AR-664 INFRATRUCTURE PLANNING

REPORT ON

INFRASTRUCTURE CONDITION OF DEHRADUN

SUBMITTED TO: P R O F. R . S H A N K A R

SUBMITTED BY: S U P R I YA G I ROT I MURP-I 11511018

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING, INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, ROORKEE

PART I

ABOUT DEHRADUN

1

REGIONAL SETTING 2 .

vikrams. 24 km from Dehradun city. ACCESSIBILITY Air : The nearest airport is Jolly Grant. Auto rickshaws. Railway station is at Dehradun. Dehradun is connected to other parts of India with a wide network of road and rail routes. buses.GENERAL INFORMATION Area : Altitude : 300 sq km. 960 m. ISBT at 8 km from the city. Rail : Bus: Road : Local modes of Transport: ACCESSIBILITY 3 . taxis.

PHYSICAL GROWTH AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT: There are major issues of overcrowding and haphazard growth. Degradation of riverside and lack of public open spaces. lack of developed land for affordable housing and non-conforming land uses in both core city and newly developed areas. wholesale and local markets. slaughter houses and a range of such facilities. Coupled with this. TRAFFIC CONGESTION NON-CONFORMING LAND USE S I T UAT I O N A L A N A LY S I S 4 . sports and recreational facilities are leading to an unsustainable situation. there are unmet needs of community facilities. eg.. unexplained changes in land uses. congestion in core city area.

the same piece of land has 400 people. It thus requires immediate and sustained effort to upgrade to a full service level. besides. disposal of raw sewage into natural water courses has rendered this sector a cause for environmental and health concern. low pressures. STORM WATER DRAINAGE: Although the natural topography of the city helps in gravity drainage. SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT: The city has not met its mandatory obligations under the Solid Waste Management Rules. natural drainage courses require rehabilitation. as they are choked with disposed solid waste and encroached upon. lack of environmentally sound disposal site(s) and uncontrolled dumping at a site by a rivulet. 2000 and is burdened with an inefficient collection system.(Earlier 5 bighas of land had one household (4 people) with orchard. uncontrolled zoning and unsatisfactory operation and maintenance requires thorough reorganization and upgradation of this sector. water shortage is a big problem.WATER SUPPLY: Unequal distribution of water. Now. particularly by the urban poor. old dilapidated pipelines.) SEWERAGE: Inadequate coverage of area under sewerage system. there are pockets of waterlogging. Hence. requires immediate intervention and a careful planning with adoption of appropriate technology to take care of environmental concerns. S I T UAT I O N A L A N A LY S I S 5 .

congestion and lack of parking spaces are everyday problems citizens face.ROADS AND TRANSPORT: This sector perhaps is the most troubled one with annual vehicular growth reaching an unprecedented rate of 10 percent. Approximately. inadequate traffic management throughout the city and a general lack of proper road hierarchy requires a sustained effort over a period of time to reorganize the road sector. The extremely narrow roads in the core city area. registering an increase of nearly 40 percent over 1991 population. accommodating about 1.6 percent of the poor are families below poverty line (BPL).2 lakh population. URBAN POOR: The city has about 80 poverty pockets or slums. SLUMS S I T UAT I O N A L A N A LY S I S 6 . 7.

PART II DEHRADUN NAGAR NIGAM (DNN) 7 .

which are then transferred to the agencies directly responsible for the provision of infrastructure facilities. Broadly. Different kinds of institutions and organisations. belonging to various levels. Dehradun had been a major urban node in the Garhwal region. various state level agencies are operating here and are responsible for some of the major infrastructures/services provision for the city. the institutions involved in infrastructure/service provision in the city are: • Dehardun Nagar Nigam(commonly known as Dehradun Nagar Nigam) • Mussourie-Dehradun Development Authority • Uttarakhand Pey Jal Nigam • Uttarakhand Jal Sansthan • Town and Country Planning Organisation • Public Works Department • Regional Transport Office • Uttarakhand State Electricity Board • Uttarakhand Environment Protection and Pollution Control Board • Uttarakhand State Urban Development Agency • Uttarakhand Transport Corporation • Uttarakhand Power Corporation Owing to the fact that Dehradun is the capital city of the state. the City has risen to further prominence in politicoadministrative parlance. DEHRADUN WARD MAP (60 WARDS) INSTITUTIONS I N VO LV E D I N INFRASTRUCTURE 8 .Even before its capital city status. After the formation of the Uttarakhand State in 2000. are functioning in the city for the provision of infrastructure and services. designing and execution of the projects. The responsibility often is limited to the planning.

