hoc audeat? dare do that? If you do this you will Hoc si egeris. I will Sciam de reltquo quit agendum sit. ing done it. be punished.com. Quid facto opus est? What must be done? Quid me par est facere What must I do? Tell file what is to be Prrescrihe mihi qui: facto sit opus? done? J well know what I must Recte ego meam ren sapio do. t Ausisne hoc facere ? Plane. But we. I have been punished Satis superque pceniirum dedi. ldne fecisti? Admodurr Did you do it? Yes. omnino prorsus. enough.Haud muto factum. What! you dared do Quid? tu ausus es ? that? At whose. Would you dare do that ?-Certainly. what have we At vera nos quid . imprudentia ab eo pecciitum est. . It does not concern you. more even than I deserved. non feres tacttum.

You will have to deal Res tibi erit cum rLentulo. 179 Faciesne id? Maxtme. 11. with Lentulus. most wilciam Illud ex aUl1110 lingly. SENTENTIAM AGITARE. What are you doing? Quid tibi agis? Nihil aliud qualn Iudis. mind. You do well. Facis commode. doing. TO THINK. Look to what you are Vide quid agas. lubens.FOl'1ns of Conversation. . fa. I Istud ergame beneficium adhtbe. TO HAVE A. ldid it in consideration of you. Merlto tuo feci. Do me this favor. SENTIRE. . Mea sic est ratio. You are doing nothing but playing. THOUGHT. my heart. Consider well what JTOU Vide etiam atque etiam quid sis factiirus. judgment. Do it according to your Judicio tuo rem permitte. 'Vill you do it? Certainly. What shall I say to Qui pro tuo desiderio dicam? please you? I shall do it with all Faciam illud anlmo libenti prolixoq ue. This is my resolution. This is' rooted in his Hoc ejus ammo insldet. are about to do. What is your intention? Quid tibi consilii est? ..

Mea quidem sententift. what think you of it? What is your opinion? Are you of this opinion? . They have been of dif. I am not of Celsus's opinion. The affair is worthy of attention.Distracti sunt. -Add my opinion to that Adscribe me sententire of Ceesar.ut rneafert opinio. Consilii res est. tecum sentio. Nec Celso aeceo. Ita censes. Think no more of those things. Id tantisper cogna. ture sententire faveo. ahierunt ferent opinions. Think a little of that. quaritum ego angtiror. agedum qui censes? Quid mihi auctor es '? Quid mihi suades ? Evoca antmum au his negotiis? Cogitationem Illam toto pectore amplectere. Now then. In my opinion. what think you of it? What advice do YOU give me? . We are of the same opinion. Nostri sensus congrnunt. I am of your opinion. tibi ita videtur. sentis . But you. eo in tuam sententiam. Think seriously of that. C~saris. Tu vero quid sentis ? Quid sentis? Siccme est sententia? Age vero. . in diversas sententias.180 Guide to Latin Conversation. This is your opinion. Tibi assentio.

Cura haecapud 111e exeubat. not yet.Forms of Conversation. REPASTS.. DE coxvrvrrs EPULIS. You rsmind me of my Me admones officii mei. ° It came to me when I Id nec opinanti accldit. . How long have you Quam pridem. dixi. Considerate cum annnis vestris velim. SEU Have you dined ?-No. 181 I think of it day and I shall give . promisi . nequaquam. Consider it.It my sen- night.N ondum.Ca?sari condixi. . ad unum idem sentiunt omnes Tendunt in di versum sententire. wasnot thinking of it. I pray you. Did he impart to you Nihilne impertiit tibi sui consilii ? anything concerning his intention? ous attentIon. De hoc valde videro.UETS. . res ista habet deliberati6nem. Sententire constant. prreter opinionem. The opinions agree. quam dudum non edisti? been fasting ? I promised to t~k~ sup. ON BANQ. Consilii res est. ad ccenam promisi.. minfme. Cresari coenamconper with Cresar. The opinions are con°trary. 12. duty. Prandistine? . This subject merits our attention.

