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‘LORAX’ RAKES IN THE GREEN SSUUPPEERR TTUUEESSDDAAYY SF SHERIFF’S WIFE BRINGS THE DRAMA GOP CANDIDATES FACE
‘LORAX’ RAKES
IN THE GREEN
SSUUPPEERR TTUUEESSDDAAYY
SF SHERIFF’S WIFE
BRINGS THE DRAMA
GOP CANDIDATES FACE BIG TEST TOMORROW
DATEBOOK PAGE 17
NATION PAGE 7
LOCAL PAGE 5
Monday • March 5, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 172
www.smdailyjournal.com
‘LORAX’ RAKES IN THE GREEN SSUUPPEERR TTUUEESSDDAAYY SF SHERIFF’S WIFE BRINGS THE DRAMA GOP CANDIDATES FACE

HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL

Jeff Shafe, left to right, is joined by his family Dylan, Claire and Kendall in their San Carlos home Thursday evening.

Embarking on a new life

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

where a person sees a challenge

ahead and hopes they can pull it off.

San Carlos resident Jeff Shafe joked Thursday night that his New Year's resolution was his new life. The 59-year-old was kind of telling the truth. Just a few short months ago he was able bodied, enjoying life and on a dirt biking trip in the North Bay with his 19- year-old son and a group of friends. It was a trail with which Shafe was- n't familiar but after completing a rather steep climb on his bike, he was feeling confident. There are times when riding

Shafe came over the crest to find a huge stump ahead. He was unknow- ingly off the trail. Without a way around it, Shafe hit the stump. His bike stopped but he didn't. Shafe's life did change Dec. 30. He's now in a wheelchair slowly regaining strength and movements in his limbs. Shafe is learning how to get things done differently and only recently returned home. While the Shafes feel blessed at the out- come - Shafe is making progress and home - there are many chal- lenges ahead. Claire Shafe, Jeff's

wife, was recently unemployed prior to the accident. Due to the rehabilitation requirements of Jeff, he also isn't working. As a result, friends have rallied around the fam- ily putting together fundraisers to support the Shafes while they adjust to their new life. Shafe admitted to being a cynic before this happened. The over- whelming support from family, friends and acquaintances has been life changing. “My life is dramatically changed. How I view people and mankind.

See LIFE, Page 19

CHAMPIONS

‘LORAX’ RAKES IN THE GREEN SSUUPPEERR TTUUEESSDDAAYY SF SHERIFF’S WIFE BRINGS THE DRAMA GOP CANDIDATES FACE

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

San Mateo goalkeeper Will Amaya,who finished with 12 saves,makes this sprawling save in the second overtime to preserve a scoreless tie with Willow Glen.The Bearcats earned a CCS co-championship,the first-ever boys’soccer title for the school. SSEEEE SSTTOORRYY PPAAGGEE 1111..

One more round for Carlos Club

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Of the 131 incidents reported at the Carlos Club over a year span, more than half were initiated by police and only seven were specif- ically alcohol-related, according to the busi- ness owner who wants to expand the down- town San Carlos nightclub with an outdoor patio and live entertainment. Sheriff’s Capt. Greg Rothaus, who oversees the San Carlos Patrol Bureau, opposes Carlos Club owner Fred Duncan’s request because he said more of the nightclub could equal more alcohol and public safety problems. However, Duncan has long questioned the validity of Rothaus’ statistics and said a breakdown of the calls from October 2010 to October 2011 cement his argument. “He said 131 incidents which is true but you have to look at what those are,” Duncan said. “He doesn’t want the club to expand so he’s going to make it look worse than it really is.”

See CLUB, Page 19

City cries fowl over geese

Messy birds wreaking havoc in Redwood Shores

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The growing number of geese making them- selves at home in Redwood Shores parks are lay- ing more than golden eggs. Now, hoping to combat the overabundance of waste, Redwood City officials are looking at revamping city park rules on waterfowl so resi-

dents can legally try controlling the problem.

But actually the birds themselves are not the

biggest issue, said Harris Rogers, president of the Redwood City Community Association. “It’s not the geese, it’s the [waste] they leave behind. They eat and they poop and they foul our sidewalks and our city parks to the point it’s

See GEESE, Page 19

Montrose dies TT HH EE AA SS SS OO CC II AA TT EE DD PP
Montrose dies
TT HH EE AA SS SS OO CC II AA TT EE DD PP RR EE SS SS
Rock guitarist Ronnie Montrose, who
formed the band that bore his name and
performed with some of rock’s heavy hit-
ters, has died, his booking agent said
Sunday.
Montrose died Saturday at his home in
Millbrae, agent Jim Douglas said. He was
See RONNIE, Page 19
‘LORAX’ RAKES IN THE GREEN SSUUPPEERR TTUUEESSDDAAYY SF SHERIFF’S WIFE BRINGS THE DRAMA GOP CANDIDATES FACE
‘LORAX’ RAKES IN THE GREEN SSUUPPEERR TTUUEESSDDAAYY SF SHERIFF’S WIFE BRINGS THE DRAMA GOP CANDIDATES FACE
‘LORAX’ RAKES IN THE GREEN SSUUPPEERR TTUUEESSDDAAYY SF SHERIFF’S WIFE BRINGS THE DRAMA GOP CANDIDATES FACE
‘LORAX’ RAKES IN THE GREEN SSUUPPEERR TTUUEESSDDAAYY SF SHERIFF’S WIFE BRINGS THE DRAMA GOP CANDIDATES FACE

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  • 2 Monday March 5, 2012

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“Tomorrow is a thief of pleasure.”

— Sir Rex Harrison,British actor (1908-1990).

This Day in History

1770 The Boston Massacre took place as

British soldiers who’d been taunted by

a crowd of colonists opened fire, killing

five people.

In 1868 , the Senate was organized into a Court of Impeachment to decide charges against President Andrew Johnson, who was later acquitted. In 1933, in German parliamentary elections, the Nazi Party won 44 percent of the vote; the Nazis joined with a conserva- tive nationalist party to gain a slender majority in the Reichstag. In 1934, the first Mothers-in-Law Day celebration and parade took place in Amarillo, Texas. In 1946, Winston Churchill delivered his “Iron Curtain” speech at Westminster College in Fulton, Mo. In 1953, Soviet dictator Josef Stalin died after three decades in power. In 1959, a fire at the Negro Boys Industrial School in Wrightsville, Ark., claimed the lives of 21 teenagers trapped inside a locked dormitory room. In 1960, Cuban newspaper photographer Alberto Korda took the now-famous picture of guerrilla leader Ernesto “Che” Guevara during a memorial service in Havana for victims of a ship explo- sion. Elvis Presley was discharged from the U.S. Army. In 1963, country music performers Patsy Cline, “Cowboy” Copas and “Hawkshaw” Hawkins died in a plane crash near Camden, Tenn., that also claimed the life of pilot Randy Hughes (Cline’s manager). In 1970, the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons went into effect after 43 nations ratified it. In 1979, NASA’s Voyager 1 space probe flew past Jupiter, sending back photographs of the planet and its moons. In 1982, comedian John Belushi was found dead of a drug overdose in a rented bungalow in Hollywood; he was 33. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush slapped punishing tariffs of eight to 30 percent on several types of imported steel in an effort to aid the ailing U.S. industry. California Rep. Gary Condit, dogged by the Chandra Levy scandal, lost a Democratic primary election to Dennis Cardoza.

Find us on Facebook http://www .facebook.com/jumble Monday • March 5, 2012 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY

Singer Eddy Grant is 64.

Birthdays

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Actress Eva Mendes is 37.

Find us on Facebook http://www .facebook.com/jumble Monday • March 5, 2012 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY

Actor Jake Lloyd is

23.

Actor James Noble is 90. Actor James B. Sikking is 78. Actor Dean Stockwell is 76. Actor Fred Williamson is 74. Actress Samantha Eggar is 73. Actor Michael Warren is 66. Actor Eddie Hodges is 65. Rock musician Alan Clark (Dire Straits) is 60. Actress-comedian Marsha Warfield is 58. Magician Penn Jillette is 57. Actress Adriana Barraza is 56. Rock singers Charlie and Craig Reid (The Proclaimers) are 50. Rock musician John Frusciante (froo-SHAN’-tee) (Red Hot Chili Peppers) is 42. Singer Rome is 42. Actor Kevin Connolly is 38. Actress Jill Ritchie is 38. Actress Jolene Blalock is 37. Model Niki Taylor is 37. Actor Sterling Knight is 23.

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. ENKTL ©2012
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ENKTL
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
NSURP
CUTALA CRENTH
CUTALA
CRENTH

Answer:

Answer:
Answer:
 

(Answers tomorrow)

Saturday’s

Jumbles:

UPPER

ICING

FORGOT

ASTRAY

Answer:

Putting the spire on the building was this —

 

TOP PRIORITY

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REUTERS

Kentucky Gov.Steve Beshear flies in a Kentucky National Guard UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter over the tornado devastated town of West Liberty, Saturday. Rescue teams and residents combed through storm-wracked towns to assess damage on Saturday from a chain of tornadoes that cut a 1,000-mile swath of destruction from the Midwest to the Gulf of Mexico, as the death toll crept up to at least 39 people. SSEEEE SSTTOORRYY PPAAGGEE 66..

In other news ...

Pitt, Clooney, Sheen headline marriage rights play

LOS ANGELES — Martin Sheen commanded the stage with his impas- sioned portrayal of an attorney arguing for gay-marriage rights; Jane Lynch inspired instant response as a vehement same-sex marriage opponent; Brad Pitt dazzled as a judge. It was all part of the star-studded West Coast premiere of “8,” a play about the 2010 federal court fight against

Proposition 8, the gay-marriage ban that

California voters approved in 2008. The performance Saturday at the Wilshire Ebell Theatre in Los Angeles also featured George Clooney, Kevin Bacon, Jamie Lee Curtis, Christine Lahti, George Takei, John C. Reilly, Chris Colfer, Matthew Morrison and Jesse Tyler Ferguson.

The play by Oscar winner Dustin Lance Black made its Broadway debut

last year in similar starry fashion. Saturday’s benefit performance was broadcast live on YouTube, where direc- tor Rob Reiner said it drew 200,000 viewers. He hopes it attracts more than a million before its weeklong online run ends. The play will also be staged around the country with local actors at colleges and community theaters. “We want as many people as possible to see what happened inside that courtroom,” said Reiner, a founding member of the American Foundation for Equal Rights,

Find us on Facebook http://www .facebook.com/jumble Monday • March 5, 2012 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY

which is fund- ing the federal fight for mar- riage equality. Relying largely on tran- scripts from court proceed- ings, “8” intro- duces viewers to the couples who chal- lenged the

California initiative, the attorneys who

argued their case and a bumbling witness who spoke out against them. One couple has two children together; the other wants to start a family; and a witness testifying in favor of the same- sex marriage ban said under oath that marriage equality was best for couples, kids and the country. The real-life couples in the case —

Sandy Stier (Curtis) and Kris Perry

(Lahti), and Jeff Zarillo (Matt Bomer) and Paul Katami (Morrison) — and the attorneys — David Boies (Clooney) and Theodore B. Olson (Sheen) — were in the audience Saturday, along with direc- tor Brett Ratner, designer Diane Von Furstenberg and Clooney’s girlfriend, Stacy Keibler. “We did put fear and prejudice on trial, and fear and prejudice lost,” Olson said after Reiner brought him on stage. Last month, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld an earlier judge’s decision that found California’s proposed amend-

ment banning same-sex marriage uncon- stitutional. Reiner said he and Black decided to make a play and eventually a movie based on the Prop. 8 trial after proponents suc- cessfully petitioned to block cameras from the courtroom. Saturday’s reading was held on a court- room-like set, with eight chairs on each side and Pitt’s judge’s box in the center. Sheen and Clooney made for an impres- sive legal team, while Reilly cracked up the crowd as a verbose marriage expert. “I knew that Martin Sheen was going to get a huge ovation after that speech because we applauded for him in rehearsal,” said Ferguson, adding that he wanted to be in “8” as soon as he heard about it. “John C. Reilly did a brilliant job with his role but I loved seeing Jane Lynch play such a villainous, homopho- bic creature. It really felt like she was sticking it to the man.” Reilly said he was moved by the materi- al, and even more so by its message. “I think America will be a better place and we can hold our chins up a little higher in this country when everyone is treated (equally),” he said. “These aren’t gay rights or special rights, they’re basic rights that people who love each other should have.” Reilly was thrilled to participate in the play, and even took on a last-minute role change when Pitt signed on. Reilly was to play the judge, but instead jumped into a role that Reiner originally was going to play.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Find us on Facebook http://www .facebook.com/jumble Monday • March 5, 2012 FOR THE RECORD THE DAILY

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as

suggested by the above cartoon.