parking lots. The major functions of DNN are: city cleanliness. encroachment removal. all storm water and wastewater drainage. flood control. Although the act lists water supply and waste water management as ULB responsibilities these have been adopted by the State through Jal Nigam and Jal Sansthan. stray cattle management. FUNCTIONS OF DNN 9 . community halls. 1956. sale of land. solid waste management. advertisement. development works.Nagar Nigam Functions The functions of DNN are listed in Uttar Pradesh Nagar Nigam Act. and licensing. maintenance of gardens/dividers/circles. house tax. community toilets. slaughter house. bio-medical waste. street light. It provides for mandatory functions as well as discretionary functions of DNN.

PART III INFRASTRUCTURE CONDITION OF DEHRADUN 10 .

There are two water treatment plants in the city with a total capacity of 34 mld.51 mld) is supplied from ground water sources while the remaining 24. Based on the socio-economic survey of 1160 households it has been that about 71% of the population in the city is covered by piped water supply. the central part with gravity and pumping while the southern part is supplied water through pumping. inefficient network hydraulics. or actual position. The total water losses amount to 30%.WATER SUPPLY Water for the city was supplied only from surface sources earlier but later ground water sources also started being used to supplement the surface source. old and dilapidated networks are some of the other major problems related to water supply in the city. lpcd = litres per capita per day) A WOMAN FILLING WATER AT A SLUM AREA IN DEHRADUN. Deterioration in the quality of water. needs to be obtained from UJS and should not be based on a survey of a small number of households. twice a day. The total water supply to the city is 127. The water supply is operated and maintained in the city by Uttaranchal Jal Sansthan. (mld= mega litres per day. WAT E R S U P P LY 11 .05 mld of which 76% (102. The northern part of the city is supplied water through gravity. Unequal intra-city distribution is one of the problems being faced in the city due to which some localities are facing acute water shortage. Large capital works and overall planning is carried out by Uttaranchal Pey Jal Nigam. The average per capita supply in the city is 124 lpcd at present. The average duration of supply in the city is 4 hours.54 mld is supplied from surface sources. This estimate.

The northern part of the town mainly Rajpur Road and localities around it falls under the gravity flow zone. WAT E R S U P P LY Z O N E S 12 . while the southern part of the town including old city area receive water through pumping.Distribution System Dehradun is broadly divided into three water supply zones. Gravity flow zone. The third zone has come into existence which is in between these two zones and can be called as mixed zone where water is supplied through pumping as well as from surface sources. Pumping flow zone and mixed flow zone.

TUBEWELLS. P U M P I N G STAT I O N S 13 .

The average per capita supply rate may therefore be assumed as 124 litre per day which is slightly below the norm of 135 lpcd prescribed by the Central Public Health and Environmental Engineering Organization (CPHEEO) of Government of India.Per Capita Water Supply Considering 30% line and production losses the total quantity of water reaching to 5. The supply rate varies throughout the town. WAT E R AVA I L A B I L I T Y 14 .000) is about 72 MLD.80.000 population of the town (including a floating population of 35.

S I T UAT I O N A L A N A LY S I S 15 . Of the BPL households 63.3 percent and 86.Majority (90%) of the households have in-house water supply connection.8 percent of the poor have house connection. The number of house connection increases with higher income.

On an average people from the lower and lower-middle income groups travel less than 50 metres and spend half an hour for collection of drinking water. S I T UAT I O N A L A N A LY S I S 16 .