Potum alieni miscere. . To invite anyone to supper. Qualem vultis panem? cujusmodi panern vultis? Explere. Inecenatus'deeubuit. To prepare dinner. invadere in offam. To invite anyone to dinner. To eat something with one's bread. to pour out wine. Altquem invitiire. a repast. To eat mutton. This makes one thirsty. To appease hunger. vinum infundere. sedare. Hoc sitirn aecendit. His cibis renovas mihi integram famem. post demum ibo cubttum. extinguere. Impransus abiit. Irruere. To partake of partridge. epnlas. Ovillam edere. Ieviire sitim. vocare ad ccenam. Famern roplere Adhibere aliquid ad panem. I shall take supper and then go to bed. mensee adhibere. adjicere aliquid pani. eonviviurn instituere. apparare. What kind of bread do you wish? To quench thirst. Perdice vesoi. pariire. breakfast. administriire . To begin the repast. He went away without taking dinner. He went to bed without his supper.· . After dinner. To give drink to anyone. Aliquem in prandio accipere . prandio. Prandium curare. A prandio. Coenaho. a jentaculo. With these victuals you whet my appetite.182 Guide to Latin Conversation.

The nights are less long No c t e s contraetiores in sum mer than in sunt restate quam hierne. sol ad oceisum abscessit. lIe drinks sparingly. instat. NOX. To drink wine that is too pure. At the close of evening. nox appetit.abstemius est. solis. There's a new moon. 13. See that Iny dinner be got ready. Oriente sale. occidente sale. sub occasum solis. Vide mihiprandium.Forms of Conversation. . at sunset. To drink wine much diluted. SOMNUS. inclinat ad vesperu In dies. Dilutius potare. Occtdit sol. To study far into the Ad multam noctem studere. night. Propiniire salutem alieni. adhibere. VESPER. night Advesperascit. declinat. To drink one's health. NIGHT. he never drinks wine. too strong. winter. N octe concubia. Meracius vinum sumere.ortum At sunrise. 183 Exiquo utltur potu. Rub . Luna ad initium recurrit. is coming on. The sun is set. EVENING. It is 'getting late. SLEEP.

it was still night. Decubueruntne omnes ? Have all gone to bed? Cubitum discediimus. multa de nocte profectus est. Seeiirus dormit. I arose. me. the sun is already Surge. hoc somnum adrmit. concubia nocte exsurrexi. high. I have not slept a wink Hac nocte non qui-vi. Pervigllat noctes totas . tat. Hoc somnum prohlbet. In noctem se conj ecit. noctes insomnes ducit. sleep. You must not go to 'I'ibi dormitandum non est. he passes sleepless nights. Excitiire e lecto. This wards off sleep. He set out during the night. diei 111ultum j am est. Sleep has made him Oppressit eum SOlTIn us. I slept longer than is Arctior quam sol-bat me somnus tenuit. Let us go to bed. To cause one to arise.184 Guide' to Latin Conoereation. conciliat. somnum non vidi this night. facit. He stays awake whole nights. quieti nos tradiimus Sleep has taken hold of Me complexus est'S0111nus. drowsy. complexus est. He sleeps undisturbed. -. dies est. my custom. De nocte multa. . This induces. nullam partem noctis requievi. ex clsleep. Arise. invites Hoc SOlIlnU111 indiicit.

deal.. 14.. Hoc mihi gratis constat. Illorning and to sit up far into the night. TO :BUY. TO PAY. Th 9. TO SELL. Ad multum diei. mihi magno that coste IDe ~. To sleep late in the. VENDEHE. vendere. to Illy heart's content. auctione To ask the price of anypublic sale. constat? cost you? Hoe extra pretium est. How much do you wish Quanti hoc judfcas. ad multam Incern stertere et au multam noctem vigiHire. the day and remains awake at night. at Per prrec6nem. a?Sttmas ? for that? What is the price of Quanti est hoc? that? How much did he sell Quanti hoc veniit ? this for? IIow much has that Quanti hoc venit. ad multam diem dormire. Mercis pretium exquirere. thing. De diedormit et de nocte vigtlat. SOLVERE. great constat.5 I shall sleep .1 is beyond price. To sell at auction. That costs me nothing.For11'ts of Conversation. Crastma die 111e S0111110 replebo. EMERE. lIe sleeps during . TO-1110rrOW 18. .

solvere. He gave me the price I Meo pretio emit. Laxiivit annona. He is able to pay his Solvendo est. adaquato singillatim pretio. debt. bes. impenso. Ii. . I shall institute a process Tibi scribam. selling J acent equorum pretia. To pay on time. tirnantur. pactis.. This has put me in Hoe mihi res alienum attulit. I-Iorses are cheap. ad diem dictam. the others. against you. we will ad judices veniemus. · They have come to an Venerunt ad pactidnem. These apples sell for a Poma hoc teruntio rescent apiece. dicam . demanded. cheap. He did not stand to the Non stetit conventis agreemen t. agreement. contraxit. Rabes tibi res soliitas. Provisions are cheaper. Pay me what you owe Dissolve mihi quod deme. responders. . go before the judges. very dear. He sells cheaper than Vendit minoris ceeteris. debts. Ad tempus. It is for you to say what Tua judicatio est. You are paid. it is worth. He is much in debt at Multa Romre nomlna Rome.186 Guide to Latin Oonoersaiion: He bought a book very Librum comparavit vi.

sponsionem vincero. S p 0 n s ion e vincere . Come then. t87 Nomfna exigere. 'ro play at foot-ball. Ludere pila. Ludo aliquem poscere De pila palmaria non eum metuo. I-Iunting and foot-ball refresh me a great deal. Do you wish to play? I et us play together. I accept the terms. Conditionem non respuo. lusus. Docet eum pila. To deulnnd payment. . Placetne tibi ludere ? Inter nos ludiimus. conditionem sequor. How· nUlch do you wish to wager? To win the wager. Tibi cedo. refIcit. Reddere certamtnis potestatem. repetendi copiam facere. certiimen instauretur. DE VARIIS LUDIS. let the contest be renewed.Forms of. To challenge anyone to play. oblectat. afftcit venationis usus et pila. 15. dere. ON VARIOUS GAMES. I give yon the game. nomtna.. Conversation. I am not afraid of him at playing ball. at foot-ball.-Solvere. Antmum meum mire recreat. To give an opportunity to retaliate. to pay one's debts. He is teaching him how to play. Qua sponsione vis Iu. dissolvere res alienum. Age.

Do not cry. Quorsum.() Latin Conversation. To fence with anyone'. To play at odd or even. To play chess. Iierum ritu. ACCUSATIONF:S. Cursu ad metas conten dere. digladi. Batuere cum allquo 1U· drbus. lie fences. 'I'runculis Iudere. To spin top. Versiire.188 Guidf 1. To play at skittles. quorsus haec disputatio. testate. Rudfbus el iidit. To play at hunt the slipper. To learn fencing. Ludere par impart Discere rudtbus.indignatio '! What is the question G. What wrong has he Quid tibi injurise facdone you? tum est? Who gave you ·that Quis hoc tibi nomen imname? /posuit. indtdit? Why this dispute 1 . Calculis ludere. rotsr« torquere turbmem. ALTERCATIO.L Quid est argentum quer-ilre ? issue? They quarrel like Altercantur inter se muwomen. Latruncrilis ludere. atur. lie crieswhenever he Habet ·lacrymas in po. To play prisoners' base. Solea detrita ludere. 10. agitiire. To play at draughts.. wishes. Omitte lacrymas.

. have I done wrong? \Vhat wrong have I done? What great fault have I cornmi tted ? . I-Ie struck me with his fist. infregit. Eriglte aures. ATTENTE AUDIRE. nomlne : meo accerse Quid. patriivit. Pugnos mihi impegit.For'ins of Oonversation. ausculta. How 189 V oca ill 11m meis verbis. inflixit.Alias res agis. advertfte. illum.Did it happen through any fault of mine ? How did the affair come off? What happened then? He drove me from Iny place. commisit? Meritone mea id acctdit? Uti res gesta est? Quid tum postea? Extriisit me de loco.Call him in my name. TO LISTEN ATTENTIVELY. Me supplantavit. anlmum attendlte. ANh MUM ATTENDERE. tion to something else. 17. lie tripped up Iny heels.vVhatcrinle has he committed '! . qua in re pecciivi ? Quid offendi? Quid tantopere deliqui ! Quod scelus admisit. Lend your ear and lis. You are paying atten. . TO BE ATTENTIVE.Admove aurem et subten. Listen attentively.

hearing. You are not listening. Be attentive. adverte anf"'am going to tell you.] 90 Guide to Latin Conversation-. Antmum et aures adhfbe. Silentio.ius. You speak too freely. Favete. Ture peregrinantur aures. ask. Take a higher tone. mum ad ea qure die. You interrupt me! you reply to me ! What is your reply? Without reply. Liberiore uteris lingua. 0 . Be quiet and calmly listen. Ioqueris. Pay attention to what Attende. adeste [€quo anImo. Keep this well in mind.. Adesdum. attolle vocem. HOe is a little dull of Aures habet hebetiores. Look out for what fol. qu~ sequuntur. Lower your voice. Haec in memoria vestra penttus insideant. be attentive.. Wake up. Mihi interloqueres ! mi. tendtte. I want to say a word to you. paucis te vola. You speak too long and Nimis diu et nimium too much. audire.tfirus sum. attento ammo adesse. Intende. antmo at. Listen. Remitte vocem. hi obloqueris ! Quid repones ? Dicta cit.Attendlte anlmos ad ea lows. Pay attention to what I Quid petam. abjecta OU1" nicunctatione. Listen without saying a word. Expltca atque excnte intelligentiam tuam.

There is no reason why Causa nulla est cur apud te mentiar.lapidrbus. . What excuse have you? Qua excusatione uteris ? will he offer his age as -An retatein afferet ? an excuse? It is not my fault. sta recto corpore. sta in pedes. Listen to what I say.rendered Gravi te scelere devin x:yourself guilty of a isti. A ppetiit me . sum extra culpam. I deny it. Have you done it?. Beware of lying to me. Attendlte me dicentern. He makes everyone Risum omnibus movet. Negasne ?-Nego enimvero. . t\ccustom yourself to . speak Latin. Yes. Rectus assiste. culpa. serious offense. abest a me innocent. 191 Excerce te Latino sermane. resfdet ej us rei in te culpa. concrtat.lane fecisti ?-Adlll0durn. He threw stones at me.: . Excuse me. You do nothing but tell Nullus tibi mentiendi modus est. I am Culpa vaco. Do you deny it ?-Yes. Latine loq ui. I should lie to you. penes It is your fault. Row long is it since you Ecquando te ad bonam began to reform? frugem reci pies? You have . laugh. Cave mihi mendacii quidquam. te cuIpa est. Stand erect. Exousatum me habeas.Forms of ·Oonversation. untruths. A te pecciitum est.

T -~----- 192 Guide to Latin Oonversation. TO OBSERVE. I accept your excuse. vestris. See what you are doing. Deferam nomen tnU111 ad patrem de prigritia. Vide quid agas. I shall put it before Rem subjiciam oculis your eyes. Id non observaveram. Converte ora et ociilos in me. 18. Aceipio. ponam vobis ob octilos. VIDEHE. admitto. Did you not observe it? Ecquid non animadvertis? I had not perceived it. He has sharp eyes. I did not notice it. non hoc observiivi. Vide ut incedat. TO PERCEIVE. See how he walks. in conspectu vestro collocabo. dit6res. I will let your father know of your laziness.N umquid patri subolet ? pect it ? Ociilos nabet aciitos. Show' him to us. ANIMADVER~'ERE. Look at me. capio tuam cxcusationem. am wholly in the dark. Hoc 111e pnetervolavit. TO SEE. ad me. Exhtbe i llum nobis. Does not my father sus. Mihi What is going on? I Quid agltur? enim tencbrre sunt. . 'I'urn your face to the Admove vultum ad auaudience.