Lotto

MMaarr cchh 22 MM eeggaa MM iilllliioonnss 16 29 48 52 54 5 Mega number
MMaarr cchh 22 MM eeggaa MM iilllliioonnss
16
29
48 52 54
5
Mega number
MMaarr cchh 33 SS uupp eerr LL ootttt oo PP lluuss 2 4 6 7 18
MMaarr cchh 33 SS uupp eerr LL ootttt oo PP lluuss
2
4 6
7
18
8
Mega number

FFaann ttaassyy FF iivv ee

9 15 24 30
9
15
24 30

DDaaiillyy FF oouurr

9
9
8
8
1
1
2
2

DDaaiillyy tthhrr eeee mmiiddddaa yy

 
0
0
4
4
3
3

DDaaiillyy

tthhrr eeee ee vveenniinngg

 
3
3
8
8
5
5
39
39

The Daily Derby race winners are No. 01 Gold Rush in first place; No. 09 Winning Spirit in sec- ond place; and No. 05 California Classic in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:41.28.

Local Weather Forecast

Monday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.

Monday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of

showers. Lows in the lower 40s. Northwest

winds 10 to 20 mph

... 10 mph after midnight.

Becoming

west 5 to

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Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning

then becoming partly cloudy. Breezy. A chance of showers in the morning. Highs in the lower 50s.

Northwest winds 20 to 30 mph with gusts to around 45 mph.

Chance of showers 40 percent. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming mostly clear. Breezy. Lows in the upper 30s. North winds 20 to 30 mph with gusts to around 45 mph. Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s. Wednesday night through Friday: Mostly clear.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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Publisher: Jerry Lee

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Editor in Chief: Jon Mays

jon@smdailyjournal.com

scribd.com/smdailyjournal

facebook.com/smdailyjournal

 

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Monday March 5, 2012

3

Easton Family in Burlingame

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • March 5, 2012 3 Easton Family in Burlingame J ose

J ose Isidro Sanchez inherited 1,500 acres of land when his father, Jose Antonio Sanchez, died in 1843. This

land (in Burlingame) ran from Sanchez Avenue to Adeline Drive, from the Bay to the western hills. Jose Isidro lived on the land in an adobe house on Edgehill Avenue until he sold the property to Ansel Ives Easton in 1860. To the north of this land, his brother, Jose de la Cruz owned 1,500 acres. Jose de la Cruz borrowed money on the land, defaulted on payments and D. O. Mills purchased the property for $10,000 at a sheriff’s sell. Ansel Ives Easton was one of seven chil- dren, and his brother was Aschell Samuel Easton who became the San Mateo County surveyor in the 1860s. Aschell married Georgette Tilton of San Mateo. Their sister, Jenny, married Ed Taylor who bought the San Mateo House on El Camino Real. Ansel migrated to California in 1852, after the initial Gold Rush had subsided but he nev- ertheless made much money in the booming real estate market, along with other business dealings. He married Darius Ogden Mills’ sis- ter Adeline, for which Adeline Creek in Burlingame is named.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • March 5, 2012 3 Easton Family in Burlingame J ose

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM

The inter-related Mills and Easton women were active and influential in San Francisco and Peninsula affairs.

Following their wedding, Adeline and her husband Ansel sailed to Panama, crossed the isthmus by train and boarded the ship, SS Central America bound for New York. The side-wheel steamship sank 200 miles off the coast of the Carolinas in 1857. Ansel and Adeline were rescued and, after they returned to California, they bought the Rancho Buri Buri property in Burlingame. Adeline had always wanted to live in a gen-

uine adobe house so Ansel had the adobe of Jose Isidro taken down and reassembled on the property west of the El Camino Real, unmindful of warnings of earthquakes. Easton Drive, with columns of eucalyptus trees lining the road, led to the ranch they named Blackhawk. All did not go well for the family. A great earthquake in 1868 damaged the

See HISTORY, Page 27

Police reports

Nice threads!

Clothing items were taken from a pack- age on the front porch of a residence on the 400 block of Oak Court in Menlo Park before 3:55 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 29.

SAN CARLOS

Narcotics. A man was arrested for being in possession of a controlled substance on the

  • 900 block of Cowgill Alley before 1:23 a.m.

Sunday, Feb. 26.

Petty theft. A petty theft occurred on the 400 block of Sycamore Street before 10:47 a.m. Friday, Feb. 24. Grand theft. A grand theft occurred on the

  • 300 block of Glenwood Avenue before 7:40

a.m. Friday, Feb. 24.

MENLO PARK

Bike theft. A bike was taken on the 1000 block of Oakland Avenue before 12:11 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 29. Burglary. A garage was broken into and a bicycle was stolen on the 300 block of Oak Court before 5:24 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28. Burglary. A burglary occurred on the 200 block of El Camino Real before 10:56 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28.

REDWOOD CITY

Burglary. A television was stolen out of a vehicle on Broadway before 6:11 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18. Theft. A bicycle was stolen on El Camino Real and Redwood Avenue before 5:03 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17.

Assault. A married couple was assaulted

while walking their dog on Tenth Avenue before 9:27 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • March 5, 2012 3 Easton Family in Burlingame J ose
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • March 5, 2012 3 Easton Family in Burlingame J ose
THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL Monday • March 5, 2012 3 Easton Family in Burlingame J ose

4

Monday March 5, 2012

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday • March 5, 2012 THE DAILY JOURNAL Aren’t You Curious? Stop by and check out
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Monday March 5, 2012

5

Sheriff’s actress wife adds to trial drama

By Terry Collins

Lopez has become a symbol, will-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ing or not, for anti-domestic violence

advocates and the central figure in a case that has already separated her family and threatens her husband’s political career. A video purportedly showing her discussing what hap- pened has emerged as key evidence.

Noticeable bruise

On Feb. 27, Judge Garrett Wong ruled the video could be used as evi- dence as Mirkarimi’s attorneys sought a mistrial. Then Lopez’s lawyers argued two days later that the video be inadmissible to no avail, after prosecutors released photo images from the video showing an emotional Lopez with a noticeable bruise on her arm. Lopez’s lawyers appealed, and on Friday a judge put on hold using the video until he could rule on its admissibility. Lopez probably did not want this type of celebrity and Mirkarimi can’t afford anything less than an acquittal, said Rory Little, a professor at the University of California Hastings School of Law in San Francisco. “It’s an unfor- tunate cycle for some victims in that they may regret calling attention to their partner’s apparent brief loss of control,” said Little, a former federal prosecutor. “But then again, we

SAN FRANCISCO — Months after moving to the United States, Latin America telenovela star Eliana Lopez blogged about her hopes and aspirations for her new, simpler life as a wife and mother, far from the bright lights of TV and movies. The Venezuelan actress was excit- ed about living in San Francisco— “a beautiful and avant-garde city where millions of interesting people make things happen every day” — raising her son with then-Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi, and teaching bilin- gual mother-and-baby dance classes. “To try to be conscious of my life whenever possible, of what scares me, of what I love and what moves

me,” Lopez wrote in 2010. “To try to ask questions of myself and what surrounds me, to question myself and not wake up one day and see my son as a stranger, thinking that life

passed me by

goal.” Today, Lopez is back in

the spotlight. This time as an alleged victim of domestic violence as her husband, Mirkarimi — now the embattled San Francisco sheriff — faces trial this week on misde- meanor criminal charges that he grabbed and bruised her arm in front of their tod- dler son on New Year’s Eve.

...

That is my
That is my

don’t know what happened. That’s what makes these domestic violence cases difficult to prosecute because there are usually no witnesses, except for the victim and the defen- dant.” Both Lopez and Mirkarimi have repeatedly denied the allegations. She went on Venezuelan radio in January declaring that prosecutors are out to get her husband. She also stood by Mirkarimi as he was sworn in as sheriff, just days before he was booked at his own jail. And she later tearfully told a judge that that she is not some “poor little immigrant,” adding, “I’m not afraid of my husband at all.” While the judge found Lopez to be strong and “quite charming,” he said there was still a “volatile situation” at play. The sheriff is under a court order to stay away from Lopez, although he recently has been allowed to see his son. Lopez is dejected that the case is proceeding, said Paula Canny, one of her lawyers. “She feels disrespected by the gov- ernment,” Canny said. “She has repeatedly advised them that there was no act of domestic violence, it was an argument. As a family, they’re a wreck. This isn’t supposed to happen in America.” Asked whether her client would take the witness stand, Canny initial- ly said they were “keeping all options open.” Later, though, she expressed doubts. “(The prosecution) are trying to squeeze her to testify,” Canny said. “The irony of it is, they won’t grant

her immunity

I

want a blanket grant

... of immunity that would cover any- thing and everything in federal court

and in immigra- tion proceed- ings. She’s not testifying (other- wise).” But Bay Area defense attorney
and in immigra-
tion proceed-
ings. She’s not
testifying (other-
wise).”
But Bay Area
defense attorney
Michael
Cardoza said he
thinks Lopez
Ross Mirkarimi

could be com- pelled to testify as the alleged victim. “I highly doubt that she will be allowed to keep quiet,” he said. Lopez, 36, has appeared in numer- ous TV shows and films in Latin America. She is perhaps best known as Oriana Ponce De Lesn, a villain- turned-heroine on the Venezuelan telenovela, “Amor a Palos.”

New role

She’s scheduled to star later this year as Venezuelan Independence War heroine Luisa Caceres de Arismendi in the feature film, “The Colonel’s Wife.” Lopez met Mirkarimi in 2008 at an environmental conference in Brazil. They married after she gave birth to their son, Theo, in 2009. The couple kept mostly out of the public eye until Mirkarimi, 50, with his term ending as a supervisor, announced his run for sheriff last spring. Mirkarimi, a former investi- gator in the District Attorney’s Office, won handily in November. During an argument at their home less than two months later, Mirkarimi grabbed Lopez and bruised her right arm, authorities say. The next day, Lopez turned to a neighbor, Ivory Madison, who later contacted police. They eventually confiscated video Madison had

taken, along with text messages and emails between the two women. Prosecutors say Lopez recounted Mirkarimi’s actions on the video. “I’m going to use this just in case he wants to take Theo away from me,” Lopez said on the video, according to court documents.

“Because he did, he said that, that

he’s very powerful, and he can, he can do it.” The video shows Lopez pointing to a bruise on her right bicep where she says Mirkarimi grabbed her, a police affidavit says. Mirkarimi’s defense attorneys argue that Lopez’s statements should be inadmissible because they were intended to help her gain custody of their son if the marriage failed. “The videotape itself was the product of a reflective and deliberate decision to create evidence for purposes of a custody proceeding,” wrote Mirkarimi attorney Lidia Stiglich, calling it hearsay. Mirkarimi pleaded not guilty to charges of domestic violence battery, child endangerment and dissuading a witness. He could face up to a year in jail, if convicted. After he was sworn in as sheriff, Mirkarimi called the alleged incident “a private matter, a family matter.” And that inflamed anti-domestic vio- lence advocates who commissioned a billboard that reads, “Domestic violence is NEVER a private matter.” “If that’s his last word, then that’s 30 to 40 years of our work down the drain and all of the gains we’ve des- perately worked so hard for to get victims to speak up,” said Kathy Black, executive director of La Casa de las Madres, the nonprofit behind the billboard.

