BY MIKE FORD

mford@delphosherald.com
LIMA — Rick Santorum
delivered a stump speech
to a receptive crowd at
the annual Allen County
Republican Party dinner held
Saturday at the University
of Northwestern Ohio Event
Center.
Santorum introduced his
wife and children, saying
campaigning is a family affair
and noting his children were
born after the wedding. He
mentioned he wrote a book
on the importance of fam-
ily after Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton’s book “It
Takes a Village: And Other
Lessons Children Teach Us”
was published in 1996. He
said the elites want to make
government big enough to
run people’s lives and this
amounts to an assault on free-
dom.
He declared America hav-
ing been built from the bot-
tom up by free people, not
by kings and princes. He said
Americans get their freedom
from their Creator through
the Constitution.
“We believe in God-given
rights and the potential of
every human life,” he said.
He mentioned that our
founders believed in the
people and the United States
is different from every other
country in the world because
of it. He said the US has a
network of grassroots groups
and because of the Tea Party,
the Constitution is alive
and well in current political
debates.
He said the Framers were
against a large central gov-
ernment and talked about the
French Revolution, where
people were deemed to get
their rights from each other.
Santorum declared secular
governments and societies as
“ending up tyrannical” like
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Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2A
State/Local 3A
Politics 4A
Community 5A
Sports 6-8A
Announcements 9A
Classifieds 4B
TV 5B
Index
Partly cloudy
Tuesday
with high in
low 50s. See
page 2A.
Monday, March 5, 2012
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Upfront
www.delphosherald.com
June Orr photos
Jefferson senior Curtis Miller, center, takes his place at the top of the podium Saturday
night after his Division III state title win over Kennedy Smith, left, of Bedford St. Peter
Chanel. Taking third place was Sandusky St. Marys Central Catholic senior Kody Bellamy.
Miller reigns supreme
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
COLUMBUS — It wasn’t
easy.
It may have been the best
match of the entire 2012
OHSAA State Wrestling
Championships, the 75th
anniversary of the annual
event.
Jefferson senior grap-
pler Curtis Miller went the
distance — and more — to
grab the Division III 220-
pound state championship
with a 5-1 3-overtime vic-
tory over Bedford St. Peter
Chanel’s Kennedy Smith
Saturday night at the Jerome
Schottenstein Center on the
campus of The Ohio State
University.
It was a relief to get the
gold.
“It feels good to finally
Curtis Miller gets a hug from his mom, Cammy Miller,
after his state championship win. See MILLER, page 6A
See STUMP, page 6A
Mike Ford photo
Former US Senator and Republican presidential hopeful
Rick Santorum spoke to a crowd of approximately 500
Saturday at the Allen County Republican Party dinner held
at the University of Northwestern Ohio Event Center.
Santorum stumps in Lima
St. John’s, Elida selling
district cage tickets
Both St. John’s and
Elida have announced
ticket sales for their respec-
tive boys basketball dis-
trict semifinal clashes.
The Blue Jays, who will
face Fort Recovery at 6:15
p.m. Tuesday at Elida, will
sell their tickets until 3:30
p.m. today and from 7:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday in
the high school office.
All season tickets will be
punched and no tickets will
be sold in the grade school.
Adult tickets are $6 and
students $4; all tickets at the
gates (open at 5:15 p.m.)
are $6. Parking is $2.
This is a split session.
The Bulldogs will sell
their tickets from 5:30-7
p.m. tonight in the High
School Activities Office
and from 11:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. Wednesday in the
Commons at the high school.
Presale tickets are $6
for adults and $4 for stu-
dents. Elida plays Willard
at 6:15 p.m. Wednesday at
Ohio Northern University.
TUESDAY
Boys District Basketball
(D-IV at Elida): St. John’s
vs. Fort Recovery, 6:15
p.m.; Crestview vs. St.
Henry, 8 p.m. (approx.)
WEDNESDAY
Boys District Basketball
(D-II at ONU): Elida vs.
Willard, 6:15 p.m.
Firefighters battling blaze at local business
Firefighters from four local departments remain on the scene at Green Fiber on Gressel Drive in Delphos this morning at press time. The fire call
was received at 4:08 a.m. by Delphos Fire and Rescue. They called for assistance from American Township, Middle Point and Van Wert departments.
No further information was available at press time.
Nancy Spencer photo
Preschool offers
chicken BBQ
Kreative Learning
Preschool will offer
chicken dinners from
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. March
17 at the preschool.
The carry-out-only din-
ners include a half barbecued
chicken, baked potato, corn
and dinner roll for $7.
Tickets are available at The
Chik-N-House.
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Students can pick up their
awards in their school offices.
St. John’s Scholars of
the Day are
Michaela
Hoffman and
Madison Ellis.
Congratulations Michaela
and Maidson!
Jefferson’s Scholars of the
Day are Kole
McKee Madison
Spring.
Congratulations
Kole and Madison!
Scholars of the Day
2A – The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
FUNERAL
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
POLICE REPORT
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 200
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager,
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily
except Sundays, Tuesdays and
Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
per week.
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POSTMASTER:
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Delphos, Ohio 45833
Timothy Allen
Lindeman
Eileen D. Calvelage
High temperature Sunday
in Delphos was 36 degrees,
low was 27. Snowfall was
recorded at .25 inch. High a
year ago today was 52, low
was 30. Record high for today
is 78, set in 1983. Record low
is -3. Set in 1978.
Tabatha (Stant) Beining,
42, of Sun City, Fla., and for-
merly of Delphos, died at 1:20
a.m. Friday.
She is the daughter of Roger
Stant and the late Virginia
Stant.
Feb. 3, 1921-March 3, 2012
Alvin Louis Von Lehmden,
91, of Fort Jennings, died at
11:55 p.m. Saturday at the
Meadows of Kalida.
He was born on Feb. 3,
1921, to Urban and Olivia
(Nomina) Von Lehmden.
On May 24, 1944, he mar-
ried Rita Marie (Stechschulte),
who died on Dec. 17, 2005.
Survivors include sons
Eugene (Joann), Doyle (Joyce),
Ronald (Mary), Duane (Becky)
and Kim (Yolanda) Von
Lehmden of Fort Jennings;
grandsons Mark, Brent, Todd,
Keith, Darin and Adam Von
Lehmden; granddaughters
Cheryl Koch, Trina Steep,
Heather Siebeneck, Sarah
Schroeder, Jenna Shelley,
Lisa Brianne, Kendra and
Katie Von Lehmden; great-
grandchildren Logan, Kialee,
Connor and Alexa Koch;
Kelsey, Alex, Cody, Georgia
and Piper Steep; Andrew,
Aiden, Caleb, Seth, Victor
and Vivian Von Lehmden;
Sydnie, Savanna and Carson
Siebeneck; Brody and Alexa
Steep; and Noah and Oliver
Schroeder.
He was also preceded in
death by his brother, Donald;
and granddaughter, Lori Von
Lehmden.
Mr. Von Lehmden was
a full-time farmer near Fort
Jennings his entire life who
also started Riverbend Crafts,
building wood furniture and
refinishing antiques. He was
a member of the St. Joseph
Catholic Church; was a charter
member of the Fort Jennings
Lions Club; advisor to the
Fort Jennings Showman 4-H
Club for more than 25 years;
and a member of the square
dance and polka dance clubs.
He enjoyed playing cards and
games and time spent with
family and friends.
Mass of Christian Burial
begins at 10:30 a.m. Thursday
at St. Joseph Catholic Church,
the Rev. John Stites officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in St.
Joseph Cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-8
p.m. Wednesday at Harter and
Schier Funeral Home, where
a parish wake begins at 7:30
p.m.; and for an hour prior to
the service at the church.
Delphos weather
Tabatha (Stant)
Beining
Alvin Louis Von
Lehmden
Timothy Allen Lindeman,
20, of Delphos, died on
Saturday at his residence.
Arrangements are incom-
plete at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home.
Eileen D. Calvelage, 80, of
Fort Jennings died 2:45 p.m.
Sunday at the Meadows of
Kalida.
Arrangements are incom-
plete at Love-Heitmeyer
Funeral Home, Jackson
Township.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the mid 20s. South
winds 5 to 10 mph.
TUESDAY: Partly cloudy
in the morning then clear-
ing. Not as cool. Highs in the
lower 50s. South winds 15 to
20 mph with gusts up to 30
mph.
TUESDAY NIGHT,
WEDNESDAY: Mostly clear.
Lows in the upper 30s. Highs
in the lower 60s. Southwest
winds 15 to 20 mph with gusts
up to 30 mph.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy. A 40 percent
chance of showers after mid-
night. Lows in the upper 40s.
THURSDAY: Rain likely.
Highs in the mid 50s. Chance
of rain 70 percent.
THURSDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy. A 30 percent
chance of rain and snow
through midnight. Lows in the
mid 30s.
FRIDAY, SATURDAY:
Mostly clear. Highs in the upper
40s. Lows in the upper 20s.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy. Lows in the
mid 30s.
KIMMET, Angela B.,
90, of Delphos, Mass of
Christian Burial will begin
at 11 a.m. Tuesday at St.
John the Evangelist Catholic
Church, the Rev. Melvin
Verhoff officiating. Burial
will be in Resurrection
Cemetery. Friends may call
from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.
today at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home, where a par-
ish wake will be in at 7:30
p.m. Preferred memorials
are to St. John’s Church
Missions or St. Rita’s
Hospice.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $127
million
Pick 3 Evening
5-9-2
Pick 4 Evening
1-4-1-4
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $60
million
Rolling Cash 5
02-13-22-36-37
Estimated jackpot:
$138,000
Ten OH Evening
09-25-27-34-36-37-38-42-
44-45-46-52-53-55-60-67-68-
70-73-74
Corn: $6.51
Wheat: $6.67
Beans: $13.11
Police investigating three weekend break-ins
Baby dropped in field by
tornado dies; toll at 39
Delphos Police are inves-
tigating a rash of breaking-
and-enterings that occurred
over the weekend.
At 12:19 p.m. on Saturday,
police were called to the 400
block of South Canal Street
in reference to a breaking-
and-entering complaint at a
residence in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that someone
had forcibly gained entry into
a shed at the residence and
had taken tools and an air
compressor from the shed.
Officers observed the door to
the shed being damaged.
At 1:30 p.m. on Saturday,
police were called to the 400
block of South Franklin Street
in reference to a breaking-
and-entering complaint at a
residence in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
homeowner stated someone
had gained entry into the resi-
dence by breaking the door
handle to the residence.
At 8:05 p.m. on Sunday,
police were called to the 100
block of West Third Street in
reference to a breaking-and-
entering complaint at a busi-
ness in that area.
By TOM LoBIANCO
and BRUCE SCHREINER
The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. —
Fifteen-month-old Angel
Babcock seemed to be the
miracle survivor of a deadly
tornado that killed her par-
ents and two siblings when
she arrived Friday night at
Kosair Children’s Hospital in
Louisville, Ky. Though criti-
cally injured, she was opening
her eyes, and hospital workers
said that was a hopeful sign.
But the New Pekin, Ind.,
girl’s condition deterio-
rated Saturday as her brain
swelled, chief nursing officer
Cis Gruebbel said. As the day
went on, Angel’s eyes ceased
to move, and there was no
sign of brain activity. Medical
staff told her family there was
nothing more they could do.
Angel’s death Sunday
ended a hopeful tale for survi-
vors in the Midwest and South
and brought to 39 the number
of people killed by the storms
that devastated five states.
As residents picked through
the rubble and made plans to
bury their dead, they also began
trying to find a semblance of
normalcy as officials contin-
ued to assess the damage.
The National Weather
Service in Louisville, Ky.,
said the tornado that struck
New Pekin measured an EF-3
on the enhanced Fujita scale,
while another tornado that
struck nearby Henryville, Ind.,
was stronger yet, measuring
an EF-4 and packing winds of
175 mph.
Early today, a blanket of
wet snow covered Henryville
and other parts of tornado-
stricken Clark County. State
homeland security spokes-
woman Emily Norcross said
the 2 to 4 inches of snow
would likely slow the clean-
up effort because it covered
debris and concealed potential
hazards.
“It’s slippery and it’s ham-
pering visibility on roads, so
it’s more difficult to see small
debris like nails,” Norcross
said. “It’s complicating
things.”
Theresa McCarty, owner
of Pop Top Bar in New Pekin,
said her husband was with
emergency workers Friday
when they found the Babcock
family. Their bodies had been
scattered, she said.
McCarty, her friends and
co-workers talked about estab-
lishing the bar as a central ref-
uge for victims of the tornado
from the immediate region,
including making roughly
1,000 meals Sunday for vic-
tims and volunteers.
But when she talked about the
Babcock family, she got quiet:
“It was the whole family.”
Speaking from his bed at
the University of Louisville
Hospital, Jason Miller told
NBC’s “Today” show today
that he saw the Babcock fam-
ily outside as the storm was
bearing down and took them
into his home. As the tornado
hit, they took shelter in the
hallway, grabbed hands and
began praying.
Miller said he remembers
being sucked up into the air
but blacked out soon after. His
arm, back and five ribs were
broken.
“It’s very saddening to
hear that the whole family
passed away and I was sit-
ting right there holding their
hands two seconds before they
died,” Miller said.
Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels
told CBS’ “Face the Nation”
that the twister “moved like
a lawnmower though some of
the most beautiful countryside,
and some of the most beauti-
ful towns that we have.”
In Henryville, about 20
miles north of Louisville,
school was canceled for the
week because of heavy dam-
age to the education complex
housing elementary through
high school students.
Even so, small signs of
normalcy slowly began to
emerge.
Utility crews replaced
downed poles and restrung elec-
trical lines. Portable cell towers
went up, and a truck equipped
with batteries, cellphone charg-
ing stations, computers and even
satellite television was headed to
Henryville on today.
“We’re going to keep
living,” said the Rev. Steve
Schaftlein during a Sunday
service at St. Francis Xavier
Catholic Church, where about
100 people gathered under a
patched-up 6-foot hole in the
church’s roof to worship and
catch up on news of the tor-
nado.
In West Liberty, Ky., about
85 miles east of Lexington, the
roar of chain saws filled the
air as utility workers battled
chilly weather and debris to
get electricity restored to the
battered town. Almost 19,000
customers were without
power in Kentucky, according
to the state’s Public Service
Commission, and a few thou-
sand more from municipal
utilities and TVA, which the
PSC does not track.
In Indiana, about 2,700
remained without power,
down from 8,000 in the hours
after the storms. But in some
hard-hit areas, like Henryville,
a substation and transmission
lines need to be rebuilt, and
that could take up to a week.
Even with life upended in
so many ways, one family got
a reminder that a deadly tor-
nado can’t uproot everything.
The home that Shalonda
Kerr shares with her husband
and Jack Russell terrier outside
of Chelsea, Ind., was obliterat-
ed: The front wall was ripped
clean, leaving the home look-
ing eerily like a shaken doll-
house. An upended couch and
a tipped-over fish tank lay in
the rubble.
The mailbox was
untouched. Its front hatch was
tipped open, revealing a white
piece of paper.
“Inside was a $300 IRS
bill,” Kerr said, laughing amid
the ruins.
Homeowner
reports attempted
break-in
At 10:13 p.m. on Saturday,
Delphos Police were called
to the 400 block of West
Clime Street in reference to
an attempted burglary at a
residence in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated someone had
attempted to gain entry into
the residence by breaking a
window on a rear door of the
residence.
The case was forwarded
to the Detective Bureau for
further investigation.
Today and Tuesday
By The Associated Press
Today is Monday, March
5, the 65th day of 2012. There
are 301 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On March 5, 1512, car-
tographer Gerardus Mercator,
creator of the Mercator
Projection map of the world,
was born in Flanders in the
Holy Roman Empire.
On this date:
In 1770, the Boston
Massacre took place as British
soldiers who’d been taunted
by a crowd of colonists opened
fire, killing five people.
In 1868, the Senate was
organized into a Court of
Impeachment to decide
charges against President
Andrew Johnson, who was
later acquitted.
In 1933, in German parlia-
mentary elections, the Nazi
Party won 44 percent of the
vote; the Nazis joined with a
conservative nationalist party
to gain a slender majority in
the Reichstag.
In 1934, the first Mothers-
in-Law Day celebration and
parade took place in Amarillo,
Texas.
In 1946, Winston Churchill
delivered his “Iron Curtain”
speech at Westminster
College in Fulton, Mo.
In 1953, Soviet dictator
Josef Stalin died after three
decades in power.
In 1959, a fire at the Negro
Boys Industrial School in
Wrightsville, Ark., claimed
the lives of 21 teenagers
trapped inside a locked dor-
mitory room.
Elvis Presley was dis-
charged from the U.S. Army.
In 1963, country music
performers Patsy Cline,
“Cowboy” Copas and
“Hawkshaw” Hawkins died
in a plane crash near Camden,
Tenn., that also claimed the
life of pilot Randy Hughes
(Cline’s manager).
EPA heightens scrutiny over Pa. gas drilling
DIMOCK, Pa. (AP) —
Tugging on rubber gloves, a
laboratory worker kneels before
a gushing spigot behind Kim
Grosso’s house and positions
an empty bottle under the clear,
cold stream. The process is
repeated dozens of times as
bottles are filled, marked and
packed into coolers.
After extensive testing,
Grosso and dozens of her
neighbors will know this week
what may be lurking in their
well water as federal regulators
investigate claims of contami-
nation in the midst of one of the
nation’s most productive natu-
ral gas fields.
More than three years into
the gas-drilling boom that’s
produced thousands of new
wells, the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency and the state
of Pennsylvania are tussling
over regulation of the Marcellus
Shale, the vast underground
rock formation that holds tril-
lions of cubic feet of gas.
The state says EPA is med-
dling. EPA says it is doing its
job.
Grosso, who lives near
a pair of gas wells drilled in
2008, told federal officials her
water became discolored a few
months ago, with an intermit-
tent foul odor and taste. Her
dog and cats refused to drink it.
While there’s no indication the
problems are related to drilling,
she hopes the testing will pro-
vide answers.
“If there is something wrong
with the water, who is responsi-
ble?” she asked. “Who’s going
to fix it, and what does it do to
the value of the property?”
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St. John’s
Preschool Open
House and
Registration
for the 2012-2013 School Year
6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, April 11
St. John’s Annex
722 S. Jefferson St., Delphos
Give your child the opportunity to begin their school
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Monday, March 5, 2012 The Herald — 3A
www.delphosherald.com
Stump
(Continued from page 1A)
France was at the time of
its revolution and the for-
mer Soviet Union and other
Communist countries.
He said our rights can-
not be taken away and that,
one family at a time, we are
building the great society
from the bottom up because
big government doesn’t
entrust its people with free-
dom.
He declared the founding
of the United States as a turn-
ing point in human societies,
saying life expectancy has
doubled since the US began
because American society
applauds when people take
chances and succeed and
encourages them when they
fail.
Santorum said people
in nations where there is
universal health care “don’t
know any better because
they don’t know what
they’re missing.” He said
people get used to whatever
level of care and life they
have, not knowing what
they would have if govern-
ment didn’t stop progress.
He criticized President
Barack Obama’s health care
insurance reform, saying
government is “taking over
health care” and that the
legislation is, in Santorum’s
opinion, the most important
in our lifetime. He told the
crowd of approximately 500
this is also the most impor-
tant election of their life-
time because our country’s
very freedoms are at stake
because President Obama is
leading the nation in a direc-
tion where “every American
will have to go to the gov-
ernment and the government
will decide what health care
you can get.”
“Any right the government
can give you, they can take
away but our rights don’t
come from the government,”
he added.
Santorum made sure to
reference contraception:
“I love it when the Left
says we need separation
of church and state, except
when the state wants to tell
the church what to do,” he
said to heavy applause.
He criticized Mitt
Romney’s health care-related
legislation in Massachusetts
and likened it to President
Obama’s insurance reform.
“My opponent wants the
same big government Obama
does, except he wants it at
the state level instead of the
federal level,” he said.
Santorum said, if he gets
the nomination and wins the
general election, he will enact
a tax plan that gets people
back to work and that he
will cut $5 trillion from the
budget and balance it in five
years. He criticized President
Obama for wanting to cut
defense spending, saying
defense is 17 percent of the
budget but social benefit pro-
grams that help the poor and
elderly on a fixed income
are 60 percent of the budget.
He said basic mathematics
is, therefore, needed at the
White House.
Santorum turned his atten-
tion toward poverty, saying
those programs are supposed
to “be a safety net, not a ham-
mock.” He claimed Welfare
is at an all-time high and
that the poverty rate goes
down when people get back
to work. He said those who
want big government embrace
entitlement programs because
those elected officials can
get recipients’ votes or they
will threaten to take away the
benefits, locking in the votes
and fostering government-
dependency.
He said poverty is also
tied to personal decisions.
He said there is less pov-
erty in two-parent households
and that single-parent homes
work hard to get by but end
up needing assistance, adding
that government gets bigger
alongside poverty rates going
up. He also said big govern-
ment tears down families by
taxing married couples more
heavily.
He went on to cite a liberal
think-tank’s study during the
Clinton Administration that
said the best ways to address
poverty is for people to grad-
uate from high school, keep
a job and don’t have children
until they are married.
“If you do these three
things,” he said, “you only
have a 2 percent chance of
being in poverty and you
have a 77 percent chance of
being among the top wage-
earners.”
Santorum wants to bring
manufacturing jobs back to
the United States by creating
an environment where that
can happen by cutting the
corporate tax to zero.
His litany of bullet points
rolled on, hitting on ener-
gy. He criticized President
Obama for questioning frack-
ing and not endorsing the
oil pipeline project from the
Gulf of Mexico to Canada.
Santorum questioned global
warming, saying it is a politi-
cal conspiracy tied to cap and
trade legislation.
He touted his conservative
record in Pennsylvania and
said the government should
get out of education, letting
local communities run their
schools but made no mention
of what should be done about
failing urban districts.
Underground Railroad stops in Ohio get fresh flags
By KEN GORDON
The Columbus Dispatch
COLUMBUS (AP) — Emotions
wash over Drew Berry every time
he ascends to the third-floor bell
tower of the Christian Heyl House
on Sunbury Road.
Built in 1857, the home served as
a stop on the Underground Railroad
— a haven for fugitive slaves trying
to avoid bounty hunters and reach
freedom in Canada.
“I look out the window and
think, ‘This is the same view that
people were looking (for runaways
to arrive) outside,”’ said Berry, an
administrator at what is now the
Ark House, a residential-care facil-
ity for adults with disabilities.
“It’s such an honor for me every
day to walk in the same steps and
look out the same windows and feel
the hope and all the emotions that
go along with that.”
Berry’s feelings were echoed
recently by others who live or work
in former Underground Railroad
stations in the Columbus area —
houses now marked by commemo-
rative red flags.
First put in place a dozen years
ago, the small markers for this and
other houses have become tattered
and torn and are being replaced.
As Columbus celebrates its
bicentennial this year, the city’s role
in aiding escaped slaves remains an
important piece of its history. At
least 25 documented Underground
Railroad stations survive in the
Columbus area — most of them
privately owned.
Three stops are operated as
museums: the Kelton House in
Columbus, the Hanby House in
Westerville and the Livingston
House in Reynoldsburg.
In 1997, Cathy Nelson, a retired
Columbus teacher, founded the
Friends of Freedom Society, a vol-
unteer group that researches and
publicizes the heritage of Ohio’s
Underground Railroad.
Of the estimated 100,000 slaves
who escaped to freedom through
the Underground Railroad — most
between 1830 and 1860 — about
40,000 are thought to have passed
through Ohio.
In 2000, Nelson’s group distrib-
uted flags — about 12 inches by 18
inches — that residents of former
stations could display in their win-
dows.
Recently, Nelson was making
the rounds again, part of an ongoing
effort to replace lost or faded flags
or to deliver them to those who
never had one.
The first Ark House flag had
become too shredded to display.