along with the immediate needs as estimated by UJS for proper running and maintenance of the water supply system and to cater to the vision of stakeholders up to the year 2036 have been included in this plan after discussions with UJS officers.. Khurbuda 19. Pathribagh 27.L. Vidya Vihar 28. Curzon Road 16. Sourceworks In order to meet the demand on the above basis it is suggested to continue with the present source i. Laxman Chowk 23. 1. Rest Camp 29. Sachivalaya 4. Mothrowala 31. Adhoiwala VISION ( WAT E R S U P P LY ) 17 . Kishanpur 9.Suggested Interventions to Achieve Sectoral Vision in Water Supply Essential works. Green Park 25. Kaonligaon 21. Tubewells until the year 2036. stakeholders and peoples representatives. . Sahastradhara Road 11. Gandhi Gram 22. Vijay Colony 15. Patel Nagar24. Matawala Bagh 2. Yamuna Colony 18. Lakhi Bag 7. Phase 1) are given below.e. Jhanda Mohalla 20. Trans Bindal – 2 Nos. Tagorevilla 17. Circuit House 3.Canal Road 8. D. 13. The provision of water has been made @ 135 lpcd keeping an allowance of 15% for wastage. Badrish Colony 12. Majra Upper 26.e. Race Course 30. Chidowali 10. Trans Bindal 6. Road 14. The suggested areas for the proposed Tubewells upto 2021 (i. Jakhan 5.

An ambitious rehaul of the water supply and sewage systems is under way in the state capital. REPLACEMENT OF WAT E R P I P E L I N ES 18 .

4 kg per capita per day. Primary collection system exists in very few localities of the city and covers only about 5-6% of the city’s population. The solid waste disposal site (area approx.SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT The city generates about 200 MT of municipal solid waste per day @ 0. Uttarakhand Government has already taken initiatives by identifying four alternative sites at different locations outside the city limits for future disposal of dead animals. 70% of the waste generated is removed daily. SWM 19 . Shifting of the carcass disposal site therefore becomes essential to avoid further environmental degradation of these areas. DNN has identified 15 acres of land located at a distance of 22 kms from the city for future solid waste disposal. 4 ha) is located about 7 kms away from the city and is being used for the last 3 years. These localities are getting populated day by day. According to Dehradun Nagar Nigam (DNN). Disposal of Carcass: At present the dead animals are disposed in two places namely Bhandari Bagh and Kargi.

Inspectors and Supervisors support him.Institutional Setup Public Health Department (PHD) of DNN is responsible for solid waste management of the city. SWM INSTITUTIONAL SETUP 20 . Chief Sanitary Inspectors. DNN has divided the municipal wards into 5 SWM Circles for better management of solid waste. The Senior Health Officer heads the department and Zonal Sanitary Officers.

SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES 21 .

Higher income groups usually appoint private worker for solid waste collection and they pay for this monthly. About 20 percent of the residents burn waste in the locality.Of all the families about 85 percent do not segregate solid waste at source. Segregation is done mainly by the women member of the family. Municipal collection is not uniform in the city. plastic. A solid waste disposal site SWM 22 . Burning is more frequent in BPL localities. Of the households 87 percent sell old newspaper. etc. glass. bottles.

street sweeping in a limited way.ENCOURAGED BY JNNURM Private Sector Participation in SWM: The private sector has been involved in door-to door collection of solid waste. secondary storage and transportation and for treatment and disposal of waste 23 .

GARBAGE CARRIERS IN THE CITY GARBAGE BINS TRICYCLE TATA ACE WHEEL BARROW TRACTOR WITH TROLLEY 24 .

rubber.Disposable diapers and incontinence pads 5.Glass and metallic waste 7.Old stored news papers waste 4. bones 2. 6 Types of waste to be put in the bin meant for food wastes and bio-degradable wastes 1.Rags. sachets and tetra packs (rinsed) SWM 25 . 3 Awareness programmes for segregation of waste.Ashes 7 Types of recyclables wastes to be kept for collection by informal sector / for processing 1. 4 Citizen’s participation and involvement/community participation.Cardboard and cartons 3. including egg shells.Packaging material waste of all kinds 6.PROPOSAL FOR IMPROVING SWM SYSTEMS 1 Prohibit Littering: ensure source segregation of recyclables and storage of waste at source.Paper and plastic of all kinds 2. pouches.Sanitary towels/toilet papers and tissue papers 4.Flower and fruit waste including juice peels and house –plant wastes 3.Food wastes of all kinds. 5 Measure for Households. 2 Quantity of waste to be treated( 80%) and land filled. cooked and uncooked.Plastic and metallic containers 5.

CITY LEVEL SWOT A N A LY S I S 26 .

CITY LEVEL SWOT A N A LYS I S 27 .

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful