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volume 45 / issue 20

February 29, 2012
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2 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener
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3 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener NEWS
New residence coming to Rye
A new partnership with a pri-
vate residential developer is al-
lowing Ryerson to begin building
more residence space.
MPI Group was named as the
partner for the project during
Monday’s announcement.
The residence will be built at
186-188 Jarvis St., well within the
Ryerson Master Plan circumfer-
ence for student housing.
Julia Hanigsberg, vice president
of administration and fnance, ex-
plained that the third party will
allow Ryerson to create the space
without taking money out of the
operating budget.
“We were really challenged by
how to make it happen,” she said,
explaining that they’ve been dis-
cussing this for at least two years.
“When I talk to my counterparts
[across the country] everybody is
trying to fgure out how to build
student residences in a way that is
afordable.”
MPI will fnance, develop and
maintain the building, as well as
generate revenue from the resi-
dence fees. The room costs are close
to that of the International Living
and Learning Centre (ILLC), but
could be higher.
“The expectation is this will be
on the high end because it will be
the newest and nicest, obviously,”
said Hanigsberg.
She is certain it will be aford-
able to Ryerson students as they
are the only market.
“The fact that we had such a
good partnership available be-
tween a private sector and the uni-
versity was very good,” said Ry-
erson president Sheldon Levy. “I
just look forward to it starting and
students having the opportunity
for more accommodation.”
The rendering by IBI Group
Architects can change after the re-
zoning and city approvals, which
should start immediately.
“The City of Toronto’s Down-
town East Planning Study calls for
mixed-use zoning, increased den-
sity and increasing residential, em-
ployment and institutional growth
on this site,” said an MPI spokes-
person in an email. “We believe
this residence is in keeping with
this plan.”
The spokesperson said they noti-
fed adjacent landowners of plans
through the application process,
and so has Ryerson.
“I’ve spoken in the past couple
of days to the head of the local resi-
dents association there wanting to
reassure him that we really want
to be part of the neighbourhood,”
said Hanigsberg.
The plans for the building in-
cludes a podium of undetermined
retail space.
“We foresee the two-storey po-
dium ofering a mix of retailers,
perhaps a café and other services,”
said the spokesperson, adding that
they will encourage students to
seek employment opportunities.
They confrmed that it is de-
signed as a ‘purpose built’ student
residence and would not be easily
used for any other type of building.
The agreement is not fnalized but
they expect the fnal partnership
contracts to be for a 49-year term.
“Our preliminary agreements
with Ryerson require that resi-
dence fee increases be consistent
with market comparables for simi-
lar (student) accommodations and
amenities,” continued the spokes-
person email.
The project will be the frst resi-
dence building that MPI will de-
velop solely for students, but they
said they’ve extensively reviewed
and analyzed the Canadian resi-
dence market. They primarily de-
velop senior residences and multi-
family housing in Toronto.
“The next stage is to work out a
service agreement of how the nity
grity of the relationship works,”
said Chad Nutall, manager of stu-
dent housing services.
MPI will also pay for residence
life staf to work in the new resi-
dence, which in other residences is
done by student housing services.
The rooms will also be assigned
by Ryerson, which stops the new
residence from competing with the
current ones for applicants.
“It’s great that we sort of con-
trol all that stock,” said Nutall.
“We just have to make sure that
we build at a sustainable rate to fll
these beds.”
A new partnership with a private development company is facilitating Ryerson’s need for more student residence on campus
without sacrifcing their operating budget. News Editor Carolyn Turgeon reports
Grad executives consider separation from RSU
By reBecca Burton
news editor
Graduate students say lack of
action from the Ryerson Student’s
Union (RSU) for more funding has
them fed up. Enough to consider
complete separation from the RSU.
“[RSU] executives shut down
ideas that are not good for the
whole student body but graduate
students have diferent issues than
undergraduates,” said Osman Ha-
mid, chairperson of the graduate
executive commitee.
The main argument arose at a
RSU board meeting on Feb. 27,
when the two graduate executives
on the RSU board of governors,
Hamid and Ebrahim Poulad, said
they made a plea for more fund-
ing. The two were then allegedly
“laughed at” and called “sketchy,”
by RSU executives.
Hamid and Poulad wanted to
make an amendment regarding
the travel grant fund that reim-
burses students who have already
atended a conference or workshop
that partners their graduate work.
A maximum of $500 is given to
students, with only one grant per
student per year. Of the $19,000
available this year towards travel
grants, an increase from last year’s
$16,000 fund, Hamid said the fund
is almost depleted. An obvious
need for more funding, he said.
Hamid said they also requested
to put leftover money from one of
their events into the travel grant
fund but was denied by the RSU.
As it stands, members of the
graduate executive commitee, the
travel grants commitee nor the
directors on the RSU board are al-
lowed to apply for this travel grant.
Hamid and Poulad atempted to
make an amendment that would
allow members of the travel grant
commitee to still be allowed to
apply for the travel grant. The
two felt it was unfair to deny stu-
dents funding just for becoming
involved.
Hamid suggested they remove
the member of the travel fund
commitee from the room during
the decision process, allowing the
remaining two members to make
the decision.
“We need more involvement to
make the community strong. But
if [students] are smart they won’t
step up to the [travel grants] com-
mitee,” said Poulad.
The amendment was not ap-
proved.
But the RSU executives are fght-
ing back saying these decisions
were made in haste and leters sent
out from the graduate executive
contain misinformation.
“It only restricts two students
who voluntarily put themselves
toward becoming part of the travel
grant commitee. They are fully
aware of this restriction and are
still eligible to get any other type of
funding from the university,” said
Sean Carson, RSU vice-president
operations.
According to Carson, the board
was discussing the travel fund in
order to change the policy to allow
students to receive funding prior
to their trip. Carson also indicated
no suggestions to allow a member
to leave the room were made dur-
ing the meeting.
Allegations saying Carson had
used the word “sketchy” during
the meeting were “taken out of
context,” he said. “To give yourself
money when you sit on the com-
mitee is ‘sketchy.’ I oversimplifed
my language when I should have
used the words ‘confict of inter-
est.’”
Vice-president education, Me-
lissa Palermo, was unavailable for
comment but Carson spoke on her
behalf. The laughter as indicated
by Hamid, was “nervous laughter”
after the chair had asked Hamid
to stop referring to the defeated
amendment when he was meant to
motivate the policy, said Carson.
“These leters contain misinfor-
mation that need to be clarifed,”
said Carson.
But Hamid is eager to take the
next step to separate from the RSU.
“It is not enough money given
to graduate students. We are pay-
ing membership fees to the RSU.
We are just trying to use our own
money,” said Hamid.
Terry McAfee, director of busi-
ness administration, said he is un-
able to comment on the possibil-
ity of creating a separate graduate
students union but says the school
is currently working on making it
more clear what funds are avail-
able for students — be it the RSU
or the school itself.
“There is not a lot of money giv-
en out to travel [from the school]
because there are no set funds for
this. But we do what we can when
we are able to,” he said.
The graduate executive could go
about separating themselves from
the RSU is still unclear but Hamid
will present this idea to the dean of
graduate studies and other admin-
istration.
“The funding is not to have fun