“For our organization, it has
been (about) the friendships that
we’ve made with people who live
in these homes,” Nelson said. “We
help them understand more of their
history.”
Adrian and Anne Bennett appre-
ciate the history of their house, also
on Sunbury Road. Known as the
Margaret Agler House, it was built
in 1841 and was a well-known
station along the route that moved
runaways north into Delaware
County.
Adrian is of West Indian descent,
so his ancestors might have been
slaves. Anne is a descendant of
Harriet Beecher Stowe, the aboli-
tionist whose book Uncle Tom’s
Cabin created a firestorm when it
was published in 1852.
On display in their house is a
quote from Stowe: “Never give up,
for that is just the place and time
that the tide will turn.”
The Bennetts had eyed the house
longingly for years, snapping it up
in 2002 when it hit the market.
“It kind of feels like we were
supposed to be here,” Mrs. Bennett
said.
The home includes a basement
tunnel that has collapsed but likely
led to nearby Alum Creek.
The couple’s house also has a
hidden crawl space — large enough
to hold perhaps three people — off
an upstairs bathroom.
Although tunnels and hidden
rooms fit the romantic notion of the
Underground Railroad, most sta-
tions had no such features.
“Most people did not build their
house to accommodate that part
of their lives,” said Georgeanne
Reuter, director of the Kelton
House. “People usually hid run-
aways in barns or basements or
attics.”
Such was the case at yet another
Sunbury Road stop, known as the
Timothy Lee Mansion. Lee prob-
ably hid runaways in his outbuild-
ings.
Diane Brown and her husband,
Steve Duff, own the house. Nelson
gave them their first flag last week.
Not everyone has welcomed the
flags, though.
At a home on Africa Road in
Westerville, a family member
objected that designating his home
as historic could lead to unwanted
publicity. Eventually, though, he
accepted it.
Some homes — such as the Lee
mansion, with its pillars and porti-
cos — stand out as old and grand.
But, more often, the former
stations now are simply well-
kept homes tucked discreetly into
older neighborhoods, such as the
Ansel Mattoon House on North
Street in Worthington or the David
Graham House on French Street in
Reynoldsburg.
The red flags are the only clue
that something notable happened
there.
“It’s a good little sign now to let
people know that they still live in
and around history,” Nelson said,
“and this history is important.”
Judges upset
with new
sentencing
requirement
COLUMBUS (AP) — Some
Ohio judges are unhappy with a
new requirement that they ask
the state corrections department
for alternatives to prison before
sentencing certain nonviolent,
first-time offenders.
Fairfield County Common
Pleas Judge Richard Berens tells
The Columbus Dispatch (http://
bit.ly/A1RuT9 ) he thinks that
basically means asking bureau-
crats for permission to imprison
someone.
The requirement took effect
Sept. 30 as part of a sentenc-
ing law aimed at shrinking the
prison population and reducing
costs. Certain offenders now
must be sentenced to a com-
munity control program, such
as a drug treatment program or
county jail, instead of prison
if such a program is available.
The measure applies to offend-
ers convicted of fourth- or fifth-
degree felonies.
Berens is among several
judges that see it as bad policy
but say they’ll follow the law.
“This, in my opinion, is
essentially an executive agency
co-opting a judicial function,”
Hocking County Common Pleas
Judge John T. Wallace said.
Hancock County Common
Pleas Judge Reginald J.
Routson, a former president
of the Ohio Common Pleas
Judges Association, predicts the
requirement will be challenged.
“It needs to be tested,” said
Routson, who worked with
lawmakers as the bill was cre-
ated. “It is unlike any piece of
legislation that I’ve ever seen.”
Ohio Turnpike
director: Pay
policies must
change
BEREA (AP) — The new
director of the Ohio Turnpike
says its policies for payouts to
employees are too generous.
The turnpike’s top engineer
retired last year with $287,000
in pay and separation payments,
highlighting attractive benefits
for employees of the toll road.
The money paid to 30-year turn-
pike employee Dan Castrigano
included an $111,000 separa-
tion payment.
The turnpike, which is under
scrutiny by Gov. John Kasich’s
administration, says the pay-
ments were owed under turn-
pike pay policies.
Executive Director Richard
Hodges says those policies need
to be changed.
According to The Plain
Dealer (http://bit.ly/w3XwaW
), the chief engineer was among
29 workers who cashed out
$20,000 or more in unused sick
and vacation pay upon retiring
last year. The turnpike paid out
$1.43 million in separation pay
last year.
Look to the Delphos Herald for all the latest in
•LOCAL NEWS •LOCAL SPORTS
•LOCAL INFORMATION
“Tomorrow is a thief of pleasure.”
— Sir Rex Harrison, British actor (1908-1990)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4A — The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• Members of the Dancer by Gina competition squad
practiced for their performance at Friday night’s Cleveland
Cavaliers game versus the Detroit Pistons. The 61 dancers will
perform the halftime show. The girls were selected through a
video audition. Also in attendance will be an adjudicator for
the Guinness Book of World Records as the crowd will try to
set a world record for “the largest gathering of people wearing
fleece blankets.”
25 Years Ago — 1987
• Central Soya Company plant manager, Orville “Doc”
Rainwater held the group award the company received at the
Lima Area Safety Council’s 31st annual safety awards banquet
Tuesday at the Milano Club, Lima. Other employees attend-
ing were plant supervisor, Doug Lopshire; plant auditor, Barb
Kleckner and maintenance superintendent, Bob Negrete.
• Art Schnipke was named a director of The Farmers Mutual
Aid Association of Ottoville at the company’s annual meeting
held at the Ottoville Branch Library. Schnipke succeeds George
Knippen, who resigned after 11 years service with the com-
pany. Carl Ricker was re-elected director of district one.
• St. John’s full-court pressure took Jefferson out of the
game in the first quarter, and the Wildcats never recovered. The
Blue Jays outscored the Wildcats 18-6 in the opening quarter on
the way to a 76-53 win Tuesday night in the Class A sectional
tournament at Van Wert. The Jays were led by Mike Williams
with seven and Craig Allemeier with six.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• The Fort Jennings Pleasant Valley Bowmen were declared
instinctive team champions in the state indoor championships
of the Ohio Archery Association held recently at the newly con-
structed indoor range of the Archery Club of Findlay. Members
of the Fort Jennings team and their scores were Ralph Menke
(404), Herb Nesbitt (481), Vic Haehn (446) and Robert Menke
(469).
• This morning the city awakened to start digging itself out
from under one of the heaviest snowstorms of the season. An
official six inches of snow was reported here at the sewage
treatment plant by 9 a.m., and the snow was still coming down
hard. All schools in the city and the area were closed because
of the hazardous driving conditions.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• Dr. C. E. Savage left Thursday for Columbus where he will
attend the 103rd Founders’ Day Celebration and Post Collegiate
Assembly of the College of Medicine to be held at Ohio State
University at Columbus on Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
He was accompanied by Mrs. Savage. They plan to return to
Delphos Sunday morning.
• Pupils of Jefferson High School are being kept busy prac-
ticing for the district choral competition to be held at Ada on
March 20. The competition will include solos, duets, trios,
quartets and groups of mixed voices. Esther Leilich and K. W.
Findley are in charge of the classes in instruction.
WASHINGTON (AP) —
The lure of roads, bridges,
buses and trains isn’t enough
anymore to drive an expen-
sive transportation bill through
Congress. So to round up
votes, congressional lead-
ers are pitching the bills as
the hottest thing around these
days: job generators.
But do they really create
more jobs? The answer from a
lot of economists is not really.
The bills would simply shift
spending that was creating jobs
elsewhere in the economy to
transportation industries. That
means different jobs, but not
necessarily additional ones.
“Investments in transpor-
tation infrastructure, if well
designed, should be viewed
as investments in future pro-
ductivity growth,” said Alice
Rivlin, a former director of
the White House Office of
Management and Budget
under President Bill Clinton.
“If they speed the delivery
of goods and people, they will
certainly do that,” she said.
“They will also create jobs,
but not necessarily more jobs
than the same money spent in
other ways.”
But that hasn’t diminished
the jobs claims being made on
Capitol Hill.
“This legislation would
put 2 million middle-class
Americans back to work
right away,” Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.,
said Thursday, as he fumed
about nearly 100 amendments
that have delayed action on the
Senate’s version of the trans-
portation bill.
“Although our economy
has gained momentum, there
are still millions of Americans
out of work. So it should be
obvious why we can’t afford
to delay efforts to rebuild our
roadways, railways and bridg-
es,” he explained.
In the House, Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, made
a transportation bill the elec-
tion-year centerpiece of the
GOP’s jobs agenda last fall
when he unveiled its broad
outlines. To make sure nobody
missed the point, the bill was
dubbed the “American Energy
and Infrastructure Jobs Act of
2012.”
Support for the five-
year, $260 billion House
bill has since fallen apart
because conservatives think
it spends too much money,
and because Democrats and
some Republicans balk at pol-
icy changes they say would
undermine mass-transit fund-
ing, weaken environmental
protections and penalize union
workers.
Urgency is growing because
the government’s spending
authority for highway and
transit programs expires at the
end of this month and the
trust fund that finances them
is expected to go broke some-
time next winter. Boehner is
struggling to find some mix
of policy and spending that
can win the votes needed for
passage.
President Barack Obama
has pitched his own six-year,
$476 billion transportation bill
as a jobs plan as well, but
it is obvious lawmakers are
unwilling to consider such a
large proposal. They’ve had
to scour the federal budget
to find money to pay for a
Senate bill a quarter of that
size. While paying lip service
to their own bill, administra-
tion officials are also backing
the more modest Senate bill,
which would cost $109 billion
over two years.
By BEN FELLER
AP White House
Correspondent
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama said
Sunday he would not hesitate
to attack Iran to keep it from
getting a nuclear bomb, hoping
a forceful assurance will dis-
courage Israel from launching
a unilateral strike that could
ignite the Middle East and
drag the U.S. into war.
Pleading for time for diplo-
macy to work, Obama warned
that “loose talk of war” was
only undermining world secu-
rity.
Addressing a powerful pro-
Israel lobby, Obama delivered
messages to multiple political
audiences: Israel, Iran, Jewish
voters, a restless Congress,
a wary international com-
munity and three Republican
presidential contenders who
will speak to the same group
Tuesday.
At the core was his bull-
ish assertion that the United
States will never settle for
containing a nuclear-armed
Iran or fail to defend Israel.
“I will not hesitate to use
force when it is necessary to
defend the United States and
its interests,” Obama said.
But he framed military
force as a last resort, not the
next option at a time when
sanctions are squeezing Iran.
The president seemed intent
on quieting a drumbeat for
war, saying even the talk of it
has driven up the price of oil
to the benefit of Iran.
“Now is not the time for
bluster,” Obama said. “Now
is the time to let our increased
pressure sink in.”
Obama’s speech to the
American Israel Public
Affairs Committee set a tone
for a vital meeting today with
Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu, whose embattled
Mideast nation fears it will
soon lose a window to strike
Iran before it becomes a target
of nuclear weapons.
More than once, Obama
threatened force but made
clear his preference was peace
through pressure.
Netanyahu, standing his
ground against what his coun-
try perceives as a threat to
its existence, said he perhaps
most appreciated hearing
Obama say “Israel must be
able to defend itself, by itself,
against any threat.” Speaking
to reporters in Canada ahead
of his arrival in the U.S.,
Netanyahu made no reference
to the sanctions and diplo-
macy Obama emphasized.
Iran insists its nuclear pro-
gram is for peaceful purposes,
and escalating sanctions have
not deterred its pursuit. It has
rapidly ramped up production
of the higher-grade enriched
uranium needed for an atomic
bomb.
Obama offered the lines
Israel wanted to hear, fram-
ing the Iranian threat as a
problem for the entire world,
and asserting Israel’s right to
defend itself how it sees fit.
No assurance was more
important than when Obama
said he has does not have a
“policy of containment” about
Iran, but rather one to deny it
a nuclear weapon.
Election-year politics, too,
were part of Obama’s speech
as he spoke of his record on
Israel. He told his audience
that his Republican rivals
would probably distort his
record.
“There should not be a
shred of doubt by now,”
Obama said. “When the chips
are down, I have Israel’s
back.”
The United States fears an
Israeli strike on Iran would
do little to derail its long-term
nuclear weapons pursuit and,
in the near term, would turn
Iran into a victim. Many ana-
lysts believe an Israeli attack
would result in a region-wide
conflict, including Iranian
attacks on American troops in
the Persian Gulf.
Obama is also worried
about gas prices, a chief con-
cern to American voters this
election year.
“I would ask that we all
remember the weightiness
of these issues, the stakes
involved for Israel, for
America, and for the world,”
Obama said. “Already, there is
too much loose talk of war.”
By KASIE HUNT and
STEVE PEOPLES
Associated Press
CANTON — The stakes
enormous, Republican
presidential candidates Mitt
Romney and Rick Santorum
were making last-minute
appeals to woo Ohioans in a
Rust Belt state where polls
show a neck-and-neck race
just one day before the Super
Tuesday primary.
Ten states across all regions
of the country will hold GOP
nominating contests Tuesday,
presenting a critical test of
momentum and organiza-
tion for the GOP hopefuls in
what’s become a prolonged
battle for the right to take on
Democratic President Barack
Obama in November.
In an interview Sunday
with The Associated Press,
Santorum said Romney’s
inability to wrap up the nomi-
nation, despite an enormous
financial advantage, “raises
a lot of questions in people’s
minds whether this is the man
who can unite the party and
be effective as a foil against
Obama.” He suggested that
the GOP nomination may not
be settled until this summer’s
party convention.
In Knoxville, Tenn.,
Romney didn’t mention his
GOP rivals, instead quoting
verses from the theme song to
Davy Crockett and exhorting
the hundreds who showed up
to vote for him Tuesday.
Romney and Santorum
both were to campaign across
Ohio today. While Romney
has a significant advantage
in northeastern states like
Vermont and Massachusetts
and Santorum sees advantag-
es in conservative states like
Oklahoma, Ohio is a critical
battleground that also has a
history as a key general elec-
tion swing state.
Former House Speaker
Newt Gingrich was set to
campaign in Georgia, where
he began his political career.
He has labeled that contest a
must-win for his fading presi-
dential bid.
Texas Rep. Ron Paul spent
Sunday in Alaska, a state
where no other candidates
have campaigned in the 2012
primary season.
Romney has been working
to avoid intensifying debate
over conservative social val-
ues — and Republican icon
Rush Limbaugh — as he tries
to keep his focus on the eco-
nomic concerns that surveys
show voters most care about.
Limbaugh, who boasts a
huge conservative following,
recently apologized for call-
ing a Georgetown University
law student a “slut” and a
“prostitute” on his nationally
syndicated radio program.
The woman testified at a con-
gressional hearing in favor
of an Obama administration
mandate that employee health
plans include free contracep-
tive coverage.
While religious institutions
are exempt, their affiliates,
such as hospitals and univer-
sities, were at first included
in the requirement. Under
criticism from conservatives,
President Barack Obama later
said the affiliates could opt
out, but insurers must pay for
the coverage.
The GOP framed the issue
as one of religious liberty.
But Obama’s chief politi-
cal strategist suggested that
Limbaugh’s comments —
and Republicans’ slow repu-
diation of them — would ben-
efit Democrats in the general
election this fall.
While the contraception
debate raged on national tele-
vision Sunday, Gingrich pre-
dicted a strong performance
Tuesday would resurrect his
fading candidacy. Romney
and Santorum spent Sunday
racing across Georgia,
Tennessee, Oklahoma and
Ohio, four of the ten states
to host elections on Super
Tuesday, the biggest single
voting day of the 2012 pri-
mary cycle.
Romney picked up
endorsements from two influ-
ential Republican lawmak-
ers: House Majority Leader
Eric Cantor of Virginia and
Oklahoma Sen. Tom Coburn,
widely regarded as one of the
most conservative members
of the U.S. Senate.
By MICHAEL RUBINKAM
Associated Press
DIMOCK, Pa. — Tugging
on rubber gloves, a labora-
tory worker kneels before a
gushing spigot behind Kim
Grosso’s house and positions
an empty bottle under the
clear, cold stream. The process
is repeated dozens of times as
bottles are filled, marked and
packed into coolers.
After extensive testing,
Grosso and dozens of her
neighbors will know this week
what may be lurking in their
well water as federal regula-
tors investigate claims of con-
tamination in the midst of one
of the nation’s most produc-
tive natural gas fields.
More than three years into
the gas-drilling that’s produced
thousands of new wells, the
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency and the state of
Pennsylvania are tussling over
regulation of the Marcellus
Shale, the vast underground
rock formation that holds tril-
lions of cubic feet of gas.
The state says EPA is med-
dling. EPA says it is doing
its job.
Grosso, who lives near a
pair of gas wells drilled in
2008, told federal officials her
water became discolored a few
months ago, with an intermit-
tent foul odor and taste. Her
dog and cats refused to drink
it. While there’s no indication
the problems are related to
drilling, she hopes the testing
will provide answers.
“If there is something
wrong with the water, who
is responsible?” she asked.
“Who’s going to fix it, and
what does it do to the value of
the property?”
Federal regulators are
ramping up their oversight
of the Marcellus with dual
investigations in the north-
eastern and southwestern cor-
ners of Pennsylvania. EPA is
also sampling water around
Pennsylvania for its national
study of the potential envi-
ronmental and public health
impacts of hydraulic fractur-
ing, or fracking, the tech-
nique that blasts a cocktail
of sand, water and chemicals
deep underground to stimu-
late oil and gas production
in shale formations like the
Marcellus. Fracking allows
drillers to reach previously
inaccessible gas reserves, but
it produces huge volumes of
polluted wastewater and envi-
ronmentalists say it can taint
groundwater.
The heightened federal
scrutiny rankles the industry
and politicians in the state
capital, where the adminis-
tration of pro-drilling Gov.
Tom Corbett insists that
Pennsylvania regulators are
best suited to oversee the
gas industry. The complaints
echo those in Texas and in
Wyoming, where EPA’s pre-
liminary finding that fracking
chemicals contaminated water
supplies is forcefully disputed
by state officials and energy
executives.
Caught in the middle of the
state-federal regulatory dispute
are residents who don’t know if
their water is safe to drink.
EPA is charged by law with
protecting and ensuring the
safety of the nation’s drink-
ing water, but it has largely
allowed the states to take the
lead on rules and enforcement
as energy companies drilled
and fracked tens of thousands
of new wells in recent years.
In Pennsylvania, that began
to change last spring after The
Associated Press and other
news organizations reported
huge volumes of partially
treated wastewater were being
discharged into rivers and
streams that supply drinking
water. EPA asked the state to
boost its monitoring of frack-
ing wastewater from gas wells,
and the state declared a volun-
tary moratorium for drillers
that led to significant reduc-
tions of Marcellus waste. Yet
a loophole in the policy allows
operators of many older oil
and gas wells to continue dis-
charging significant amounts
of wastewater into treatment
plants, and thus, into rivers.
The Delphos Herald welcomes letters to the editor. Letters
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the right to edit content for length, clarity and grammar. Letters
concerning private matters will not be published.
Failure to supply a full name, home address and daytime
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Letters can be mailed to The Delphos Herald, 405 N. Main
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Obama assures Israel US
force an option on Iran
Republican hopefuls sprint to Super Tuesday
EPA heightens scrutiny of Pa.’s Marcellus Shale
Job creation
driving highway
bills in Congress
1
STAN OWENS
ELECT
FOR VAN WERT COUNTY COMMISSIONER
• Forconservativevalues,
commonsense
• Experienceinbudgetary
managementexperienced
inadministrationofcounty
governmentexperiencedin
projectplanning/implementation
• Supportseconomic
development/jobs
Paid political ad
ELECT
BillEVANS
for Van Wert County Commissioner
(/.%34s(!2$7/2+).'s%80%2)%.#%$
Paid for by Citizens for Evans, Ruth Evans, Treasurer
16170 Wren Landeck, Van Wert, OH 45891
VOTE
REPUBLÌCAN PRÌMARY
March 6, 2012
MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT
BILL EVANS
VAN WERT COUNTY COMMÌSSÌONER
· HONEST
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· EXPERIENCED
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T
Bill EVANS
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ELECT
BillEVANS
for Van Wert County Commissioner
(/.%34s(!2$7/2+).'s%80%2)%.#%$
Paid for by Citizens for Evans, Ruth Evans, Treasurer
16170 Wren Landeck, Van Wert, OH 45891
E L E C T
B i l l E V A N S
f o r V a n W e r t C o u n t y C o m m i s s i o n e r
( / . % 3 4 s ( ! 2 $ 7 / 2 + ) . ' s % 8 0 % 2 ) % . # % $
P a i d f o r b y C i t i z e n s f o r E v a n s , R u t h E v a n s , T r e a s u r e r
1 6 1 7 0 W r e n L a n d e c k , V a n W e r t , O H 4 5 8 9 1
Paid for by Citizens for Evans, Ruth Evans, Treasurer, 16170 Wren Landeck,
Van Wert, OH 45891
Republican Primary March 6, 2012
MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT
Bill Evans 4 CommissionEr
Choice�Travel
Buckeye�Charter’s
1235�E.�Hanthorn�Rd.
Lima,�OH��45804
(419)�222-2455
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Check�our�website�for�trip�information
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Delphos herald
RELAY FOR LIFE
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with Mashed Potatoes & Gravy
Noodles, Green Beans, Cookie.............only
$
7
Sunday, March 18
Serving from 11:00 am till sold out
ALL PROCEEDS GO TO DELPHOS RELAY FOR LIFE!
Pickup only - Convenient drive thru service
Delphos Herald parking lot.
Enter the parking lot from Main Street.
Don’t be left hungry!
These dinners will go fast!
To be sure you get your meal
pre-sale tickets are available at the
Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St., Delphos
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FOR YOUR
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Straw
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Quality Produce,
Insanely Low Prices
• We get our produce from the Detroit
Produce Terminal, the 4th largest in the U.S.
• Our produce buyers are there 3 times a
week inspecting produce and finding
great deals.
• The Detroit Produce Terminal only offers
a limited supply of produce, so take
advantage of the savings WHILE OUR
SUPPLIES LAST!
• Supplies are limited and we don’t know what
we’ll get each week - this creates
the PRODUCE ADVENTURE.
Save up to $1.01 lb.
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1
28
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Starts Tuesday
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27
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Did You Know?
• Rich in vitamins K, A
and C
• Boil & add to omelets
and fritattas
• Use in place of spinach
Green or Red
Swiss Chard
Red or Green
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1
48
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KOSTA’S
Topp Chalet
Restaurant and Lounge
FAMILY FRIENDLY
ATMOSPHERE
WITH A
EUROPEAN TWIST
•PIZZA
•GREEK
SALADS
•GYROS
•STEAKS
•SEAFOOD
Open T-W-Th-Sat. at 4 p.m.
Fri. & Sun. at 11 a.m.
229 W. Fifth St.
Delphos, Ohio
CALLFORWEEKENDSPECIALS!
419-692-8888 or 419-692-8751
MARCH PIZZA SPECIAL
FRIDAY FISH FRY
All you can eat
$
7
95
through lent
$
2
00
OFF
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(specialty pizza not included)
$
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00
OFF an order
of Cheesy Breadsticks
Check us out online:
www.delphosherald.com
Monday, March 5, 2012 The Herald – 5A
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Fort Jennings
Memorial Hall
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
7 p.m. — Delphos City
Council meets at the Delphos
Municipal Building, 608 N.
Canal St.
Delphos Parks and
Recreation board meets at the
recreation building at Stadium
Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the
mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 Fifth St.
8 p.m. — The Veterans
of Foreign Wars meet at the
hall.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.

WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St., Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club meets at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission meets at
Municipal Building.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
MARCH 6
Julie Martin
Barry Groves
Julie Sevitz
Denny Kapcar
Richard Moorman
Chase Harman
MARCH 7
Michaela Shawhan
Bryant Trenkamp
Lacey Moore
Dan Ditto
Nicholas Menke
Linda Bockrath
Alexa Geise
Kim Hodgson
Terry VanGrootheest
CAMPUS NOTE
UNOH names dean’s list
The University of
Northwestern Ohio is proud
to acknowledge its Dean’s
List for January Session 2012
for students in the College of
Technologies.
The following full-time
students received a grade
point average of 3.5 or bet-
ter:
Delphos
James Asberry
Zachary Robert Hardesty
Bill Kozar
Ray McClelland
Michael O’Brien
Cory Osting
John Poce
Kevin Rooks
Lance Weppler
Patrick Redmon
Elida
Kyle Delauter
Jonathan Freed
Michael O’Bradovich
Seth Thomas
Ethan Watkins
Brent Weaver
Rick Miller
Fort Jennings
Craig Elwer
Joshua Heitman
Joshua Kuhlman
Middle Point
Chad Williams
Spencerville
Cory Counts
Russell Jones
Cole Mason
Camp Willson names upcoming events
YMCA Camp Willson in
Bellefontaine is a wonder-
ful place for family camp-
ing, enrichment programs for
children and weekends for
adults.
Summer camp opportuni-
ties put a little excitement
in your child’s summer!
YMCA Camp Willson in
Bellefontaine offers a wide
variety of summer overnight
camp opportunities for chil-
dren 7-17. Traditional camp
with archery, swimming,
water trampoline, canoeing,
arts & crafts, nature; and spe-
cialty camps with emphasis
on horseback riding, fishing.
The teen programs include
the fun of our traditional
camp with emphasis on teen
trips, high ropes, community
building or leadership pro-
grams are just a few of the
camps available.
The camp is currently tak-
ing registrations for these
programs:
Women’s Weekend,
April 13-15
Adult woman looking for
a great weekend to get away
from the hustle and bustle of
work and family this is the
program for you! You can
do as much or as little as you
like. Crafts, relaxing mas-
sages, hiking, horseback trail
rides, delicious meals, and so
much more. Cost $154.
Family Days, Sunday,
April 1 (2-4 p.m.), May 20,
April 28 and June 2, (1:30-5
p.m.)
Bring the family, meet our
staff and enjoy camp. Try
canoeing, target sports, climb
the wall, take a hike and lim-
ited horseback rides ($12/per-
son) available. Directors will
be available to answer ques-
tions, and give guided tours.
Memorial Day Family
Getaway Camp, May 26-28
Families have their choice
of activities — boating,
horseback riding, hiking,
swimming, campfire, climb-
ing wall, great meals includ-
ed and so much more. $133/
adults; $106/teens 13-17
yrs.; $93/child 6-12 yrs.; 5 &
under free.
July Family Getaway
Camp, June 29-July 1
Families have their
choice of activities — boat-
ing, horseback riding, hik-
ing, swimming, campfire,
climbing wall, great meals
included and so much more.
$120/adults; $96/teens 13-17
yrs.; $84/child 6-12 yrs.; 5 &
under free.
Labor Day Family
Getaway Camp, Sept. 1-3
Families have their choice
of activities — boating,
horseback riding, hiking,
swimming, campfire, climb-
ing wall, great meals includ-
ed and so much more. $133/
adults; $106/teens 13-17
yrs; $93/child 6-12 yrs.; 5 &
under free.
Women’s Weekend, Sept.
21-23
For adult woman look-
ing for a great weekend to
get away from the hustle and
bustle of work and family this
is the program for you! You
can do as much or as little as
you like. Crafts, relaxing mas-
sages, hiking, horseback trail
rides, delicious meals, and so
much more. Cost $154.
Call 1-800-423-0427 for
registration information.
Visit ymcacampwillson.
org.
Read all the local
coverage in
The Delphos
Herald
Subscribe today
419-695-0015
2
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The Quality Door Place
6A– The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
At Jerome Schottenstein
Center, Ohio State University
Session 5 Attendance: 13,520
Total for 5 sessions: 59,446
DIVISION III
Team Scores: Apple Creek
Waynedale 104.0, Troy Christian 81,
Delta 74.0, Nelsonville-York 69.5,
Rootstown 58.0, Beachwood 56.5,
Garrettsville Garfield 49.5, Bedford
St. Peter Chanel 41.5, Defiance
Ayersville 40.0, Day. Christian
38.0, Archbold 35.5, Jamestown
Greeneview 33.0, Ashland
Crestview 32.5, Mechanicsburg/
Shadyside 30.5, Swanton 27.0,
Delphos Jefferson/Caldwell 26.0,
Day. Miami Valley School 25.5,
Hicksville 23.5, Bloomdale Elmwood/
Marion Pleasant 23.0, Lima Bath/
Brookville/Liberty Center 22.0,
Akron Manchester/N. Baltimore/
Orrville 21.0, Creston Norwayne
20.5, Ashland Mapleton/Huron/Sand.
St. Mary C.C./Waynesville 18.0,
Col. Bishop Ready 17.5, Amanda-
Clearcreek/Carlisle 17.0, Attica
Seneca East/Lewisburg Tri-County
N./Magnolia Sandy Valley/Sullivan
Black River/W. Jefferson 16.0,
Smithville 14.0, Elmore Woodmore/
Johnstown Northridge/LaGrange
Keystone 13.0, Bluffton/Atwater
Waterloo/N. Lima South Range/Tiffin
Calvert 12.0, Doylestown Chippewa/
Edgerton/Genoa Area 11.0, Fostoria
10.5, Covington/Massillon Tuslaw/
Zoarville Tuscarawas Val. 10.0,
Blanchester 9.5, Lima Central Cath./
Harrod Allen East/Haviland Wayne
Trace/Orwell Grand Valley 9.0,
Carey/Carroll Bloom-Carroll 8.0,
Kansas Lakota 7.5, Day. Northridge/
New Lebanon Dixie/Ontario 7.0,
Coshocton 6.0, Cardington-Lincoln
5.0, Cin. Hills Christian Acad./
Columbia St. Columbia/Johnstown-
Monroe/Newark Cath. 4.0, Bellaire/
Casstown Miami East/Greenwich
S. Central/Middlefield Cardinal/
Ne wc o me r s t o wn / Pl y mo u t h /
Richwood N. Union/Sycamore
Mohawk/Woodsfield Monroe Cent.
3.0, Versailles/And. Pymatuning Val./
Galion/Galion Northmor/Kirtland/
New Paris National Trail/W. Salem
Northwestern 2.0, Ottawa-Glandorf/
Norwalk St. Paul/Spring. Cath.
Central/W. Lafayette Ridgewood 1.0.
First Place Finals: 106: Matthew
Kolodzik (DMVS) dec. Jarred Ganger
(TROY) 5-0. 113: Sammy Gross
(BEAC) dec. Zack Durbin (ASHM)
3-1. 120: Cade Mansfield (AYER)
dec. Austin Reese (MECH) 8-2.
126: Thomas McLaughlin (N-Y) dec.
Cody Laney (HICK) 14-9. 132: Jacob
Danishek (DAYC) maj. dec. Zavier
Meeks (LBAT) 15-4. 138: Luke Kern
(DELT) dec. Zane Nelson (ACWA)
10-6. 145: Jordan Marshall (TROY)
dec. Tyler Fahrer (DELT) 5-4. 152:
Jordan Cowell (ARCH) dec. Brenden
Stanley (ACWA) 7-4. 160: Zebulun
Beam (ACWA) dec. Aaron Yonker
(GARR) 3-2. 170: Zach Mays (N-Y)
pin Armani Robinson (JAME), 2:42.
182: B.J. Toal (TROY) dec. Kevin
Stock (GARR) 3-2. 195: Garrett
Linton (ROOT) pin Dan Barrett
(BSPC), 1:32. 220: Curtis Miller
(DJEF) dec. Kennedy Smith (BSPC)
5-1TB. 285: Mimmo Lytle (SWAN)
dec. Nino Majoy (HURO) 1-0.
Third Place Finals: 106: Zon
Fields (PLEA) pin Evan Ulinski
(WOOD), 2:54. 113: Christian Clary
(DAYC) dec. Mike Hozan (SULL)
6-3. 120: Cody Steiner (WAYN) dec.
Zack Nelson (ACWA) 10-8. 126:
Jason Sandlin (CARL) dec. Gennar
Feucht (WJEF) 7-5. 132: Jeremy
Border (CALD) dec. Zach Niner
(LIBE) 5-1. 138: Ryan Harris (BEAC)
dec. Thomas Williams (JOHNN) 2-1.
145: Wyatt Music (ACRV) dec. Zach
Wilson (BLUF) 10-5. 152: Alex Quinn
(SHAD) pin David Williams (BROO),
1:23. 160: David Shapiro (BEAC)
dec. Max Brooke (NLSR) 9-6. 170:
Travis Linton (ROOT) maj. dec.
Garrick Montgomery (ACRV) 13-2.
182: Sam Groff (MAGN) dec. Jacob
Schlater (LTC-N) 7-3. 195: Dalton
Ishmael (BALT) pin Lucas Dies
(AKRO), 2:24. 220: Kody Bellamy
(SSMCC) pin Jake Moore (ROOT),
3:50. 285: Patrik Garren (READ) dec.
Paul Kelbly (SMIT) 3-2.
Fifth Place Finals: 106: Kyle
Keller (DELT) pin Dakota Mays (N-Y),
0:24. 113: Garrett Hancock (TROY)
dec. Dexter Lee (BLOO) 10-5. 120:
Andrew Hoskins (JAME) pin Damien
Showman (ATTI), 0:59. 126: William
Spangler (KEYS) dec. Ben Timmons
(KANS) 4-2. 132: Jared VanVleet
(EDGE) over Dustin Grier (NORW),
default. 138: Ian Baker (SHAD) dec.
Colt Lovejoy (HARR) 8-5. 145: Kurt
Moore (NORW) dec. Cory Larick
(CARE) 4-0. 152: Jared Mattin
(DELT) maj. dec. D.J. Blair (MASS)
15-2. 160: Nick Hughes (ATTI) maj.
dec. Codie Millhone (ZOAR) 12-1.
170: Trevor White (ORR) pin Tony
Reynolds (FOST), 4:22. 182: Jake
Sheehy (GENO) dec. Brian Olson
(COVI) 8-5. 195: Daniel Kwiat (TIFF)
pin Matt Zaller (ORWE), 2:39. 220:
Travis Boyd (BLAN) dec. Jacob Coon
(N-Y) 6-3. 285: Zack Srock (DOYL)
dec. Justin Gillen (LIBE) 6-2.
Seventh Place Finals: 106:
Ryan Behringer (AYER) maj. dec.
Drew Coffey (ARCH) 13-5. 113:
Chandler Minnard (CB-C) maj. dec.
Frankie Alvarado (AYER) 12-4. 120:
Kyle Ferguson (AKRO) pin Dustin
Ferguson (BLOO), 1:35. 126: Dalton
Hiltibran (MECH) maj. dec. Nick
Hermann (WATE) 12-0. 132: Bradley
Wardell (ACWA) over Brian Spangler
(KEYS), default. 138: J.J. Diven
(WATE) dec. Josh Lyttle (DAYN)
8-6. 145: Ricky Ratcliff (WJEF) dec.
Dakota Stanley (ACWA) 8-3. 152:
Sawyer Temple (HAVI) dec. Zac
Potts (WMCE) 5-2. 160: Austin Ripke
(ARCH) dec. Kale Rayner (CALD)
9-6. 170: Bobby Sunderhaus (LCC)
over Aaron King (DIXI), default.
182: Jacob Bresciani (COSH) dec.
Brandon Heidinger (COLU) 8-2. 195:
Spencer Chenetski (A-C) pin Joey
Dismuke (JOHNM), 4:29. 220: Jake
Baker (BLOO) dec. Jake Genders
(A-C) 3-1SV. 285: Devin Dressler
(GARR) pin Ronnie Lehtomaki
(ORR), 0:20.
LOCAL WRESTLERS:
Consolation Semifinals: 138:
Ryan Harris Williams (JOHNN) dec.
Colt Lovejoy (HARR) 4-1. 145: Zach
Wilson (BLUF) dec. Larick (CAR)
6-2.
Consolation Quarterfinals:
138: Colt Lovejoy (HARR) dec. Diven
(WATE) 3-2. 152: Blair (MASS)
pin Sawyer Temple (HAVI), 4:35.
170: White (ORR) maj. dec. Bobby
Sunderhaus (LCC) 12-2.
Championship Semifinals:
132: Zavier Meeks (LBAT) pin Grier
(NORW), 0:46. 145: Fahrer (DELT)
dec. Zach Wilson (BLUF) 10-7. 220:
Curtis Miller (DJEF) dec. Bellamy
(SSMCC) 6-2.
Consolation Round Two:
126: Hiltibran (MECH) tech.
fall Brandon McCormick (LCC)
15-0. 132: VanVleet (EDGE) dec.
Kameran Clemens (HAVI) 4-3. 138:
Colt Lovejoy (HARR) dec. Barnett
(GSCE) 4-0. 152: Sawyer Temple
(HAVI) pin Nick Miller (ONTA),
2:58. 160: Brooke (NLSR) dec. J.R.
Conyers (HARR) 3-2. 170: Bobby
Sunderhaus (LCC) dec. Jonathan
McClenathan (C-L) 2-1; King (DIX)
dec. Kaleb Matchett (VERS) 8-6SV.
182: Bresciani (COSH) dec. David
Gremling (LCC) 4-2SV. 220: Moore
(ROOT) dec. Wyatt Karhoff (O-G)
10-5.
Championship Quarterfinals:
132: Zavier Meeks (LBAT) dec.
VanVleet (EDGE) 7-4. 138: Baker
(SHAD) dec. Colt Lovejoy (HARR)
2-0. 145: Zach Wilson (BLUF) dec.
Moore (NORW) 17-10. 160: Yonker
(GARR) dec. J.R. Conyers (HARR)
6-2. 170: Mays (N-Y) dec. Kaleb
Matchett (VERS) 11-5. 220: Curtis
Miller (DJEF) pin Moore (ROOT),
0:31.
Consolation Round One: 126:
Brandon McCormick (LCC) maj.
dec. Rathburn (HART) 10-1. 132:
Kameran Clemens (HAVI) pin Fulton
(WJEF), 2:09. 138: Hansel (NEWA)
maj. dec. Dylan Kleman (Columbus
Grove) 15-2. 152: Sawyer Temple
(HAVI) dec. Leasure (CALD) 5-3.
160: Brooke (NLSR) dec. Logan
Looser (Delphos St. John’s) 5-2.
170: Bobby Sunderhaus (LCC) dec.
Cody McGuire (FRED) 4-1. 182:
David Gremling (LCC) dec. Sharpe
(MILL) 4-2. 195: Jaramillo (ARCH)
dec. Logan Heiing (Delphos St.
John’s) 3-1; Zaller (ORWE) maj. dec.
Gavin Windau (Columbus Grove)
13-0. 220: Wyatt Karhoff (O-G) dec.
Wiley (SMIT) 5-1; Coon (N-Y) dec.
Tyler Ash (Paulding) 5-4.
Championship Preliminaries:
126: Hermann (WATE) dec. Brandon
McCormick (LCC) 6-4. 132: Campbell
(PYMA) dec. Kameran Clemens
(HAVI) 12-8; Zavier Meeks (LBAT)
pin Bradley Wardell (ACW), 3:30.
138: Kern (DELT) maj. dec. Dylan
Kleman (CG) 17-4; Colt Lovejoy
(HARR) dec. Widmer (GIBS) 9-3.
145: Zach Wilson (BLUF) dec. Larick
(CARE) 11-4. 152: Blumenthal
(BEAC) maj. dec. Sawyer Temple
(HAVI) 14-5. 160: J.R. Conyers
(HARR) dec. Trae Garlando (NEWC)
10-7; Millhone (ZOAR) dec. Logan
Looser (DSJ) 9-5. 170: Reynolds
(FOST) pin Bobby Sunderhaus
(LCC), 1:59; Kaleb Matchett (VERS)
dec. Patchin (EVER) 7-3. 182:
Groff (MAGN) dec. David Gremling
(LCC) 6-2. 195: Chenetski (A-C)
dec. Logan Heiing (DSJ) 5-4; Beck
(GALI) dec. Gavin Windau (CG) 7-4;
Curtis Miller (DJEF) pin Tyler Ash
(PAUL), 0:39.
DIVISION II
Team Scores: St. Paris Graham
Local 183.5, Lexington 97.5, Cuy.
Falls CVCA 84.5, Cuy. Falls Walsh
Jesuit 74.5, Steubenville 67.0,
Uhrichsville Claymont 59.0, Wauseon
50.0, Mentor Lake Cath. 45.0, Clyde
44.0, Parma Padua Franciscan 43.0,
Akron St. Vin.-St. Mary 40.0, Milan
Edison 38.0, Wash. C.H. Washington
37.0, Millersburg W. Holmes 34.0,
Tol. Central Cath. 31.0, Perry 29.0,
Gallipolis Gallia Acad. 27.0, Goshen
26.5, Oak Harbor 26.0, Col. Walnut
Ridge 24.0, Bellbrook 23.0, Bellville
Clear Fork 20.0, Lima Shawnee/Beloit
W. Branch 18.0, New Richmond
17.0, Mogadore Field 16.5, Akron
Coventry/Minerva/Wash. C.H. Miami
Trace 15.0, Eaton/Gnadenhutten
Indian Va./Mantua Crestwood/
Tiffin Columbian/Warren Howland
14.0, Urbana 13.0, Louisville 12.5,
Dover/Hi l l sboro/London/Newark
Licking Valley/Spring. Kenton Ridge
12.0, Carrollton/Thornville Sheridan
11.0, Caledonia River Valley/Cle.
Benedictine/Norton 10.0, Cambridge/
Germantown Valley View 9.0,
Clarksville Clinton-Massie/Sandusky
Perkins 8.0, McConnelsville Morgan
7.5, Kenton/Belle. Benjamin Logan/
Circleville/Ravenna Southeast/
Spring. Shawnee 7.0, Canton South/
Monroe/Pemberville Eastwood
6.0, Bryan/Hamilton Ross/Parma
Hts. Holy Name 5.0, Chagrin Falls/
Col. Hamilton Township/New
Philadelphia/Pepper Pike Orange
4.0, Peninsula Woodridge 3.5,
Athens/Canal Fulton Northwest/New
Lexington/Pataskala Licking Hts./
Richfield Revere 3.0, Akron Arch.
Hoban/Aurora/Col. Centennial/Day.
Chaminade-Julienne/Dresden Tri-
Valley/Greenville/Hebron Lakewood/
Marietta/Norwalk/Plain City Jonathan
Alder/Sandusky 2.0, Wapakoneta/
Cadiz Harrison Central/Circleville
Logan Elm/Granville 1.0
See STATE WRESTLING, page 7A
75TH OHSAA STATE
WRESTLING
CHAMPIONSHIPS
(Continued from page 1A)
win the title. I had something
to prove and I had some busi-
ness to take care of, espe-
cially after last year, and it’s
great to finally be able to
finish that business,” Miller
exclaimed. “We condition to
go the distance like this and
more, like tonight. It was a
difficult match but one that
can make me appreciate this
even more. We both had to
feel each other out for a long
time — just like in the semi-
final match (versus Sandusky
St. Mary Central Catholic’s
Kody Bellamy) and it was
tough to find anything that
was going to work tonight.
Neither of us want to
make a big mistake or mess
up, so neither of us really
gambled.
“I felt he actually had
more pressure on him; he
was the runner-up last year. I
could tell he definitely didn’t
want me to get on the top and
he was pretty quick.”
Of course, both combat-
ants had to wait for 3-plus
hours before taking the mat
after the impressive Parade
of Champions that marched
out all 84 wrestlers battling
for the 42 championships
throughout the night.
After a scoreless draw at
the end of the first period,
Smith got an escape at 1:14
of the second period with
Miller in the top position.
Miller tied it at 1 with his
own escape at the 42-second
mark of the third period and
the two battled to overtime.
After a minute of sudden-
victory overtime that saw
neither grappler able to get a
point, Miller got the up posi-
tion in the first of the 30-sec-
ond overtimes and got three
back points, coming very
close to finishing the match
with a pin but heading to the
second 30-second overtime
with a 4-1 lead.
When Smith chose to go
neutral, that gave the final
point of the match. Miller
easily held off the Chanel
senior (24-4) to grab the
championship.
Miller finished unbeaten
at 56-0, joining seven others
that won state titles among the
three divisions with unbeaten
marks, but he had the most
wins of the unbeatens. He
was second to Division III
152-pound champion Jordan
Cowell from Archbold’s 63
victories to set the all-time
mark of 237 triumphs in the
state of Ohio.
He also joins big brother
Stuart, who took the 215-
pound title in 2009, to become
the second Jefferson wrestler
to grab gold in the program’s
12 seasons.
“That feels good, too; to
win not only for the pro-
gram for both of us. It’s nice
that the only two that have
won titles are in our family,”
Miller continued. “The only
advice he gave me — like
he has all during this time
— was just to wrestle my
match. Afterward, he hugged
and kissed me.
“It was great to finish my
high school wrestling career —
and likely my wrestling career
— with a championship.”
Miller ends his 4-year
career with a 167-11 mark.
Jefferson head coach Mike
Wilson was thankful that his
tenure as the program’s lead-
er began with Miller and his
senior season.
“I wish I could take credit
for what he’s done this year
but I inherited a very good
wrestler. He is self-made; he
worked hard to get to this
point and I didn’t have to do
much,” Wilson added. “It’s
great that he became the sec-
ond wrestler to win a title to
match his brother and he did
it with a great match. Both
come from a great family that
instilled a work ethic in both
of their sons.”
Miller’s four wins — two
by pinfall — accounted for
all 26 of Jefferson’s points,
good for a tie for 17th as a
team.
Miller
Curtis Miller exults with his classmates after winning the title. He became the second
wrestler in Jefferson’s 12-year history to win a title Saturday evening.
Curtis Miller tries to turn Kennedy Smith during Saturday’s Division III state finals
at The Schott. The Jefferson senior went on to capture the 220-pound title with a 5-1
3-OT victory.
June Orr photos
By BOB WEBER
Herald correspondent
btzweber@bright.net
LIMA — Friday night at
Lima Senior High School
was a tale of two halves of
boys basketball.
The Wapakoneta Redskins
started strong
and roared out
to an early lead
and maintained it
through the half-
time intermis-
sion.
However, the Elida
Bulldogs took charge in the
second half, outscoring the
Redskins 40-19 to come away
with the Division II sectional
title with a 51-39 triumph.
The Redskins, under the
direction of head coach Matt
Bradley, started the game
with strong performances
on both the offensive and
defensive ends of the court.
Compounded by the poor
shooting of the Bulldogs, the
Redskins were able to fin-
ish the first quarter leading
the heavily-favored Bulldogs
12-2.
The Redskins were led
by 6-3 junior Travis Bertram
with seven points and 6-5
junior Jake Buzzard with five
points. The Bulldogs only two
points of the quarter came
at the 1:55 mark when 6-3
sophomore Dakota Mathias
connected on two
foul shots.
In the sec-
ond quarter, the
Bulldogs, led by
6-6 senior Reggie
McAdams’ nine
points, started to work them-
selves back into the con-
test. However, the Redskins
answered with help off the
bench from 6-6 senior Kaleb
Vondenhuevel’s four points.
As time was running out
in the quarter, senior Andy
Fauer banked home a deep 3
from the left side to send his
team to the locker room with
a 20-11 halftime lead.
Sometimes the best thing
— or the worst thing — can
be the halftime break for
teams. Nothing could be as
true as it was for both teams
Friday night.
Elida, under the leader-
ship of head coach Denny
Thompson, started the third
quarter with increased inten-
sity on both ends and out-
scored the Redskins 17-9 to
only trail by one, 29-28, after
three quarters of play. The
Bulldogs saw all five starters
contributing in the scoring
column.
The fourth quarter found
the Bulldogs taking full
control of the game. The
Redskins continued to cool
down from the field and
found themselves in deep
foul trouble, with no answer
in stopping the momentum
of the Bulldogs as they out-
scored the Redskins 23-10 to
come away with the sectional
title. Junior Aric Thompson
was key in the second half
in helping the Bulldogs pull
away with three deep 3-point-
ers. Also, forced to the foul
line throughout the second
half, the Bulldogs connected
on 22-of-30 (73 percent) for
the game.
For the Redskins (8-14)
as they finish their year, they
were led in scoring by Alex
Greve, Buzzard and Bertram,
all with 10 points apiece for
the game. The Redskins were
17-of-41 from the field for
41 percent, 4-of-8 from the
stripe for 50 percent, hauled
in 18 rebounds and commit-
ted only 10 turnovers.
For the victorious
Bulldogs (19-3), they were
led by McAdams (8-11 from
the line) with a game-high 18
points. Mathias (8-8 from the
line) and Thompson chipped
in 12 and 11 points, respec-
tively. From the field, the
Bulldogs shot 33 percent
(13-39). They hauled in 18
rebounds and committed only
six turnovers.
The Bulldogs move on to
district play at Ohio Northern
University at 6:15 p.m.
Wednesday versus Willard.
Elida (51)
Ebin Stratton 2-0-5-3-7, Mike
McDonald 1-0-4-1-3, Reggie
McAdams 2-2-11-8-18, Aric
Thompson 0-3-2-2-11, Dakota
Mathias 2-0-8-8-12. Totals 7-5-
30-22-51
Wapakoneta (39)
Alex Greve 2-1-4-3-10, Andy
Fauer 0-1-0-0-3, Jake Buzzard
2-2-0-0-10, Travis Bertram 3-1-4-
1-10, Kaleb Vondenhuevel 3-0-0-
0-6. Totals 10-5-8-4-39.
Score by Quarters:
Elida 2-9-17-23 = 51
Wapak 12-8-9-10 = 39
Three-point goals: Elida,
Thompson 3, McAdams 2;
Wapakoneta, Buzzard 2, Greve,
Fauer, Bertram.
(Due to technical difficul-
ties, the story did not run in
Saturday’s Herald).
Bulldogs big second half nets sectional title
1
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Monday, March 5, 2012 The Herald — 7A
www.delphosherald.com
(Continued from Page 6A)
First Place Finals: 106:
Cameron Kelly (BELLB) dec.
Cody Burcher (UHRI) 7-2. 113:
Nathan Tomasello (CVCA) dec.
Anthony Tutolo (MENT) 8-5. 120:
Ryan Taylor (SPGL) dec. Cory
Stainbrook (CFWJ) 7-5. 126:
Micah Jordan (SPGL) tech. fall
Bobby Mason (PADU) 24-8. 132:
Brent Fickel (PADU) dec. Colin
McDermitt (LSHA) 7-0. 138: Nate
Skonieczny (CFWJ) maj. dec.
Dalton Nicely (WAUS) 13-5. 145:
Jake Faust (LEXI) dec. Blake
Kastl (SPGL) 7-3. 152: Bo Jordan
(SPGL) pin Kyle Burns (EDIS),
3:51. 160: Isaac Jordan (SPGL)
dec. Brad Metz (LEXI) 5-3. 170:
Chris Moore (CLYD) dec. Brandon
O’Neill (BELLV) 4-2. 182: Chaz
Gresham (GOSH) dec. Huston
Evans (SPGL) 3-2SV. 195: Josh
Lehner (LEXI) tech. fall Charlie
Keenan (STEU) 17-1. 220: Matt
Meadows (CVCA) dec. Zane
Krall (WAUS) 6-1. 285: Riley
Shaw (WCHW) pin Travis Gusan
(WALN), 4:35.
Third Place Finals: 106: Devin
Brown (STEU) dec. Ryan Bennett
(CVCA) 8-5. 113: Luke Langdon
(UHRI) pin Eli Seipel (SPGL),
0:21. 120: Jesse Gunter (COVE)
dec. Mike Rix (SVSM) 5-0. 126:
Mikey Kostandaras (CFWJ) dec.
Darran Warner (GNAD) 3-0. 132:
Alex Mossing (TOLCC) dec. Arron
Thompson (LOND) 8-2. 138:
Max Rohskopf (MILL) pin Luke
Cramer (HARB), 2:16. 145: T.J.
Fox (MOGA) dec. Shawn McGhee
(STEU) 4-3. 152: Seth Williams
(TIFF) dec. Alex Bergman (HARB)
5-2. 160: Scott Boyce (MINE)
dec. Kordell Ford (HILL) 3-2. 170:
Brandon Taylor (GALL) pin Jacob
Kasper (LEXI), 4:26. 182: Brad
Smith (CLYD) dec. Jordan Cole
(EDIS) 3-2. 195: Jimmy Szep
(MENT) dec. Sam Harris (URBA)
4-2. 220: Ray Stone (SVSM) over
Greg Moray (STEU), default. 285:
Connor Sharp (BELO) dec. Billy
Miller (PERR) 2-1.
Fifth Place Finals: 106: Eli
Stickley (SPGL) maj. dec. Michael
May (EATO) 10-0. 113: Brody
Hooks (RICH) maj. dec. Trent
Duffy (WCHMT) 11-3. 120: Calvin
Campbell (LEXI) dec. Aaran
Gessic (PERR) 3-0. 126: Preston
Bowshier (KENR) dec. Sean Fee
(MENT) 5-2. 132: Nic Skonieczny
(CFWJ) dec. Dylan Kager (MANT)
3-2. 138: Gabe Stark (WARR)
dec. Cameron Campbell (SAND)
7-2. 145: Sawyer Leppla (CAMB)
dec. Nathan Bowers (WCHMT)
1-0UTB. 152: Kyle Warner (UHRI)
dec. Justin Stitzlein (MILL) 7-0.
160: Lucas Poyser (LOUI) maj.
dec. Marshall Overholt (MILL)
14-5. 170: Brogan Endres (DOVE)
dec. Wyatt Running (CC-M) 16-13.
182: Clay Rollison (CALE) dec.
Zack Tackett (GALL) 4-1. 195:
R.J. Waugh (THOR) dec. Alex
Poole (CARR) 3-1. 220: Bryan
Day (GERM) dec. Lucas Sparks
(SSHA) 4-2. 285: Joe Nawalaniec
(BENE) over Levi Pickerel
(TOLCC), disq.
Seventh Place Finals: 106:
Jake Zemaitis (MANT) dec. Brad
Taton (MENT) 4-3. 113: Wade
Hodges (WAUS) dec. D.J.
Schoeppner (CANT) 5-3. 120:
Nate Hagan (TOLCC) dec. Jose
Parsons (LICK) 3-2. 126: Ricky
Simonelli (CVCA) dec. Tyler Knul
(CIRC) 7-6. 132: Ryan Skonieczny
(SVSM) dec. Josh Decatur (CVCA)
6-4. 138: Shelden Struble (BRYA)
dec. Kyle Harris (FULT) 4-0. 145:
Jimmy Klosz (HOLY) dec. Jeff
Hojnacki (CVCA) 6-5. 152: Bradley
Ponchak (MCCO) pin Brandon
James (RAVE), 3:57. 160: Chris
Wilson (MONR) dec. Jake Lagace
(LICK) 7-2. 170: David Gray
(CVCA) dec. Jake Howarth (STEU)
7-5. 182: Sean Rutherford (NORT)
pin Kyle Patterson (PEMB), 2:37.
195: Cameron Shaw (WCHW)
dec. Gabe King (KENT) 9-3. 220:
Anthony Miller (PERR) dec. Trent
Johnson (UHRI) 6-2. 285: J.R.
Forsee (RICH) dec. Beau Harmon
(BENJ) 5-3.
Consolation Quarterfinals:
195: Waugh (THOR) dec. Gabe
King (KENT) 4-3.
Championship Semifinals:
132: Colin McDermitt (LSHA) dec.
Mossing (TOLCC) 2-1.
Consolation Round Two:
106: Taton (MENT) dec. John
Martin (WAPA) 3-1SV; 195: Gabe
King (KENT) pin Auletta (PEPP),
4:48.
Championship Quarterfinals:
132: Colin McDermitt (LSHA) dec.
N. Skonieczny (CFWJ) 6-1.
Consolation Round One:
106: John Martin (WAPA) dec.
Jay (W-Y) 5-1. 195: Gabe King
(KENT) pin McCown (LICK), 2:21.
285: Forsee (RICH) dec. Terrin
Contreras (Van Wert) 3-2.
Championship Preliminaries:
106: May (EATO) pin John