State, local briefs

About 2,000 Sacramento-area teachers get notices

SACRAMENTO — Nearly 2,000 Sacramento-area teachers are wondering if they’ll be losing their jobs this year. The Sacramento Bee reports that pink slips due by March 15 will warn teachers and other school employees that they could be out of work by the end of the school year. The newspaper says Sacramento City Unified board officials have voted to send notices to 700 teachers, while San Juan Unified officials have notified more than 600 employees, and Elk Grove Unified officials have sent out notices to 239 school employ- ees. Placer County education leaders say about 125 teachers will get preliminary layoff notices, while smaller districts, including Twin Rivers Unified, will also be sending out notices. Last year about 2,500 Sacramento County teachers received pink slips, but most kept their jobs when the Legislature barred school districts from laying off teachers to balance their budget.

Man jumps out of

car on freeway, dies

LOS ANGELES — Authorities say a 28- year-old man died after jumping out of a car traveling about 65 mph on a Southern California freeway. The California Highway Patrol says 28- year-old Javier Gonzalez was riding in the backseat of a Chevrolet Tahoe driven by his aunt when he opened the door and jumped onto the 10 Freeway near Baldwin Park. Gonzalez, of Ontario, was taken to a hospi- tal, where he died. The CHP says the possible use of drugs and alcohol in the incident is being investigated.

Man arrested after his SUV crashes into Bay

SAN FRANCISCO — A 38-year-old San Francisco man is facing charges after his SUV jumped a curb and crashed into the waters of San Francisco Bay early Sunday. A police spokesman says witnesses told officers that the man, identified by police as Agatito Hernandez, was doing “donuts” with his vehicle when it crashed into the bay in the city’s Fort Mason area around 3 a.m.

THE DAILY JOURNAL LOCAL/STATE Monday • March 5, 2012 5 Sheriff’s actress wife adds to trial
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  • 6 Monday March 5, 2012

NATION/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Tornadoes disrupt routines in ravaged towns

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HENRYVILLE, Ind. — Under a patched-up six-foot hole in the roof, people in the devastated town of Henryville gathered Sunday at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church to worship and catch up on news of their devastating tornado by word of mouth, not with cellphones or email. At least 38 people were killed in the storm system that struck Friday night and rescuers were still going door-to-door in rural areas to rule out more victims. Some of the worst damage stretched on either side of the Ohio River between Indiana and Kentucky. The storms thrashed the conven- iences of modern life, too:

Cellphone signals were hard to find, Internet was out and electricity indefinitely interrupted. People went back to basics or got creative to learn about their loved ones and begin rebuilding.

Monday • March 5, 2012 NATION/STATE THE DAILY JOURNAL Tornadoes disrupt routines in ravaged towns

REUTERS

A vehicle and a building damaged by a chain of tornadoes are seen in West Liberty, Ky. Sunday. Calm weather gave dazed residents of storm- wracked towns a respite early on Sunday as they dug out from a chain of tornadoes that cut a swath of destruction,killing at least 39 people.

“It’s horrible. It’s things you take for granted that aren’t there any- more,” said Jack Cleveland, 50, a Census Bureau worker. Randy Mattingly, a 24-year-old mechanic, said he and his neighbors passed on information by word-of- mouth to make sure people were OK: “It was like, ‘Hey, did you talk to this guy?”’ He said state police quickly set up two gathering points for adults and children, at the church and at a nearby community center. At Sunday’s mass, Father Steve Schaftlein turned the church into an information exchange, asking the 100 or so in attendance to stand up and share information. Immediately, volunteers stood to share tips about functioning in what is in many ways a tech-free zone. Lisa Smith, who has been Henryville’s postmaster for six weeks, told people that they could pick up their mail in Scottsburg, about 10 miles north. She said she

was most worried about people needing medication and she had been shaking boxes to see if they had pills inside with hopes of con- necting them to their recipients. A local insurance agent, Lyn Murphy-Carter, shared another story. The founder of her agency, 84- year-old Tom Murphy, had told her always to keep paper records. That proved valuable without access to computers. She collected about 1,000 claims Saturday alone, and was gathering handwritten claims from policyholders at church. While it could be days before power and cell service are fully restored to the damaged areas, crews were making progress Sunday. In Indiana, about 2,800 homes were without power, down from 8,000 in the hours after the storms. But in some hard-hit areas, like Henryville, a substation and transmission lines need to be rebuilt, and that could take up to a week.

Monday • March 5, 2012 NATION/STATE THE DAILY JOURNAL Tornadoes disrupt routines in ravaged towns
Monday • March 5, 2012 NATION/STATE THE DAILY JOURNAL Tornadoes disrupt routines in ravaged towns

State brief

Proof of insurance? Lawmaker wants an app for that

SACRAMENTO — California drivers see- ing flashing lights in their rearview mirror may soon be reaching for their smartphones instead of putting them down. A bill introduced by Democratic Assemblyman Mike Gatto of Los Angeles would give Californians the option of present- ing their proof of insurance on a hand-held

device during traffic stops.

Many insurance companies have introduced

apps that display customer information, but the state vehicle code does not mention elec- tronic devices, leaving law enforcement offi- cers in a gray area during traffic stops. Gatto plans to amend the bill to include reg- istration papers, which the Department of Motor Vehicles would have to provide elec- tronically. The bill is expected to go before the Assembly Insurance Committee later this month.

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Monday • March 5, 2012 NATION/STATE THE DAILY JOURNAL Tornadoes disrupt routines in ravaged towns

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Monday March 5, 2012

7

What’s so super about Tuesday?

By Connie Cass

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Super? Maybe not this time. But it is a Tuesday, one with the biggest pay- out of the Republican presidential primaries. Super Tuesday, slimmed down to half its 2008 size but still doling out one-third of the delegates needed to win, probably won’t settle much. Sure, it could nudge Newt Gingrich out of the race, or lend Ron Paul more credibility. But it won’t be easy for either Mitt Romney or Rick Santorum to score a decisive advantage, because dele- gates are handed out by share. A close second in a state can pay off almost as well as first place. Win some big states, especially Ohio, and the symbolism is power- ful, of course. Romney might cement the front- runner status that keeps slipping through his fingers. Santorum could

prove

he’s

the

real thing.

What’s

at

stake,

what’s it

mean and what

might happen?

A

Super

Tuesday

tip

sheet:

Delegates

 

for grabs

Tuesday: 419

Delegates

already won:

353. Romney, 203; Santorum, 92; Gingrich, 33; Paul, 25.

Mitt Romney Newt Gingrich
Mitt Romney
Newt Gingrich
Rick Santorum Ron Paul
Rick Santorum
Ron Paul

A week’s worth of heavy advertising in all 10 states would cost a candidate about $5 mil- lion. That’s a lot

even

for

Romney’s well- financed cam-

paign, prompt- ing him to make

a plea for dona- tions amid his Michigan victo- ry speech. Gingrich is get- ting another

multimillion-

dollar boost

Delegates needed for the nomination: 1,144

from Las Vegas billionaire Sheldon Adelson, who donated the money to a special type of political action committee, known as a super PAC, that will run advertising in key states.

Super Tuesday is super expen- sive:

Ohio, Ohio, Ohio:

It’s the race to watch. Political junkies get all misty-eyed over this Rust Belt swing state, and not just because of the 63 delegates. No Republican nominee has ever become president without winning the state. That makes it a powerful

proving ground for the men trying to show they can take on President

Barack Obama. It’s home to Joe the Plumber and tens of thousands of auto workers, but Ohio’s not all blue-collar. It’s also the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, high-tech science, medical and energy workers, suburbanites, soybean farmers and a quarter-mil-

lion dairy cows (OK, the cows can’t

vote). The big issue is the economy, including Obama’s bailout of the auto industry. Santorum and Romney are duk- ing it out in Ohio. Look for the out- come to generate more buzz than any other Super Tuesday contest.

Newt’s last stand or Gingrich rises again?

Get out the hook for Newt Gingrich if he loses in Georgia, the state he represented in the U.S. House for two decades. Gingrich hopes to win decisively here and pick up enough other dele- gates to relaunch his up-and-down campaign, which has been mostly down-and-out since he lost Florida in January. He’s got endorsements from Gov. Nathan Deal and Herman Cain, a fellow Georgian. He’s got a new pitch, claiming he can bring the cost of gas down to $2.50 per gallon.

Santorum is pushing hard to wrest the state’s Christian conservative and tea party voters away from Gingrich. Romney remains a force, even if the state is outside his com- fort zone. Georgia boasts the day’s biggest cache of delegates: 76.

Limbaugh overshadows GOP contest

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Intensifying debate over conserva- tive social values — and Republican icon Rush Limbaugh — overshad- owed the nation’s economic con- cerns Sunday as the Republican presidential campaign hurtled toward Super Tuesday contests that could re-shape the nomination battle and shift the direction of the Grand Old Party. Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum distanced themselves from Limbaugh, who boasts a huge con- servative following and recently apologized for calling a Georgetown University law student a “slut” and a “prostitute” on his nationally syndi- cated radio program. The woman testified at a congres-

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • March 5, 2012 7 What’s so super about Tuesday? By

Rush Limbaugh

sional hearing in

favor of an Obama adminis- tration mandate that employee health plans include free contraceptive

coverage. While

religious institu- tions

are exempt, their affiliates, such as hos- pitals and universities, were at first included in the requirement. Under harsh criticism from conserva- tives, President Barack Obama later said the affiliates could opt out, but insurers must pay for the coverage. The GOP framed the issue as one of religious liberty. But Obama’s chief political strategist suggested

the Limbaugh’s reaction — and Republicans slow repudiation of his comments — would benefit Democrats in the general election this fall. “I think what Rush Limbaugh said about that young woman was not only vile and degrading to her,

but to women across the country,”

David Axelrod said on ABC’s “This Week” Sunday morning. While the contraception debate raged on national television, Newt Gingrich predicted a strong per- formance Tuesday would resurrect his fading candidacy. Romney and Santorum spent Sunday racing across Georgia, Tennessee, Oklahoma and Ohio, four of the ten states to host elections on Super Tuesday, the biggest single voting day of the 2012 cycle.

Nation briefs

BP settlement includes new health claims process

BOOTHEVILLE, La. — A settle- ment that BP is hammering out with victims of the massive Gulf oil spill finally provides a system for moni- toring health concerns and compen- sating people whose illnesses are found to have a link to the disaster. Government and university doc- tors studying locals’ health haven’t found significant evidence of spill- related illnesses, but problems years from now remain a question mark. Gulf Coast residents say they’re happy their complaints are getting a serious look, even if they’ll face hurdles in proving that rashes, shortness of breath and other mal- adies were caused by the oil or chemical dispersants sprayed to break it up.

Same-sex custody battle

could change Florida law

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — A cus- tody battle in Florida between two lesbians could fuel the growing national debate over the definition of motherhood. It also might force state lawmak- ers to reconsider a 19-year-old law regarding the rights of sperm and egg donors. The women, now in their 30s and known in court papers only by their initials, were both law enforcement officers in Florida. One partner donated an egg that was fertilized and implanted in the other. That woman gave birth in 2004, nine years into their relationship. But the Brevard County couple separated two years later, and the birth mother eventually left Florida with the child without telling her former lover.

THE DAILY JOURNAL NATION Monday • March 5, 2012 7 What’s so super about Tuesday? By

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  • 8 Monday March 5, 2012

WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Uprising in Syria gains support

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Saudi Arabia said Sunday that Syrians have a right to take up arms to defend themselves against the regime and accused the Damascus government of “imposing itself by force,” as concerns mount- ed over a humanitarian crisis there. In a rare televised news confer- ence, Saudi Foreign Minister Saud al-Faisal said the kingdom wel- comed international efforts to broker a ceasefire in Syria but added that they have “failed to stop the mas- sacres.” “Is there something greater than the right to defend oneself and to defend human rights,” he said, adding that the Syrian people want to defend themselves. “The regime is not wanted by the people,” he said. “The regime is insisting on impos- ing itself by force on the Syrian peo- ple,” he said. Saudi Arabia and Qatar have been discussing military aid the to the

8 Monday • March 5, 2012 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Uprising in Syria gains support THE

REUTERS

Syrians living in Lebanon protest to show their support for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, while a Salafist protest in solidarity with Syria’s anti- government protesters takes place nearby in Beirut Sunday.

