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MARCH 7-13, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Turf field team
Market, recreation foundation
fundraise for field. PAGE 2
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Players to perform Xanadu
By ROBERT LINNEHAN
The Hopewell Sun
This is a public-health an-
nouncement for all those plan-
ning on checking out the Pen-
nington Players newest produc-
tion this week.
Please, before seeing the show,
visit your local practitioner and
receive the John Waters Inocula-
tion, because the upcoming per-
formance of Xanadu contains
extremely high levels of camp
and cheese.
Dont forget fun it also will
contain a lot of fun but you
dont need anything for that. Just
enjoy the show.
The Pennington Players will
perform Xanadu for the next
two weeks, beginning with an
opening-night performance on
Friday, March 9 at 8 p.m., in the
Kelsey Theater, Mercer County
Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor.
The players will perform the
show on March 9, 10, 16 and 17 at
the theater at 8 p.m. Additionally,
matinees will be performed on
March 11 and 18 at 2 p.m.
Adult tickets are $18, senior cit-
izens are $16, and students and
children are $14.
Xanadu follows the journey
of a magical and beautiful Greek
muse, Kira, who descends from
Mt. Olympus to Venice Beach,
Calif., in 1980 in a quest to inspire
a struggling artist, Sonny, to
achieve the greatest artistic cre-
ation of all time the first roller
disco. The roller-skating, musical
adventure about following your
dreams despite the limitations
others set for you, features an
original hit score composed by
pop-rock legends Jeff Lynne (of
Electric Light Orchestra) and
John Farrar, and includes,
Photos Special to The Sun
There will be a lot of dancing and roller skates as The Pennington Players put on Xanadu on March 9-11 and 16-18 at the Kelsey Theater at
Mercer County College. Friday and Saturday shows start at 8 p.m., and the Sunday show starts at 2 p.m.
Guilty
plea in
kidnap
case
By ROBERT LINNEHAN
The Hopewell Sun
Bizarre news out of
Hopewell Township, as the U.S.
Attorneys Office district of
New Jersey is reporting that
a Pennsylvania man has plead-
ed guilty to engaging someone
he thought was a white su-
premacist to kidnap a New
Jersey woman and her child,
U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman
announced last week.
Jayen I. Patel, 41, of
Southampton, Pa., pleaded
guilty to an indictment charg-
ing him with one count of so-
liciting an individual to aid in
a kidnapping. The defendant
entered his guilty plea before
U.S. District Judge Freda L.
Wolfson in Trenton federal
court.
According to documents
filed in the case and state-
ments made in court, in Sep-
tember 2010, Patel reached out
to an FBI agent acting in an
undercover capacity (the
UC) through an Internet-
based social networking site.
As the relationship between
the UC and Patel developed,
Patel identified a woman and
please see MAN, page 5
please see FUN, page 4
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 7-13, 2012
Your PromHeadquarters
We Moved!
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Tues, Wed 10:30-6:00 Thursday 12:00-7:00
Friday 10:30-5:00 Sat 10:00-5:00 Sunday 12:00-4:00
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1378 Rt. 206 Skillman, NJ 08558
609.430.4600 www.kikidresses.com
Its a natural.
Last fall, Mike Rothwell, vice-
president and general manager of
Pennington Quality Market and
Sheryl Stone, a trustee of the
Recreation Foundation of
Hopewell Valley, sat down to ex-
plore how the market could help
with fundraising for a turf field
at Hopewell Valley Central High
School.
The Pennington Quality Mar-
ket is proud to announce a part-
nership with the recreation foun-
dation to raise funds for an Astro-
Turf field at Hopewell Valley Cen-
tral High School. Plans are under-
way to support Turf s Up! the
fundraising initiative for the field
by inviting loyal customers and
the entire community to join to-
gether for the project.
On Saturday, March 17, PQM
will donate 5 percent of sales to
support Turf s Up! to help the
recreation foundation close in on
their goal of $1 million.
Student athletes, musicians,
coaches and directors will be bag-
ging your groceries as a way of
showing their appreciation and
a raffle of items donated by local
businesses will add to the
fundraising total for the day.
The field will provide an out-
standing venue for field hockey,
football, lacrosse, soccer, march-
ing band, cheerleading and spe-
cial community events such as
graduation and homecoming.
With the communitys help and
support, the field will be con-
structed this coming summer.
Make your grocery list now
and plan to be part of this project.
For more information about
the project or to make a donation,
visit www.hvrecfoundation.org.
Special to The Sun
Above: Sheryl Stone, a Recre-
ation Foundation of Hopewell
Valley trustee, and Mike Roth-
well, vice-president and GM of
Pennington Quality Market.
Market, recreation foundation
team up for turf field fundraiser
MARCH 7-13, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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(609) 466-2100
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Donate sports cards to
Cards2Kids charity
Do you have sports cards gath-
ering dust in your basement or
attic?
Consider donating them to
Cards2Kids, a non-profit organi-
zation started in Chicago that col-
lects new and used sports cards,
distributing them to kids at vari-
ous child-focused charities.
Cards2Kids has a new East
Coast representative, Ben Schrag-
ger, who is collecting cards for
children in need in the area. Con-
tributions can be dropped off at
CG Sports, 15 North Main St.,
Pennington.
Free iPad learning
sessions at library
The Pennington Public Library
is offering two free sessions enti-
tled You and Your iPad, about
how to get the most from your
iPad or iPhone.
Choose either Tuesday, March
13, at 11 a.m., or Thursday, March
15, at 7 p.m. Both sessions will be
held at the Pennington Library, 30
North Main St.
Led by Tyler Caton of Mercer
County Computer Service, the
sessions will be informative and
entertaining. Patrons should
bring their own iPad or IPhone.
Two iPads are available for use at
the library on a first-come, first-
served basis.
For questions or to reserve
your place, contact Tara Russell
at (609) 737-0404, or trussell@pen-
ningtonlibrary.org.
Chat with Greenberg
on March 9
The Lets Chat group with Vi-
vian Greenberg will meet on Fri-
day, March 9, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at
the Hopewell Valley Senior Cen-
ter, 395 Reading St. in Pennington.
Stop by for a lively discussion. All
are welcome. No registration re-
quired. Refreshments will be
served.
For more information, call 737-
0605, ext. 692, or
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
BRIEFS
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 7-13, 2012
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Minutes from Hopewell, Pennington and Princeton
Magic, All Over the World,
Suddenly, Im Alive, Evil
Woman, Have You Never Been
Mellow and Xanadu, to name
a few.
Children of the 1980s certainly
know the movie, first-time Pen-
nington Players Director John
Boccanfuso said.
If you grew up in the 80s, you
know the music and you probably
have seen the movie. You know
how awful it is but also how
great it is because of how terri-
ble it was, he said with a laugh.
The movie, starring Olivia
Newton John, has become a cult
classic despite being a box office
bomb.
The original production of
Xanadu opened on Broadway in
2007 to glowing reviews and was
subsequently nominated for four
2008 Tony Awards, including Best
Musical. It broke house records at
the Helen Hayes Theatre, where it
enjoyed a run of 500-plus per-
formances.
The movie was a huge disas-
ter, but the Broadway show was
fantastic, he said. Its a happy
musical. Its cheesy, campy and
its just a fun musical.
The leads of the production,
Jaclyn Dixon who plays Clio
and Kara and Matt Reher who
plays Sonny had to be quadru-
ple threats during the production,
he said.
They had to sing, dance, act,
and of course, roller skate.
In fact, Dixon is on roller
skates almost throughout the en-
tire production, he said.
People can purchase tickets at
the Pennington Players website at
www.kelseyatmccc.org.
A special discount for the
Thursday, March 15 show will be
offered by typing the code
XA9A15 into the ticket pur-
chase window.
Visitors are also encouraged to
dress up in their best 80s clothes
for each performance, Boccanfu-
so said, as there will be a costume
competition each night.
The Pennington Players have
been entertaining local audiences
since 1951.
In 1964, they became the first
group ever to perform at the
Washington Crossing State Park
Open Air Theatre with a produc-
tion of Shaw's The Devil's Disci-
ple.
For more information, check
out their website at www.penning
tonplayers.org.
FUN
Continued from page 1
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MARCH 7-13, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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her daughter, whom he wished to
have kidnapped, claiming that the
childs father wanted custody of
the child.
Patels plan involved forcing
the woman to do things to make
her loose [sic] custody of her
child, according to representa-
tives in the district attorney of-
fice.
Patel and his associates,
who were to have aided in
the abduction, would have
been paid from money they ex-
torted from the victim, reports
said.
Additionally, reports say the
men would all have shared the
woman as a so-called slave fol-
lowing her abduction, reports
said.
In his guilty plea, reports say
Patel admitted he provided in-
structions to separate the
child from her mother, to restrain
the mother with handcuffs, and
to knock the mother unconscious
with a handgun if she
resisted.
Patel also provided the victims
names and address, urging the
UC to conduct surveillance on the
victims to determine their
schedules and how many people
lived in the residence, reports
said.
Reports say he also gave in-
structions regarding the makeup
of the group that should engage
in the kidnapping.
The solicitation charge to
which Patel pleaded guilty car-
ries a maximum potential penal-
ty of 20 years in prison and a
$125,000 fine.
He will be sentenced before a
judge on June 1.
Fishman praised the outstand-
ing work of special agents
of the FBI, under the direction
of Special Agent in Charge
Michael B. Ward, as well as
the other members of the
Newark Joint Terrorism Task
Force.
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MAN
Continued from page 1
Man pleads guilty to soliciting an
individual to aid in kidnapping
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 7-13, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
T
heres not a lot that Gov.
Christie does that doesnt pro-
voke a heated response from
someone, somewhere. Budget cuts, ed-
ucation reform, you name it, shortly
after the governor stops talking, some-
one tears into his proposal. And thats
not a bad thing. We mention it to point
out that the governor has a habit of
diving head-first into controversy
over and over again.
However, the governor is now back-
ing a constitutional amendment to re-
form the bail system in the state. Its a
move that he calls common sense.
We agree.
The measure would allow judges to
consider such things as the defen-
dants past dangerous behavior before
sending that person back out onto the
streets, often to cause more problems,
intimidate witnesses, etc.
This is a proposal that should re-
ceive widespread, bi-partisan support.
Its a move that is long overdue. Its a
move that will keep people safe and
help law enforcement put people be-
hind bars and keep them there.
The governor points to a number of
statistics from a 2007 study by the Bu-
reau of Justice Statistics to support
his measure: about one-third of re-
leased defendants were charged with
one or more types of pretrial miscon-
duct; nearly one-fourth had a bench
warrant issued for failing to appear;
and about one-sixth were arrested for
a new arrest with more than half of
these new arrests for felonies.
Indeed, at some point, someone is
going to object to depriving someone
who is not convicted of his or her con-
stitutional rights. And thats a reason-
able debate to hold.
But well side with the governor on
this one. Defendants who have a histo-
ry of violence, who are a threat to the
community, and who are likely to try
to intimidate witnesses against them
need to be locked up.
Its time to take a stand for public
safety. Passing this amendment would
do just that.
Yes to bail reform measure
Heres one Christie proposal that should be widely supported
Bail reform a smart move
Reform could give judges an opportu-
nity to keep dangerous people off the
streets unable to commit additional
crimes or to intimidate those testify-
ing against them.
The following items are taken from re-
ports on file with the Hopewell Police De-
partment:
Officer Christopher Vaccarino observed
a car pass several other cars over double
yellow lines along Trenton Harbourton
Road on Feb. 19. The car failed to stop for
Vaccarinos emergency lights and siren
when the officer attempted to stop the car.
The driver, later identified as a 17-year-old
boy, turned into a private driveway where
he was located by Vaccarino moments
later. The boy was placed under arrest and
transported to police headquarters for pro-
cessing. The juvenile was charged with
eluding police with a motor vehicle, reck-
less driving, passing on double yellow lines
and failing to yield to an emergency vehi-
cle.
The juvenile was later released into the
custody of a parent, and this case will be
heard in family court.
Sgt. William Springer responded to East
Prospect Street for the report of solicitors
going door to door without having a permit
on Feb. 21. Springer says he spoke with two
employees of a home remodeling group,
who were not in possession of a permit to
solicit in Hopewell Borough. The two men
were both issued summonses for the ordi-
nance violation, which will be heard in
municipal court.
Officer William Gaskill responded to a
hit and run crash along Pennington Rocky
Hill Road on Feb. 20. A witness told police a
dark colored sports utility vehicle, possibly
a Jeep, struck a mailbox. The driver, police
say, briefly got out of the car, but drove
away before Gaskill arrived at the scene.
Officer Michael Toth, along with other
officers, responded to a Maddock Road ad-
dress for the report of a burglary in
progress on Feb. 22. Police say the resident
of the home told them that she heard a
banging noise on the rear door of her
house.
When she went to answer the door, she
found it smashed out and a man, medium
height and medium build wearing dark
clothing, standing in the house. The resi-
dent ran out of the house and flagged down
a postal carrier who dialed 9-1-1. Officers
were unable to locate the man during a
search of the home and surrounding area
with the assistance of canine units. Noth-
ing was taken from the residence. Officers
from the Ewing Township Police Depart-
ment, Trenton Police Department, and the
Mercer County Sheriff s Office assisted
with the search. Detective Kevin Zorn is as-
sisting with this investigation.
Officer Joseph Maccaquano responded
to a Hopewell Pennington Road address in
response to a missing person investigation
involving a 16-year-old Hopewell Township
girl on Tuesday, Feb. 21. The girl had been
reported missing earlier in the morning
and information was developed that she
may be at this address. Maccaquano ar-
rived and observed several people, all
younger than 21, in the home. Maccaquano
also observed beer cans and beer bottles
out in the open in the home.
The missing girl was located a short
time later in the home, and she was re-
turned to the custody of her parents.
One adult man, and two adult women,
received summonses for violating the
township ordinance for the underage pos-
session/consumption of alcohol on private
property. Their cases will be heard in mu-
nicipal court. One underage girl and five
underage boys, including a resident of the
home, were charged with violating the
township ordinance for underage posses-
sion/consumption of alcohol on private
property. Their cases will be heard in fami-
ly court.
police report
please see POLICE, page 7
MARCH 7-13, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
Now Enrolling for the
2012-2013 SCHOOL YEAR
SUMMER CAMP PROGRAM
JuIy 9th-Aug. 3rd

HaIf Day program weekIy 9-1


Each week has a different and fun theme!
Preschool classes for children ages 2-5.
We nurture the social, developmental, emotional and spiritual lives of children.
Small Class Size Lunch Program Allergy-safe Environment
Enrichment Classes Mom's Morning Out
OPEN HOUSE
March 24th

10am-12pm
Blawenburg Village School
424 Route 518 Blawenburg, NJ
(609) 466-6600 blawenburgvillageschool.com
Less than 10 minutes from Hopewell!
Wendy Scloiland VMD Debbie Ellioii, DVM
1 Tree Farm Road
Pennington, NJ 08534
Ph: (609) 730-8700
Hours: Tues-Fri: 10-6pm, Sat: 10-5pm
BLACKWELL MEMORIAL HOME
Continuos Family Service since 1881
Elizabeth Blackwell Davis,
Director/Manager NJ Lic. #2475
21 North Main Street
Pennington, NJ
609-737-2900
Handicapped Accessible
Officer William Gaskill re-
sponded to the former Art
Wholesalers parking lot for the
report of a fire on Feb. 22. A
Waste Management garbage
truck, driven by John Bynum,
dumped his load of garbage in
the parking lot after observing
smoke and fire in the container
of the truck. The pile of garbage
was extinguished by the Pen-
nington Fire Department. There
was no damage to the truck.
Officer Louis Vastola re-
sponded to a Rosedale Way ad-
dress for the report of an open
burn on Feb. 25. Vastola says he
arrived and found a large fire
behind a residence. Several
pieces of wood and asphalt roof-
ing shingles were burning in a
makeshift pit and were extin-
guished by the Pennington Fire
Department. A visiting family
member was issued a summons
by the Hopewell Valley Bureau
of Fire Safety for an ordinance
violation for open burning with-
out a permit. This case will be
heard in municipal court.
Officer Louis Vastola respond-
ed to a Hallett Drive address for
the report of criminal mischief
on Feb. 21. Sometime between 3
p.m. on Feb. 20 and 2:30 p.m. on
Feb. 21, someone damaged the
metal mailbox at the end of the
driveway. An estimate of the
damage was unavailable.
police report
POLICE
Continued from page 6
The Delaware & Raritan Canal
Watch will lead another in its se-
ries of free walking tours of the
D&R Canal on Saturday, March
10.
The walk will be along the
canal feeder between Upper Ferry
Road in Ewing Township and the
Trenton Battle Monument, with
an option for a shorter walk.
The five-mile walk begins
under a canopy of trees, but past
Cadwalader Park transitions into
the urban Trenton environment.
Numerous historical structures
will be encountered and ex-
plained, including aqueducts car-
rying the canal over Sullivan Way
and Parkside Avenue, artifacts of
the railroad era and several canal
houses.
An option for a shorter walk to
Cadwalader Park, about three
miles, is also offered.
Canal Watch board member
Bob Barth will conduct the walk
and provide commentary. Meet 10
a.m. at the Trenton Battle Monu-
ment, 348 North Warren St., Tren-
ton, at the intersection of Broad
Street (Route 206) and Pennington
Road (Route 31).
Carpools will be arranged to
allow a one-way walk.
For further information and
weather-related updates, call
Barth at (201) 401-3121 or e-mail
barths@att.net.
Free canal
walk on
March 10
WEDNESDAY
March 7
FOR ALL
Wednesday Night Out: 7 p.m. at
Hopewell Train Station. Come listen
to author Scott Mulhern read from
his book, 17 Steps to the Edge:
Haikus from Heaven/Haikus from
Hell and his soon-to-be-published
Dialogues with the Abyss.
Hopewell Township Zoning Board
of Adjustment meeting: 7:30 p.m.
regular meeting in the Municipal
Building. For more information visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Body, Mind and Spirit: 7 to 8:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the Mer-
cer County Library System. Sara
Holcombe of Your Journey Center
discusses how the body, mind and
spirit are all connected. Non-reli-
gious/non-denominational presen-
tation.
FOR CHILDREN
Lorax Party: All ages. 7 to 7:45 p.m.
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Get to know
the Once-ler, the Swomees and the
Bar-ba-Loots. Hear the story, plant
some seeds and participate in fun
activities centered around the
earth-friendly Lorax and his pals.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities. Age-
appropriate craft follows story time.
Parental supervision required.
THURSDAY
March 8
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth Thurs-
day of the month in the Municipal
Auditorium. For more information
visit www.hopewelltwp.org.
Hopewell Public Library Board of
Trustees meeting: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Public Library, 13 E. Broad
St. Open to the public. For more
information call (609) 466-1625 or
visit www.RedLibrary.org.
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities. Age-
appropriate craft follows story time.
Parental supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Singing, dancing ad rhymes.
Play with musical instruments, pup-
pets, parachutes and more.
FRIDAY
March 9
FOR ALL
Crazy for You at Hopewell Valley
Central High School: 7:30 p.m. Tick-
ets are $8 and $12 and can be pur-
chased at the door, by calling (866)
967-8167 or by visiting www.show
tix4u.com.
FOR CHILDREN
Open Play: All ages welcome; adult
supervision required. 11 a.m. to noon
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Come to the
childrens activity room for open
play time. Toys and coloring supplies
will be available.
SATURDAY
March 10
FOR ALL
eLibraryNJ: eBooks @ Your
Library: 10:30 a.m. to noon at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer Coun-
ty Library System. Learn how to
download eBooks to your computer,
a compatible eReader or compatible
mobile device. Hands-on workshop
with demonstrations of eLibraryNJ, a
free source of current and classic
books for county library patrons.
Bring a laptop and/or eReader to fol-
low along. Advance registration
required by calling 737-2610.
Crazy for You at Hopewell Valley
Central High School: 7:30 p.m. Tick-
ets are $8 and $12 and can be pur-
chased at the door, by calling (866)
967-8167 or by visiting www.show
tix4u.com.
FOR CHILDREN
Stony Brook Elementary School
Science Expo: 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. All
students in grades kindergarten
through fifth can participate. Mad
Science will present its popular new
program Spin, Pop, Boom! The
expo is non-competitive. Each child
receives a ribbon and certificate.
SUNDAY
March 11
FOR ALL
A Taste of Hopewell: 7 to 9 p.m. at
Off-Broad Street Theatre. Featuring
epicurean specialties from over 15
Hopewell area restaurants. Spon-
sored by the Friends of the Hopewell
Public Library. Tickets $40 pre-
event and $50 at the door. Purchase
tickets at the library through March
10 or online at www.friendsofhope
welllibrary.wordpress.com.
FOR CHILDREN
Kids Fun Run: For kids in preschool
through fifth grade. 1 to 3 p.m. at
PEAC Health & Fitness, 1440 Lower
Ferry Road, Ewing. Registration is
$15 the day of the event. There will
be three individual running events,
an obstacle course, moon bounce,
creative movement dance class,
safety town display, face painting,
carnival games, giveaways, commu-
nity vendors and more. Parental
supervision required. For more
information visit hopewellvalley
momsclub.com.
MONDAY
March 12
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Committee
meeting: 7 p.m. at the Municipal
Building. For more information visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat or
large towel. Registration required;
call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn this
ancient art to promote good health
calendar PAGE 8 MARCH 7-13, 2012
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 103
Carnegie Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com.
Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
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please see CALENDAR, page 9
MARCH 7-13, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
and relaxation. No registration
required.
FOR CHILDREN
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and pre-
schoolers. Stories, songs and finger-
plays. Registration is not required.
Kids Open Craft: All ages. 4 to 5:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the Mer-
cer County Library System. Staff
member will assist kids with the
craft of the week. Parent supervi-
sion required.
Creation Station: Grades four
through eight. 12:30 to 2 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Use provid-
ed materials to create a drawing,
painting or collage to enter into the
librarys Art of Reading contest.
TUESDAY
March 13
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Affordable
Housing Committee meeting: 7
p.m. For more information visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library. This
group welcomes knitters of all lev-
els. Join for a cozy evening of stitch-
ing and conversation.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat or
large towel. Registration required;
call (609) 737-2610.
FOR CHILDREN
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System. A
great way to introduce your child to
library story times and reading. Age-
appropriate books shared. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience. Adult
supervision required.
St. Patricks Day Story Time: Ages
2 to 5; siblings welcome. 2 to 2:45
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the Mer-
cer County Library System. Wear
something green! Stories, songs and
crafts. Follow the rainbow clues to
find something gold.
calendar
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
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(856) 486-4444
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
MARCH 7-13, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
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job posting or merchandise.
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$
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B US I NE S S
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
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Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
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