Martin (WAPA), 5:40. 132: Colin
McDermitt (LSHA) dec. Scherer
(WARS) 4-0. 195: Szep (MENT)
maj. dec. Gabe King (KENT) 9-0.
285: Castillo (PHIL) dec. Terrin
Contreras (VW) 10-4.
DIVISION I
Team Scores: Lakewood St.
Edward 223.5, Massillon Perry
105.5, Cin. Arch. Moeller 65.5,
Solon 64.0, Oregon Clay 63.0,
Maple Hts. 49.0, Barberton/
Wadsworth 45.0, Brecksville-
Broad. Hts. 44.0, Twinsburg 40.0,
Powell Olentangy Liberty 39.0,
Cle. St. Ignatius 36.0, Marysville
31.0, Gr. City Central Crossing
29.5, Lewis Center Olentangy
29.0, Kettering Fairmont 23.0, Cin.
LaSalle 22.0, Cin. Colerain/Medina
Highland 21.0, Lancaster 20.5,
Cin. Elder 20.0, Loveland/Stow-
Munroe Falls 18.0, Tol. St. John’s
Jesuit 17.5, Canton GlenOak/
Massillon Washington/Perrysburg
17.0, Mount Vernon 16.0, Avon/
Hilliard Davidson/Mayfield Vill.
Mayfield/Painesville Riverside
15.0, Ashville Teays Valley/
Madison/Springboro 14.0, Cin. St.
Xavier/Dublin Coffman/Fairfield/
Gahanna Lincoln/Hilliard Darby
13.0, Centerville 12.0, Medina/
Springfield/Young. Boardman 11.0,
Cin. Anderson/Pickerington North
10.0, Huber Hts. Wayne/Massillon
Jackson 9.0, Sidney 8.0, Dublin
Scioto/Hamilton 7.0, Middletown
6.5, Parma/Trenton Edgewood 6.0,
Amherst Steele/Cin. Northwest/
Mason/N. Royalton 5.0, Chagrin
Falls Kenston/Liberty Twp. Lakota
E./Uniontown Lake 4.0, Ashtabula
Lakeside/Col. St. Charles/N.
Olmsted/Westerville Central 3.0,
Beavercreek/Cuyahoga Falls/
Lebanon/ Maumee/ Ment or / N.
Canton Hoover/Vandal i a
Butler/W. Chester Lakota West/
Worth. Kilbourne 2.0, Brunswick/
Cin. Sycamore/Copley/Delaware
Hayes/Dublin Jerome/Green/
Hilliard Bradley/Lorain/Macedonia
Nordonia/Miamisburg 1.0.
First Place Finals: 106:
David Bavery (PERR) dec. Austin
Assad (B-BH) 5-2. 113: Brandon
Thompson (SOLO) dec. Alex
Moore (STED) 5-1. 120: George
DiCamillo (STIG) dec. Max Byrd
(LASA) 4-0. 126: Dean Heil
(STED) maj. dec. Trevor Fiorucci
(LOLEN) 11-2. 132: Joey Ward
(MOEL) dec. Edgar Bright (STED)
2-1TB. 138: Mitch Newhouse
(PERR) dec. Mike Labry (TWIN)
7-5. 145: Anthony Collica (SOLO)
dec. Markus Scheidel (STED) 3-1.
152: Zack Dailey (PERR) dec.
Richard Robertson (MAPL) 5-2.
160: Roy Daniels (POLEN) dec.
Connor McMahon (SM-F) 6-5. 170:
Mark Martin (STED) dec. Vince
Pickett (CROS) 3-2. 182: Domenic
Abounader (STED) dec. Michael
Baker (TWIN) 3-0. 195: JoJo
Tayse (PERR) dec. James Suvak
(STED) 6-4. 220: Ty Walz (STED)
dec. Rahkim Johnson (ELDE) 2-1.
285: Nick Tavanello (WADS) dec.
Garrett Gray (OREG) 6-5UTB.
Third Place Finals: 106:
Dakota Riley (VERN) dec. Taleb
Rahmani (MARY) 9-4. 113:
Aaron Assad (B-BH) pin Jacob
Spearman (LANC), 7:25UTB.
120: Ivan McClay (WASH) dec.
Colin Heffernan (STED) 11-6.
126: Cobey Fehr (BARB) dec.
Ryan Murdock (COFF) 3-2TB.
132: Kagan Squire (WADS) dec.
Drew McDougle (LINC) 5-2. 138:
Nick Barber (STED) dec. Noah
Forrider (MARY) 3-2. 145: Zane
Zeman (AVON) maj. dec. Jake
Neyer (FAIR) 10-1. 152: Dakota
Sizemore (MOEL) dec. Chase
Delande (DAVI) 9-3. 160: Justin
Kresevic (SOLO) dec. Jacob
Davis (STED) 3-1SV. 170: Tommy
Kimbrell (KETTF) maj. dec.
Connor Murray (MAYF) 9-0. 182:
Brandon Walker (BORO) dec.
Tegray Scales (COLE) 3-2. 195:
Ted Schoen (TSJJ) dec. Evan
Rosborough (PAIN) 2-1. 220:
Almonte’ Patrick (MAPL) dec.
Chalmer Frueauf (MOEL) 5-1.
285: Derrick Everett (GLEN) over
Aaron Pipkins (MAPL), default.
Fifth Place Finals: 106:
Josh Wimer (CROS) dec. Payton
Gutierrez (PICKN) 7-5. 113: Ryan
Hornack (MEDI) dec. Tom Zeigler
(STIG) 6-3. 120: Reed Shump
(BARB) pin Marcus Windsor
(HUBE), 2:11. 126: Mike Screptock
(OREG) dec. Tyler Ziegler (MOEL)
1-0. 132: Jacob Conine (OREG)
dec. Logan Strope (LANC) 6-2.
138: Angelo Amenta (OREG) maj.
dec. Mason Calvert (SIDN) 11-0.
145: Patrick Campbell (ANDE)
dec. Lucas Marcelli (JACK)
1-0. 152: Colin Rininger (HIGH)
dec. Joe Heyob (STXA) 15-12.
160: Nico Graziani (BOAR) dec.
Quinton Hiles (B-BH) 4-3. 170:
Adam Kluk (HIGH) dec. Tyler
Bowens (DARB) 6-2. 182: Luke
Boff (PBURG) dec. Darryl Grayson
(SPRI) 7-3. 195: Garrett Conner
(CENT) dec. Aaron Tschantz
(BARB) 5-4. 220: Josh Ransom
(MADI) dec. Vernon Rowe (BARB)
4-3. 285: Luke Fleming (POLEN)
dec. Jon Neihaus (COLE) 11-6.
Seventh Place Finals: 106:
Jared Davis (OREG) dec. Jim
Ferritto (STIG) 4-2. 113: Richie
Screptock (OREG) dec. Anthony
Milano (LASA) 6-2. 120: Jordan
Puska (EDGE) dec. Mark Matos
(AMHE) 8-4. 126: Anthony Trunzo
(ROYA) dec. Jorge Gonzalez
(MASO) 3-0. 132: Isaac Bast
(PERR) maj. dec. Cole Nace
(ASHV) 12-4. 138: Jake Ryan
(POLEN) pin Ryan Roth (PBURG),
1:23. 145: Chris Baughman
(WADS) dec. Chase Boyd (MARY)
5-3. 152: Matt VanCuren (STED)
dec. Jacob Globke (MIDD) 7-4.
160: Josh Arrendale (PERR) dec.
Zach Brown (WEST) 2-1. 170:
Micheal Weber (LOVE) maj. dec.
Matt Olson (CHAG) 12-0. 182:
Brocky Leidecker (ASHV) dec.
Justin Halaska (PARM) 4-1. 195:
Kylee Knabe (LOVE) pin Jacob
Burton (LAKO), 3:14. 220: Wesley
King (SCIO) dec. Jake Venable
(HAMI) 2-1TB. 285: Bryan Young
(LOLEN) pin Ameer Daniels
(NORT), 3:26.
State wrestling
Kalida’s Alexis Wurth finds herself boxed in by Ottoville’s Megan Bendele and Nicole
Vorst. Ottoville’s defense stifled Kalida’s offense and the Big Green won the Lima Senior
Division IV District Championship 55-33 Saturday night.
Tom Morris photo
By Charlie Warnimont
Sentinel Sports Editor
LIMA – Ottoville’s girls
basketball team has some
lofty goals for the season.
Before each game this sea-
son, the Big Green have writ-
ten the word ‘Now’ on a hand
to remind of the task at hand.
With their mental focus intact
Saturday in the Division IV
district finals at Lima Senior,
Ottoville took another step on
their journey as they defeated
Kalida 55-33.
The win sends the Lady
Green (23-0) to the Division IV
regional semifinals Thursday
against Arlington, a 53-48 win-
ner over Leipsic. The 8 p.m.
game pits the number 1 and 2
ranked teams in Division IV
against each other.
“We’ve been writing on
our hand all year,” junior
center Abby Siefker said. “It
helps us to stay focused on
every single game because
we can’t look too far into the
future. Obviously, we have
bigger and better goals and
we can’t look too far ahead.”
With that in mind, the Lady
Green went about playing their
game Saturday night against
their Putnam County League
rival. Grabbing a quick lead,
the Big Green scored the first
eight points for a lead they
would never lose.
Lauren Kramer opened
the scoring with a basket that
was followed by a putback
by Megan Bendele. After two
free throws by Siefker, anoth-
er basket by Bendele on the
inside made it 8-0, forcing the
LadyCats to take a timeout
with 5:17 left in the quarter.
After the timeout, Kalida
scored its only point of the
opening quarter as freshman
Jackie Gardner hit the second-
of-2 free throws. Ottoville
closed out the opening quar-
ter with a Nicole Vorst bas-
ket and a 3-pointer by Tonya
Kaufman for a 13-1 lead.
“You try to figure out what
they are going to do to you,”
Ottoville coach Dave Kleman
said. “Their game is to push
the tempo and press you and
we got down there and scored
some easy baskets; it’s deflat-
ing if that’s your game.”
Kalida’s offensive troubles
continued into the second
quarter as Ottoville scored the
first five points of the quar-
ter for an 18-1 lead. Bendele
had four of the points and
Taylor Mangas added a free
throw. After missing their
first 21 shots of the game, the
Wildcats hit their first bucket
with 3:26 left in the half when
Nicole Kaufman canned a 3.
Ottoville scored the next
five points as Rachel Bening
had four points and Siefker
added a free throw before the
Wildcats went on a mini-run
as Julia Vandemark scored
four straight points, which
included a 3-pointer. The Big
Green responded with another
5-0 run as Rachel Turnwald
had three points and Siefker
two. Kalida ended the open-
ing half with a basket as they
trailed 28-10 at the half.
“We have a pretty good
defensive team,” Kleman
said. “We really emphasize
defense; we’ve done that for-
ever and we were doing a
pretty good job offensively
to get that lead. They were
excited and pretty focused.”
“It was similar to the last
time we played them,” Kalida
coach Adam Huber said.
“We were getting some good
shots; they just were not fall-
ing. Missing 21 shots to start
the game is not going to win a
lot of games, especially when
you are playing a team like
Ottoville.”
Although the Wildcats
struggled the first half, they
were a different team in the
second half.
Baskets by Kaufman and
Vandemark opened the sec-
ond-half scoring for Kalida
before Ottoville used another
5-0 run: a 3-point play by
Siefker and a Bendele bas-
ket; to go up 19 points at
33-14. The Big Green were
leading 34-16 before Kalida
went on a 6-0 run on baskets
by Vandemark, Kaufman and
Gardner as they were within
34-22.
The key to Kalida’s sec-
ond-half run was coming
out and playing a bit more
relaxed.
“Once we settled down,
the game was pretty even
the rest of the way,” Huber
added. “I’m so proud of my
kids and seniors; they worked
their tails off all season.
Tonight, they showed what
kind of character they have
the way they came back and
kept fighting and fighting.
We played pretty even after
the start; it was just too big a
hole to dig out of.”
While the Wildcats were
inching closer to the Big
Green, Ottoville righted the
ship with a 6-1 run to end the
third quarter as Siefker had
a pair of baskets inside and
Kramer dropped in two free
throws. Gardner scored the
Wildcats’ lone point with a
free throw as the Green and
Gold were up 40-23.
Beining opened the fourth
quarter with a basket that
Summer Holtkamp matched
for Kalida. A 3-pointer by
Koch and a Bendele basket
pushed the Ottoville lead out
to 22 at 47-25.
Bendele led the Big
Green with 13 points and six
rebounds, while Siefker added
12 points and 10 rebounds.
Beining added 10 points.
“Megan Bendele had a
great game again. She is an
unsung, unheralded player
that I think should have got-
ten some awards at the end
of the year,” Kleman added.
“When you have such a good
team, people get lost in the
shuffle and I told her that. She
is kind of the glue and Koch
is another one, the glue that
holds our team together. They
could be very selfish and they
are not and that’s what makes
a team.”
Vandemark led Kalida
(13-10) with 12 points and
Kaufman finished with nine.
Haley McIntyre ripped down
seven rebounds.
* * *
Kalida 12-53 4-9 33: Schmitz
0-0-0; Holtkamp 1-0-2; Vandemark
5-1-12; Kaufman 4-0-9; Wurth 0-0-0;
Verhoff 0-0-0; Smith 0-0-0; Turnwald
0-1-1; Honigfort 0-0-0; McIntyre 0-0-
0; Merschman 1-0-2; Gardner 2-2-7;
Recker 0-0-0.
Ottoville 20-38 13-17 55:
Turnwald 1-1-3; Bendele 5-3-13; Koch
0-0-0; Mangas 1-1-3; Vorst 1-0-2;
Kaufman 1-0-3; Kramer 2-2-7; Sarka
0-0-0; Eickholt 0-0-0; Von Sossan 0-0-
0; Landwehr 0-0-0; Lindeman 1-0-2;
Beining 4-2-10; Schimmoeller 0-0-0;
Siefker 4-4-12.
Score by Quarters:
Kalida 1 9 13 10 – 33
Ottoville 13 15 12 15 – 55
Three-point goals: Kalida 3
(Vandemark 1, Kaufman 1, Gardner
1), Ottoville 2 (Kaufman 1, Kramer 1).
Rebounds: Ottoville 30 (Siefker 10,
Bendele 6); Kalida 19 (McIntyre 7).
Lady Green stays on course
Gelhaus, Horstman
top MAC cagers
Fort Recovery junior Wade
Gelhaus copped Midwest
Athletic Conference boys
basketball Player of the Year
honors, with his coach,
Brian Patch, securing
that honor.
On the girls side,
New Knoxville sopho-
more Haley Horstman
was voted Player of
the Year, while Marion
Local mentor Treva
Fortkamp was named
Coach of the Year.
Joining Gelhaus on the boys
first unit are St. John’s junior
Curtis Geise, Tribe teammates
Jared Kahlig (senior) and Elijah
Kahlig (sophomore); a trio from
Versailles in senior Mitchell
Campbell, junior Chad Winner
and freshman Kyle Ahrens;
Coldwater junior Austin Bruns,
Minster junior Adam Niemeyer,
New Bremen Aaron Clune,
New Knoxville senior Lucas
Leffel and St. Henry junior
Kyle Stahl.
On the second team are St.
John’s senior Alex Clark and
junior Ryan Buescher; Marion
Local senior Lee Pierron,
Minster senior Doug Huber,
New Bremen senior Troy
Williams, New Knoxville junior
Jake Allen, Parkway senior
Derek Luth, St. Henry senior
Caleb Heitkamp and Versailles
senior Zach Niekamp.
Honorable Mention: St.
John’s senior Ben Warnecke,
Coldwater’s Mark Brunet,
Fort Recovery’s Jason
Pottkotter, Marion Local’s Alex
Rosenbeck, Minster’s Devon
Poeppelman, New Bremen’s
Elliott Westerbeck, Parkway’s
Riley Bransteter, St. Henry’s
Craig Knapke and Versailles’
Ethan Bruns.
Joining Horstman on the
girls first unit are St. John’s
seniors Courtney Grothouse
and Shelby Reindel; fellow
Lady Ranger sophomore Paige
Lehman, the Marion Local duo
of senior Margaret Wuebker
and junior Chelsea Winner;
Minster 12th-graders Tara
Clune and Kayla Wuebker;
Coldwater freshman Sarah
Kanney, Fort Recovery senior
Kylie Kahlig, Parkway senior
Becca Harshman and St. Henry
senior Ashley Heitkamp.
On the second unit are Lady
Jay junior Katie Vorst, New
Bremen juniors Kyla Otting and
Haley Moeller; Versailles soph-
omores Katie Heckman
and Amanda Winner;
C o l d w a t e r
senior Jenae
Muhlenkamp,
Fort Recovery
senior Kelly
N i e t f e l d ,
Marion Local
senior Megan
Seitz, Minster junior Bridget
Geiger, New Knoxville senior
Tiana Heidt, Parkway senior
Haley Burtch and St. Henry
senior Stacy Lange.
Honorable Mention:
St. John’s junior Jessica
Recker, Coldwater’s Larissa
Goubeaux, Fort Recovery’s
Olivia Schwieterman,
Marion Local’s Allie
Thobe, New Bremen’s
Hannah Holdren, New
Knoxville’s Haley
Dillon, Parkway’s
Haley Roehm, St.
Henry’s Sarah Moeder and
Kelly Siefring and Versailles’
Chloe Warvel.
-----
Kohls named
PCL boys POY
Columbus Grove senior
Connor Kohls took home the
Putnam County League boys
basketball Player of the Year
honor, while his coach, Ryan
Stechschulte, grabbed that
honor.
Joining Kohls on the first
team are senior teammate Jordan
Travis, Fort Jennings senior
Cody Warnecke, Leipsic’s Ty
Maag and Miller City’s Brent
Hermiller.
On the second unit are
Kalida seniors Ben Schroeder
and Kevan Unverferth, Ottoville
senior Kevin Schnipke,
Continental’s Bret Slattman,
Leipsic’s Devin Mangas and
Ross Kaufman (Miller City).
Honorable Mention:
Fort Jennings senior Tyler
Wiedeman and junior Kurt
Warnecke; Ottoville juniors
Ryan Honigford and Derek
Schimmoeller; Kalida 12th-
graders Drew Stechschulte and
Paul Utendorf; Grove senior
Wade Heffner and junior Derek
Rieman; Continental’s Clay
Bracken and Chaz Slattman;
Leipsic’s Zach Kuhlman and
Brady Schroeder; Brent Niese
and Russell Niese (Miller City);
and Nathan Schutz and Abe
Basinger (Pandora-Gilboa).
S c h o l a s t i c
Awards Team:
W i e d e m a n ,
S c h r o e d e r ,
U n v e r f e r t h ,
Heffner, Bracken,
Schutz, Maag,
Cody Warnecke,
Brady Schroeder, Brent Niese,
Fort Jennings senior Nolan
Neidert, Kalida seniors Austin
Roebke and Nathan Kortokrax
and Chris Wagler (P-G).
-----
All-Star Wrestling
Meet Wednesday
ELIDA — The annual Lima
Area Wrestling Coaches
Association All-Star
Meet will be held start-
ing 6 p.m. Wednesday in
the main gymnasium at
Elida High School.
The dual-meet for-
mat is as follows: Round I: Mat
I: GMC vs MAC; Round I: Mat
II: NWC vs WBL; Round II:
Mat I: Winners go head to head;
Round II: Mat II: Other two
teams will face off.
Northwest Conference:
Coaches: Jefferson’s Mike
Wilson and Spencerville’s Tom
Wegesin --- Jefferson: senior
Curtis Miller (220), junior
Geoff Ketcham (285), junior
Colin McConnahea (195),
freshman Gaige Rassman
(113); Spencerville: junior Cory
Binkley (132); Columbus Grove:
senior Gavin Windau (195),
senior Dylan Kleman (138),
junior Tregg Keysor; Allen
East: Tyler Baker (120),
Colt Lovejoy (138), J.R.
Conyers (160); Bluffton:
Zach Wilson (145);
Lima Central Catholic:
Brandon McCormick
(126), Bobby Sunderhaus
(170), David Gremling
(182), Vincent Fosburgh (182);
Paulding: Tyler Ash (220).
Midwest Athletic
Conference: Coaches: St.
John’s Derek Sterling and
Coldwater’s Rob Schmit --- St.
John’s: senior Logan Looser
(160, senior Logan Heiing
(195), junior Brett Schwinnen
(182), junior Will Buettner
(152), sophomore Austin
Martin (138); Coldwater: Tyler
Tebbe (106), Jeremy Post (132),
Alex Timmerman (145), Justin
Post (220); Versailles: Andrew
Slonkosky (120), Matt Mangen
(126), Kaleb Machett (170),
Mitch Jokerst (285); Cory-
Rawson (for purposes of the
meet): Brandon Eck (113).
Western Buckeye League:
Coaches: Kevin Bowers (Elida)
and Clayton Westerbeck
(Bath) --- Elida: senior Zach
Green (152); Van Wert: Zach
Burk (126), Jordan Daniels
LOCAL ROUNDUP
See ROUNDUP, page 8A
2
VANCREST
1425 East Fifth Street, Delphos
419-695-2871
www.vancrest.com
METABOLIC WEIGHTLOSS CLINIC
7531 Patriot Drive, Findlay
419-423-6878 • 866-351-8794
www.ohiocgclinic.com
VAN WERT COUNTY HOSPITAL
1250 S. Washington St, Van Wert
419-238-2390
VanWertHospital.org
VAN WERT COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
1179 Westwood Dr., Suite 300 , Van Wert
419-238-0808
MEDLAB
1012 Bellefontaine Avenue
2211 Timber Trail
705 N. Madriver
1187 West Wood Drive
404 Hamilton Street
855 W. Market Street
1800 Perry Street
816 Pro Drive
800-522-7556
www.themedlab.com
VAN WERT FAMILY DENTISTRY
1196 Professional Drive, Van Wert
419-238-1219
www.vanwertfamilydentistry.com
ST. RITAS MEDICAL CENTER
Lima • sstritas.org
INTERIM HEALTHCARE
3745 Shawnee Rd, Suite 108, Lima
419-228-2535
www.interimhealthcare.com
PEAK COMMUNITY WELLNESS CENTER 24/7
Stadium Park Offce Conference
419-695-PEAK (7325)
ORTHOPAEDIC INSTITUTE OF OHIO
801 Medical Drive, Suite A, Lima
419-222-6622 • 800-225-3921
www.orthoohio.com
1800 East Fifth Street, Delphos
BELTONE
718 N Cable Rd., Suite 101
419-773-4021
CANCER CARE OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO
1-888-586-1411
Lima: 2740 W. Market Street
419-221-2273
Celina: 900 Havemann Road
419-586-1411
VEIN CARE CENTER
419-227-4472 • 866-472-4472
www.yourveincarecetner.com
CHAMPAIGN RESIDENTIAL SERVICES, INC (CRSI)
Allen County: 419-229-3200
Auglaize/Van Wert/Mercer Counties - 419-738-9511
Defance/Putnam Counties - 419-784-0886
Logan County- 937-592-3599
www.crsi-oh.com
THIN & HEALTHY TOTAL SOLUTION
Located in stadium Park Offce Complex
419-692-3488
NO SCAPEL VASECTOMY OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO
937-592-2248
www.nomorechildren.com
GI PHYSICIANS INC
1005 Belefontaine Ave., Suite 360, Lima
1888-GUTRUS (488-9787)
419-228-2600
REED SPINAL CARE
419-238-2701
www.ReedSpinalCare.com
ENVIRO-EDICAL WASTE SERVICE, INC.
937-890-3100 • 1-866-669-9201
www.enviromedicalwaste.com
VAN WERT MEDICAL SERVICES
Pediatrics - 419-232-2323
OB-GYN - 419-238-3047
Surgery - 419-238-4909
Internal Medicine - 419-238-7727
Physical Medicine - 419-232-6333
Family Medicine - 419-232-2077
THE UNION BANK
1-800-837-8111
www.theubank.com
P&R MEDICAL CONNECTION
1018 S. Ralston Ave., Defance
1113 S. Shannon St., Van Wert
1100 Mercer Ave., Decatur, IN
1-800-587-7670
www.prmedicalconnection.com
DERRY’S HEALTH MART
1191 Westwood Dr., Van Wert
OB/GYN SPECIALISTS OF LIMA, INC
419-227-0610 • 800-686-4096
830 W. High St., Lima Delphos Ambulatory Care Center
Putnam County Ambulatory Care Center
COMMUNITY HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
602 E. Fifth St., Delphos
419-695-1999
www.ComHealthPro.org
PUTNAM COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
256 Williamstown Rd.
419-523-5608
www.putnamhealth.com
DELPHOS VISION CARE
134 E. Third St., Delphos
419-692-0010
THE ENDOSCOPY CENTER OF WEST CENTRAL OHIO
GASTRO-INTESTINAL ASSOCIATES, INC
1-877-4COLONS (1-877-426-5667)
BLUFFTON HOSPITAL
(BLANCHARD VALLEY HEALTH SYSTEM)
1-888-458-5550
bvhealthsystem.org
2012 Health & Medical Directory
8A – The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 22 16 .579 —
Boston 19 17 .528 2
New York 18 19 .486 3 1/2
Toronto 12 25 .324 9 1/2
New Jersey 12 26 .316 10
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami 28 9 .757 —
Orlando 24 14 .632 4 1/2
Atlanta 22 15 .595 6
Washington 8 28 .222 19 1/2
Charlotte 4 31 .114 23
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 31 8 .795 —
Indiana 23 12 .657 6
Milwaukee 14 23 .378 16
Cleveland 13 22 .371 16
Detroit 12 26 .316 18 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 25 12 .676 —
Memphis 22 15 .595 3
Dallas 22 16 .579 3 1/2
Houston 21 17 .553 4 1/2
New Orleans 9 28 .243 16
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 29 8 .784 —
Denver 21 17 .553 8 1/2
Minnesota 19 19 .500 10 1/2
Portland 18 19 .486 11
Utah 17 19 .472 11 1/2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 22 13 .629 —
L.A. Lakers 23 14 .622 —
Phoenix 17 20 .459 6
Golden State 14 20 .412 7 1/2
Sacramento 12 25 .324 11
———
Saturday’s Results
Atlanta 97, Oklahoma City 90
Orlando 114, Milwaukee 98
Washington 101, Cleveland 98
Indiana 102, New Orleans 84
Memphis 100, Detroit 83
Dallas 102, Utah 96
Minnesota 122, Portland 110
Sunday’s Results
Boston 115, New York 111, OT
L.A. Lakers 93, Miami 83
New Jersey 104, Charlotte 101
Toronto 83, Golden State 75
L.A. Clippers 105, Houston 103, OT
Chicago 96, Philadelphia 91
Phoenix 96, Sacramento 88
Denver 99, San Antonio 94
Today’s Games
Utah at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Orlando at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Golden State at Washington, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Denver, 9 p.m.
New Orleans at Portland, 10 p.m.
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers 64 42 15 7 91 179 133
Pittsburgh 64 38 21 5 81 207 167
Philadelphia 64 36 21 7 79 210 191
New Jersey 65 36 24 5 77 180 175
N.Y. Islanders 66 28 29 9 65 155 195
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston 64 38 23 3 79 209 150
Ottawa 67 34 25 8 76 202 198
Buffalo 65 30 27 8 68 162 183
Toronto 65 30 28 7 67 194 201
Montreal 66 25 31 10 60 170 184
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida 65 31 22 12 74 163 184
Winnipeg 66 31 27 8 70 173 186
Washington 65 32 28 5 69 172 184
Tampa Bay 65 31 28 6 68 184 219
Carolina 65 24 27 14 62 171 197
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 66 41 18 7 89 169 131
Detroit 66 43 20 3 89 209 153
Nashville 65 38 20 7 83 184 166
Chicago 67 36 24 7 79 202 195
Columbus 65 20 38 7 47 153 214
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 66 41 17 8 90 209 161
Colorado 67 34 29 4 72 171 180
Calgary 66 29 25 12 70 159 181
Minnesota 66 28 28 10 66 143 180
Edmonton 64 25 33 6 56 170 192
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Phoenix 65 33 23 9 75 170 165
Dallas 66 35 26 5 75 174 178
San Jose 64 33 24 7 73 179 163
Los Angeles 65 30 23 12 72 142 139
Anaheim 66 28 28 10 66 166 186
Saturday’s Results
N.Y. Islanders 3, Boston 2
Toronto 3, Montreal 1
Tampa Bay 4, Carolina 3, OT
Nashville 3, Florida 1
Columbus 5, Phoenix 2
Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 1
Buffalo 5, Vancouver 3
Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 2
St. Louis 3, San Jose 1
Sunday’s Results
Dallas 3, Calgary 2, SO
N.Y. Rangers 4, Boston 3
N.Y. Islanders 1, New Jersey 0
Chicago 2, Detroit 1
Florida 4, Ottawa 2
Philadelphia 1, Washington 0
Colorado 2, Minnesota 0
Today’s Games
Phoenix at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Carolina at Washington, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Los Angeles at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Montreal at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Dallas at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Edmonton at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
NBA
GLANCE
NHL
GLANCE
By LARRY LAGE
The Associated Press
EAST LANSING, Mich.
— Ohio State’s only senior
ended Michigan State’s regu-
lar season on a sour note.
William Buford made a
high-arcing jumper from the
top of the key with 1
second left, lifting the
10th-ranked Buckeyes
to a 72-70 win over the
fifth-ranked Spartans on
Sunday to forge a 3-way
tie for the Big Ten cham-
pionship.
“I was fortunate to knock
down the big shot of the night
to give us another Big Ten
title,” Buford said.
Draymond Green had a
chance to put the Spartans
ahead in his final home game
with 32 seconds left but
missed a long fadeaway from
the right wing. Just before the
buzzer, Green had a heave
that missed the mark.
Buford’s game-winning
shot made a once-raucous
arena nearly silent and gave
a group of people elsewhere
in the state a reason to shout
with joy.
The Buckeyes (25-6, 13-5)
earned a share of their third
straight conference champi-
onship — and fifth in seven
years. They also forced the
Spartans (24-7, 13-5) to settle
for just a piece of it and ended
a quarter-century drought for
No. 13 Michigan.
The Wolverines, who won
their first Big Ten title since
1986, watched
their rivals play
from the school’s
basketball facil-
ity in Ann Arbor
after winning at
Penn State ear-
lier in the day.
Michigan State will
be the top-seeded team in
the Big Ten tournament,
which begins Thursday in
Indianapolis. Michigan will
be No. 2 and Ohio State
No. 3.
Michigan State jumped
out to a 15-point lead over
Ohio State in the first half
but let the advantage slip
away just as it did with a
2-game lead in the Big Ten
race with two games left in
the regular season.
“No excuses,” Spartans