Syrian opposition, but the U.S. and others have not advocated arming the rebels, in part out of fear it would create an even more bloody and prolonged conflict. Sunni Saudi

Arabia is wary of the wave of Arab Spring uprisings, particularly in nearby Bahrain, where a Shiite majority is demanding greater rights from its Sunni rulers. However, the

kingdom strongly backs the largely Sunni uprising in Syria. On Sunday Red Cross teams handed out food, blankets and med- ical kits in central Homs province, but the government blocked access to the worst-hit district of Baba Amr. The humanitarian group was try- ing to help families who fled Baba Amr after a monthlong siege and took shelter in nearby villages, ICRC spokesman Hicham Hassan said in Geneva. “The needs are so far mainly in the forms of food and also blankets because of the cold,” Hassan said. Government forces have blocked humanitarian access to Baba Amr since Friday, the day after troops seized it from rebels. Opposition fighters had been in control of the neighborhood for several months, and a regime offensive on Homs that began in early February aimed to retake rebel-held neighborhoods inside the city. Syrian troops managed to take control of Baba Amr after nearly a

month of intense and relentless shelling, and activists say hundreds were killed in the daily bombard- ments that led up to the final battle on Thursday. Some Baba Amr resi- dents were killed when, in despera- tion, they dared to venture out of their homes to forage for food. Activists have said residents face a humanitarian catastrophe in Baba Amr and other parts of Homs, Syria’s third-largest city with a pop- ulation of 1 million. Electricity, water and communications have been cut off, and recent days have seen frigid temperatures and snow- fall. Food was running low, and many are too scared to venture out. The government had said it would allow the Red Cross into Baba Amr on Friday but then blocked their access, citing security concerns. In the meantime, activists accused Syrian forces of killing tens of resi- dents execution-style and burning homes in revenge attacks against those believed to be supporting the rebels.

Saint’s ancient heart stolen from cathedral

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DUBLIN — Somewhere in Ireland, a burglar has the heart of a saint. Officials at Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin said Sunday they’re distraught and perplexed over the theft of the church’s most precious relic: the preserved heart of St. Laurence O’Toole, patron saint of Dublin. O’Toole’s heart had been dis- played in the cathedral since the 13th century. It was stored in a heart- shaped wooden box and secured in a small, square iron cage on the wall

8 Monday • March 5, 2012 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Uprising in Syria gains support THE

St.Laurence O’Toole’s heart

of a chapel dedicated to his memory. On Saturday someone cut through two bars, pried the cage loose, and made off with the relic. “I am devastated that one of the treasured artifacts of the cathedral is stolen,” said the Most Rev. Dermot

Dunne, the cathedral’s dean. “It has no economic value but it is a price- less treasure that links our present foundation with its founding father.” Ireland’s national police force, the Garda Siochana, said detectives were studying hours of closed-cir- cuit TV footage to try to identify the

approximately 40 people who walked out the cathedral’s front doors Saturday morning. The force said the thief may have hidden overnight in the cathedral and fled with the heart when its doors opened Saturday. Worshippers didn’t spot that the relic was missing until Saturday afternoon.

Poland defends rail safety after crash

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SZCZEKOCINY, Poland — Poland’s government insisted Sunday that rail travel is safe in the country despite a train collision that killed 16 people, assurances that come months before masses of

sports fans will enter the country for

a major soccer tournament — many of whom will crisscross the nation by train. Saturday night’s crash, Poland’s mostly deadly rail tragedy in more than two decades, raised new ques- tions about the safety of a state-run

rail network, which has undergone modernization in recent years. Poland still has a rail system marked by the legacy of the communist decades, but has been working to upgrade trains and tracks. The trains collided head-on, killing 16 people and injuring dozens more.

World briefs

Mass grave of 157 bodies unearthed in Libyan town

BIN JAWWAD, Libya — Libyan government officials said Sunday they have unearthed a mass grave with 157 bodies of rebel fighters and civilians in an eastern town that was a major battleground during the country’s 2011 civil war. It is the largest grave yet to be dis- covered from the conflict that began as a popular uprising and ended with the capture and killing of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi last October.

Hugo Chavez says new tumor was cancerous

CARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez revealed Sunday that a new tumor recently removed from his pelvic region was of the same type of can- cer as a baseball-sized growth extracted from that part of his body about eight months ago. In his first TV appearance in nine

days, Chavez said the surgery and

follow-up tests showed the tumor

was “a recurrence of the initially diagnosed cancer.” He said “the tumor was totally extracted” and noted “the absence of lesions suggestive of cancer neither locally, neither in nearby organs,

neither far away

neither metasta-

... sis, none of this thanks to God, to the

diagnosis and rapid intervention.”

206 killed in Republic of Congo arms depot blasts

BRAZZAVILLE, Republic of Congo — Houses and buildings collapsed in the Congolese capital Sunday, entombing inhabitants after an arms depot exploded, killing at least 206 people, officials said, including dozens attending Mass in a church that buckled under the force of the blast. The shock waves shattered win- dows in a three-mile (five-kilome- ter) radius surrounding the arms depot, including across the river that separates Brazzaville, the capital of the Republic of Congo, from Kinshasa, the capital of the larger Central African nation of Congo.

8 Monday • March 5, 2012 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Uprising in Syria gains support THE
8 Monday • March 5, 2012 WORLD THE DAILY JOURNAL Uprising in Syria gains support THE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Monday March 5, 2012

9

The president’s energy policies

— Parkersburg (W.Va.) News and Sentinel

O n the campaign fundraising trail in Florida recently, President Barack Obama

addressed the rising cost of gasoline by talking up his own energy policies —

taking credit for increased oil and natu-

ral gas

production.

...

This is a cyclical rise. It has nothing to do with politicians or campaign promises. Any decrease in the cost of gasoline will be the result of market forces, as well. But rising gasoline prices will have an effect on attempts at economic recovery in this country. And Obama has missed several steps that might

Other voices

oping a greater mix of energy sources will not hold much water for Obama,

either. Honest efforts by those who are

working to develop renewable energy sources are, of course, admirable. But the percentage of cars on the road today powered by anything other than gaso- line is minuscule. Even his own staff quietly admits there is very little a president can do to affect gasoline prices in the short term. And Obama clearly has done nothing to increase oil production in the long run. To the contrary, through opposition to new drilling in many areas of the coun- try, his administration has had a nega- tive effect. But that is not stopping Obama from

have buffered that blow. His rejection of a permit for the pro- posed Keystone XL pipeline likely caused at the least a delay in efforts toward energy independence, and squashed the creation of possibly thou- sands of jobs. And, for all Obama’s talk about increased production, the trend actually began during the George W. Bush pres- idency, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The agency projects that by 2020, oil pro- duction will hit a level last seen in

  • 1994. using a little coal smoke and solar mir- rors on the campaign trail.

Touting his alleged success in devel-

Letters to the editor

Sorrow for loss of journalist

Editor,

  • I am writing on behalf of the San

Mateo County Republican Party to express our profound sorrow at the loss journalist of Andrew Breitbart. Andrew was a leader in the “citizen journalism movement” creating grassroots change through the use of social media. Andrew uncovered “the systemic fraud and corruption of ACORN” ... “and hypocrisy of congressmen, sena- tors and senior administration officials,” according to the California Young Republican Party and leaves a “legacy of accountable government through journalism.” He was revered and respected as a champion of freedom, individual rights and the truth. Andrew Breitbart leaves behind his wife, Susie, and their four young chil- dren. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family.

Chuck McDougald South San Francisco

The letter writer is the chair of the San Mateo County Republican Party.

He will be missed

Editor, The conservative movement lost a true soldier and fearless crusader for their views with the passing of Andrew

Breitbart. Standing up to the left espe- cially in California is a tougher and tougher proposition for conservatives.

  • I was thinking of getting a Romney

sticker for my car the other day. I think

he is the best candidate for president. Both my wife and mother said that would be provocative and I shouldn’t do it. I had to scratch my head. Provocative for whom? I mean, I get it; the area I live in is very supportive of taxing others to pay for what we want. What deficit? Bring on the Chinatown tunnel, high-speed rail and let’s throw

in a water conveyance system that Dianne and Jerry support. Meanwhile Obama 2012 stickers are popping up

everywhere in California. That is fine, but please allow citizens who feel dif- ferently a voice without fear of a physi- cal altercation. A salute to Breitbart who showed no fear in questioning the institutional left. Not easy these days.

Christopher P. Conway San Mateo

Hats off to Dorothy

Editor, I wish to give kudos to Dorothy Dimitre for her enlightening column, “Justifiable indignation” in the Feb. 17 edition of the Daily Journal. She finally came out of the closet, although it was sugarcoated. Nonetheless, she told the reading public that they were just too stupid to make decisions on their own and that only the government was capa- ble of making those decisions for them. I would like to point out to Dorothy that the same people who she thinks are “not educated enough” to think for themselves will be the ones working for her government: a government that will tell everyone what they can eat and drive and when to have a fire, a baby or a life for that matter. And, remember, she is not one of the stupid ones.

Randy Swan

San Mateo

Preserving the social safety net

Editor, To those who believe that our coun- try is spending too much money on entitlement programs, they should know why these programs exist. People do not just receive Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security because they don’t want to work. These pro-

grams exist as parts of the social safety net for people who are older, suffer from chronic disabilities or qualify for other reasons. If people vote to elimi- nate these programs then they leave themselves vulnerable to economic events, as seen in the stock market (pri- vate sector) crash of the 1930s. The real giveaway in our society and the biggest handout of all is the tax breaks that the very wealthy enjoy which enable them to live like kings while the burden of taxation falls on the middle class. When you go to church, do you expect the poorest members of the con- gregation to give the most in offering or the people who are of greater means and have more to give? One just has to ask oneself, ”If the country is ever faced with an economic depression as great as the 1930s, would you rather be selling pencils on the street corner or qualify for a federally funded program to help you through the hard times?

Patrick Field

Palo Alto

Citizens United

Editor, The U.S. Supreme Court has a chance now to fix the enormous mis- take it made in the Citizens United decision. A Montana case challenging that Supreme Court decision has just been appealed back to the Court (American Tradition Partnership vs. Bullock). Justice Scalia recently said, “If the system seems crazy to you, don’t blame it on the court.” Well, I do blame it on the Supreme Court. It’s decision in the Citizens United case two years ago is destroying our democ- racy. Polls show 80 percent of Americans want Citizens United over- turned.

Scott Grinthal

San Mateo

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Journal, please contact the editor at

The real issue is not pepper spray

  • I n June 2010, a young boy in a county special day class at a San Mateo elementary school ran away and, when he final- ly returned to the classroom, climbed on top of a bookcase.

The police were called, tried to coax the child down without suc- cess and, as a last resort, used pepper spray. There was outrage, concern for the child, but also a questioning of legal fees. As I wrote in an earlier column, “It was a sad day for everyone.” But now that the child is in another school, a private one paid for by taxpayers, and the lawsuits against the county, the Belmont-Redwood Shores school district and the city of San Mateo have been resolved, the question remains about the appropriate care and cost of special education students. *** There is a federal mandate that every child, no matter what the disability, is entitled to a free and appropriate education. The mandate covers ages 3- 21. There are few federal dol- lars to match implementation. When the law was passed, the federal government prom- ised to pay at least 40 per- cent, but that has not hap- pened. Today, it is closer to 15 percent. That means pub- lic schools must pick up most of the cost of placement in district special education or county special day classes, or in private schools, no matter what the distance or expense, if that is deemed necessary. Costs include special aides for students who have severe physical handicaps, very small classes with multiple staff for students with severe mental or emotional conditions, and transportation. It’s a tall order for California schools which have been facing budget woes since Proposition 13. It’s also a national problem. To fulfill the man- date these students do need special and extra help to succeed or even just function in school. And the parents usually win when they go to court if they don’t receive what is expected. *** In San Mateo County, there are 10,186 special ed students, about 10 percent of the total school population. Special needs are defined as mental retardation; hearing, speech, language, visual and orthopedic impairments; emotional disturbance; learning disabilities; and autism. In the last 10 years, the biggest jump has been in autism from 236 cases in 2000 to 962 today. However, the largest number of students continue to be those with learning disabilities or speech and language impairments. The total cost of educating these students can range from 6 percent to 22 percent of a school’s general fund budget. It varies depending on need and placement. Those attending private schools, especially those out of state, will cost dis- tricts much more. Today, the San Mateo Union High School District pays the most for special ed — $9,410,048 followed by San Mateo Foster City elementary at $9,260,521. These numbers don’t tell half the story. As school funding declines and the number and severity of special ed students increases, will the burden on school districts become too heavy to bear without sacrificing the quality of education for all students? ***

THE DAILY JOURNAL OPINION Monday • March 5, 2012 9 The president’s energy policies — Parkersburg
  • I asked county superintendent of schools, Anne Campbell for

her thoughts on this conundrum. “We are working hard not to get to that point,” she said. The trend is for more students to attend district classes at local schools instead of more expensive county-run special day classes. This reduces transportation costs. In 2004, there were 803 pupils enrolled in county programs; today there are just 362. Meanwhile, the overall number of spe- cial ed students has increased. Identifying students early is also important, says Campbell. Once a child is identified as special needs, an Individual Education Program is created by the parents and professionals. The IEP determines placement. Each school district contributes to the county special ed pool depending on its students’ placements. For example, Belmont-Redwood Shores with a total general fund budget of $26,139,557 paid $5,961,536 or 22.81 percent of its total budget on special ed last year. *** A former high school special ed director once told me the current system was unsustainable and there needed to be a cap on how much school districts had to pay for out of state placement. I asked Campbell about this and she repeated that no matter what the disability the child was entitled to a free and appropriate education. A district who refused to pay would be in violation of the federal mandate. *** The Woodside Fire Department (woodsidefire.org) has a special training program for situations similar to the pepper spray incident when a child is unresponsive: When Words Are Not Enough. WWANE includes a video, sign language and icons, a manual which teaches responders about the spe- cial needs of some children and adults with regards to emer- gency services. Thanks to Glenda Fuge for this information.

Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour- nal.com.

  • 10 Monday March 5, 2012

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

10 Monday • March 5, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL 13,000 has some worried By Bernard
10 Monday • March 5, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL 13,000 has some worried By Bernard
10 Monday • March 5, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL 13,000 has some worried By Bernard
10 Monday • March 5, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL 13,000 has some worried By Bernard
10 Monday • March 5, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL 13,000 has some worried By Bernard

13,000 has some worried

By Bernard Condon

dividends, while the better-known Dow

rallied 8 percent this year but is still 6

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jones industrial average rose 2.5 percent.

percent below its high of April 29.

NEW YORK — What’s not to like

Since last April, the high for most index- es last year, the transports have dropped

• Traders are scarce. About 4 billion shares are trading every day on the New

about Dow 13,000?

6 percent, compared with a 1.2 percent

York Stock Exchange, compared with

While some investors cheered when

gain for the Dow.

about 4.4 billion last year. That suggests

the blue-chip index closed above that

Technical analysts say that if one

investors aren’t buying with much con-

level Tuesday for the first time since

index reaches a high and the other does-

viction.

May 2008, some were wringing their

n’t, that means the rally could falter.

• Main Street still isn’t bullish.

hands. The Dow Jones industrial average

They say that’s what happened before

Investors pulled $137 billion from U.S.

has left the Dow transportation average

stocks tanked in 1929, 1937 and 2000.

stock mutual funds from last June

behind, and that could mean trouble.

The analysts disagree over how much

through January, according to Strategic

“There’s a risk that stocks could slide,”

to worry now. And the Dow is not the

Insight, an industry consulting group.

says Bruce McCain, chief strategist at

only index climbing fast. A day after the

Technical analysts watching the trans-

Key Private Bank. Adds Dennis

Dow closed at 13,005, the Nasdaq com-

portation average for signals to buy or

Slothower, editor of the investor newslet-

posite index of technology stocks briefly

sell can make your head spin with their

ter Stealth Stock Daily: “When the Dow

broke through 3,000 for the first time in

talk of “head and shoulders patterns,”

leads everything else, that’s not a healthy

11 years.

‘’Fibonacci retracements” and “resist-

sign.”

Still, there are worrisome signs

ance areas.” But even investors who usu-

The rap on the Dow is that it tracks the

besides transportation stocks that the

ally talk in normal English have taken

biggest, most financially stable compa-

rally may not last:

note of the lagging index lately and

nies. Technical analysts, who study pre-

• The price of gasoline is up, too. The

lapsed into techno-speak.

vious stock movements to anticipate

average for a gallon of unleaded is $3.74

A day after the Dow hit 13,000, David

future ones, say you have to look at other

(nearly $1 a liter), the highest on record

Rosenberg, the normally lucid chief

indexes, too.

this time of year. Some investors believe

economist at Gluskin Sheff &

Take the Dow Jones transportation

gas prices are the biggest threat to the

Associates, put out a report noting the

average, the granddaddy of indexes,

rally because when people pay more at

recent “nonconfirmation” signal from

which traces its origins to 1884. It tracks

the pump, they often spend less else-

the transportation average. A few days

railroads, shipping companies and air-

where.

earlier, the folks at research group

lines — the businesses that move people

• The Russell 2,000 is still off its high.

Bespoke Investment wrote a note to

and goods through the economy.

The popular index of smaller stocks, the

clients pointing out the “negative diver-

This collection of 20 stocks fell 3 per-

kind of iffy outfits that surge when

gence” themselves.

cent in February, counting reinvested

investors feel like taking big risks, has

Translation: Watch out.

From idea to store shelf: A new product is born

By Mae Anderson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — It took eight years,

450 product sketches, 6,000 consumer

tests and hundreds of millions of dollars

for Procter & Gamble to create some-

thing that it hopes will be destroyed in

the wash. Tide Pods are palm-size, liquid deter- gent-filled tablets that are designed to be tossed in the washer to take the measur- ing cups — and messiness — out of laundry. P&G says the product, which hit store shelves last month, is its biggest innovation in laundry in about a quarter of a century. Tide Pods aren’t the sexiest of inven- tions, but they illustrate how mature companies that are looking for growth often have to tweak things as mundane as soap and detergent. The story behind Tide Pods provides a window into the time, money and brainpower that goes into doing that.

P&G, the maker of everything from

Pampers diapers to Pantene shampoo, has built its 175-year history on creating

things people need and then improving

them. (Think: Ivory soap in 1879; Swiffer Sweeper in 1999.) Each year, the company spends $2 billion on research and development and rolls out about 27

products worldwide — more than two a

month.

That focus on innovation has paid off.

P&G says 98 percent of American households have at least one of its prod- ucts in their cupboards, broom closets or bathrooms. And while about 15 to 20 percent of all

10 Monday • March 5, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL 13,000 has some worried By Bernard

new products succeed, P&G has claimed a 50 percent success rate. Four of the top 10 new consumer products in 2010 were made by P&G, according to research firm SymphonyIRI. “What they’ve gotten very good at is being able to understand consumer expectations,” says Robert Passikoff, president of Brand Keys Inc., a New York customer research firm.

But improving things like window cleaner and toilet paper can take years. It also can cost hundreds of millions of dollars — or up to 100 percent of first- year sales — to develop, make and mar- ket them. And even then, new products are a tough sell to consumers. “You have to develop a product that is meaningfully better than the ones out there, which is tough because generally speaking consumer products work pretty well,” says Ali Dibadj, an analyst at Bernstein Research who follows P&G. “You then have to convince the con-

sumer to try the product

and then get

... that consumer to break their old habit to make a new one.” The laundry detergent industry, with $6.5 billion in annual sales, is always looking for the next big thing. Over the

years, fruity scents were introduced, along with suds that work in cold water. There also were concentrated and super- concentrated detergents that need less packaging. Liquid Tide, which costs about $15 for 32 loads, is the best-selling detergent, according to SymphonyIRI, the research firm. But cheaper rivals have been gain- ing: For instance, the number of units sold of Church & Dwight’s Arm & Hammer Oxi-Clean Laundry, the No. 2 detergent brand that costs $8 for 35 loads, rose 13 percent in the past year. Unit sales of Liquid Tide were flat. In 2004, P&G decided to try to fresh- en up the category. Surveys and observa- tions of 6,000 consumers found that more than a third dreaded doing laundry. A big reason: Many apartment dwellers hated lugging a seven-pound detergent bottle downstairs to the laundry room or a Laundromat and back. Researchers also found that people rewashed loads about 20 percent of the time because they thought detergent did- n’t get their laundry clean enough. And many were confused about which detergent to use when they wash in dif- ferent ways: in regular washers versus high-efficiency machines; in big loads or small; and in hot or cold water. “We knew people felt laundry was complicated,” says Alex Keith, vice pres- ident of P&G’s unit that makes laundry detergents and fabric softeners. So P&G set about creating a product that weighed less, cleaned better and could be used with any washing machine, any size load and in water at any temperature.

On the move

California construction company C.W. Driver opened a new office in San Mateo and has appointed industry veteran Mike Castillo as senior vice president for the Northern California Region. Castillo will oversee projects with new and existing clients in Northern California within the areas of education, healthcare/biomedical, public sector, military contracting, entertainment,

retail, corporate and hospitality. C.W.

Driver was recently named general con-

tractor for the PDI/DreamWorks

Animation Northern California facility

in Redwood City. Castillo previously

was vice president of operations for 25

years at Rudolph and Sletten, located in

Redwood City. C.W. Driver’s new Northern California headquarters is located at 1900 Alameda de Las Pulgas, Ste. 100 in San Mateo.

***

The Foster City Chamber of

Commerce Board of Directors has appointed Joanne Bohigian as interim CEO. Bohigian will lead the chamber’s transition in the interim while taking the time to develop the criteria needed for a permanent replacement for for- mer chamber CEO, Chris Messina, who recently resigned. She is a longtime resident of Foster City, former association-board director,

member of the Advisory Board to Energy Upgrade California San Mateo County, and member of the Board of Directors for the California Associations Institute Bay Area/Central

10 Monday • March 5, 2012 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL 13,000 has some worried By Bernard

Joanne

Bohigian

California Chapter. Bohigian is a marketing and business development professional with over 20 years experience. She is currently the principal of Whaddyathink, a business consulting firm established in 2000 focused on market development, busi- ness transformation and sustainability.

SSWW AARRMM OOFF BBEEEESS:: GIANTS HAVE TO BATTLE BEES IN SPRING TRAINING GAME >>> PAGE 15
SSWW AARRMM OOFF BBEEEESS:: GIANTS HAVE TO BATTLE BEES IN SPRING TRAINING GAME >>> PAGE 15
Monday, March 5, 2012
<< Golf has a new No. 1, page 16
• CSM softball team on a roll, page 14
• Hamlin wins Sprint Cup race, page 16

Bearcats share CCS title

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

GILROY — Like any good goal- keeper, San Mateo’s Will Amaya credited his defensive line for hold- ing Willow Glen at bay in the Central Coast Section Division II boy’s soccer championship game Saturday morning at Gilroy High. While the back line of Kent Turtletaub, Larry Campbell, Salvador Gomez and Andrew Kwoka were strong, make no mis- take: Amaya was the reason the third-seeded Bearcats kept a clean

sheet, settling for a scoreless draw

and a share of the CCS title.

In the Division I title game, top- seeded Menlo-Atherton (17-1-5) suffered its first loss of the season, falling to No. 3 Watsonville, 3-1. San Mateo and fourth-seeded Willow Glen battled through 80 minutes of regulation and 20 min- utes of overtime without either team rippling the net. “The goalie is only as good as his defense,” Amaya said. “It would have been awesome for it to be obvious we won, but we played an excellent game.”

Amaya made several spectacular, world-class saves to preserve the tie and earn a piece of San Mateo’s first ever CCS soccer championship. “Incredible,” is how San Mateo coach Chuck Callaghan described Amaya’s performance. “He’s done it all year.” Willow Glen, the defending Division II champion, wasted little time in testing Amaya, forcing him to make a reflex save mere moments after the opening kickoff as he pushed a shot over the crossbar. “From the first whistle, you have to be ready,” Amaya said. “It all

starts with a great warm-up.” Willow Glen, which was the Division II runner-up two years ago, dominated San Mateo. It appeared the Rams had more than the allowed 11 players on the field as they dom- inated possession. The Rams earned earned 12 corner kicks to just two for San Mateo, won nearly every 50-50 ball and ball in the air, and pressured the Bearcats all over the field. The Bearcats could never get into a rhythm and had a tough time stringing multiple passes together.