and play games. Graduate stu-
dents are going to present papers
that will enhance their education
and the reputation of the univer-
sity,” said Hamid.
Quick Facts
The rendering of the residence.
The current lot at 186-188 Jarvis.
RENdERiNg by ibi gROUP ARCHiTECTS
PHOTO: REbECCA bURTON
>> the proposed building is
23 stories
>> the addition of approxi-
mately 500 beds for ryer-
son students increases the
total residence space by 30
per cent
>> 186 & 188 Jarvis con-
sists of 14,000 square feet
>> the building’s principal
access is from Jarvis street
and the initial designs incor-
porate access from the rear
of the building via Mutual
street
>> the new residence will
meet toronto’s Green Build-
ing standards
>> this is just the frst in-
stallment of 2,000 new resi-
dence spaces that the uni-
versity would like to add by
2020
>> the residence is expect-
ed to begin construction in
2014 and open in septem-
ber 2016
Information courtesy of
Ryerson University
Ryerson Students’ Union (RSU) Annual General Meeting. FiLE PHOTO
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Lauren “BBB” Strapagiel
NEWS
Rebecca “WOODARD” Burton
Carolyn “BERNSTEIN” Turgeon
ASSOCIATE NEWS
Sean Tepper “-WARE”
FEATURES
Kai “PARTAY” Benson
BIZ & TECH
Sarah “HUGS” Del Giallo
ARTS & LIFE
Sean “WHERE IS GF?” Wetselaar
SPORTS
Gabe “NOT A PADDLE” Lee
COMMUNITIES
Nicole “FISTED” Siena
PHOTO
Lindsay “SHARK” Boeckl
Mohamed “NAYNAY” Omar
ASSOCIATE PHOTO
Marissa “POTTED” Dederer
FUN
Suraj “NOTORIOUS” Singh
MEDIA
Lee “POSTED” Richardson
ONLINE
Jeff “ABSENTEE” Lagerquist
John “BANDWIDTH’D” Shmuel
GENERAL MANAGER
Liane “PRODIGAL” McLarty
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Chris “METRO” Roberts
DESIGN DIRECTOR
J.D. “JAVIER DIEGO” Mowat
INTERN ARMY
Rina “SAILER MOON” Tse
Sadie “SICKIE” McInnes
Jamaica “GOLD STAR” Ty
Althia “POTATO” Donato
VOLUNTEERS
Eric Mark “BUFFET” Do
Lindsay “CUCUMBER” Fitzgerald
Halla “UNKNOWN” Imam
Diana “WATCHDOG” Hall
Abigale “WELL-EQUIPPED” Subhan
Tanya “BALZAC” Mok
Tara “TIGGER” Deschamps
Chris “Y2J” Babic
Playing the role of the Annoying
Talking Coffee Mug this week...
Fucking Roll Up The Rim. One in
six my ass,
The Eyeopener is Ryerson’s
largest and independent student
newspaper. It is owned and oper-
ated by Rye Eye Publishing Inc.,
a non-proft corporation owned by
the students of Ryerson. Our of-
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can reach us at 416-979-5262 or
www.theeyeopener.com.
4 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener
EDITORIAL
DRAWN OUT
By CATHERINE POLCz
LAUREN
STRAPAGIEL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Generation Me: reality check
They call us Generation Me: en-
titled, spoiled, self-centered want-
it-alls and know-it-alls.
We’re told from an early age that
if we dream it, we can be it. We
expect accessible post-secondary
education. We expect to be handed
highly-paid, professional careers
where we will quickly move up the
corporate ladder. We expect that
with a university degree in hand,
we’ll never have to work a shity
retail or fast food job again. It’s all
about us, our uninhibited ambi-
tions, our incessant chant of me,
me, me, me, me.
At least, that’s what the countless
articles, columns and blog posts es-
pousing disdain for people our age
would suggest.
However, I wonder if we’re re-
ally asking for so much.
This is certainly the dream my
parents had set out for me. Both
born in the middle of the baby
boom, they come from humble be-
ginnings. My dad is the only child
of Polish immigrants who came
to Canada after being liberated
from Nazi labour camps. My mom
grew up in a village in New Bruns-
wick as one of nine children. Her
mother, who lost her WWII veteran
husband and had many mouths to
feed, at times had to turn to social
assistance. Despite the disadvan-
tages of their backgrounds, both
my parents built very successful
lives for themselves. My dad put
himself through a business degree
while living above a Chinese gro-
cer in Kensington Market and my
mom convinced an ad agency to
not only hire her without a post-
secondary degree, but pay for her
to further her education. Good luck
trying to do that these days.
As my mom put it, times were
simpler then. No one was intern-
ing for free, even several years af-
ter graduating, and geting a pro-
fessional job without a university
degree was completely atainable.
There was far less government
assistance with tuition and mov-
ing up in your industry could be
very difcult, but the middle class
dream was still alive. My parents
were able to start a family, pur-
chase a home and keep a car up and
running. They, like most parents,
wanted to give me a beter life with
more advantages than their own.
And to their credit, they did.
They encouraged me from middle
school to atend university, paid
my tuition and supported the in-
dustry I chose for myself.
The entitlement of my generation
is also the hopes and dreams of our
parents. But the economy doesn’t
share their vision.
I do not expect that I’ll be able to
own a home (or even a tiny condo)
in this city for quite some time. If
one day I choose to have a family,
leaving my career for an extended
period of time won’t be an option.
And it turns out that our university
degrees aren’t that valuable unless
we’re willing to pair them with
further education (and debt) or an
eagerness to be used as free labour
until someone gives us a shot.
Generation Me has some high ex-
pectations and we’re being told to
stuf them away because the “real
world” can’t support them. We’re
not assholes, we were told over and
over that the world was a diferent,
more oyster-like place.
Perhaps this is why we take to
the streets to protest fees. Expect-
ing a free ride is ridiculous, but I
don’t blame anyone for being furi-
ous that their ever more expensive
education is meaning less and less.
On page 12, you’ll read that
there’s a light at the end of the tun-
nel, but it’s dim. Sadly, Generation
Me has no choice but to grow up.
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5
February 29, 2012
The Eyeopener
NEWS
Copyright software breaches privacy
With two Ontario Universities fresh off the heels of enrolling with a controversial licensing company, Diana Hall reports
on whether or not Ryerson will follow and sign on with Access Copyright
The University of Western On-
tario and the University of Toronto
have entered a controversial copy-
right agreement with licensing gi-
ant Access Copyright, raising con-
cerns about the future of Ryerson’s
own policies.
The agreement, which was f-
nalized last month, included: pro-
visions increasing per-student
licensing fees to $27.50, defning
hyperlinking as a method of pho-
tocopying, and a mandate to track
and monitor student-faculty email
for linked copyrighted material. It’s
a modifed version of the Canadian
copyright license provider’s push
for revenue in an online education-
al environment.
“Access copyright is trying to in-
crease the tarif from $3.38 to $45
per (full-time) student,” said Julia
Shin Doi, General Counsel of the
Ryerson Board of Governors. “The
copyright landscape is changing
with all the digital access of materi-
als, so Access Copyright is probably
looking at its own business model
to see how they can continue to
make money of of copy.”
The agency protects its authors
and publishers while creating part-
nerships with universities for legal
access to writen material, mean-
ing that universities can photocopy
copyright-protected material to re-
distribute to students and faculty.
Ryerson University has instead
opted for the Interim Agreement
with Access Copyright, as well as
the Ryerson Fair Dealing Policy
(which gives students and faculty
members leeway to use copyright-
ed material for educational purpos-
es). Students are paying approxi-
mately $17 each under the current
arrangement.
Roxanne Dubois, National Chair-
person of the Canadian Federation
of Students (CFS), said that the CFS
was betrayed by the agreements
signed by Western and the Uni-
versity of Toronto on Jan 30. She
argued that the licensing agency’s
provisions invade student privacy
and educational well-being.
“[Access Copyright] is basically
just charging students extra money
and restricting access to works that
we need to have access to as stu-
dents,” Dubois said.
The CFS and the Canadian Asso-
ciation of University Teachers fled
a joint objection in 2010 against the
copyright provision overhaul, call-
ing the increased cost for students
“excessive,” and the Canadian li-
cense provider’s provisions of mon-
itoring student and faculty emails
as an “unreasonable burden.”
Avner Levin, chair of the law &
business department at the Ted
Rogers School of Management,
agreed that Access Copyright’s
proposal is a “heavy-handed tool”
that infringes not only on privacy,
but on independence and aca-
demic freedoms.
“I understand
what they’re
trying to do,
they’re try-
ing to get
the best
deal for
their mem-
bers, [but]
I think uni-
versities should
be out looking for
students,” Levin said. “I
don’t think universities should be
worried about Access Copyright
and their interests, they should be
out to protect the students.”
This could all change, as univer-
sities, publishers and distributors
wait for Bill C-11 (the Copyright
Modernization Act) to set the re-
cord straight about the defnition
of ‘copy’ and what are considered
publicly available documents
online.
Levin said Ryerson
should sit back and
wait to see what the
legislation reveals
before entering into
Access Copyright’s
dictatorial “agenda.”
“I think the reality
is that a lot of the ma-
terial today, like in my
classes, is what I would con-
sider publicly available sources that
are available online – and you don’t
want people to start second guess-
ing,” said Levin.
PHoto: ANver LeviN (ABove) courtesy
of ANver LeviN
Drummond advises tuition hike
BY ABIGALE SUBHAN
Approximately 30 suggestions for
post-secondary education appeared
in economist Don Drummond’s an-
nual report to the Ontario govern-
ment to reduce their $16-billion def-
icit. But Ryerson says they are well
equipped if these changes come into
efect.
“If you take a look at what the
Drummond report recommends it
is very consistent with the planning
of the university. If it materializes in
the fscal plan of the province and
is announced with the budget then
[Ryerson’s] planning is right in line
with those recommendations,” said
president Sheldon Levy.
The 668-page report outlines 362
recommendations mainly focused
on health and education.
The report proposes that the
government should maintain its
plan to increase tuition by fve per
cent. Drummond also recommends
scrapping the 30 per cent Ontario
tuition grant, a rebate for post-sec-
ondary students that started this
January.
Levy said the university has
planned in such a way that the tu-
ition fees would go up by fve per
cent and the only additional revenue
that would come from the province
would be through growth funding.
“I think Ryerson is gearing up for
various scenarios of cutbacks,” said
John Shields, professor of politics
and public administration.
“The main issue is bracing with
how do you do more with less.”
But he feels the university has an
advantage in comparison to other
institutions.
“Ryerson is in a well-placed geo-
graphic position that is very much
in demand. The programs here are
atractive because [students feel]
secure about their futures,” said
Shields.
Along with those suggestions,
Drummond wants universities to
consider changing some four-year
degree programs to three continu-
ous years.
Shamhad Abdi, a second-year
nursing student, is not in favour of
this proposal.
“It’s not benefcial to learning.
No one can focus for that long,” she
said. “The only thing that gets me
through the year is thinking about
summer.”
According to Taryn Linder,
fourth-year arts and contemporary
studies student, this idea will not be
manageable for students.
“I don’t think [changing pro-
grams to three years] would work,”
said Linder. “That makes it more in-
accessible to pay for your education.
Many students rely on summers to
make a substantial amount of in-
come to subsidize their tuition.”
However, despite these sug-
gested cutbacks, the report rec-
ommends increasing government
funding for post-secondary educa-
tion by 1.5 per cent annually until
2017-18.
Abdi said the funding increase
doesn’t make sense.
“It’s counter-intuitive. You can’t
increase the funding for universities
and then raise the tuition by fve per
cent,” said Abdi.
The provincial government will
make a fnal decision on these rec-
ommendations in next month’s
budget. This budget will in turn de-
termine Ryerson’s own.
Drummond warned that failure
to implement these suggestions will
lead to a $30-billion defcit by 2017.
I think Ryerson is gear-
ing up for various sce-
narios of cutbacks.
— John Shields,
Professor of politics
and public
administration
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7 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener NEWS
Forever ongoing Briefs and Groaners
BY Sean Tepper
aSSociaTe newS ediTor
Ryerson students will have to
wait until the beginning of next
semester to step foot in The Peter
Gilgan Athletic Centre at the Gar-
dens, as the university’s new ath-
letic facility is not expected to be
opened until early this summer.
“What we call the base build is
now completed. All the cement
work [is done], and now we’re into
the ft ups,” said Ryerson President
Sheldon Levy. “If you compared
it to a house, you’re now into the
wallboards, the plumbing, etc. If
you went into the arena you’d see
that the ice and the plumbing from
the ice has been put in and you’ll
see the form for the seats but the
seats haven’t been put in. All the
structures necessary [and] all the
base build is in.”
Originally expected to open last
fall, and then slated to be opened
this March, MLG has encoun-
tered a number of minor setbacks
that have afected its construction
schedule.
“A couple of extra months for
something like this is basically on
schedule,” he said. “There will be a
grand opening date, but it has not
been fnalized yet.”
With the construction now ex-
pected to be completed by June,
Ryerson is expected to hold two
grand openings: one for the media
in July and one for its student body
in September. However, no specif-
ic plans have been made.
“It will likely be in June [and]
there will almost certainly be an-
other opening in September,” said
Levy.
“A lot of planning is going into
this.”
If construction is completed on
time and students are permited
in the facility by September, Ry-
erson’s student union will likely
hold their annual parade and pic-
nic in the Gardens.
An independent cofee house is
bringing an old-school twist to Ry-
erson’s Image Arts building, as Bal-
zac’s Cofee Roastery is set to open
this April.
Beating out big-name cofee
houses like Starbucks for the spot,
Ryerson’s version won’t likely have
a huge chandelier like its original
Distillery District counterpart, but
Julia Hanigsberg, VP administra-
tion and fnance, said that Balzac’s
is still responsible for its own decor.
Its designers will aim to uphold the
cafés cozy and rustic feel and a pa-
tio section on Gould Street will be
incorporated in the design.
Hanigsberg also said that Bal-
zac’s will accept OneCard pay-
ments and that students will be able
to apply for jobs at the cofee house
when it opens.
Fourth-year flm major Elaine
Poon is excited for a Tim Hortons
alternative on campus.
“I love the [Balzac’s] at the Distill-
ery and I hope that the interior of
ours is going to look just as great,”
she said.
Balzac’s has only fve other loca-
tions in Ontario, and frst gained a
name amongst Torontonians for
the rustic furniture and homey am-
biance of its downtown Distillery
District location.
“I felt that we ft because we are
local, have strong ties with the art
and creative community of Toron-
to,” said Diana Olsen, President of
Balzac’s to The Eyeopener last month.
The cofee house which has their
own roastery located in Stoney
Creek, Ont., will ofer cofee and
espresso beverages along with a
small collection of sandwiches and
pastries.
In light of the announcement about Ryerson’s newest building project,
here are some updates on the ones you care most about
The Peter Gilgan Athletic Centre at the Gardens
photo: Lindsay boeckL
photo: courtesy of baLzac’s
BY TanYa mok
on four different occa-
sions, numerous pellet
holes were found in doors
and windows across
campus. police attended
to update their investigation
on similar incidents, which
have clearly been caused
by call of duty enthusiasts
who have been kicked out-
side by their roommates
who are actually getting
laid.
on Feb. 22, security at-
tended kerr Hall east room
137 for a report of vandal-
ism. a student discharged
a fre extinguisher and
got residue all over the
computers and desk. The
room was cleared due to
the amount of residue in
the area as a precaution-
ary measure. This stu-
dent clearly has a problem
containing his residue on
school grounds.
in the image arts building
on Feb. 16, near room B21,
a student reported her lock
had been cut off her locker.
The offender stole a pencil
case with $800 cash and
various art supplies. oh,
those crazy arts students
and their crazy artsy drug
money.
a student discovered her
locker was broken into in
kerr Hall west after she re-
turned to fnd her laptop and
fnance textbook was gone
and her belongings had
been rummaged through.
The lock still remained
secure, causing us to won-
der what kind of crazy ninja
ghost student we can blame
for this witchcraft.
an intoxicated non-
community member who
claimed he was looking
for a U.S. senator was es-
corted out of the library by
security on Friday, Feb 24.
maybe he was looking for
ryerson Senate nominees,
but we understand why he
got confused as no one
knows who the hell they
are.
Security rushed over to
the quad on Sunday, Feb.
26, in response to reports
of freworks being set off.
when they got there, they
found a student group
shooting freworks at
each other and attempt-
ing to block them with a
Captain America shield
as part of a test to become
frosh leaders. nerdS
aSSemBLe!
Balzac’s Coffee Roastery
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Job # None Filename HUM_11101_CampusPlus_University_Jan9_v3.indd Modified 1-10-2012 9:32 AM Created 1-10-2012 9:31 AM Station Brian’s MacBook Pro
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FOR A
DIFFERENT
PATH?
See what Humber’s
four-year bachelor’s
degrees have to offer.
Expert faculty, industry
connections, and the
insight you’ll need for
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DEGREES DIPLOMAS APPRENTICESHIPS CERTIFICATES CONTINUING EDUCATION
8 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener FEATURES
Never
Back
Down.
Photo: Marissa DeDerer
9 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener FEATURES
D
erek Soberal stands along
a police barrier with a
crowd in Nathan Phil-
lips Square as part of a January
protest against Toronto budget
cuts. Holding a small camera, he
flms the scene as tension grows
between the protestors and police.
The situation erupts as a protes-
tor atempts to break through the
line. In the ensuing chaos, a police
ofcer knocks Soberal’s camera
down and punches him in the face
before stomping on the camera.
However, when Soberal crosses
the police barrier atempting to
retrieve his camera, he is arrested
and charged with unlawful as-
sembly, mischief and two counts
of obstructing a police ofcer.
A photo in the Toronto Sun
shows Soberal in handcufs,
bruised and
bloody.
He quotes
Martin Luther
King in ratio-
nalizing why he
went over the
police barrier
to retrieve his
camera, contain-
ing potential
evidence of the alleged assault:
“I submit that an individual who
breaks a law that conscience tells
him is unjust, and who willingly
accepts the penalty of imprison-
ment in order to arouse the con-
science of the community over its
injustice, is in reality expressing
the highest respect for the law.”
S
oberal has gone from being
unable to recite his phone
number without stutering
to being a prominent voice of the
Toronto protest scene, featured
on the CBC’s Lang and O’Leary
Exchange and credited in a G20
edition of The Fifth Estate. He also
created an activist-based YouTube
channel, TheSecretStore, with
over 5,000 subscribers and 3.5 mil-
lion upload views, as well as the
35,000 member Occupy Canada
Facebook page.
But January’s budget protest
was not Soberal’s frst run-in with
Toronto police. His life as an ac-
tivist and citizen journalist started
with the 2010 G20 protests and
Ryerson’s now-defunct CKLN
radio station’s Word of Mouth
Wednesday program.
“Basically I got involved [with
CKLN] because of the G20 sum-
mit,” says Soberal.
“That was my frst protest …
and I exercised my rights at that
time. I got invited onto the show
by [host] Daniel Libby to talk
about the experience.”
He would become a regular on
Libby’s show, eventually earning
the title of CKLN programmer.
“Derek is atracted to media
atention,” says Libby. “He’s not
afraid to talk to reporters when
they’re around.”
His ability to speak on the radio
and communicate with the media
is a hard-earned skill — from the
time he was a toddler until his
teens, Soberal underwent speech
therapy. Today, he speaks with
near-perfect clarity, pausing oc-
casionally if his stuter starts to
creep back in.
He says this ability to speak
publicly is inspired by Libby.
“[Libby] was confdent on the
radio, and my voice was crack-
ing the frst time,” Soberal says. “I
learned from him.”
Through the radio show, the
pair promoted Toronto G20 Ex-
posed, a documentary produced
by Soberal. The flm highlights
questionable police actions during
the G20 weekend, and premiered
at the Student Campus Centre on
Gould Street as part of the Ryer-
son Student Union’s Xpressions
Against Oppression week.
One scene in the documentary
shows security
footage from
Soberal’s condo-
minium, a block
away from Ry-
erson, about two
months after the
G20 protests. As
he tells it, So-
beral noticed a
police car across
the street with its lights of, so he
approached the ofcer and asked
a few questions. After saying
goodbye, the police ofcer then
drove away and came back, accus-
ing him of loitering and forcefully
pushing him.
After running from the ofcer
who pushed him, Soberal was
detained by as many as 12 of-
cers who seem to come out of no-
where. He also claims that while
they searched him, they were call-
ing him a drug addict, an alcohol-
ic and mentally unstable.
“My cell phone and iPad were
geting searched,” he recalls.
Though he was eventually re-
leased without charge, he felt it
was a message. “I felt like I was
being targeted … I felt like it was
a threat; I felt intimidated.”
Toronto G20 Exposed was used as
a source for The Fifth Estate’s doc-
umentary You Should Have Stayed
At Home, with Soberal given spe-
cial thanks in the credits.
When the Occupy Wall Street
movement was happening, Sober-
al created the Facebook page “Oc-
cupy Canada.” That prompted a
producer from the CBC to contact
him to be interviewed on the Lang
and O’Leary Exchange. Soberal ap-
peared on the show Oct 14: the eve
of mass demonstrations world-
wide, including Occupy Toronto.
Day three of those protests was
also day one of Social Justice Week
at Ryerson, and Occupy Toronto
was invited to join the campus for
a rally. However, some Ryerson
students wondered what message
that sends.
“Occupy Toronto was an illegal
activity, I don’t think Ryerson or
the students’ union should get in-
volved in that,” says Mark Single,
a fourth-year student in indus-
trial engineering. Single has run
for RSU president multiple times
against the activism-heavy Stu-
dents United platform in an at-
tempt to focus Ryerson’s fnances
on education.
B
ut Ryerson does have insti-
tutionalized connections to
activism. The university’s
Gindin Chair in Social Justice and
Democracy is mandated to “cre-
ate a hub of interaction between
social justice activists and aca-
demics at Ryerson University.”
Current chairholder Winnie Ng
acknowledges the divide between
the law and the protests, but says
social justice is still important.
“I think the message is quite
clear that Ryerson as a campus
is supportive in increasingly di-
verse strategies of organizing,”
she says. “It was most appropri-
ate for us to kick of Social Justice
Week with Occupy Toronto on the
International Day for the Eradica-
tion of Poverty.”
Single says he’s against any
university promoting activism on
campus, because an educational
institution shouldn’t have politi-
cal values.
“Ryerson is a university; Ryer-
son’s role is to teach students,” he
says. “Ryerson has zero interest.
It’s not part of the student’s con-
tract with the university to have
students engaging [in activism].”
Sandy Hudson, Chairperson of
the Canadian Federation of Stu-
dents-Ontario, says otherwise.
“Our whole purpose is educa-
tion and innovation, essentially
changing our world and making
it beter — everything that we do
is moving forward our society,”
says Hudson. “Why wouldn’t
we, as students, use that time to
use what we’re learning to practi-
cally change our world? I actually
think it’s integral to the learning
process.”
T
he divide among students’
views of campus activ-
ism is highly visible right
now in Montreal, where students
staged a sit-in at the McGill Uni-
versity administration building.
Another group of students, upset
with the demonstration, created
an event on Facebook entitled:
The James 6th Floor occupiers
do NOT represent me. More than
2,100 students have signed up so
far.
The McGill sit-in was the sub-
ject of a recent episode of CBC Ra-
dio’s The Current, in which Single
talks about his distaste for student
sit-ins, protests and marches. He
says he has a problem with it
when it infringes on others’ rights
and takes up extra costs in order
to accommodate the protest. But
Soberal sees it as a necessary cost
to incur.
“Everybody has the right to
freely think what they want, but
at the end of
the day we are
all individuals,
and sometimes
trafc is stopped
because it’s
not business as
usual,” says So-
beral. “There’s
something that
needs to be brought to the public
atention. It creates spark, aware-
ness … sometimes you have to
create atention to make it an is-
sue.”
But Single doesn’t buy into the
idea that activism, like Occupy
Toronto or the G20 protest, actu-
ally gets anything done.
“If you want to make a dif-
ference in this world, go to
school, become successful, be-
come wealthy, and then use your
wealth as a philanthropist, like
Bill Gates or Warren Bufet,” says
Single. “They’re billionaires and
making signifcant change in the
world … because they’re success-
ful academically. Marching and
protesting isn’t really making a
diference.”
Ng says students should look
beyond their texts and assign-
ments to bring their educational
process into broader political,
ecological, and social contexts to
become more critical thinkers.
“For example, I could just hit
my books and be the best that I
can be in my feld, but how does
that relate and transcend to the
rest of society?” asks Ng. “How
does excelling in what I’m doing
having an impact in the larger
community?“
She sees the post-secondary
community as essential to social
change.
“To me, that’s the essence of
learning, critical refection, some-
thing that’s down deep in your
core, there’s some sense of core
values,” she says. “So for me
building a society that’s more car-
ing and more just, we need more
people to act when those core val-
ues are violated.”
Though he never actually at-
tended Ryerson, Soberal contin-
ues to be involved with many of
the same causes as student activ-
ists.
“We are all a part of the change
that we want to see,” says Soberal.
“I think university activism and
community activism are all con-
nected. What a great way to start,
in university, to stand behind
something you believe in, to cre-
ate networks and communities
and make a diference.”
He says he may be taking action
against the Toronto Police, but not
until his trial for the camera inci-
dent is over.
Soberal’s father Richard found
out about the arrest from a friend.
“I was prety disturbed … I
turned on the TV and they kept
replaying it,” he says. “They
showed him in handcufs and
bringing him into city hall. That
upset me.”
Four people were arrested at
the rally, but
only Soberal was
detained over-
night. Richard
says he thinks
they purposeful-
ly kept Soberal
because he had
been in the pub-
lic eye as part of
protest movements.
S
oberal was raised near the in-
tersections of Jane Street and
Finch Avenue West, an area
with an unsavoury reputation.
“I mean, when we were liv-
ing there, you had to stick up for
yourself,” recalls Richard. “You
couldn’t run away from anything
because the kids would be on your
back. [Derek] got in some fghts
and that, but you know, it was just
normal stuf.”
Soberal says the experience was
formative and helped make him
who he is. “Growing up in Jane
and Finch was a great place, it cre-
ates adversity but it creates char-
acter,” he says. “And that’s my
home.”
“Moving down here now, down
here is just the center of every-
thing, ‘the big city.’ If he was liv-
ing outside the city I don’t think he
would be involved like he is,” says
Soberal’s father. Arguably, he’s
more concerned for his son now
than when they lived at Jane and
Finch.
“Personally, I told him to back
of [the activism] for a while and
that’s the way I feel now,” he says.
”I’m proud of him for what he’s
doing, he’s puting in a lot of ef-
fort and he knows what he’s talk-
ing about, but I’m just scared that
something bad is going to happen
to him.”
Richard is especially concerned
because Derek’s brother Shawn
passed away in 2009 at the age of
33. The family has not disclosed
the circumstances involved in
Shawn’s death.
“I lost one son and I don’t
want to lose another,” Rich-
ard says. “As a father I’m just
worried.”
But Soberal has no plans on
stopping. He’s still flming and
editing videos, and still strongly
believes in activism and citizen
journalism. He wears his brother’s
jacket (pictured) when he atends
protests, saying he feels protected
by it.
“I think everyone has to rec-
ognize that we have the freedom
of assembly and the freedom of
speech and we must exercise all of
it,” says Soberal. “We have voices,
we gota speak out; we have bod-
ies, we gota stand up.
“It’s about being there for some-
thing that you stand behind. We
have a climate in Canada where it’s
winter and a lot of people can’t get
out. We’re hoping for a Canadian
Spring.”
[Soberal] is not afraid
to talk to reporters
when they’re around.
—Daniel Libby,
former CKLN host
I felt like it was a threat;
I felt intimidated.
—Derek Soberal
Marching and protest-
ing isn’t really making
a difference.
—Mark Single,
fourth-year engineering
Derek Soberal has had his share of run-ins with police as a documentarian
and protestor, but he’s still fghting. Eric Mark Do reports
10 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener COMMUNITIES
Supporting First Nations
The Centre for Indigenous Governance making progress within community
By Tara Deschamp
The Centre for Indigenous Gov-
ernance was launched March 2010
to support research and enhance
opportunities for indigenous stu-
dents and integrate indigenous cul-
ture into the Ryerson community.
Since the centre opened, it has
developed key partnerships with
First Nations in Ontario.
They have worked closely with
the Union of Ontario Indians on
First Nations education issues, par-
ticipated in several First Nation ed-
ucation policy conferences, and co-
hosted and co-chaired the frst ever
First Nation- led Academic Think
Tank on First Nation Education.
Pamela Palmater, a Mi’Kmaq
lawyer and professor in the depart-
ment of politics and public admin-
istration, has been the interim act-
ing director of the Centre.
Palmater, says she couldn’t re-
fuse the ofer when she discovered
that the centre would be indige-
nous-led.
She says being Mi’kmaq is an as-
set to the research the centre does.
“The fact that I’m Mi’kmaq and
come from similar culture and
histories as other Indigenous Na-
tions helps me direct my research
in a way that will contribute to the
work First Nations are doing,” says
Palmater.
She atributes her approach to
teaching and the Centre’s work to
her culture.
“As an indigenous person, I
come at teaching, research and
partnerships from a decolonization
framework where the focus is on
indigenous legal traditions, laws,
customs, histories, knowledges and
perspectives,” she says.
Although the centre only has two
staf members, Palmater says stu-
dents are becoming involved in the
centre’s work and some of the First
Nations proposals she makes to the
federal government.
“I have research assistants work-
ing on key research to help me with
public presentations, information
sessions for First Nations commu-
nities, and even for my submis-
sions for parliament on legislation
impacting First Nations,” she says.
As part of her research, Palmater
and the Centre have hosted a lec-
ture series on minority rights and
indigenous identity, and an ethics
speaking series a with former Prime
Minister Paul Martin and members
of the First Nations community.
They’ve also launched a partner-
ship between Ryerson and the First
Nations Technical Institute which
allows First Nations students to
earn certifcates, advanced certif-
cates and bachelor degrees.
Since the program’s inception,
over 178 First Nations students
from over 30 communities have
taken courses in subjects like fnan-
cial management, public adminis-
tration and policy analysis.
According to Palmater, partner-
ships like these are benefcial for
all students because they help to
demystify stereotypes about indig-
enous people and distinguish be-
tween fact and myth.
“The main aim [of the centre’s
work] is to develop partnerships
with First Nations to work on ar-
eas related to governance, to con-
duct research on indigenous laws,
policies, governance and specialty
issues like citizenship, and to de-
velop curriculum related to indig-
enous studies,” she says.
In the coming months, the cen-
tre will hold a lecture series about
indigenous women in leadership
positions.
It will also be hosting a confer-
ence in the fall regarding the Unit-
ed Nations and relations to indig-
enous rights.


Pamela Palmater, interim acting director of the Centre. Photo: MohaMed oMar
Drink of the week
Alien Brain Hemorrhage
TOdo
Wednesday, Feb. 29
Queen’s Blyth Worldwide
information session
Queen and Beaver
35 elm street @ 5 p.m.
Third year photography
show. Until march 10
I.m.a. Gallery, 80 spadina
avenue, suite 305
Be Well and Be active:
De-stress and Unwind
KhW 362 @1:30 p.m. -
3:00 p.m.
Thursday, March 1
Interventions Lecture series
arc 202, Department of architectural
science, 325 church st.
@ 6:30 p.m. — 8:30 p.m.
Friday, March 2
meTa 2012 & the Image arts Union.
Game night @ the ram in the rye.
Nintendo 64 competitive showdown,
minimum 25 cent donation per game.
GO TO THEEYEOPENER.COM
TO CHECK OUT OUR NEW
SEX COLUMN!
INGREDIENTS
1/2 shot peach schnapps
1/2 shot Bailey's Irish Cream
A few drops of Blue Curacao
A few drops of grenadine
Photo: Marissa dederer
DIRECTIONS
Pour the peach
schnapps into a shot
glass. To layer the
Bailey’s, flip a spoon
upside down, place it
on top of the schnapps
and gently pour in the
Bailey’s. Add a few
drops of Blue Curacao
and top it up with
grenadine.
Humber Ad-4x7.5-outline.indd 1 12-02-01 10:16 AM
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PATHWAYS TO FURTHER EDUCATION
helping out the workers here and
there. He only sits down briefy
twice in two hours to answer phone
calls for more pizza orders.
Sufyan, 36, used to be a merchant
seaman. He started working at
around 18 years old, and travelled
all around the world as a deckhand.
He helped run the ship for four
years.
“Too many girls, too much fun,”
Sufyan says, reminiscing on the
simple and exciting lifestyle he had
as a teenager.
Later, in 1997,
he decided to
come to Can-
ada where
he started
wor ki ng
at Big
Slice full
time.
“When
I frst came
to Big Slice,
I thought I
couldn’t do
this. I was scared,
because this guy
came to my other workplace
and told me to come work here. I
didn’t know the guy. I came on a
Saturday night and it was crazy
here, so I thought ‘I don’t know.’ I
went home and then thought, ‘Why
can’t I do this? Everyone here is like
11 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener ARTS & LIFE
Dance Matters is an organization that provides venues for dancers to perform in an industry where fnding stages can often
be a major barrier to success. Susana Gómez Báez reports
He’s kind of a Big Slice
“Make sure I get an extra big slice
sir,” says a young blonde woman
at the counter, dressed scantily in
a tight, short black dress. She, like
many others, is at Big Slice fulfll-
ing late-night cravings after drink-
ing and partying.
She smiles at Abu “Sufe” Sufyan,
the owner and manager of Big Slice
Pizza, who is helping move along
the order line. She looks down at
the slice with tipsy amazement, as
Sufyan carefully chooses a colossal
slice and hands it to her.
The width is larger
than two hands
put side-by-
side; most
cus t omer s
even fold
the serv-
ing in half
to make
it easier
to eat. The
woman ac-
cepts the
pizza and grins,
stumbles into a
chair, and starts to bite
down into the gooey cheese
and crispy crust.
It is around 1 a.m. on a Friday
night, and Sufyan, a Pakistani im-
migrant, has been working since 6
a.m. the previous day. He shufes
around the back of the counter,
me.’”
This turned out to be a good de-
cision. “I became the manager after
one year,” he says with a harsh, de-
termined gaze.
It is now 1:45 a.m.
Sufyan looks out into the clusters
of people enjoying their food.
“You know this place, so many
people meet the girls here, and
get married. Lots of girls and guys
meet here. When you come from
the party, here the music is playing,
it’s a good place, right?”
Sufyan should know. He met his
wife Natasha here, and has been
married to her for six years.
Sufyan works two jobs to sup-
port his family.
Currently, he only works part-
time at Big Slice. For the rest of his
time, Sufyan runs a magazine and
newspaper distribution company.
“You need to divide the time,”
he says. “Or else, no time for fam-
ily. You need to pay the bills, right?
Now my kids are going to a private
school.”
After starting work at 6 a.m. the
previous day, Sufyan will work un-
til 5 a.m., and then he will pack up
the building and go home.
He mentions at least 150 of their
enormous pizzas have been sold.
He says today was not that busy.
“Saturday will be beter.”
Photo: mohamed omar
University can be tough, espe-
cially in a program as demand-
ing as performance dance. But, for
many students, that’s just the frst
of a series of challenges — fnding
work outside of university can be
difcult at the best of times.
Dance Maters is a not-for-proft
organization that encourages pro-
fessional dancers to focus on origi-
nality and creativity — instead of
fnancial difculties — by provid-
ing dancers with a venue and pro-
duction team. The show started
season 16 this weekend.
The show featured 29-year-old
Lauren Cook, a 2005 Ryerson grad-
uate, who danced a piece that vi-
sualized feelings of paralysis and
perpetual ignorance.
The piece, choreographed by
Oflio Portillo, is called Euforik-
abyss. It features a mixture of se-
lected street dance styles.
Cook says that during rehearsals,
she contemplated ideas of claustro-
phobia and fear to get into charac-
ter.
But she hasn’t always had a char-
acter to get into.
“When I graduated I felt over-
whelmed, intimidated and unpre-
pared,” Cook said.
Upon receiving her diploma, she
joined a collective — a group of
dancers who work together, like a
company. There, Cook was able to
meet many artists and learn more
about the craft.
“Dance is my whole life,” she
said. “It’s my identity.”
Today, Cook teaches dance and
even has her own company. She
recognizes how tough the competi-
tion is. She celebrates Dance Mat-
ters for providing a great opportu-
nity.
The organization has held all its
series at Scotiabank Studio Theatre
since it was founded in 2006 by
Tanya Crowder, the organization’s
artistic director and a professional
dancer herself.
A struggle with the venue’s small
and casual roots originally plagued
the group, said co-artistic director
Stuart Baulch.
Baluch, a 1995 Ryerson theatre
school graduate, is in charge of pro-
duction, which he says has come a
long way over the years.
“If you don’t have a venue, make
one,” Baulch said.
In the end, the most important
thing to Baulch and Crowder is that
dancers who want to dance are per-
forming.
“There aren’t a lot of presenters
in Toronto,” Cook said. The only
other option, according to Cook, is
to self-produce, which is too expen-
sive because dancers then have to
pay for all the costs.
“Dance Maters gives you the op-
portunity to present work that you
otherwise wouldn’t be able to pres-
ent. Plus, there is no entrance fee.”
Dancers wishing to participate
must submit their applications,
consisting of a draft describing
their piece (sometimes including
video) and a list of their experience.
The shows are customarily fol-
lowed by a discussion in which the
audience is welcome to exchange
comments and ideas with the cho-
reographers and performers.
The conversation’s main goal is
to encourage the audience to be-
come a part of the world of dance
and to understand the process that
goes into a performance.
“Dance is a very challenging life-
style,” said David Steele, the Dance
Maters general manager and trea-
surer.
Steele, another 1995 Ryerson the-
atre graduate, decided to become
a part of the Dance Maters team
because he believes that fnancial
worries should not stunt talent.
Remembering his days in school,
Steele asks student dancers who are
just starting out to not give up.
“Ryerson dancers are some of the
best in the country – if not the best
in the country,” Steele said. “And I
know they’ll continue to be success-
ful so they shouldn’t worry about
competition.”
Cook gives Ryerson dancers
some frst-hand industry advice on
this topic.
“Prepare by learning how to
write grants so that when you get
out [you] can start applying for
funding and then can do every-
thing that [you] want to do,” she
said. “You have to be a good writer
if you want to support your work.”
Cook also stressed the impor-
tance of persistence.
“Don’t give up just because in the
frst six months nobody asks you to
do anything.”
Making dance matter
Photo: mariSSa dederer
Big Slice is one of the most popular pizza shops near campus. megan
matsuda spent a day with its owner
business.humber.ca/pathways
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13574 Pathway Ad 4x7.5 2/3/12 3:25 PM Page 1
She tossed her smoke onto
Yonge Street and went back inside.
The Friendly Thai handed her
more than $8 per hour of work un-
der the table for that night. As she
left to go home, she was greeted by
a screeching woman and a mouse
scurrying away.
“I need a real job,” she thought.
That was one of the more hope-
less moments Candice van Ra-
venswaay has had three months
before graduating from Ryerson
with an undergraduate degree in
fnance and a minor in law.
“The professors don’t have to
tell us. It’s all over the place; all
over the news, from all the people
we know that have graduated and
don’t have jobs,” van Ravenswaay
said referring to the tough job mar-
ket and recovering economy stu-
dents are facing.
Some may say she has reason to
be worried. The unemployment
rate has risen to 7.6 per cent ac-
cording to the latest Labour Force
survey released in January.
Close to graduating, internships
are unrealistic for van Raven-
swaay. She spends her summers
saving for tuition and her low level
jobs still make a heftier fgure than
her sister does as a professional
medical ultrasound technician.
“Everyone I know is taking
longer to graduate,”said van Ra-
venswaay. “I will need more cre-
dentials; another license or desig-
nation.”
So how’s the “real job” market
and economy looking post-reces-
sion?
The Drummond report is the
most recent statement on Ontario’s
economy. It was released on Feb.
BIZ & TECH
12
February 29, 2012
The Eyeopener
Post grad problems
The state of the labour market is intimidating for upcoming graduates, but
the future may not be as bleak as it seems. Lindsay Fitzgerald reports
TWEETS
OF THE WEEK
Want to vent your frustration
or make us laugh? Use the
#eyeforatweet hashtag. If
we like what we see, we may
print it! Be sure to follow
@theeyeopener for all your
Ryerson news.
@thatCSAguy
1:30am, or as we univer-
sity students call it, “When
completion marks start to
mean more than correct
answers”. #EyeForATweet
@jennleahko
YEAH. I KNOW YOU
HEARD ME. DON’T YOU
DARE IGNORE ME YOU
MOTHER FUCKERS
#Queens #UofT #Ryerson
@jacobmorris
I could go for a Billy right
about now! #ryerson
@LukaszBarto-
szek
Someone seriously needs
to start a #coffee delivery
service. Spending the day
at #Ryerson Library.
@spoonifur
Salad king spring rolls will
be the death of me, can’t
believe I can buy them with