coach Tom Izzo said, look-
ing and sounding somber.
“We just didn’t get it done.”
The Buckeyes seized an
opportunity created when the
Spartans had a 7-game win-
ning streak snapped Tuesday
night at Indiana.
“Luckily enough the Big
Ten’s one of the toughest
conferences in the country
and it gave us a chance to get
a hat and get a shirt,” Jared
Sullinger said.
Buford scored just four
points when Michigan State
ended Ohio State’s 39-game
home winning streak last
month. He returned the favor
with his game-winning shot
and by scoring 19 of his 25
points in the second half,
handing the Spartans their
first loss at home this sea-
son.
Sullinger had 14 points
on 5-of-17 shooting and
Deshaun Thomas scored nine
of his 12 points in the second
half for the Buckeyes, who
rallied to beat a motivated
team that desperately wanted
to win an outright champion-
ship after starting the season
unranked.
Green seemed too fired
up about playing in his last
home game, shooting a long
airball on his first attempt
from the baseline and finish-
ing 6-of-18 from the field
with 19 points, 12 rebounds
and a game-high four turn-
overs.
Brandon Wood scored 15
points and Derrick Nix had
11 off the bench, while Keith
Appling was held to two of
his 11 points after halftime
for the Spartans, who lost
standout freshman Branden
Dawson in the first half with
an injured left knee.
Dawson has a torn ACL
and will miss the rest of the
season.
Even with Michigan
State’s students on spring
break, there was big-game
buzz in the Breslin Center
and the fans had plenty to
stand and cheer about when
the Spartans went on a 12-0
run to take a 19-7 lead.
“It was looking pretty
bleak,” Ohio State coach
Thad Matta said.
Michigan State led 24-9
midway through the first
half, then had a setback that
will hurt heading into the Big
Ten tournament this week
and the NCAA tournament
the following week.
Dawson injured his left
knee with 10:16 left in the
first half. The 6-6, 220-pound
forward, who ranks third on
the team in scoring, second
in rebounds and perhaps first
in athletic ability, rubbed his
left knee while his leg was
propped up on a chair and
later walked gingerly to the
locker room.
After the game, Michigan
State announced Dawson has
a torn ACL and will miss the
rest of the season.
Sullinger missed his first
five shots and was 2-of-10
in the first half but stayed
active and aggressive enough
to make all four of his free
throws and to score eight
points to help Ohio State trail
by just nine at halftime.
The Buckeyes scored the
first six points of the second
half and went ahead 52-51
with 9:53 left to take their
first lead since scoring the
game’s first two points.
For the rest of the game,
each team took a turn with a
small lead, exchanging shots
and banging bodies in a test
that should prepare both for
the rest of the month. In the
second half, there were nine
lead changes and seven ties.
“This is about as high a
level game as you can see,”
Matta added. “I’m happy we
were on this side of it.”
Ohio St. tops Michigan St. for 3-way tie in Big Ten
(160), Terrin Contreras (285);
Bath: Tre Wheeler (120), Zavier
Meeks (138); Defiance: Gabe
Gonzales (113), Zach McCarthy
(145); Kenton: Gabe King
(195); Ottawa-Glandorf: Wyatt
Karhoff (220); Shawnee: Colin
McDermott (132); Wapakoneta:
John Martin (106), Nate Valentine
(138), Holden Hengstier (170),
Alex Brown (182).
Green Meadows
Conference: Coaches: George
Clemens (Wayne Trace) and
Bill Ondrus --- Ayersville: Ryan
Behringer (106), Kyle Behringer
(113), Frankie Alvarado (120),
Tate Ankney (170), Devon
Bergeon (182), Griffen Friesner
(220); Antwerp: Jarret Bute
(285); Hicksville: Cody Laney
(126), Austin Laney (132),
Jake Thiel (145); Wayne Trace:
Kameran Clemens (138), Zach
Cotterman (145), Sawyer
Temple (152), Tyler Arnett
(160); Tinora: Aaron Urivez
(160), Mike Scantlin (195).
Admission is $4 for adults,
$2 for students and $10 for fam-
ily.
Roundup
(Continued from Page 6A)
1
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Phone 650-560-9990
“Not for Sale” is also the name of a book by David Batsone
detailing stories of the 30 million people
who are currently victims of the traffcking.
Monday, March 5, 2012 The Herald — 9A
www.delphosherald.com
ODENWELLER/MYERS
Don and Deb Odenweller of Delphos announce the
engagement of their daughter, Melissa Marie, to Todd
Michael Myers, son of Mike and Annette Myers of Van
Wert.
The couple will exchange vows on April 28 at St. John
the Evangelist Catholic Church in Delphos.
The bride-elect is a 2003 graduate of St. John’s High
School and a 2008 graduate of the University of Toledo,
with a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education.
She is currently attending Walden University to obtain her
master’s degree in reading and literacy. She is employed
as a teacher at Dunbar Primary School in Dunbar, W.Va.
Her fiance is a 2003 graduate of Crestview High
School and a 2008 graduate of The Ohio State University
with a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering. He is
employed as a process supervisor at Dupont in Belle,
W.Va.
KERNS/RICKER
Eric and Deb Kerns of Middle Point announce the
engagement of their daughter, Kayla Ann, to Jeffrey Neal
Ricker, son of Kevin and Jane Ricker of Delphos
The couple will exchange vows on April 7 at the Van
Wert County Fair Grounds.
The bride-elect is a 2008 graduate of Lincolnview
High School and has a license in Cosmetology. She is
employed by Hearth and Home as an STNA and works at
Tractor Supply Co. in Van Wert.
Her fiance is a 2007 graduate of St. John’s High
School. He is employed by T&D Interiors as a fine finish
carpenter and is a volunteer fireman for the Middle Point
Fire Department.
Engagement
Engagement
By JOHN ROGERS
The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
He spent two years in a fed-
eral lockup for trying to sell
cocaine to undercover agents,
and all Wayne Kramer can
think about these days is try-
ing to find a way to get back
behind bars.
This time, though, the gui-
tar god for rock music’s semi-
nal pre-punk band, the MC5,
wants to bring his ax with him
— and a few dozen others for
the inmates to play.
With a little help from
friends like the Foo Fighters’
Chris Shiflett, former Guns ‘N
Roses guitarist Gilby Clarke
and others, Kramer has formed
Jail Guitar Doors USA.
He runs the nonprofit
charitable organization with
his wife, Margaret, out of the
Hollywood studio where he
makes a comfortable living
these days composing music
for movies and television.
Over the past two years, Jail
Guitar Doors USA has deliv-
ered scores of instruments to
prisons and jails in Nevada,
California and Texas.
“He’s a great man. He’s
taken his skill, his talent and
he’s putting it to use, giv-
ing back to society,” says
Deputy David Bates, who has
worked with Kramer in bring-
ing guitars to several jails run
by the Los Angeles County
Sheriff’s Department. Bates,
who calls music “the universal
language,” says he’s seen the
positive impact it has had on
inmates.
So, Kramer says, has he. In
his case, first hand.
“When I played music in
prison, I wasn’t in prison any-
more,” he says, as he sits in his
studio over a lunch of vegetar-
ian Thai food.
“And that’s what we’re
trying to accomplish with the
instrument donations,” he con-
tinues. “That this is a way that
you can get through this time,
that you can go someplace
else, you can get involved in
your guitar.”
Kramer, who is 63, is
dressed in blue jeans and a
plaid flannel shirt over a white
T. Although he still looks about
as thin as he did in the days
when he was tearing up tunes
like “Kick Out the Jams,” the
huge white-guy Afro that once
nearly defined him as much
as his guitar has given way to
thinning close-cropped hair.
He was still in his 20s when
he arrived at the federal pris-
on in Lexington, Ky., in the
1970s, scheduled to do four
years for trying to sell $10,000
worth of cocaine.
The place was bleak and
dispiriting, especially for
someone who had been a rock
star just a few years before.
But Kramer would soon dis-
cover there was a music class
there. It was taught by the
legendary jazz trumpeter Red
Rodney, who was doing time
himself for a heroin bust.
Punk rocker Wayne
Kramer returns to
jail with guitars
By PHILIP ELLIOTT
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Conservative talk show host
Rush Limbaugh apologized
Saturday to a Georgetown
University law student he had
branded a “slut” and “prosti-
tute” after fellow Republicans
as well as Democrats criti-
cized him and several adver-
tisers left his program.
The student, Sandra Fluke,
had testified to congressional
Democrats in support of their
national health care policy
that would compel her col-
lege to offer health plans that
cover her birth control.
“My choice of words was
not the best, and in the attempt
to be humorous, I created a
national stir,” Limbaugh said
on his website. “I sincerely
apologize to Ms. Fluke for the
insulting word choices.”
Attempts to reach Fluke
by telephone and e-mail were
unsuccessful.
Fluke had been invited to
testify to a House committee
about her school’s health care
plan that does not include
contraception. Republican
lawmakers barred her from
testifying during that hear-
ing, but Democrats invited
her back and she spoke to the
Democratic lawmakers at an
unofficial session.
President Barack Obama,
whose landmark health care
overhaul requires many insti-
tutions to provide birth con-
trol coverage, telephoned
her from the Oval Office on
Friday to express his support.
The issue has been much
debated in the presidential
race, with Republican candi-
dates particularly criticizing
the Obama plan’s require-
ments on such employers as
Catholic hospitals. Democrats
— and many Republican lead-
ers, too — have suggested the
issue could energize women
to vote for Obama and other
Democrats in November.
Limbaugh was not swayed
by Fluke’s statements before
the House panel.
He said on Wednesday,
“What does it say about the
college coed ... who goes
before a congressional com-
mittee and essentially says
that she must be paid to have
sex? It makes her a slut,
right? It makes her a prosti-
tute. She wants to be paid to
have sex.”
He dug in a day later,
refusing to give ground.
“If we’re going to have
to pay for this, then we want
something in return, Ms.
Fluke,” Limbaugh said. “And
that would be the videos of all
this sex posted online so we
can see what we’re getting for
our money.”
He also asked the 30-year-
old Fluke: “Who bought your
condoms in junior high?”
And on Friday, still defi-
ant even after Democrats
beat back Republican chal-
lenges to the new health care
law, Limbaugh scoffed at the
Democrats’ talk of a conser-
vative “war on women.”
“Amazingly, when there is
the slightest bit of opposition
to this new welfare entitle-
ment being created, then all
of a sudden we hate women.
We want ‘em barefoot and
pregnant in the kitchen,” he
said. “And now, at the end
of this week, I am the person
that the women of America
are to fear the most.”
By Saturday, six advertis-
ers had pulled sponsorship
of Limbaugh’s show and
Republicans distanced them-
selves from the comments.
Republican Newt
Gingrich said reporters were
more excited to talk about
Limbaugh’s language than
Obama’s record.
“I think that’s a vastly
bigger issue than anything
a radio host says,” Gingrich
told reporters in Bowling
Green, Ohio.
Even so, Limbaugh decid-
ed to yield late Saturday.
Limbaugh apologizes to law student for insult
Newsboys.
Newsstands.
Home delivery.
On-line access.
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Herald
419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
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Delphos Herald’s
Website Directory
COLUMBUS GROVE BUSINESS SALUTE
10A – The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Saturday’s questions:
Raquel Welch published a book in 2010 with the subtitle Beyond the Cleavage.
In the famous baseball poem Casey at the Bat, two men were on base when the mighty
Casey struck out — Flynn was on third; Jimmy Blake on second.
Today’s questions:
What popular 1980s family sitcom is shown on Italian TV as I Robinson or The
Robinsons?
What breed was Snuppy, the world’s first cloned dog?
Answers in Wednesday’s Herald
Today’s words:
Forisfamiliate: to disinherit
Ushabti: a mummy-like figure entombed with a mummy for certain farm chores
required in the next world
High winds tear down bank sign
The First Federal Bank sign at the corner of East Second and Franklin streets was
a casualty of the high winds late Friday evening. Gusts were marked at up to 60 miles
per hour.
Nancy Spencer photo
Nancy Spencer photos
Up to the Challenge hits the lanes
Staff reports
DELPHOS — Up to the Challenge
brought 26 bowlers to the Delphos
Recreation Center on Saturday for the
annual bowling outing. Seven Delphos
Knights of Columbus members joined them
as helpers.
“This is the second year the K of C has
supported us and it’s just been wonderful,”
Up to the Challenge coordinator Sherry
Fetzer said Saturday. “We really appreci-
ate their help and the monetary support
they give us. We couldn’t do this without
them.”
K of C member Tony Wrasman said
the organization is grateful for Up to the
Challenge and its mission.
“These are very important people
in our community and it’s my pleasure
to be here and help out and the K of C
thank Sherry and the others who have
made Up to the Challenge so success-
ful,” Wrasman said. “When you get
to know these guys, they are a lot of
fun.”
Up to the Challenge also offers a softball
tournament during the Delphos Fourth of
July celebration, a swim meet and a dance
to individuals who are challenged to do
their best and have fun.
Right: Eddie Sanderson lines up his
ball during the Up to the Challenge
bowling outing Saturday.
Russell Strayer, left, and Curtis Hoersten line up their next balls during the Up to the
Challenge bowling outing Saturday at the Delphos Recreation Center.
1
The Bridal Emporium
29 E. Auglaize St., Wapakoneta
Phone: 419-738-8565
www.thebridalemporium.net
Store Hours: Mon., Wed. Thurs. 9am-7pm; Tues., Fri. 10am-5pm
Saturday 9am-4pm•Sunday 12noon-4pm Appointments appreciated
Casablanca Bridal Trunk Show
Where: The Bridal Emporium, 29 E. Auglaize Street, Wapakoneta
When: Friday, March 9th, 2012 and Saturday, March 10th, 2012
A Casablanca Bridal Trunk Show is a fun and unique event where brides can
learn about the latest bridal fashion trends while having the opportunity to view
an expanded Casablanca Bridal collection. During a trunk show, The Bridal
Emporium showcases a wider variety of Casablanca Bridal gowns than they may
normally have available. It is also a wonderful way to include your bridal party or
family members.
Mori Lee Bridal Trunk Show
Where: The Bridal Emporium, 29 E. Auglaize Street, Wapakoneta
When: Friday, March 30th, 2012 and Saturday, April 1, 2012
For these three days only, you will be able to not only purchase a gown that
hasn’t even hit the market yet, you will also get your choice of a free Tiara
with the purchase of a Mori Lee Bridal Gown during this once in a lifetime
event. Mori Lee Bridals and Bridesmaids have been one of the most popu-
lar designers for decades. Designed by Madeline Gardner, these gowns are
highly stylish while amazingly affordable.
“Making Every Girl’s Dream Come True”
Open 7 days a week!
We understand that it is sometimes diffcult
to get your wedding party together at the one
time therefore we are open 7 days a week. If
this still proves to be a problem and you can-
not manage in working hours please phone
and we will try to accommodate.
When: Friday, March 30th, 2012 - April 1, 2012
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Monday, March 5, 2012 The Herald — 1B
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2
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A natural way to lose weight is available to those seeking to
lose weight in the new year.
The Metabolic Weight Loss Clinic has been open since
October 2008, and is located at 7531 Patriot Drive in front of
Mernards in Findlay. The clinic offers the use of HCG treatment
for individuals struggling with obesity. HCG therapy is the num-
ber one weight-loss program nationally, with 87% of the clients
maintaining their weight after completing the program. Recently,
the program was featured on the Dr. Oz Show as a cure for
obesity.
HCG, or human chorionic gonadotropin, is a naturally oc-
curring lipoprotein in men and women. In pregnant women, it’s
responsible for the release of nutrients that the growing fetus
needs from the mother’s stored fat. As a weight-reduction pro-
gram, low-dose HCG injections are used to stimulate the release
of 2,000-4,000 fat calories into the individual’s bloodstream. The
results are a decrease of hunger, which allows for a very low-
calorie diet. A loss of one-half to one pound a day in women and
up to three pounds a day in men is typical in the program. No
exercise is necessary.
Mary Clemons, CRNA, said individuals are told not to exer-
cise until they reach a normal weight, in order to decrease joint
stress and prevent injuries. Clients are asked to walk daily, if
possible. Once an individual reaches their desired weight, they
are taught to incorporate some form of exercise into their daily
routine, Clemons said.
With HCG, Clemons said, there is no muscle wasting, and
the program allows for targeted fat loss from the abdomen, but-
tocks, hips and thighs. The body is reshaped and contoured as
abnormal fat stores are lost. In other programs, high-impact car-
diovascular exercise is required to access fat stores in those
areas. Clemons said no other weight-loss program is able to
give such targeted weight-loss results.
Clemons said the clinic has seen a complete spectrum of
patients, both women and men. Even clients in their 80’s have
successfully completed the program.
“We have group classroom sessions, and I overhear during
the clinic days clients telling each other of someone they know
on the program who has lost a ton of weight,” she said. “One
woman said that her grandmother was 80 and did the program,
and if her grandma could do it successfully, so could she!”
Clemons explained there are specific programs geared to-
wards individuals with preexisting medical conditions, such as
diabetes and hypertension. The majority of the time, obesity,
diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease go
hand-in-hand. With substantial weight loss, and following a low-
glycemic-index, diabetic diet, clients are often helped, together
with their family physician, to decrease the amount of medi-
cation they are required to take. In certain circumstances, all
medications can be eliminated. In many cases, clients see blood
sugars, blood pressures and cholesterol levels normalize with
adherence to the program.
Many cardiologists and cardiac surgeons are referring their
patients to HCG clinics for the overall cardiovascular benefits.
Clients suffering from arthritis, gout, rheumatism and psoria-
sis have also shown improvements with HCG therapy.
Diabetes is an epidemic condition at present. The clinic’s
diabetic program works with each client to make following a dia-
betic diet easy and simple, allowing each patient to gain control
of their runaway blood sugars. Diabetics are taken out of the
passenger’s seat and put in the driver’s seat; they are placed in
control of their health with the help of HCG. With less medication
and controlled blood sugars, clients have a greater chance of
avoiding the progression of vascular disease and kidney prob-
lems.
“We are stressing the clinic being a wellness center,” Clem-
ons said. “We have had a tremendous response to this program,
and are striving to improve and make diabetic education simple
to understand.”
The Metabolic Weight Loss Clinic now is an exclusive pro-
vider of Releana, patent pending, which is the only prescription
oral form of HCG available in the U.S. Oral HCG is an excellent
choice for those squeamish about injections or for anyone who is
on a blood thinner such as Coumadin, Lovenox or Heparin. For
these individuals, Releana produces comparable results to the
injection. Ultimately, however, the injectable HCG produces the
greatest weight loss.
Since the Metabolic Weight Loss Clinic was opened, more
than 1,000 patients have been treated. They have opened a
second clinic in Ann Arbor, Mich, due to the huge out-of-state
requests they have received for their services.
“The success rate is phenomenal, and the program speaks
for itself,” Clemons said. HCG research study data presently is
being compiled for publication for professionals on success and
various presenting factors.
Clemons attributed the effect of HCG on a person as being
“like a bear in hibernation, living off your own fat. With HCG,
you’re not hungry. It’s like you just ate a 2,000 to 4,000 calorie
meal, so you are able to lower your caloric intake easily because
of the HCG,” she said.
When an individual starts the program, which runs for ei-
ther
four, six or nine weeks, baseline lab work is done, as well
as a health history.
“Dr. John Ross, Board Certified, then sees the patient and
prescribes the proper HCG program for them,” she said. “With
the injectable HCG, they are taught by a nurse how to do self-
injections with a very small insulin syringe needle that doesn’t
hurt. They then attend an extensive diet education class on what
foods to eat and are given a specific list with amounts. The diet
consists of fresh fruits, fresh vegetables and lean cuts of meat.
They are taught how to prepare their food in a new, healthy,
tasty way.”
“We teach them how to cook a new way,” said Clemons
“Recipes are shared and discussed. Also included is extensive
instruction in label reading, and taking sugar and artificial sweet-
eners out of your diet and replacing them with Stevia, a natural
sweetener.”
The clinic now houses its own health store with everything
an HCG dieter may need for every stage of the program. Stevia
in every form and flavor can be found there. A large selection
of green teas and supplements can be found at the store, and
are very reasonably priced. There is a team of counselors here,
all degreed, to assist patients at any time with any problems or
concerns they may have, Clemons said.
Diabetics are followed very closely during this program be-
cause their blood sugars are normalizing so quickly,” she said.
“All clients keep a journal with all of their blood pressures, blood
sugars, medications they have taken, how they feel and what
they ate. They must take an active role in the process. The clinic
has a very active Web site with a chat room and blog page…yes,
a lot of chatter goes on.”
“We have merely responded to what people want and
need,” said Clemons. “Clients like to talk to others on the same
program, experiencing the same things.”
“We instruct clients on vitamins and supplements that may
help any medical conditions they may present with,” she said.
The clinic is using CardioCocktail, a special blend of nutri-
ents which includes arginine, vitamin D, omega 3 fatty acids,
vitamins and minerals. The correct combination produces natu-
rally occurring nitric oxide in the body, which naturally lowers
blood pressure, supports cardiovascular health and healthy vi-
sion, promotes healthy sexual performance and delivers more
energy. Clemons said the book, “No More Heart Disease,” writ-
ten by the 1998 winner of the Nobel prize in Medicine, Louis
Ignarro, outlined the discovery of the importance of nitric oxide
to the cardiovascular system. It helps prevent heart attacks,
strokes and the progression of cardiovascular disease.
The maximum length of time the HCG program can be done
is nine weeks. After that, patients must wait three weeks before
doing another round. They need to stabilize their weight and
increase their protein before doing the next round. Maintaining
their weight and a healthy lifestyle is easier for patients on the
HCG program, Clemons said.
“When they are done, they are preparing their own food, so
they know exactly how to maintain their own weight,” she said.
“At the end of the program, there is a class on reintroducing
foods into their diet. They do keep a food journal, and have to
weigh themselves daily.”
The cost of the HCG program varies, and the clinic recently
introduced interest-free financing through Care Credit.
Anyone interested can call for a free consultation at (419)
423-6879, or toll-free at (866) 351-8794, or visit the clinic’s web
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SAVE UP TO $350.00 YEARLY
$
200 OFF
THRU 3/31/12
Since 1960
2B– The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
1
Summers Landing
3930 Elida Rd., Lima
1/2 mile West of Lowe’s
419-224-7676
• Playsets
• Playhouses
• Porch Swings
• Gazebos
• Polyvinyl Deck Furniture
• New 5ft Polyvinyl Gliders
from $359+up
• We Move Sheds
OPEN
10am-5pm Daily
Closed Sunday
www.playmorswingsets.com
OPEN MARCH 12