See TITLE, Page 14

Ladies are co-champs at Aragon

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

You gotta believe. It might be just a simple slogan to some, but to the Aragon girls’ soccer team, it’s the motto they’ve been liv- ing for the last year, wearing on the back of their team gear, preaching to each other throughout the 2011- 2012 season. And on Saturday, in the Central Coast Section Division II final against 11-time champion Archbishop Mitty, with seemingly the entire CCS universe doubting they even stood a chance against the mighty Monarchs, the Dons translat- ed that slogan into 100 minutes of inspired soccer. And thus, for only the second time in school history, Aragon girls’ soc- cer is a CCS champion. The Dons tied Mitty 2-2 to share the Division II title. Perhaps more appropriately though, the Monarchs tied Aragon. While that might be surprising to some, seeing as though Mitty was the No. 5 team in the county heading into Saturday, the Dons played like a squad that belonged. Aragon led twice, 1-0, and 2-1. The last lead came on a magical right-footed flying flick by Angela Knowles from an equally

See DONS, Page 13

SSWW AARRMM OOFF BBEEEESS:: GIANTS HAVE TO BATTLE BEES IN SPRING TRAINING GAME >>> PAGE 15

KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL

Aragon’s Jenny Winterbottom handles the ball Saturday in the Central Coast Section Division II title match Saturday.The Dons tied Mitty 2-2 to share the title.

Tigers outworked for CCS title

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

SANTA CLARA — With three Division I college recruits, this year was the year the Terra Nova girls’ basketball team finally captured that elusive Central Coast Section Division III crown. The Tigers went into Saturday’s championship game at Santa Clara University as the top seed and appeared to be the favorite against a Sacred Heart Cathedral squad that was just two wins over .500 on the season. But the Irish proved why they’ve won 11 CCS titles since 2000. The Irish out-hustled and out-played

Terra Nova, beating the Tigers 61-

There was also plenty of standing

  • 56. around and watching by the Tigers as the Irish crashed the boards more effectively and their quickness led to a number of easy layups. Summerville, who said the teams know each other very well because half the players on each squad play for the same club team, expected the Irish to come in with a different look. Summerville knew if the Irish went big, there would be a number of mismatches for the Tigers. Instead, SHC went the opposite direction. “We knew they would change their approach,” Summerville said.

“They hustled,” said Terra Nova coach Kareem Summerville about SHC. “Whoever wants it more is going to win the ball game and our girls didn’t want it.” Nothing illustrated that point bet- ter than in the first half when Terilyn Moe, who was bringing the ball up court following an Irish basket, had the ball deflect off the heel of an Irish defender, sending it rolling toward the baseline. As Moe jogged over to retrieve it, SHC’s Briannah Smith sprinted from her defensive position, nearly the length of the court to beat Moe to the ball and give the Irish another possession.

See TIGERS, Page 15

SSWW AARRMM OOFF BBEEEESS:: GIANTS HAVE TO BATTLE BEES IN SPRING TRAINING GAME >>> PAGE 15

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Terra Nova's Ivonne Cook Taylor shoots over a Sacred Heart Cathe- dral defender during the CCS Division III championship game Sat-

urday. Cook Taylor led the Tigers with 22 points in a 61-56 loss.

Colts fall in title match

By Julio Lara

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Not all epic journeys end tri- umphantly. El Camino’s historic run through the 2011-2012 boys’ basketball sea- son came to a disappointing end at the hands of Sacred Heart Cathedral Saturday afternoon, 71-53. But perhaps more disheartening than anything the Colts did on the court is the question of “what if,” as in, what if El Camino was at full strength? Would it have made any difference — considering the player that was missing was the Peninsula Athletic League’s Most Valuable this season? The truth is, Colt fans will never know. El Camino was already an under- dog heading into Saturday’s game against the 3-time defending Division III champions. But they were severely handicapped when they arrived to Santa Clara University without starting point guard Elijah White. The junior point guard was scratched from the El Camino roster prior to Saturday’s game. While head coach Archie Junio did not have an official word from the school, he did confirm that El Camino suspended White on Friday for an incident on campus. Rumors are swirling, but Junio said the school is conducting an investiga- tion. So, as it stood, El Camino had no answer for Cathedral’s backcourt, who penetrating and dished out throughout the first half as the Irish built a 21-point halftime lead. “We needed the full force of our arsenal,” Junio said. “And unfortu- nately, we didn’t have it. And even with Elijah, who knows if we had a better chance anyway. We needed to be clicking on all cylinders and we weren’t.” “They shot the ball really well,” said El Camino guard Anthony

Smith. “Every shot they took went

down.” It sure seemed like that was the case for Sacred Heart, especially in that first half. The Irish shot 61 per- cent from the floor in quarters one and two as they gradually shoveled dirt on the El Camino grave. With the score tied 8-8, Cathedral went on their first big run, 10-2 and led 25-15 after one quarter. “They pressured us really hard,” said El Camino shooting guard Michael Smith. “It was hard to get open shots and that’s what we do

best. Anthony (Knight), he came out

strong, went to the basket, but we didn’t get many foul calls.” Cathedral welcomed backed Joshua Fox, who sat on the bench near year’s end with injury and ill-

See COLTS, Page 14

12

Monday March 5, 2012

THE DAILY JOURNAL

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday March 5, 2012

13

DONS

Continued from page 11

beautiful pass by Kimi Petsche in the second overtime’s 100th minute that nearly gave Aragon the championship completely. But in a testament to just how good Mitty really is, in the most pure sense of the term “sudden-death,” the Monarchs got a miracle flying-goal of their own off the right foot of Stephanie Rebagliati less than a minute later to equalize. Saturday’s finish to the Division II champi- onship was truly fantastic. “The fact that we tied takes nothing away from the fact that we stood toe-to-toe with the best and we get to put champions next to our name for this season,” said Aragon head coach Will Colglazier. “I’m more focused on the fact that we played really well in the over- time. I thought we controlled the first half, they controlled the second. I thought in over- time, we got more chances, we were more aggressive. But that goal, it was really pretty.” “It’s an indescribable feeling,” Petsche said. “I’m so proud that we came out, definitely the underdogs and we just came into the game thinking we had nothing to lose, so we might as well give it our all. We said in the begin- ning of the year it was a goal to make it to this day - saying it and doing it is a completely different thing. It’s a great feeling.” “To be honest, CCS is mixed, Catholic schools recruit, public don’t,” said Aragon captain Rachel Killigrew. “So to do that against a school that recruits, it’s amazing. Especially in the 30 seconds left, we were winning - it sucks we couldn’t hold on to it, but you know what, co-champions, we’ll take it. We’re still champions.” That oh-so-sweet feeling echoed through- out the Aragon crowd after the game. To some, the tie might not seem as fulfilling. But the fact that they stood and competed against a team in Mitty who was 20-1-3 heading into the game (and had only allowed 11 goals all season), was not lost on Aragon. The first half belonged to Aragon. The Dons got the better looks on goal and possessed the ball better than Mitty. It didn’t take long though to see how deadly the Monarchs could be on the counterattack though - their best opportunities came there. Aragon was short-handed heading into the game. They were without the services of Lexie Rogers, starting left back, and Stevie Herrera, their most fierce midfielder. But Colglazier’s replacements didn’t miss a beat. Arianna Campos played the game of her life in Rogers’ place, while the efforts of the entire backline, particularly Ally Lim, cannot go overlooked — especially considering Killigrew had a more of a midfield roll in Saturday’s game. Jennifer Lewis, who started

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • March 5, 2012 13 DONS Continued from page 11 beautiful

KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL

Aragon led a stunned Mitty team 1-0 at halftime but could not hold on to the win.

in place of Herrera, was solid as well. Aragon earned a huge break at the tail end of the first half. It was then that Knowles was taken down by Nicole Wheeler a foot away from the penalty box. After conferring with each other, the referees determined Wheeler’s foul deserved soccer’s ultimate punishment and No. 26 was sent off with a straight red card. Moments later, Killigrew really made the infraction sting, stepping up and sending a marvel into the back of the Mitty net for the 1- 0 lead. There isn’t a goalkeeper in CCS that could have stopped that shot. Aragon led a stunned Mitty team 1-0 at halftime. Still, the Monarchs are a special team in that their 10-player team will beat most 11- player teams on any given day. The second half was a full-on blitz by the Monarchs — they put three defenders in the back and came on strong looking for the equalizer. “We tried to play more possession,” Colglazier said. “And, testament to Mitty, they played aggressive. But I thought our girls were able to withstand the storm.” It’s in the second half that the Most Valuable Player of the game emerged. Ashley Lentz was sensational in goal for Aragon - perhaps a level above sensational. “She’s making saves that she didn’t make last year,” Colglazier said. “She’s definitely the best keeper I’ve seen - really studly play. It was fun to see her play so well.” Lentz had to be razor sharp because Mitty did not stop coming. “It was basically, play Aragon soccer,” Killigrew said of her team’s second half play. “There were parts of it where we did, parts of it where we didn’t. At halftime, we said no

more corners. And they had a ton of corners.” It was a corner in the 60th minute that Mitty made the Dons pay. Madison Salom inswing somehow died in front of the Aragon goal and Abigaile Leedeman was there to poke it home for the 1-1 score. Mitty wasn’t done. They had at least a pair of wide-open looks at goal, which they didn’t convert. And everyone other time, Lentz was there to thwart the effort. In all, Mitty took nine corner kicks in the second half - each one a nail-biter for Aragon players and fans. But the game went into the overtime periods tied at one. Aragon reasserted itself in the first over- time, but the game stayed tied heading into period two. While the tension was high through the first eight minutes, nothing really surfaced, that was until a Mitty injury with two minutes left started a series of mind-boggling events. The Mitty player spent several minutes on the turf being attended to and, because the clocks stop at 2:00 and the official time is then kept by the head referee, no one in attendance knew exactly how much time was left. Therefore, when Petsche lobbed an exquisite ball to Knowles, who put world-class touch at the end of it for the 2-1 advantage, everyone thought Aragon was going to pull off the all- out shocker. “It was a perfect ball from Kimi,” Knowles said of the goal. “And I just tried to slow myself down as the goalie was coming out and hit it at the right time and it worked. I just tried to put it in the right place.” “We were all so excited,” Lentz said. “I

think we just got a little ahead of ourselves.” Yes they did. Mitty got a dead ball some 40 yards from goal seconds later as the world awaited a final whistle. On the restart, the ball was played just outside the penalty box, flicked with a head and then timed wonderful- ly by a flying Rebagliati for the equalizing tally. The game ended seconds later on the restart. Champions or co-champions, the final score did not dictate how Aragon felt about their effort. For some players, Killigrew and Marissa Bonfiglio, it was a chance to play a game that two years ago they couldn’t because of illness. “This was so special for me,” Bonfiglio said. “It felt so amazing to finally play. We knew coming out to this game we were the underdogs so we had to give it our all. They’re a super good team so we had to come out and it give it, 120 percent.” “It’s a huge deal for school,” said Jenny Winterbottom. “It’s a huge deal for us because we made it this far and we could compete against a team like Mitty. And they were lucky to tie us.” “It’ll always be sweet,” Lentz said. “No matter what — the thought of getting another star on our jersey, we deserve it.”

DIVISION III

MENLO 2, SANTA CRUZ 0

Much like the rest of the Menlo girls’ soc- cer team’s season, the Central Coast Section Division II championship culminated in a shutout — 2-0 over Santa Cruz on Saturday at Valley Christian High. Menlo finished the season with 11 shutouts in an incredible run that included its first league title since 1991. The Knights last won CCS titles from 1988-1990. This is the Knights’ first championship outright. Sophomore Jaye Boissiere put the go-ahead goal on a penalty kick in the 43rd minute and fellow sophomore Chandler Wickers secured the victory with a goal in the 67th minute. “We played a very good team,” Menlo coach Donoson FitzGerald said. “We certain- ly have some incredible individuals, but this team all the way through is strong. We found a way to win with different players stepping up. “It’s hard to put a finger on it,” FitzGerald said. "I love this team. I love to see who they are as people. The formidable tag team of juniors Kelly McConnell and Julia Dressel in goal recorded yet another shutout.