my one card. #eyeforat-
weet
FREE
APPS
OF THE WEEK
PhoTo: LindSAy boEckL Making money post-grad is daunting for many undergraduate students.
22 with over 300 recommendations
from Canadian economist Don
Drummond.
“Ontario faces a series of defcits
that would undermine the prov-
ince’s economic and social future,”
the report said. “While employ-
ment in Ontario is growing again
and has already recovered all the
jobs lost during the recession,
young people, recent immigrants
and Aboriginals continue to un-
der-perform.
“The recession worsened their
employment outcomes, but they
struggled in the job market well
before that.”
A friendlier fgure for business
and technology students is Sta-
tistics Canada’s measure of big
job vacancies. Industries of “pro-
fessional, scientifc and technical
services” are at one of the lowest
unemployment-to-vacancy rate at
just over two per cent.
Outside of the reports and
drowning market fgures is the
growing trend of self-employment.
When businesses won’t hire, some
people choose to start their own.
“I never worried about a job,
never looked for a job, always
dreamt about starting my own
business,” said Alexey Adamsky,
a Ryerson graduate who is doing
his masters degree in computer
science.
Adamsky started his own com-
pany, Three Red Cubes, with a few
other Ryerson graduates and the
company now operates out of the
Digital Media Zone (DMZ).
The team started by developing
games and programming a few
years ago, and is now focused on
mobile and web applications.
“There’s no single idea,” he said.
“We’re always coming up with
new ideas.”
Adamsky held a few part-time
jobs for a short period of time and
worked with DMZ for the research
group before starting his business.
“The biggest challenge is we are
still students,” he said.
Adamsky said doing his mas-
ters requires a lot more self-teach-
ing than a bachelor’s program with
class-time and courses. Learning
how to manage his own time more
efectively gave him the opportu-
nity to develop his own business.
“University gives a solid base,”
he said. “But most of the things I
know now I’ve taught myself.”
As a company owner looking
to hire in the future, Adamsky
doesn’t care where a new employ-
ee’s experience is gained.
“At the end of the day what mat-
ters is you can do what you can say
you can do in an interview,” he
said. “You need to put in your own
time to get practical knowledge.”
He also advises students to get
their masters for a leg up if the
industry in question is especially
competitive.
Felicity Morgan, a career coun-
cillor at the University of Toronto
Mississauga, recommends intern-
ing, contract work, volunteering,
extended schooling and network-
ing to get ahead of the game in the
job market.
“The more you get out there,
the more opportunities you come
across. [By] doing things and talk-
ing to people you can create a lot
of who-you-knows,” she said.
She tells students to look at “ev-
erything as an opportunity.”
She graduated at the end of the
last recession and remembers her
frst job in a shoe store. While she
didn’t study shoes in university, it
paid the rent.
But that survival job paid more
than just the bills because she was
working with people.
“I can’t tell you how many times
I’ve used those skills. It helped me
fgure out what I wanted to do,”
said Morgan.
Pixelated
iPhone | BlackBerry
Prepare to become mas-
sively addicted to a simple
puzzle game. It starts with a
screen of shuffed pixels in six
different colours. The goal is
to change the colour of sur-
rounding pixels to create a
solid colour screen. We dare
you to put it down after trying it.
Shortyz
Android
Enjoy crosswords? Pick up
this app. It brings you mul-
tiple crosswords each day
from major sources like the
New York Times Classic, the
Washington Post and People
Magazine, among others.
The Skyrim World
Interactive Map
iPhone
If you love Skyrim, you’ll
want this. The app brings
the nine holds to the palm of
your hand, allows you to drop
pins on points of interest and
zooms into 3200 per cent. Un-
fortunately, more features will
cost you.
I will need more cre-
dentials; another li-
cense or designation.
— Candice
van Ravenswaay, fourth-
year fnance student
I never worried about a job
... [I] always dreamt about
starting my own business.
— Alexey Adamsky,
Founder of Three Red Cubes
business.humber.ca
WORKS.
FASHION MANAGEMENT
& PROMOTIONS
POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE
From retail management to logistics:
this program offers the unique skills
you will need to launch your career as a:
• Event Manager
• Logistics Coordinator
• Product Development Manager
. Visual Merchandiser
13565 Fashion Mgmt & Promotions - Campus Plus 1/30/12 4:13 PM Page 1
13 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener
SPORTS
Ryerson Rowing barely staying afloat
Twelve years ago, a rowing team was estabished at Ryerson University. The team has since been relegated to club status due to
a lack of interest from the student body and the resignation of their coach, Associate Photo Editor Marissa Dederer reports
GRAPHIC BY MARISSA DEDERER
Clad in spandex, Ben Murphy
carefully lowers the 26 foot long
fberglass boat into the water. He
ataches the oars and climbs into
the boat. He puts his hand on the
wooden dock, careful to avoid the
puddles of goose feces and shoves
away, into open water. His strokes
are short and unbalanced. He wants
to stay upright. Finally, he extends
his arms and crouches, knees to
chest, the oars hover slightly of the
water before plunging down. He
doesn’t even get to fnish his frst
stroke before he tips into the chilly
waters of Lake Ontario. Murphy
swims back to shore ready to call it
quits but his coach, Dominic Kahn
tells him he’s “gota get back in”.
He takes longer and longer strokes
until he’s balanced and fast, gliding
across the water accompanied by
the click-swish of the seat as it slides
in rhythm.
Murphy’s frst time in a
rowing shell parallels the
journey of Ryerson’s rowing
team. The program frst came
to the school in 1996 as a trial
sport for two years. But in ’98,
there was no school interest to
continue, so rowing left Ryer-
son. It came back in 2001 and
David Dubois, who was the
athletic director at the time,
was very supportive. Rowing went
through the same two year proba-
tion and in 2003, started its frst-
ever varsity season.
But over the past few years, the
12-year old varsity team has been
on a downward slide. In the 2010
rowing season, only one athlete
made it into the Ontario University
Athletics Championships (OUA) f-
nals. This result, following an OUA
gold medal in 2009 and silver and
bronze medals in previous seasons
was an obvious step backwards,
even for a team going through a de-
velopmental year. In 2010, over half
the team consisted of athletes who
had never been in a rowing shell
before.
“We had a program [that]
seemed to be on the decline at that
point from where it had been,”
said associate athletics director
Stephanie White. “It felt like we
were having some struggles in
terms of producing some strong
results, growing the program.”
In the fall of 2011, Kahn, who
had spearheaded the rowing pro-
gram, sent in his leter of resigna-
tion. Kahn wrote in the leter that
he could not manage both his pa-
rental responsibilities and coaching
responsibilities for the team.
“This was not an easy decision to
make. I am grateful for the reward-
ing experience I’ve had with Ryer-
son University,” wrote Kahn. “I’m
very proud of what we’ve been able
to do here in my 12 years as head
coach, both on and of the water.”
But Kahn’s resignation was un-
expected for some of his athletes,
Murphy included.
“It kind of took me by surprise,”
said the third-year architecture stu-
dent.
“Not so much surprised that he
was resigning, but surprised as,
okay, what can I do now to further
rowing at Ryerson?”
Murphy had been recruited
to the team during his frst week
at Ryerson in 2009. As in previ-
ous years, he took to the streets in
hopes of recruiting rowers for the
upcoming season.
A meeting was held in Septem-
ber but many unknowns remained.
By late September, it was al-
ready too late to start a program.
The university’s on-water season
only runs until the end of October.
So with no hope of training with a
team at Ryerson, Murphy began
rowing at the Argonaut Rowing
Club, still hoping to represent Ry-
erson at the OUA championships
in late October. But he found the
training was difcult to do on his
own.
“Doing any sport without a
coach is very hard,” he said. “They
serve as motivation, guidance, a
manager, a lot of things that an
athlete on his or her own can’t do.”
Things got even more difcult
for him when he ran into a road-
block with the Ryerson athletics
administration just before OUAs.
“That was a bit of a trouble be-
cause the administration at Ryer-
son felt that I had not received the
level of support necessary to com-
pete at a provincial level. Howev-
er this was not the truth and I was
able to perform,” he said.
The school did support him,
allowing him to represent Ryer-
son at the OUAs and paying the
$1,000 entry fee. Murphy fnished
in sixth place in the fnal, improv-
ing on his previous year’s perfor-
mance. In 2010 he didn’t make the
fnals.
After the OUAs, Murphy took a
short break to focus on his school.
Now, he and rowing veteran Rob
Kania have started training with
a group of four novices. Murphy
and Kania receive workout plans
from former national team mem-
ber Arden Beddoes who acts as
a mentor for the pair. They in
turn alter the workouts for the
novices.
The training is open to any-
one with a Ryerson Athletic
Centre (RAC) membership.
Two weeks ago the team
raced at the Canadian Indoor
Rowing Championships in
Mississauga. Murphy fnished
third in the senior B men’s cate-
gory, while two novices competed
and both raced to best times in the
two kilometer event. Mat Buie, a
Ryerson rowing alum won the se-
nior men’s competition. The last
indoor rowing competition is the
Ontario Indoor Championships at
Ridley College this Saturday.
The newer members of the row-
ing club would like to see the
team grow over the coming year.
Murphy would like to see the
club back as an established varsity
team with a coach although he is
skeptical about the status of the
rowing team changing at all.
White said that Ryerson ath-
letics is hoping to put something
forward soon. She said they will
work towards a bigger rowing
club but the size will depend on
leadership at that level.
Without a coach or the neces-
sary facilities to train at, it’s un-
likely that rowing will become a
varsity sport again.
PHOTO: MARISSA DEDERER
The rowers training for an upcoming competition.
1
9
9
6
:
D
om
inic
Kahn
approaches
Ryerson for the first tim
e about starting a
row
ing team
. The sport starts its tw
o year
probation.
1
9
9
8
:

Th
e

p
ro
b
a
tio
n
e
n
d
s,
b
u
t
th
e

sch
o
o
l d
e
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e
s n
o
t to
ke
e
p
ro
w
in
g
, so
th
e

te
a
m
is d
isb
a
n
d
e
d
.
2
0
0
1
:

Kahn approaches the school
again. The sport gets a tw
o year trial
again.
2
0
0
3
:

R
ye
rso
n ro
w
in
g
sta
rts its first
va
rsity se
a
so
n w
ith six a
th
le
te
s. Th
e
y w
in
tw
o
O
U
A
m
e
d
a
ls: silve
r a
n
d
b
ro
n
ze
.
2
0
0
8
:
M
a
tt B
uie
w
in
s a
n O
U
A
silve
r
m
e
d
a
l, R
ye
rso
n’s first in five
ye
a
rs.
2
0
0
9
:

B
uie
a
n
d
h
is p
a
rtn
e
r Ph
ilip
p
e

R
o
y w
in
s R
ye
rso
n va
rsity ro
w
in
g
’s first O
U
A

g
o
ld
m
e
d
a
l.
2
0
1
1
:

C
o
a
ch

D
o
m
in
ic
K
a
h
n

re
sig
n
s.
R
y
e
rso
n
ro
w
in
g
b
e
co
m
e
s a
clu
b
sp
o
rt.
2
0
1
2
:
B
e
n M
urp
hy w
in
s b
ro
n
ze
a
t th
e

C
a
n
a
d
ia
n
in
d
o
o
r
ro
w
in
g

ch
a
m
p
io
n
sh
ip
s
b
u
t th
e
fa
te
o
f R
ye
rso
n ro
w
in
g
is still un
-
kn
o
w
n
.
Doing any sport with-
out a coach is very
hard.
— Dominic Kahn,
former coach
Increase your skills and competitiveness
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12956 tech ad (4x7.5):Layout 1 12/23/10 6:09 PM Page 1
14 February 29, 2012
The Eyeopener SPORTS
S
P
O
R
T
S
B
R
I
E
F
S
MEN’S FENCING WOMEN’S FENCING
The men’s épée team fell short
against a strong Ottawa team
in a losing cause in the semi-
fnals of the Ontario University
Athletics (OUA) championships,
but they redeemed themselves
by winning the bronze medal
match. Arseni Tikhomiro took
home the bronze medal in the
individual épée event.
The women fnished the season
strong at the OUA champion-
ships. Joanna Kolbe claimed
the gold medal in the individual
event. She was also a part of
the team that won Ryerson’s
frst gold medal in the team
épée event. Kolbe and Veronika
Dinelacker were both named to
the all-star team. By ChRiS BABiC
MEN’S BASKETBALL
The men are heading to the
OUA fnal four for the frst time
since 2000. They defeated the
Ottawa Gee-Gee’s 74-71 this
past Saturday in the fnal com-
petitive game played at Kerr hall
gymnasium before moving to
Maple Leaf Gardens. The Rams
will now face Lakehead in Wa-
terloo this Friday; the game will
be broadcasted nationally.
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
The women saw their season
end at the hands of the Ottawa
Gee-Gee’s, 89-53. The loss
marks the fourth consecutive
season in which the team bowed
out in the quarter-fnals. The
loss was also the end of Ashley
MacDonald’s all-star career at
Ryerson. She fnished second
in the conference in scoring at
18.2 points per game.
Trading spaces
Sports Editor Gabriel Lee talks to fgure skater
Christina Pulla about her move to Ryerson from
the University of Toronto
Last January, Christina Pulla
was faced with difcult decision
many students have encountered:
the choice between the University
of Toronto, where she was a fgure
skater, or Ryerson University. Af-
ter careful consideration, she sub-
mited her application to Ryerson
despite having to compete in two
more events.
Initially, she received some fak
from her teammates at U of T for
the switch, but she had to do what
was best for herself academically.
“I didn’t see myself going any-
where with my
degree [life sci-
ences] at U of
T,” Pulla said.
“I came to
Ryerson for the
nursing pro-
gram.”
Since arriving
at Ryerson in
September, she
has no regrets about leaving U of T.
Pulla said that at U of T, the
coaches of the team often neglect-
ed practice due to of-ice commit-
ments.
Pulla believes that the presence
of head coach Janean Brühn at ev-
ery practice helped the team’s per-
formance immensely.
“At some practices, there wasn’t
even one [coach] there,” Pulla said.
“Janean and Lauren [Wilson] were
at every practice, which was really
motivating…it made me want to be
there as well.”
The frst-year nursing student
also noticed that the skaters at Ry-
erson are more tight-knit than the
team at her previous school.
Two weeks ago, Pulla’s season
culminated in a bronze medal at the
Ontario University Athletics (OUA)
championships. However her podi-
um performance wasn’t her proud-
est accomplishment in her frst year
as a Ram.
In the second competition of the
year, a friendly faceof against U
of T, she skated a perfect program;
something she claims she hasn’t
done since 2006.
Before performing her routine
at the OUA championships, Pulla
was hoping she would be able to
replicate her performance from the
friendly faceof on the big stage.
She admits that regardless of hav-
ing her routine
mastered during
practice, she has
a habit of falter-
ing at competi-
tions.
“I skate clean
in practice every
single day,” Pulla
said.
“But as soon
as it comes to competitions I choke
and fall on jumps, I trip or some-
thing.”
According to Pulla, how you land
the double axel jump determines
your placing in the competition. Six
out of the nine skaters atempted
the jump, and the three that landed
it all fnished on the podium. Pulla
was one of them.
Pulla still feels she can trade in
her bronze medal for a gold next
year if she’s able to incorporate a
triple jump into her routine.
“If I had a triple jump in my pro-
gram, it would trump the double
axel,” Pulla said.
“No one in my event this year
tried it. Diane [Szmiet] won with-
out a triple jump, so I’m assuming
if someone had it they’d be able to
beat her.”
I didn’t see myself
going anywhere with
my degree at U of T.
— Christina Pulla
Figure skater Christina Pulla. PHOTO: MariSSa DEDEDEr
15 Febraury 29th, 2012 The Eyeopener FUNtastic
Gemini
Whatever you
choose to do this
week, you can
be confdent that doing the
exact opposite would have
been a beter choice.
Sagitarius
You’ll consider
checking into re-
hab just to fnd
some dealers that are actual-
ly reliable enough to support
a daily habit.
Aries
Your foray
into the world
of online dat-
ing won’t last too long,
as it seems even the awk-
ward weirdos on the in-
ternet don’t want to talk
to you.
Leo
Without get-
ting into too
much detail, you
should probably brush up
on your zombie survival
plan.
Libra
Pluto may not be
a planet anymore,
but it’s still going
to give you diabetes.
Taurus
By the end
of the week,
you’ll be the
most sought after super-
star in the amputee porn
industry.
Cancer
Sure, those
voices in your
head calling you
worthless are just a byprod-
uct of schizophrenia… But
they’re not wrong.
Virgo
You’ll be sur-
prised to fnd
out that your de-
tailed zombie survival plan
will be almost useless when
the streets are flled with an-
gry grizzly bears.
Scorpio
If people seem to
act unusually cold
to you this week,
it’s only because they’re sick
and tired of pretending you
mater.
Aquarius
Many new and
exciting things
will happen
to you this week, most of
them killer bee-related.
Capricorn
You’ll survive the
Robot uprising
and subsequent
Robocracy, if only due
to your awkward move-
ments and complete lack
of personality.
Pisces
You will invent
a new and ex-
citing form of
beer pong, leaving one
dead and three perma-
nently disabled.
MystiKai’s Prophesy
by Kai benson
SAMURAI
SUDOKU
ATTACK!
Take a stab at this
Samurai Sudoku!
Defeat the sudoku, and
bring its corpse to the
dropbox outside our
offce (SCC 207). Drop
it off with the following
information and you
could be handsomely
rewarded... a $50 cash
bounty will be yours,
brave Ronin.
If you cannot complete
this task, consider
yourself dishonoured.
Seppuku will be your
only remaining option.

Name:
Contact info:
What is your favourite
samurai movie and
WHY:
16 February 29, 2012 The Eyeopener
MOUSE CLICKS
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