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Delivering the best selection, service and price for our customers!
TAYLOR’S
AUTO SALES, INC.
Over 60 Years in Business
OPEN: Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 8:00-6:00; Wednesday 8:00-5:30; Saturday 9:00-12:00
See Gary Taylor or Gary Miller or Roy Salisbury
See us on the web ...TaylorAutoSalesInc.com
231 S. Walnut St. Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Phone: 419-238-6440
Fax: 419-238-9715
2011 CADILLAC DTS
4 door, pearl white, tan leather, 13K
2011 BUICK ENCLAVE
One Fire-Mist red, loaded, 9K, AWD, dbl moon, one lt. gold mist
2011 GMC ACADIA AWD
AWD, Di White, SLT, hot leather, 2 roofs, 12K, loaded
2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
Silver, 30K, auto, A/C, full power
2010 CHRYSLER 300C
AWD, red pearl, nav., every option, 7K
2010 SATURN VUE XR
FWD, silver, 3.6 V-6, roof-leather, remote start, 29K
2010 FORD ESCAPE
4 dr., moon roof, limited, silver, BK leather, 28K
2010 LINCOLN MKZ
Steel met., tan leather w/black piping, loaded, 11k
2009 CADILLAC SRX
4 WD, Di. white, sport pack, nav., moon, 52K
2008 CHEVY UPLANDER LT
Dk. burgundy, lt. gray cloth, leather, 7 pass,
full power, DVD, only 16K
2008 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL-2
FWD, D. white, cashmere leather, chromes, loaded, 43K
2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING
4 dr., V-6, tan, 49K
2008 TOYOTA CAMRY HYBRID 4 door, red pearl, tan
cloth, full power, 70K
2007 SATURN AURA XE
Dk. blue, full power, 40K
2007 SATURN ION
Jade, 4 door, 48K
2007 SATURN ION
4 door, 21K, lt. tan, 4 cyl., full power
2007 PONTIAC G5
2 door, white, 4 cyl., 44K
2007 SATURN QUAD COUPE
Red, 38K
2007 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT Z71
4x4, black, graphite and lt. gray leather, sunroof,
DVD, nav., only 26K
2006 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER EXT 4X4
Black, black leather, 1-owner, 125K
2005 BUICK LESABRE CUSTOM
Silver, 4 dr., dual power, cloth seats, 1-owner, 86K
2005 BUICK TERRAZZA CXL
AWD, DVD, steel blue met., 1 owner, 95K
2005 MERCURY SABLE LS
Duratech V-6, leather, lt. green with tan top, nice, 103K
2004 BUICK REGAL LS
Tan met., tan hot leather, moon, chromes, 57K
2002 CHEVY CAMARO
Red, T-Tops 3800 V-6, 82K
2001 BUICK LESABRE LIMITED
Blue met, blue top, leather, chromes, clean, 140K
1996 CADILLAC DEVILLE
Red pearl, tan leather, loaded, mint cond., 91K.
Monday, March 5, 2012 The Herald — 3B
www.delphosherald.com
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SNUFFY SMITH
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Tuesday Evening March 6, 2012
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WHIO/CBS NCIS NCIS: Los Angeles Unforgettable Local Late Show Letterman Late
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A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
AMC National Lamp. National Lamp. WarGames
ANIM Wild Amazon Walking the Amazon Wild Amazon Walking the Amazon
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TBS Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan The Office
TCM The Talk of the Town History Is Made at Night Public Menace
TLC My 600-Lb. Life 19 Kids 19 Kids Couponing: Holiday My 600-Lb. Life 19 Kids 19 Kids
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TOON Level Up Adventure King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Boondocks
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TV LAND Home Imp. Home Imp. Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Cleveland King King King
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4B - The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 2012
Don’t just talk about your good
ideas, put them to work for you
in the coming months. The results
might be worth getting past all the
apprehension you’ve had about
initiating them.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- If you find yourself contending
with more opposition from others
than usual, it’s time to examine
your recent behavior. Correct any
defects that you find, and things will
straighten out.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Take on a bad attitude and you’ll
make your duties and assignments
more complex and burdensome than
they really are. Try to see your work
as something fun and challenging.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Unless you avoid groups or cliques
that have persons whom you truly
dislike among their ranks, you can
look for it to be another problematical
day. Don’t open old grudges.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Hold your tongue so that you don’t
accidentally say anything abrasive
about someone who is extremely
important to your plans. She or he
will hear about it and won’t be likely
to laugh it off.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Even when talking to someone for
whom you have little respect, keep an
open mind about matters that concern
you. You could learn something quite
valuable.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Being
jealous or envious of others is always
a self-defeating attitude. If you let
it get the best of you, you could say
something that you might deeply
regret.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- In
order to have your say or your way,
you must first allow others to have
theirs. If you fail to let them express
themselves, they in turn will block
your means to do so.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Don’t be surprised if, when trying to
pawn off some of your duties onto
others, you are met with tremendous
rejection, especially if you haven’t
helped others out when they needed
it in the past.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Regardless of how good you think
your ideas are, if they differ either
vastly or even just a little from those
of your friends, it’s best to let the
majority rule. Sometimes a group-
made decision can be the best one.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- If your hull isn’t as strong as
you think it is, don’t rock the boat. It
might prove to be extremely easy to
alienate many of those whose support
you need.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- It could be another wasted
day if you don’t chart your course
beforehand. There’s a likelihood that
you’ll find yourself running around
in circles due to poor or totally absent
planning.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Be wary of your analysis of matters
relating to money or material assets.
If your judgment is impaired because
of a lack of knowledge, you’re likely
to make more than a few gaffes.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012
There is a chance that several
people from your past will re-enter
your life once again. Those who made
you happy and brought you luck
before will do so again. However,
avoid anybody from yesteryear who
made your life miserable.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- It’s to your benefit to be decisive
and assertive pertaining to a critical
matter. Don’t be afraid to make a
bold judgment call if you believe it
would work.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Some kind of opportunity of
considerable dimensions could
develop for you. It has something to
do with your finances and might be
able to enhance your security.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- If there are many players involved
but they lack your managerial skills,
assume a leadership role and take the
reins whether or not you’re asked to
do so. The others will appreciate it.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
If you’re in need of some assistance
concerning a confidential matter, go
to someone close whom you respect,
such as a good friend or a family
member. They’ll do the most to help.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
As conditions start to change for the
better, fresh hope will instill itself in
your heart. A beloved friend might be
instrumental in bringing this about.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Due
to the fact that Lady Luck wants to
divert your attention onto something
that would be beneficial, it isn’t
likely that you’ll be able to dismiss
commercial matters from your
agenda.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Don’t waste your time and energies
on pursuits of little or no opportunity.
Go ahead and think in grandiose
terms -- just don’t be afraid to put the
things you conceive into action.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If
you have something of importance
to do, you’ll find that you will work
far better if you don’t have anyone
peering over your shoulders. Seek
solitude, not a cheering section.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Dame Fortune is likely to
look favorably on partnership
arrangements, so don’t impatiently
go off on your own simply because
you are tired of waiting for others.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Co-workers might lack your
industriousness, so don’t allow them
to distract you from gratifying your
ambitions and fulfilling what you
want to accomplish.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Just because they like you, certain
people are apt to treat you in a far
more generous fashion than they do
others. Show your gratitude openly.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- This might be an especially good
time to devote both your mental
and physical energies to a huge
critical matter that you’ve been
afraid to tackle. Desirable results are
indicated.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
Monday, March 5, 2012 The Herald - 5B www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
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Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
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charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
950 Pets
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9535
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
950 Welding
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
Q
uality
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARMMACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STE EL
STAINLESS STE EL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd., Delphos
950 Lawn Care
950 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
•LAWN CARE
•LANDSCAPING
•EDGING
Insured!
419-692-0092
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
22 Years Experience • Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
check us out at
www.spearslawncare.com
•LAWN MOWING•
•FERTILIZATION•
•WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS•
•LAWN AERATION•
•SPRING CLEANUP•
•MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY•
•SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL•
“Your Full Service Lawn
& Landscape Provider”
www.ElwerLawnCare.com
(419) 235-3708
Travis Elwer
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
LEO E. GEISE
& ASSOCIATES
Interior & Exterior Painting
Drywall & Plaster Repair
Water Proofing
Pressure Washing
Since 1963
Residential • Commercial
419-692-2002
or 419-203-9006
Amish Crew
Needing work
Roofing • Remodeling
Bathrooms • Kitchens
Hog Barns • Drywall
Additions • Sidewalks
Concrete • etc.
FREE ESTIMATES
419-733-9601
950 Car Care
• Mulch
• Topsoil
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Construction
Tim Andrews
MASONRY
RESTORATION
Chimney Repair
419-204-4563
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
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For a low, low
price!
419 695-0015
AT YOUR
S
ervice
If you like
to meet people and build
relationships,
we have an opportunity
for you!
The Delphos Herald has an
immediate opening for
Advertising Sales
Representative
Responsibilities include selling a va-
riety of print and online products to
new and existing customers in a de-
fined geographical territory.
Hourly rate of pay, commission,
bonus, mileage reimbursement
and more.
Interested applicants should
send cover letter and resume
to:
The Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Attention: Advertising Sales
Positions Open
Roberts Manufacturing Co., Inc. of Oakwood, OH is
looking for a qualified Quality Assurance Inspector.
Roberts is an established manufacturer with an out-
standing quality and delivery reputation. Roberts is
a growing business and is looking for people to grow
with us.
Web site www.robertsmanufacturing.net
Quality Assurance Inspector
Desired qualifications and abilities:
• Geometric Tolerancing
• Blueprint Reading
• CMM operation and programming
• Gaging usage and knowledge
• Must be self-motivated and dependable
• ISO background a plus
• Experience a major plus
CNC Machinists
Desired qualifications and abilities:
• Blueprint Reading
• Gage Usage
• CNC program knowledge
• Strong mathematics background
• Must be self-motivated and dependable
• Experience a major plus
We offer a quality benefit package including 401k,
health insurance, paid vacation, paid holidays, profit
sharing and competitive wages (commensurate with
experience).
Walk in applications accepted Monday-Friday be-
tween 8:30 am and 4:00 pm or you can send your
resume to:
Roberts Manufacturing Co., Inc.
Attn: Chuck Behrens
24338 CR 148
Oakwood OH 45873
Phone: (419)594-2712 or Fax (419)594-2900
Or email to: chuckbehrens@rmci1.net
SWINE PRODUCTION
TEAM MEMBERS
Kalmbach Swine Management, a leading
producer of pork in Ohio, has employment
opportunities available at our sow-unit, near
Van Wert, OH called Noble Pork.
Candidates with previous experience in man-
ufacturing, production or agriculture desired.
Livestock experience preferred, but not nec-
essary. Must have a valid drivers license and
no criminal background. Pre-employment
drug testing required.
For consideration please call:
Phone: 419-968-2238
Monday – Friday
9 AM to 4 PM

EOE M/F/D/V
IMMEDIATE OPENING
EXPERIENCED AUTO BODY
REPAIR TECHNICIAN
Tools Required
We offer Health Insurance,
Retirement Program, Paid Vacation
and Excellent Working Conditions.
Contact Dan Wiseman or Bob Grothouse
DELPHA CHEVROLET BUICK
1725 E. Fifth St., Delphos, Ohio 45833
Now leasing:
New Delphos
Senior Villas.
See site for restrictions.
Spacious Villa Style
Apartment Homes
263 Elida Road
Delphos, OH 45833 Now Leasing!
419-238-6558
Delphos
Senior Villas
 2 Bedroom / 2 Full Baths
 Attached Garages
 Washer / Dryer Connections
 Vaulted Ceilings
 Walk-In Closets
 Pet-Friendly
419-238-6558
Independent senior living 55+.
Spacious 2 Bdrm./2 full
bath, att. garages, washer/
dryer connection, walk-in
closets. Pet friendly.
AlexanderRealtyServices.Net
119 N. Canal St.
Delphos
Lot in Menke Edition..Priced for quick sale...$14,900
THINK SPRING, Buy your lot now!
SHORT SALE
Gas heat, double A/C and drive
up window. Office, 2 storage
rooms plus huge retail area.
$159,900 NOW $99,000
Cindy Alexander 419-234-7208
REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE
CHEVROLET • BUICK
1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos
VISIT US ON THE WEB @ www.delphachevy.com
Sales Department
Mon. & Wed. 8:30 to 8:00
Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 8:30 to 5:30;
Sat. 8:30 to 1:00
IN DELPHOS 419-692-3015 TOLL FREE 1-888-692-3015
Service - Body Shop - Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 7:30 to 5:00
Wed. 7:30 to 7:00
Closed on Sat.
2010
CHEVY
HHR
2008
CHEVY
COLORADO
2007
BUICK
LUCERNE
2006
CHEVY
SILVERADO
2008
PONTIAC
G6
2008
PONTIAC
G6
$
11,400
$
16,800
$
14,700
$
16,800
$
11,900
$
12,100
#11D36
Was $12,900
#11H100
Was $17,900
#11H96
Was $15,900
#11H95
Was $17,900
#11G73
Was $14,000
#11G77
Was $13,975
WANTED
OWNERS OF 99 OR NEWER
CHEVY • PONTIAC • BUICK • CADILLAC
• OLDSMOBILE & GMC OWNERS
TRADE-IN BONUS CASH
Avalanche .................................. $2,000
Silverado 1500 ........................... $2,000
Silverado 2500HD w/gas ........... $1,000
Silverado 2500HD w/diesel ....... $2,750
Silverado 3500HD w/gas ........... $1,000
Silverado 3500HD w/diesel ....... $2,750
Chevy Suburban ........................ $1,000
Tahoe .......................................... $1,000
010