Menlo School Athletics contributed to this report.

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • March 5, 2012 13 DONS Continued from page 11 beautiful
Volunteer. www.CASAofSanMateo.org w w w . C A S A o f S a n M
Volunteer.
www.CASAofSanMateo.org
w w w . C A S A o f S a n M a t e o . o r g
650-212-4423
6 5 0 - 2 1 2 - 4 4 2 3

Burlingame School District Bond Oversight

Committee Member Search

The Burlingame School District is seeking volunteers for its Measure A Bond Oversight Committee. Local citizens are needed to review and oversee Measure A Bond expenditures for the facilities improvements at all of the Districts six schools. This a great opportunity to get involved in a facet of public school fi nance not very well known. Selected volunteers will serve a vital role in the public oversight of the school districts use of public funds.

The time commitment is fairly minimal with just four meetings a year, typically lasting one hour. Committee Membership is limited to two two-year terms with a representative needed from each of the following four categories:

Member active in a senior citizensorganization Registered Member of a bona-fi de tax organization Member active in a business organization representing the local business community Two Members of the community at-large

For additional information, please contact Dr. Robert Clark, Assistant Superin- tendent / CBO at the District (650) 259-3800 or the Districts Program Manager Richard Terrones of Dreiling Terrones Architecture (650) 696-1200. For those interested in this opportunity, please mail a letter of interest to the District Offi ce at 1825 Trousdale Drive, Burlingame, CA 94010, Attention Dr. Maggie MacIsaac, Superintendent. All letters of interest should be submitted by March 31, 2012 for Board review at the April 10, 2012 board meeting.

  • 14 Monday March 5, 2012

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CSM women on roll

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

The College of San Mateo women’s softball team has achieved several state milestones over the past 10 days to challenge for top state ranking:

• Blanking then No. 1 ranked (in state) College of the Siskiyous, 2-0 • Beating No.4 Sierra, 8-5 — and then moving up to No. 3 in the latest state poll (Feb. 27). • Beating No. 10 Feather River, 3- 1, on Saturday to become the first of California’s 85 teams to win 20 games this season. CSM is now 21-3. Capuchino High grad Jamie Navarro was the star of Saturday’s sweep of Feather River (8-3), hitting towering solo home runs out of the park in both games and scoring the walkoff run (on a bases loaded bunt by Mikayla Conlin) in the seventh inning. Navarro scored four runs in the two games to give her the state sea- son lead with 29. She also had four

hits to increase her total to 30, No. 6

in the state. Navarro now has four home runs (No. 12 in the state). Both of Saturday’s homers came with two outs in the bottom of the third inning and also tied the score at 1-1 after Feather River had taken the initial lead in both games. Michele Pilster got both wins, the second in relief, to up her season record to 13-2 — the most wins by a Northern California player and sec- ond in the state. Also a freshman out of Capuchino, Pilster had seven strikeouts to increase her season total to 87 and rank fourth in the state. Including Friday’s 24-0 win over City College of San Francisco, Navarro scored eight runs and had seven hits in two days. The Bulldogs moved-up from No. 5 to No. 3 in last week’s state poll after giving Siskiyous its first loss of the year and dropping the Eagles (from Weed) to No. 2.

COLTS

Continued from page 11

ness. Fox played like he hadn’t missed a beat. In addition, El Camino had a hard time containing Khalil James and Tyler Petroni — the two combined for 20 points in the first half, shooting 7 of 11 from the floor. “Anyone here will tell you it wasn’t really their big guys, it was their guards,” Junio said when asked about El Camino’s biggest defensive problem. “They were shooting lights out today. So that’s pretty much what happened. We were banking on them missing some shots, but they weren’t miss- ing very many shot from the out- side.” Meanwhile El Camino struggled to get into any kind of offensive groove — the combination of Cathedral defense and their miss- ing floor general might have had a lot to do with that. The Colts shot 39 percent in the first half. And any bucket they did make was answered promptly by a

bigger Cathedral shot. El Camino was outscored 20-9 in the second quarter, with the Irish taking a 45- 24 lead into recess.

“They executed a bit better,” said El Camino’s Jalen Bitanga. “They were getting a lot more open shots than we were, they played harder, they wanted it more than us and they got it.” “We knew we were in a slump,” Smith said about the halftime mes- sage. “We were down by a lot but we just tried to get it tight and get into the game.” El Camino was unsuccessful in that effort, thanks in large part to Cathedral’s work on the offensive glass. While the stat sheet says that El Camino actually out-rebounded the Irish on the offensive end (20- 14), Cathedral converted their boards into buckets. El Camino could not string together more than two buckets in the second half. The Colts cut the lead to 18 by the start of the fourth quarter on 5 of 14 shooting in the third quarter. “We tried out there,” Knight said. “We tried to knock down some shots, rebound more, play more aggressive D. But it just didn’t go our way.” El Camino got Irish big-man Taylor Johns, who’s had a monster 2012 CCS tournament, to foul out with 4:07 left in the game. Fox picked up most of that slack

though, finishing with eight points and 13 rebounds.

But

as

Junio

mentioned,

the

Achilles hell for El Camino Saturday was Cathedral’s guard play. Irish guards combined for 35 points (48 if you list Herman Pratt as a guard instead of a small for- ward) — which just adds to Saturday’s “what if?”

“He’s

a

big

part of our team,”

Smith said of White. “But we felt like, with or without him, we should beat this team. We were in the game, but mentally, I guess some of our teammates weren’t there. It was a hard loss.” “No, we gotta do what we gotta do,” Junio said when asked if

White’s presence would have made a big enough difference to say, reverse the outcome. “I feel like Alex Huerta, our back-up point guard, stepped up, did a good job.

But we can’t say, he’s not here.”

Smith

led

the

Colts

with

23

points. Knight scored 14 and

pulled down nine rebounds.

Bitanga was a monster inside at times for El Camino. He scored 12 points and brought down 11 boards.

season Camino with their first-ever appearance in the state playoffs this week. And their run through the PAL and CCS this season was still one to remember.

The

continues

for

El

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But for all the possession the Rams enjoyed, they could not crack San Mateo’s back line. “They (Willow Glen) were a very good team,” Callaghan said. “We knew that coming in.” It was Amaya’s play in the net, however, that ultimately stymied the Rams. Amaya fin- ished with 12 saves on the day. None more important than the sprawling save he made in the second overtime. Willow Glen’s Graham Moore ripped a shot from 30 yards out that was destined for the back of the net. Amaya dove to his left, getting his right hand on the ball and sending it wide for a Rams corner. Amaya sprang to his feet and let loose a scream. “When it’s in the air, I can’t take my eye off the ball,” Amaya said. “Sometimes I sur- prise myself. That (save) was on of those sur-

prising ones.” Despite being outplayed for most of the game, the Bearcats made the Rams sweat late in the second half of regulation when they had

their most sustained attack of the game. Angel

Mejia and Alejandro Mendoza made a num- ber of dangerous runs, but they could not make that final pass to make the Rams’ goal- keeper work. When the Rams goalie was called upon, he made the play. Soon after Amaya’s game saver, Mejia was taken down just outside the penalty near the left sideline - essentially a corner kick. Ryan Onizuka sent the cross into the goal box, but Willow Glen’s Anthony Macias beat Turtletaub to it, snatching the ball out of the air before he could get a head on it. In the end, neither team was especially thrilled to finish in a tie. Despite that, Callaghan put it in perspective. “We’ve had some tremendous talent and tremendous teams at San Mateo for a long time,” Callaghan said. “This team achieved something those great players and teams

never came close to doing.”

14 Monday • March 5, 2012 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL CSM women on roll DAILY JOURNAL
14 Monday • March 5, 2012 SPORTS THE DAILY JOURNAL CSM women on roll DAILY JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Monday March 5, 2012

15

Swarm of bees delays Giants game

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — This was no ‘B’ game. The Diamondbacks’ grounds crew used a combination of cotton candy and lemonade to help disperse a swarm of bees that delayed the San Francisco Giants split squad’s 11-1 win over Arizona for 41 minutes in the sec- ond inning Sunday. With runners on second and third and one out in the second inning, a dark cloud appeared in right field, sending Diamondbacks center fielder Chris Young sprinting toward left. “I didn’t see them at first I just heard them,” Young said. “I am not afraid of one or two of them. I wouldn’t flinch at that. When you start talking about 500, 600 of them yea, I am afraid of that. I would be afraid of any- thing of that many. If there were that many mosquitoes, I would be afraid of that.” The bees moved toward the right field line then down to the Giants dugout behind first base. Two sections of fans near the dugout were evacuated and the bees settled in a cam- era well adjacent to the dugout. With the bees buzzing, Young and right fielder Adam Eaton signed autographs and mingled with fans near the center field fence. Giants center fielder Angel Pagan was pre- pared if the bees reached the dugout. “I was right next to the bathroom in case I had to lock myself in,” Pagan said. The grounds crew came up with a sweet solution. They smeared a combination of conces- sion-stand lemonade and cotton candy on two utility carts and lured many of the bees away from fans and players. Some of the bees, however, found a perch on a television camera. Only one person reported being stung, a

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • March 5, 2012 15 Swarm of bees delays Giants game

ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL

Sunday’s early split-squad game in Scottsdale ended when Eric Farris of the Brewers was caught in a pickle and was eventually tagged out by Giants first baseman Brandon Belt.

Salt River Fields employee. Diamondback ace Ian Kennedy was on the mound when the bees showed up and didn’t return after the 41-minute delay. Kennedy threw 29 pitches, allowing one run and three hits. “I was almost done. I was ready to go back out there but it was way too long to go back

in,” Kennedy said. “I threw a lot of fastballs, one or two breaking balls to get my com- mand but for the most par a lot of fastballs.” In an earlier split-squad game with the Brewers, reigning NL MVP Ryan Braun was heckled while striking out in his only two at- bats in the Milwaukee Brewers’ 1-all tie with the San Francisco Giants on Sunday.

It was Braun’s first game since getting caught up in a drug case during the offsea- son. He recently won his appeal, overturning a 50-game suspension for a positive drug test. The game was at Milwaukee’s Maryvale Baseball Park and Brewers fans gave Braun a standing ovation when he came to bat. But about half of the 6,619 fans cheered for the Giants and greeted Braun with cat- calls. They serenaded the Brewers slugger with chants of “Ur-ine Sam-ple!” before Braun struck out swinging against Madison Bumgarner in his first at-bat. His second time up, Braun was greeted with chants of “Cheater!” before looking at strike three. Braun was getting the kind of treatment Barry Bonds used to draw toward the end of his career — and from the very fans who were the only ones who didn’t deride the Giants superstar who was long suspected of using steroids. Braun said he was glad the games are finally here. “Yeah, it was great. I think for all of us as a team, you look forward to games starting. It’s a little more adrenaline, little more excitement and enthusiasm. So, it was fun,” he said. The Brewers got a double dose of bad news before the game when Rickie Weeks (tight right shoulder) and right fielder Corey Hart (right knee) were late scratches. An MRI exam revealed Hart has a torn meniscus and needs arthroscopic surgery that will sideline him three to four weeks. Then, Milwaukee’s biggest star got razzed at his home spring park. Brewers starter Randy Wolf, who retired all six batters he faced, said he was oblivious to the catcalls directed at Braun, who has never really been the target of opposing fans’ wrath before.

TIGERS

Continued from page 11

“They went with all guards.” In addition to simply wanting the ball more, the Irish also did a much better job of shooting, belying their experience in championship games at the Leavey Center. First-time teams in the cavernous gym almost always struggle with their shots and Terra Nova was no exception. The Tigers shot just 27 percent from the field, while SHC was 44 percent.