one. inusitiitnm. 19~ TO EXPLAIN. word. mal is. Hlornm fallacias nunquam prresensi. In vultu pneceptoris habltant discipulorurn oculi. Verbum istud est insolens. 193 Perversis. This word has changed Recessit hoc verbum a veteri sui significatiits meaning. sonat i lla vox? Qusenam est of that word? hujus voeabuli notio? What does that word Qure notio subjecta est huie voci. That word is not in use. He looks at us askance. tritum non est illud vocabnlum. EXPLANARE. I have never been able to discover their tricks. quid istud signify? verbi est'? Let us examine that Explicemus illud verbum et excutiiimus. What is the meaning Quid valet.R UP A DIFFIUULTY. DIFFICULTATEM APERIR~~. That word means many H uie verba multrplex subj ecta est signifieathings. Pupils have their eyes continually on their teacher. torvis ocrilis nos intuetur. tio 13 . obliquis. TO CLEA.Forms of Oonversation.

means. He doer. diicam. To clear up a difficulty. stand what you wish percepi. not understand Nihil in eo videt. minus capio. I .N ondum tuam cogitationem assecutus sum.Parum intclltgc. Yes. A perire difficul tiitern. notionem What is the interpreta. This word can have two meanings. explanare. To explain anything to Aliquid pueris preelechildren. minus locum istum a Cicederstand this passage from Cicero. gere. rone accipio.Queenam est h ujus loci sententia f tion of this passage? I do not thoroughly un. a word of it. very well. .Parum intelllgo. exponere. Do you understand what Tenes quod dicam? I say? Did you understand Hoc intellextin' ? an that? or. I will make the difficul. interpretari. I do not quite under. Verbum istud in duas sententias acclpi potest. eamdem hathe same meaning. Do you not nondum etiam? Irno understand it yet? calltde. non satis novi stand what that word quid haec vox sonet. These two words have Haec duo verba unum sonant. bent sententiam.IlIum ad intelligentiam hujus difficultatis adty clear to him.194 Guide to Latin Conoersaiion. to say. do not quite under.

dttas Iegendi. He did not labor long. alio diligentius student.TO READ.TO LEARN BY HEART. dicere latius. tradere se stud Us. 'I'o give a free translation. ardor as ever. They all study as best Omnes certdtim. Lab6rem diutius non tulit. work. plenius exprimere : uberius explanare. Iaborem profundere. much.Forms of Conoersation: To in terpret a passage from Cicero. . In studiis pro mea parte versor. 20. LEGERE. Ad. To give oneself up to Dare se labori . He has an insatiable Est in eo inexhausta avilove for reading. pere . alius they can.susciTo labor in vain. To translate word for word. Diffusius. He studies zealously. ill ustrare. aperire. TotIdem verbis interpretari. Laborem inlinem . He loves study very Satis exardet ad Iitteras. 195 Locum Cieeronis explaniire. He studies with as much Studet ut CUIn maxtme. to study. enodatius explicare . MEMORTJE MANDARE. STUDUS VACARE. in studia incumbit. TOSTUDY. I study as much as I can.

percurrere. lie has begun to translate the complete works of Cicero. I employ all my spare time in reading Cicero.ou have not Virgil in your hands. y. Poetas evol vere. Frigent nunc litteree. Nihil mihi temporis a legendo vacat. Pomeridiiinum tempus lectione Vergilii traduxi. volvere. I employed the afternoon in reading Virgil. To learn one's lesson. I'o read the poets. Non habes Maronem pr~ mantbus. Cicero is continually in his hands. memorire tradere. Interpretandi Ciceronis provinciam suscepit. voluntiitem Discendi abj ecit. mandare. . Discere memortter . mandare.196 Guid» to Latin Conversation. deposui t. demittit. N unquam Ciceronem de manfbns deponit. I read all the time. He no longer desires to learn. Prsecepta crebro regustare. To learn by heart. Calent litterro Grseca. Lectionem memorise commendare. But little study is being done now. perci pere. They study G reek with ardor. Otium in legendo Cicerone consumpsi. I'o read th e rules over and over. transmisi.

TO WRITE.-----" . Latine reddere. reci tare. To recite intelligently Sensim et lente recitare.' . I '. •. _~------------ Forlns of Conversation. it 1'. Begin your lesson over Ordire lecti5nem ab integro . 197 Ii R ~'.. and slowly. vertere.. ~ Aliq uid reddere sine' scripto. misisti. To translate Greek word Ad verbum de Greecis for word.. pra-terverses in reciting. Iitteris exprimere. to me. thing.. To translate into Latin.~i' . ex memoria . TO COMPOSE. '. ~m. memortter.J '.· . from the beginning.I •••1. SCRIPTIONI ANIMUM ADHIBERE.. . interpretari . 0 misisti. .. To recite one's lesson Cursius lecti5nem recitare.. . TO TRANSLATE. in haste.·' ' .Nihil admodum sciebat. You have skipped three Tres versus reeitando preetervolasti.. I 'm not myself..•.. To recite anything.pronuntiiire. He knew hardly any. INTERPRETARI.• . His memory has failed Memoria lapsus est. The words did not come N eque mihi succurebant verba. 21. in Latinum sermonem transferre. . Apud me non sum.•'•• .

Iimare. your . and that one in poetry. To review and correct anything diligently. This student excels in Hic aratoria. In eo vehementer desudavi. Ultima lima defuit scriptioni tuee. I have worked hard over this exercise. lnculenter very well. Converte. adhfbe anfmum ad scriptionem. for V erbum verbo exprimere. AlIquid summa cura et diligenter recognoscere.theme. Preemia consequi. soliita orati6ne. A scripti6ne nullus mihi dies vacuus est. . To write one's composition with care. prose. Grrece novit. elaborare. polire. Scriptionem accurare. Opus elaborare.198 Guide to Latin Oonoersaium. perficere. You have made the Idem peccasti ac HIe. How much time have Quantum temporis scripti6ni tribuisti ? you given to your composition? To win prizes. Apply yonrself to. Your theme has not been corrected thor" oughly. facultiite. reddere verbum pro verbo. To write' an exercise. He understands Greek Luculente. same rnistake as he. HIe pnestat poettca. We compose in verse and in prose. perpoI ire. I write a theme every day. Stricta oratione scribemus. To render word word.

pen pointed Hunc mihi oalamum in aciitum mueronem. TO WRITE.Forms of Conversation. Make this. I'o make an erasure. with Latin. interpretatus est. To see if a pen be good. t 'am pleased with the writing of Lentulus. obIiterare. conformare. To this passage he has given an entirely different meaning. --. . Mendum scripturre litiira tollere. chartee. Calamum experiri. and that one blunt. Pura charta. He is not acquainted Latino nescit. Placet mihi Lentuli manus. 199 I-Ie has not translated Hanc sententiam male that passage well. SCRIBERE. . 22. Calamum apparare. To write on the back of In aversa charta scribere. Non suppetunt : mihi I have no paper. Hune locum in contrari um sensum detorsit. TO MAKE A PEN. the paper. delete. ilIum vero in latiorem' conforma. Blank paper. To make a pen. pyrus mea. My paper allows the Transmittit Iitteras pawriting to be seen on the other side. CALAMUM CONFORMARE.

Commoda mihi librum. da mihi utendum hune librum. To stain one's book with Atramento librum macink. tates. to me unopened. excipere. To seal a letter. To write what he die. Lend me that book. Give me my papers. You have blotted my book with ink. He has delivered letters Litteras integra signa mihi reddldit. To address a letter. To fold a letter. scribere.Ejus dietata scribere . epistolam sigillo munire. Cedo tabulae. Atramenti effusione ehartam meam infeeisti. explicare. ON LETTERS. dare.200 Guide to Latin Oonversation. DE EPISTOLIe. Obsigniire litteras. mittere. . hane eharthat paper. Epistolam complicare. signo Iitteras 0 bsigniire. uliire inquinare. Wri te this in your notebook. To send letters to any. 23. Epistolam inscribere. ET IN EXTREMIS EPISTOLIS Q1JO~ MODO V ALEDICENDUM SIT. resol vere. feedare.Li tteras ad alfq uem one. tam.' AND HOW r'1HEY SHOULD BE SIGNED. Epistolam resigniire. Refer hoe in adversaria. To open a letter.

Scribam ad te srepe.. We hear no longer from you. your letter gave me mnch pleasure. one.conquiscent. I shall write often to you. Plane nihil erat quod ad te scriberem. Cur conticeseunt tuaIitterse ? Ad me quam seepisslme scribas. Litteras tuas jamdiidum desidero. Nihil habebam quod dicerem. I shall write to you more at length w hen I shall have more time. Why did you not write to me'? Write to me as often as you can.r mihi sis. gratre mild . I had no news to send you. in primis Sextii nostril . do not forget to answer my letters. Accepi perbreves tuas Iitteras . 201 Alicui litteras committere.Forms of Conversation. Gratum quod mihi dedisti epistolas. vide ut pa. I have not received a letter from you for a long time. I shall not write to you again. I than k you for your lettors . they gave me great pleasure. Pluribus verbis ad te scribam q uum plus otii nactus era. . E Oappadocia ne hilum quidem. Irecei ved your short letter. Conq uiescunt Iitterae tum.. Litterre mere. To intrust letters to any. especially that of Sextius. longiore epistala supersedebo. Trul v I had not a word ofnews to tell you. tum Iitterre fuerunt. I shall be less long. Not a bit of news from Cappadocia. quae quidem me delectarunt.

et quid agas sible what you are et quid actiirum te doing and what you putes. 'l'u oelim.letudinem tuam cura d1:ligenter.202 Guide to Latin Conversation. et ita fib1: persuadeas. letter from you. Tell me as soon as pos. Me velim. omabis. Bene vale et me dilige. Vale. Fac valeas. ut amas. Valebis. diligentisslme certi6rem. Cura si me amos ut ualeae. Reliquum est 'itt te O1'e1n. hoc mihi gratius faeere nihil poles. . OU1'a ut valeas. Fac ut tuam et Tullire valetudinem cures. uf valetudini tsue. Va. diligas. facias me quaill intend to do. si nos vultis oalere. ui fads. Vale. Ama nos ei vale. si me et tuos ommes valere 'i}is. valetudinique tnu» et tranquillitat-i animi seroias. Valete. meque. Gura ut valeas. tuam et Tulliolre valetud1:nem cures. ei matrem meosque tibi commendatos hobe. diligentissime servias.Tu velim. mihi te charius ni:hil esse. ui a puerofecisti. TUJ me dil~ges ei valebis. Brutus is expecting a Tuasjam litteras Brutus expectabat. neque unquam fuisse. valete. et me. Da operam ut valeas. mea desideria. ama. atque etiam vale. Maxisne autem date operam ui valeatis. 1neque mutuo diligas. Etiam.

Vale.Forms of Conoersaiion. Saluta meis uerbi« Joannem. Eac.salutat te Oieero meus. 'ut valeas ei nos ames. Tullia tibi plurimam salutem adacribit. Salutem Marcello. mi suavissimeet optimefraier. . Oicero bellissimus tibi salutem plurimam dicit. u~ oaleas. A ma nos et vale. Oura. salute1n velim dieas. mi Tiro. Oura. Domus te nostra tota salutat. Terentia tibi impe1'tit multam sahuem. tuum. Salutem die Petro meo'nomine. Vale. salve a Petro. vale. Jubebis meo nomine saloere Poulum. Terentia tibi saluf-em. Quant'um me diligis. Tulliolre et (Iicerimis salutem dieito. ut valeas. vel quantum te a me sc.is diligi. mi frater. ui »uleas. Multam saluteni Pdio: DionyBw plurimoim soluiem: Attica plurimam. mi fraier. Cura te etiam aique eiiam diligenter. et tibi persuadeas te a me [ruierne amari. Terentia te salcerc jubet. mi optime et optatissime frater. • Ex me saluiaioprceeeptorem. Salvebis a Oicerone. ut »aleas. mi frater. Oicero te salutat. mi suavissime et charissimefraier. Dionysium velim salvere [ubeas. JYfi frater. (lura ui valeas etiam aique etiam. Te 01'0 etiam atque etiam. 203 Oura. Tiro noster. (hira. tamtumfo» ut valeas. quemegoin oculisfero. ut oaleas.

24.tEquo Marte. liberally. V ARLiE LOCUTIONES FAMILIA RES. rili parte.me multam salutem. pace tua dixerim permission. to According weather.. With equal chances. For form's sake. Verbi causa. as occasion serves. For example. Pro mea parte. In propria persona. one's self. Single-handed· by Suo Marte. Pro re. As far as I am able.Ex anfmi tui sententia. portione. In person. With the whole hand. According to your pleas. .. seriously. pro re nata. Ex anlmi sententia.204 Guide to Latin Oonoersoiion: Molinio meo multam salutem. Pro portione. exempli causa. the Pro cceli conditione. Dich. For a special business. Oommunibus amicis a. VARIOUS FAMILIAR EXPRESSIONS. ure.Plena manu. Salutem quibus videbitur. tia. causa. In earnest. Suspenso pede. On tiptoe. pro vi . . pro rata I n proportion. Oontm'ello prredpue. I will say it with your Bona venia' tua dixt rim. et Gerardo. verbi gra.

As much as possible. Since it was convenient.Per imprudentiam fecit. As was my duty.Forms of Oonversation. ing. Each one in his turn. . Quiesse melius erit 1 Aufer nugas. est. Pro eo ac debui. It is now n1Y duty. Haud muto factum. 0 factum bene! N ollem factum. It is your affair. pressing. Ut par erato Quoad ejus fieri potuit. Quippe leve est totum hoc. Leaving joking aside. It goes well. N equid mentiar. Tua res est. Not to lie. . suo quisque ordtne. To tell the truth. The business is not Res habet moram. Well done! I am vexed at it. it is finished. tua res agrtur. Bene habet. neve illud. N e tu frustra sis. Evi 1 to him who wags. That you may not be deceived. ne dicam dolo.as you are able. He did it without think. . For that is all nonsense. Sua quisque vice. Neither this nor that. 205 Actum est. Contra ac dicit. As muchi. Quoad ej us facere poteris. Ut verum Ioquar. Contrary to what he savs. I do not repent of what has been done. It is your duty to teach. Neve hoc. Tuse sunt partes docere Mere nunc partes sunt.

. There is nobody who does not like you. U t homo est. Non ita multi sunt. De scripta dicere. ' Ad memoriam notare. To take note of. In diem vivere. Extra jocum. Quid fecisset aliud? U t novus fert usus. We should take men as we find them. The affair has turned out to my liking. I want nothing to do with you. important. perat. Unus nemo te dilrgit.206 Guide to Latin Coniereation. They are not numerous. Paucis te vola. N re HIe vehementer errat. What else could he do ? After the fashion. It is useful. Extranumerum mihi es. you are genteel. He is certainly much mistaken. I wish to have a word with you. ita 11101'em geras. Suo nutu regie . I am at work on abook. bam. How is that possible? Let me alone. Will you not let me alone? Will you soon have finished? He finds a great deal of fault with it. Liberestin mantbus. To behave according to one's fancy. Qui potis est? Ql3n omitte me. To live but for the present. Ius es. Opei'R1 pretium est.. To speak from the manuscript. To tell the truth. homo bel. Non omittis ? Potin' ut deslnas? Accerrune illud vitu.. Res obtrgit atque optii.

Ut diei tempus est. Recte an secns nihil ad nos. . Everything goes well with him. H0 asks for you at the door. Res illi omnes ad votum fluunt. To read tecto t0710. A janua te queerit. 207 Uno tenore Iegere. Nihil isthrec moveo ac curo. jacet. you will rejoice at having done it. Gaudebis facto. Believe me. Non liquet. There is nothing in the world that I would do more willingly. succedunt. The matter is not clear. This is easy. Mihi omnia voto cornpetunt.. Ut mea memoria est. Right or wrong it mattel'Slittle to us. The labor has been expended with profit. Serrnones homtnnm de se factle sustinet. Everyone after his manner. Nihil est. I-Ie cares nothing for what they say of him.For1ns of Conversation. Seeing the time it is. crede mihi. Constat operse fructus. Non tantum est in re quantus est sermo. As near as I can remember. My account agrees. I am not at all anxious about that.seq ue quod faciam libens. Suus cuique mos. All things are turning out as I would wish.is right. Constat mihi ratio. There's not so much in it as is reported. Hoc in promptu est.

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