Announcements
Kreative
Learning
Preschool
340 W. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH
45833
419-695-5934
2012/2013
Registration
Going On
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
Are you looking for a child
care provider in your
area? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
080

Help Wanted
DRIVER NEEDED: Local
business is seeking a
part-time driver for late
night/early morning. Ap-
proximately 10 hours per
week plus additional deliv-
eries as needed, up to 30
hours per week. No CDL
required. Driver must sub-
mit to pre-employment
physical/drug screening
and random drug screen-
ing during employment.
Retirees welcome. Please
send replies to Box 166
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
FULL TIME Graphic Artist
is needed by local com-
pany. Website knowledge
and able to do page lay-
outs a plus. Benefits pack-
age includes: Health, Den-
tal, 401K & Vacation.
Send replies to Box 165
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
LOOKING
FOR A JOB?
Axcess Staffing Services
is seeking candidates for
long term temporary
positions for Packers and
Warehouse. 1st and 2nd
shift available. Benefits
available.
707 N. Cable Rd.
Suite H
Lima, OH
(behind Walgreens)
567-712-2200
080

Help Wanted
HELP WANTED - Local
embroidery shop needs
computer literate self
starter. $10-13 per hour.
Send replies to Box 167
c/o Delphos Herald, 405
N. Main St., Delphos, OH
45833
BK Tool
& Design
Kalida, OH
NOW HIRING
Mechanical
Design
Engineers
Machinists
Automation
Programmers
Send resume to:
BKTool@BKTool.com
PH: 419-532-3890
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k. Home
weekends & most nights.
Call Ulm!s Inc.
419-692-3951
080

Help Wanted
TRUCK MECHANI C
WANTED -Experienced
Truck Technician needed
immediately. Great pay
based on ability. Benefits
offered include: Health,
Dental & Life Insurance,
Short & Long Term Dis-
ability Insurance, Paid
Holidays & Vacation, 401K
with company contribu -
tions. If interested please
send resume to: RODOC
Leasing Sales and Serv-
ices, 5028 N. Kill Rd, Del-
phos, OH 45833
Would you like to be an
in-home child care pro -
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465.
090

Job Wanted
SPRING
HOUSECLEANING
Occasional or regular ba-
sis. 21 Years experience.
Dependabl e, Honest ,
Gr eat r ef er enc es .
419-692-1305
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
270

Auctions
VISA
MC
DISCOVER
PUBLIC
AUCTION
Every Saturday
at 6pm
Large Variety of
Merchandise
Everyone Welcome
Porter Auction
19326 CO. Rd. 60
Grover Hill, OH
For info call
(419) 587-3770
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
501

Misc. for Sale
FIREWOOD FOR Sale.
$70.00 a truckload. Deliv-
ery available for a fee. Call
419-286-3861
550

Pets & Supplies
AKC REGISTERED Pure-
bred Black Miniature
Schnauzers. 5 Male pup-
pies. $300 each.
419-692-2067
580

For Rent or Lease
DELPHOS SELF Storage
on Gressel Drive: Maxi-
mum security achieved in-
side our fenced facility
with access via your per-
sonal gate code. Why set-
tle for less? Phone any-
time 419-692-6336.
600

Apts. for Rent
APARTMENT FOR Rent
in Spencerville. 2 Bed-
room. $550. Utilities in-
cluded. Washer/Dryer
hook up. Phone or Text
419-302-0570
800

House For Sale
FOR SALE Beautiful Old
Home brought back to life.
110 W Main St., Pandora.
2,500 SqFt, 4 bedroom, 2
bath. 14x26 eat-in kitchen
wi th new cupboards,
counter seating and appli-
ances. Wood floors on
main level, enclosed porch
with Electric Fireplace.
Pack your things, it’s
ready t o move i n.
$114,900. 419-302-9308
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
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Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage
close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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928 N. Franklin St., Delphos
These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.
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BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story
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A Charming Personality
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Peace And Privacy
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Enticing Two-story
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419-692-SOLD
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SUNDAY 12- 1:00
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GREAT 1
ST
TIME
HOME-BUYER
INCENTIVES
ARE AVAILABLE!!!
CALL US FOR
MORE INFORMATION
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THINKING OF
SELLING??
MAKE THE CALL
THAT SAYS
IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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www.jimlanghalsrealty.com
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FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
1 to 3 p.m. OPEN HOUSE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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Call for showing ...
1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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GENUINE
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with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN
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2007
CHRYSLER
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Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells
Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.
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Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage
close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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928 N. Franklin St., Delphos
These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
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BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story
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$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality
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$73,000-Delphos SD
Peace And Privacy
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Enticing Two-story
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THINKING OF
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MAKE THE CALL
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IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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www.jimlanghalsrealty.com
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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Call for showing ...
1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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GENUINE
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with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN
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2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING
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Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells
Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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TOM AHL
617 KING AVE.
LIMA, OH 45805
419-228-3413
CELL 419-296-7188
See me,
BILL
HOFFMAN
for the
BEST BUY
on your
new or used
vehicle.
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*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.
*Will be trained by Microtel
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Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage
close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 1-3 P.M.
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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928 N. Franklin St., Delphos
These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.
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BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story
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$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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Cass
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648 S. Jefferson St.,
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Janet 419-236-7894
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999

Legals
THE MARION Township
Zoning Board will hold a
public hearing on an appli-
cation for a proposed zon-
ing change on the 5th day
of March, 2012 at 7:00pm
at the Marion Township
Building. The application
submitted by Nathan Lee,
requesting that a parcel of
land along Grone Road in
Marion Township be re-
zoned from Agricultural
and Residential to Busi-
ness.
(The Marion Township
Zoning Board will, within
30 days after the hearing,
refer to the Marion Town-
ship Trustees, a recom-
mendation on the pro -
posed amendment.)
Marion Township
Zoning Board
James Miller, Secretary
2/25, 2/29, 3/5
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
Place Your Ad Today
419 695-0015
Classifieds
Sell!
To advertise
call
419-695-0015
BRENDA’S
CUDDLES & CUTS
1333 N. Main, Delphos
419-692-1075
419-695-9735
KENNELS
•Grooming•Boarding
•Day Care
22
TWO DAYS ONLY
TUESDAY, MARCH 6TH 9am-6pm
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7th 9am-6pm
MILLIONS IN CASH!
BUYING GOLD & SILVER!!
MICROTEL INN & SUITES
DELPHOS
GOLD ALL DIAMOND AND ENGAGEMENT RINGS SILVER
MID-STATE GOLD BUYERS TWO DAYS ONLY
TUESDAY
MARCH 6TH
9:00AM-6:00PM
WEDNESDAY
MARCH 7TH
9:00AM-6:00PM
Microtel Inn & Suites
480 Moxie Lane
567.765.1500
FREE EVALUATIONS
20%
ADDITIONAL FOR
SENIOR CITIZENS
10%
INCREASE ON OVERALL
PRICE WITH THIS COUPON
WE BUY GOLD
ITEMS REGARDLESS
OF CONDITION
High School Rings
up to $150
Old Rings
up to $150
Chains
up to $200
Dental
Bring in for Cash
GOLD COINS SILVER DOLLARS SILVER COINS
Pay up to for the following rare gold
Pay up to for the following rare Dollars
1/4 carat......up to $150
1/2 carat......up to $1,000
1 carat.........up to $4,000
2 carat.........up to $12,000
3 carat.........up to $20,000
4 carat.........up to $100,000
•Bullion
•Silver Jewelry
•Flatware Sets
•Tea Sets
•Antique Items
GUARANTEED COMPETITIVE PRICES
IT’S FAST AND EASY
OUR TRAINED PROFESSIONALS USE
THE LATEST HIGH TECH EQUIPMENT
ONE OF OUR
BUYERS PAID $260,000
FOR 18 GOLD COINS
ONE OF OUR
BUYERS PAID
$90,000 FOR ONE
SILVER COIN
WILL PAY UP TO
1600%
ON
SILVER COINS
UP TO
OF FACE VALUE ON
SILVER COINS 1964 &
OLDER
1600%
REASONS TO SELL
YOU MAY HAVE THOUSANDS
OF DOLLARS WORTH OF ITEMS
GATHERING DUST
CONSIDER BRINGING
EVERYTHING
IMPORTANT
ECONOMIC
INFORMATION
During the past few years, low inter-
est rates, war and uncertain stock
market performance combined to
push prices of gold and silver to their
highest levels in 25 years. We have
studied the investment and retail
markets for decades, and in the past
during times of economic uncertainty
(which is deepening now), there
have been dramatic price declines in
many areas of the jewlery, gold and
retail markets.Which is why this may
be the best time in decades for you
to sell for some of the highest prices
ever.
Almost everyone has something of value
they no longer need or want: Inherited
items, jewelry that doesn’t ft your style,
watches that are old or even broken,
silver pieces. Several items that might
be useless to YOU... may be considered
treasures by the collectors from our vast
international network.
We have surprised many people who
thought their items were not valuable
enough to consider. The specialists we
have gathered together offer you a wealth
of knowledge and experience. We are
accustomed to paying thousands of dol-
lars for valuable items. Don’t miss the
opportunity. Perhaps we’ll help you fnd a
real treasure in these hidden away pieces.
There’s never a charge for our consulta-
tions or services.
• 1. Mid-State Gold Buyers specialize in evaluation and
buying New and Antique jewelry. Our generations of
experience qualify us to evaluate everything from small
pieces to the fnest and most valuable estate jewelry
• 2. Mid-State Gold Buyers has an undisputed reputation.
We work in compliance with your Local and State Govern-
ment.
• 3. This is an ideal opportunity to have your valuables
evaluated (especially if you inherited them) by specialists
right here in this area. Come in for a free consultation and
cash offer-NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
• 4. If you are not wearing or enjoying the items that you
have, then this is a great chance for you to convert them
to CASH. This is much better than just holding hard to sell
diamonds, jewelry & coins.
Bring in Coupon. Gold Only
United States USED NEW
$1.00 1842 to 1889..........up to...............$1,000..........$10,000
$2.50 1798 to 1834 ..........up to...............$5,500..........$17,500
$2.50 1840 to 1834..........up to...............$1,000..........$5,000
$3.00 1854 to 1888..........up to...............$3,000..........$10,000
$5.00 1795 to 1833..........up to...............$10,000........$50,000
$5.00 1834 to 1938..........up to...............$1,000..........$10,000
$5.00 1839 to 1908..........up to...............$1,500..........$6,000
$5.00 1908 to 1929..........up to...............$1,500..........$6,000
$10.00 1795 to 1804..........up to...............$9,000..........$29,000
$10.00 1839 to 1932..........up to...............$1,000..........$7,500
$20.00 1850 to 1933..........up to...............$1,500..........$10,000
$50.00 1851to 1852...........up to...............$5,000..........$15,000
$50.00 1915 Pan-Pec..........up to...............$7,500..........$25,000
United States USED NEW
1794 to 1803................up to...................$2,000.............$50,000
1836 to 1838................up to...................$1,000.............$5,000
1840 to 1873................up to...................$500................$5,000
Trade Dollars..................up to...................$100................$2,500
1878 to 1904................up to...................$1,500.............$12,500
1921 to 1935................up to...................$50..................$5,000
All prices in ad based on rarity and condition
Broken Chains
Bring in for Cash
Old Watches
up to $1,000
Bracelets
up to $1,500
Necklaces
up to $1,500
6B – The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
1
MARCHOCOLATE
•EAST-BELLEFONTAINE AT KIBBY
•DOWNTOWN-ELIZABETH AT MARKET
•WEST-ALLENTOWN AT CABLE




An EEO Employer
Job Applications and information about provider services in over 30 Ohio
counties available at: www. cr si - oh. com
March is DD Awareness Month
CRSI is a Provider of
Developmental
Disability
Services

Since 1976
everyone wins.
Lease it, own it
guaranteedautollc.com
567-259-3050
700 W. Ervin Rd., Van Wert
Guaranteed Auto L.L.C.
Feature of the W
eek
$
142
00
• Deferred
Down Payments

$
500 Due At Signing
• Tax Included
Bi-Weekly
Stock #Y736A
No Credit Needed...
and No Credit Check!
2001 DODGE GR. CARAVAN
2003 Ford Windstar
2005 Chevy Malibu
2001 nissan Frontier
2005 dodge gr Caravan
/bi.
S19
SILVER
4 spd., auto,
3.8L V-6 cyl.
/bi.
/bi.
*$500 minimum due at signing….tax included….24/month term
Stop in and see
Jeff McIntosh, Brian Zartman or Chuck Sperry for details
$
176
00*
/bi.
S90 (blue)
4 speed auto.,
3.5L V-6 cyl.
S89
4 WD (black)
3.3L V-6 cyl.
S80 (tan)
4 spd. auto.
3.8L V-6 cyl.
$
165
00*
$
223
00*
1995 CadillaC seville
$
148
00*
/bi.
S54A (white
1996 Chrysler sebring
$
160
00*
/bi.
S61 CONVERTIBLE (white)
2.5L V-6 cyl.,
4 speed automatic
$
180
00*
DELPHOS
TRADING
POST
528 N.Washington St.
Delphos
419-692-0044
On the corner of 5th St. and Washington St.
just look for the sign!
Tues.-Thurs.
8:30-5, Fri. 8:30-6,
Sat. 9-2
•MAN CAVE
ITEMS
•WOMEN’S
JEWELRY
•NAME BRAND
TOOLS
•DVDs,
•GAMES,
•CONSOLES
•MUCH MORE!
DISCOUNT PRICES DAILY!
More value for your buying $$.
P
R
IC
E
S
H
A
R
D

T
O
B
E
A
T
!
W
E
B
U
Y
G
O
L
D

&
S
ILV
E
R
WE’RE AN ANYTHING
YOU NEED STORE!!
Monday, March 5, 2012 The Herald — 7B
www.delphosherald.com
If YOU want to SEE your kids read more, let them see
YOU read more. Call 419-695-0015 to subscribe.
OPEN
MARCH 1
419-339-6800
705 E. Main St., Elida
(St. Rt. 309)
(just west of Speedway)
✦ Pet Food/
Supplies
✦ Poultry
Supplies
✦ Wild Bird
Feed
✦ Livestock
Feeds
✦ Fertilizer
✦ Grass Seed
✦Softener
Salt
✦ Mulch
✦ Top Soil
✦ Compost
✦ River Rock
✦ Colored
Gravel
✦ Boulders
✦ Flagstone
5393 SR 224
Ottawa, Ohio 45875
WE ARE EXPANDING
OUR SERVICE AREA
We have no first time customer
gimmicks.
WE HAVE A SET BESIDE
PROGRAM
No tank rental charge
(except the small 124 gal. tank).
No charge for tank installation
(except for copper line if needed).
Our current price is $2.149 per gallon.
We are family owned and operated by Brad,
Greg and Brad Cherry. Our qualified team of
employees are Lori Anspach, Lisa Cherry,
Russ Cramer, Brian Goecke, Tom Green,
Bill Imm, Mike Lugibihl, Tom Niese, Jeff
Niese, Wayne Williams, Chris Wilson. We are
committed to customer safety and service!
MAKE THE SWITCH NOW!!
For further information call
Lori, Lisa or Chris at
1-866-963-0101
Cherry’s
Propane
Service,
Ltd.
ACCEPTING
NEW
CUSTOMERS
8B – The Herald Monday, March 5, 2012
www.delphosherald.com

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