In a sign of things to come, after winning the opening tip, Moe drove along the baseline for a rou- tine layup - and missed. As shot

after shot clanged off the rim, Terra

Nova stopped doing what it does best, play team basketball. “Instead of running our offense, they took themselves out of the game,” Summerville said. “We were (not playing) team basketball; a lot of 1-on-1 situations.” That’s usually not such a bad option as Moe, Ivonne Cook Taylor and Jayzyl Tauala are usually bet- ter than a lot of players individual- ly, none could really get them- selves going - especially in the first

half. Both Moe and Cook Taylor combined for 18 first-half points, but five of those came from the free-throw line. Tauala was shut out in the first 16 minutes.

“They didn’t pass to her (Tuala). You have to give her the ball,” Summerville said. “If she gets started, everyone else gets going.” Cook Taylor ended up with a team-high 22 points, to go along with 14 rebounds, while Moe added 15. SHC was paced by GeAnna Summers-Lululu’s game- high 24 points. Smith chipped in

Irish. They trailed 16-11 after one quarter, but fell behind by 10 when SHC’s Kayla Coloyan hit a layup with 5:09 left in the second quarter. The Tigers responded with an 8- 3 run to close the half and trailed just 29-24 at halftime. Terra Nova’s shooting struggles continued in the third quarter and if not for the play of Cook Taylor, the Tigers would have been staring at a huge deficit. Cook Taylor finally found her stroke in the second half, scoring nine of the Tigers’ 12 third- quarter points. Unfortunately, the

  • 11. Tigers couldn’t get a defensive stop and the Irish took a 43-36 lead into the fourth quarter.

Despite their shooting woes, the Tigers managed to hang with the

Terra Nova, finally showing some urgency, opened the final period by cutting the SHC lead to 49-45 with 5:07 to play. The Irish responded with an 8-1 run, opening up a 57-46 lead when Jerrieza Enriquez nailed a 3-pointer with 2:52 left. Enriquez added another 3 for a 10-point lead with 1:39 left, and despite struggling from the line down the stretch, the Irish did enough to hold off the Tigers. “[We] were kind of nervous at the beginning,” Summerville said. “Defense is the key. We gave up a lot of easy jumpers, easy layups. … [We] just didn’t do the little things we normally do.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • March 5, 2012 15 Swarm of bees delays Giants game
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • March 5, 2012 15 Swarm of bees delays Giants game
THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS Monday • March 5, 2012 15 Swarm of bees delays Giants game
  • 16 Monday March 5, 2012

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

McIlroy holds off Tiger, goes to No. 1

By Doug Ferguson

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. — Rory McIlroy was six holes away from winning the Honda Classic and going to No. 1 in the world, an out- come that looked inevitable as he stood on the 13th green Sunday at PGA National. That’s when he heard the roar. Even from the farthest corner of the course, McIlroy knew it was for Tiger Woods. And McIlroy could tell by the sheer volume that it was an eagle. “I could hear the huge roar,”

McIlroy said. “And it definite- ly wasn’t a birdie roar.” For Woods, it was that finally
McIlroy
said.
“And it definite-
ly
wasn’t a
birdie roar.”
For Woods, it
was
that finally put
a moment
some color into
that red shirt,
birdie-eagle fin-
a
Rory McIlroy
ish for a 62, the
lowest final round of his career to get

within one shot of the lead and force the 22-year-old from Northern Ireland to play the final hour with lit- tle room for error. But this is no ordinary kid.

McIlroy answered with clutch shots of his own, a performance that showed why he’s the new No. 1 in golf. He poured in the 8-foot birdie putt on the 13th for a two-shot lead. He gouged out a wedge from grass so deep he could barely see the ball to

save par on the 14th, and he twice

saved par from the bunker on the scary par 3s for a 1-under 69 and a two-shot win. “It was tough today, especially seeing Tiger make a charge,” McIlroy said. “I knew par golf would probably be good enough. To shoot 1 under in these conditions, when you

go into the round with the lead, is very nice. And I was just able to get the job done.” McIlroy became the 16th player to be No. 1 since the world ranking began in 1986, and the fourth player in the last 16 months since Woods abdicated the top spot after a five- year reign. McIlroy replaced Luke Donald and became the second- youngest player to be No. 1 behind Woods, who was 21 when he first got to the top after the 1997 U.S. Open. “It was always a dream of mine to become the world No. 1 and the best player in the world or whatever you want to call it,” McIlroy said. “But I

didn’t know what I would be able to

get here this

quickly. ...

Hopefully, I

can hold onto it for a little longer.”

He celebrated by flying to New York to spend time with his girl- friend, tennis star Caroline Wozniacki, before returning to south Florida next week for a World Golf Championship. Donald responded quickly to the victory, tweeting “Congrats (at)McIlroyRory enjoy the view!” Woods made two eagles in the final round and wound up two shots behind, his best finish on the PGA Tour since he was runner-up in the 2009 Tour Championship.

Hamlin gets confidence- building win at Phoenix

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AVONDALE, Ariz. — Denny Hamlin spent nearly two months of the offseason in the Scottsdale area, hoping to get away from racing for a while, reinvigorate himself for the 2012 season. It seemed to do wonders, leading to a win at a place where he had one of the biggest disappointments of his career. Hamlin pulled away when NASCAR’s best closer ran out of gas and then had to sweat out his own fuel mileage before completing a confidence-boosting win at Phoenix International Raceway on Sunday. “It’s a little bit of satisfaction there, for sure,” Hamlin said. “It’s a bittersweet track.” It was, in fact, the site of one of his worst memories as a driver. Hamlin seemed to have a comfort- able lead over Jimmie Johnson in

the penultimate race of the 2010

Chase when his title hopes were derailed by a fuel strategy that back- fired. Forced to pit for fuel late in the race, he scrambled just to finish 19th while Johnson was fifth. Hamlin left the desert dejected after his lead was trimmed to 15 points and ended up losing the title the next week to Johnson, who earned his record fifth straight Sprint Cup championship. Hamlin then had bit of a hangover to start the 2011 season and never really clicked, ending up ninth in the Sprint Cup standings. That’s where his return to the desert comes in. Hamlin started 13th at PIR and briefly led a couple of times before beating Kevin Harvick off the line after a caution with 59 laps left. Harvick, NASCAR’s best finisher, put a scare into him toward the end, but ran out of gas on the final lap.

3/3 3/6 3/8 3/10 3/12 3/13 3/15 vs.Oilers @ Dallas @ Oilers @ Calgary vs.Nashville @
3/3
3/6
3/8
3/10
3/12
3/13
3/15
vs.Oilers
@ Dallas
@ Oilers
@ Calgary
vs.Nashville
@ Phoenix
7:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
5 p.m.
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
CSN-CAL
3/4
3/5
3/7
3/10
3/11
3/13
3/15
@ Wizards
vs.Grizlies
vs.Mavs
@ Clippers
@ Kings
vs.Phoenix
4 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY
CSN-BAY

SPRINT CUP RESULTS

At Phoenix

International Raceway

AAvvoonnddaallee,, AArriizz.. LLaapp lleennggtthh:: 11 mmiilleess ((SSttaarrtt ppoossiittiioonn iinn ppaarreenntthheesseess))

1.(13) Denny Hamlin,Toyota,312 laps,130 rating,47

points,$238,016.

2.

(8) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 312, 134.7, 44,

$222,836.

3.(7) Greg Biffle,Ford,312,96.4,41,$139,400.

4.

(4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 312, 120.5, 41,

$156,121.

5.

(28) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 312, 109.4, 40,

$141,495.

6.(12) Kyle Busch,Toyota,312,117.2,39,$140,158. 7.(25) Martin Truex Jr.,Toyota,312,92.3,38,$122,539. 8.(30) Jeff Gordon,Chevrolet,312,94.9,37,$134,211. 9.(1) Mark Martin,Toyota,312,106.4,36,$90,175. 10.(9) Joey Logano,Toyota,312,95.5,34,$92,000.

11.(5) Juan Pablo Montoya,Chevrolet,312,87.2,33,

$111,066.

12.(18) Aric Almirola,Ford,312,74.9,32,$116,211. 13.(26) Matt Kenseth,Ford,312,94.7,32,$122,836.

14.

(29) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 312, 73.1, 30,

$84,625.

15.(19) Kurt Busch,Chevrolet,312,78.7,30,$102,883.

16.

(17) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 312, 70.3, 28,

$98,983.

17.(24) Carl Edwards,Ford,312,78,27,$116,716.

18.

(15) A J Allmendinger, Dodge, 311, 69, 26,

$114,825.

19.(41) Travis Kvapil,Toyota,311,57.4,25,$95,908.

20.(3) Regan Smith,Chevrolet,311,76.7,24,$93,483.

21.

(6) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 310, 67.1, 23,

$115,108.

22.

(2) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 310, 93.5, 23,

$123,125.

23.(23) Dave Blaney,Chevrolet,309,55.4,21,$69,450. 24.(42) Mike Bliss,Ford,309,50.7,0,$80,800. 25.(34) David Ragan,Ford,309,44.6,20,$82,647. 26.(35) J.J.Yeley,Toyota,309,41.6,18,$69,050. 27.(40) Brendan Gaughan,Chevrolet,308,47.4,17,

$80,225.

28.(36) David Gilliland,Ford,308,42.6,16,$72,000.

NHL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

AAttllaannttiicc DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

N.Y.Rangers

42

15

7

91

179 133

Pittsburgh

38

21

5

81

207 167

Philadelphia

36

21

7

79

210

191

New Jersey

36

24

5

77

180 175

N.Y.Islanders

28

29

9

65

155

195

NNoorr tthheeaasstt

DDiivviissiioonn

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Boston

38

23

3

79

209 150

Ottawa

34

25

8

76

202 198

Buffalo

30

27

8

68

162

183

Toronto

30

28

7

67

194 201

Montreal

25

31

10

60

170 184

SSoouutthheeaasstt DDiivviissiioonn

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Florida

31

22

12

74

163

184

Winnipeg

31

27

8

70

173

186

Washington

32

28

5

69

172

184

Tampa Bay

31

28

6

68

184 219

Carolina

24

27

14

62

171

197

WESTERN CONFERENCE

CCeennttrraall DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

St.Louis

41

18

7

89

169

131

Detroit

43

20

3

89

209 153

Nashville

38

20

7

83

184 166

Chicago

36

24

7

79

202 195

Columbus

20

38

7

47

153 214

NNoorr tthhwweesstt DDiivviissiioonn

 
 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Vancouver

41

17

8

90

209

161

Colorado

34

29

4

72

171

180

Calgary

29

25

12

70

159

181

Minnesota

28

28

10

66

143

180

Edmonton

25

33

6

56

170 192

PPaacciicc DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

OT

Pts

GF

GA

Phoenix

33

23

9

75

170 165

Dallas

35

26

5

75

174 178

San Jose

33

24

7

73

179 163

Los Angeles

30

23

12

72

142

139

Anaheim

28

28

10

66

166 186

Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss or shootout loss.

SSuunnddaayyss GGaammeess Dallas 3,Calgary 2,SO N.Y.Rangers 4,Boston 3 N.Y.Islanders 1,New Jersey 0 Chicago 2,Detroit 1 Florida 4,Ottawa 2 Philadelphia 1,Washington 0 Colorado 2,Minnesota 0

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

AAttllaannttiicc DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Philadelphia

22

16

.579

Boston

19

17

.528

2

New York

18

19

.486

3 1/2

Toronto

12

25

.324

9 1/2

New Jersey

12

26

.316

10

SSoouutthheeaasstt DDiivviissiioonn

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

Miami

28

9

.757

Orlando

24

14

.632

4 1/2

Atlanta

22

15

.595

6

Washington

8

28

.222

19 1/2

Charlotte

4

31

.114

23

CCeennttrraall DDiivviissiioonn

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Chicago

31

8

.795

Indiana

23

12

.657

6

Milwaukee

14

23

.378

16

Cleveland

13

22

.371

16

Detroit

12

26

.316

18 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SSoouutthhwweesstt DDiivviissiioonn

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

San Antonio

25

11

.694

Memphis

22

15

.595

3 1/2

Dallas

22

16

.579

4

Houston

21

17

.553

5

New Orleans

9

28

.243

16 1/2

NNoorrtthhwweesstt DDiivviissiioonn

 
 

W