Safety Meeting

Given By_____________________

Topic #132

Date_________________

GENERAL SAFETY - ATTITUDE AND BEHAVIOR
Humans instinctively seek to avoid pain and death. And yet, we may behave in a manner that is a threat to our wellbeing. There are a couple of reasons why this occurs. The first is lack of knowledge. What you do not know, can hurt you!. The second reason we may act in a risky manner is attitude. Now might be a good time to do a quick self-analysis. What is your attitude toward safety? When asked, some may say they are all for it. Others may complain about any safety effort being made. The difference between the two is one of attitude. Your attitude affects almost all that you do and how you do it. Have you ever noticed that people who are successful in life, or are just happy, tend to have a positive attitude? And so it is with safety. Look at it this way. . . safety rules and procedures are written to protect you from harm. They are notwritten to make your work life more uncomfortable or inconvenient. After all, safety equipment and training costs your employer additional up front money. If you cooperate in safety matters, not only is there a lesser likelihood of you getting hurt, you will not be doing battle with the boss who is just trying to do his job by enforcing the safety rules. In addition, you should feel more confident on the job knowing you have a better chance of making it thorough the day without injury. Less fear of injury and the boss no longer on your back has to brighten your day! We are not perfect. Even the best of us can forget or make errors in judgment. To maximize our safety efforts, we must look out for one another. If someone tells you that you are not working in a safe manner, do not become angry or defensive. They are just looking out for your well-being. If you did not know you were doing something wrong, be thankful your errors were noted before someone got hurt. If you simply forgot or got a little careless, be grateful that someone cares enough to get you back on track. If you see someone doing something unsafe, speak up, but do so diplomatically. Treat others just as you would like to be treated in the same situation. Remember, attitude affects behavior. If you have a positive attitude, odds are you will exhibit safe behavior. A negative attitude toward safety will only cause conflict, stress and, ultimately, an accident.

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________

Topic #133

Date_________________

NEAR MISS - THE ONE THAT ALMOST HAPPENED
What is a "near miss?" Webster defines it as: "A result that is nearly, but not quite, successful." What does this mean to industry? It simply means that a serious accident almost occurred. Someone trips over a pallet, but doesn't fall. Two forklifts almost collide at a corner. A tool is dropped, but toes are missed…this time. Statistics tell us that for every 300 near misses there is one serious injury. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 6.1 million injuries occurred during 1995. If we multiply each injury by 300, the result is 1.8 billion near misses for 1995 alone. So what does this tell us about accidents? Look at the figures. If you reduce the number of near misses, probability tells us you will then reduce the number of injuries that happen. The Same Things That Cause Accidents Cause Near Misses:
• • •

Unsafe acts, such as improper lifting; walking under an overhead load; cutting, grinding, or chipping without safety glasses; not using proper Personal Protective Equipment, etc. Unsafe conditions, such as poorly maintained equipment, oil or grease on floors, welding leads that have been laid in walkways, trash and boxes that have been left in hallways, etc. Hurrying and taking risks to get a project done faster, or to wrap up a job at quitting time.

Report Near Misses Before They Become Accidents:
• • •

Once a near miss occurs, report it immediately to the nearest foreman or supervisor. The potential for such incidents exists all over the workplace, so all employees-not just supervisors-- must help identify them. If the near miss is a result of an unsafe condition, don't continue to work under that condition until the problem has been corrected and your supervisor gives the okay to proceed. If the incident is a result of unsafe acts, be certain that everyone involved has been alerted to their actions before they continue with the job.

Near Misses Are A Warning: Letting a near miss go unreported provides an opportunity for a serious accident to occur. Correcting these actions or conditions will enhance the safety within your facility and provide a better working environment for everyone involved. Don't let yourself or co-workers become statistics--report near misses to your supervisor. Prevent An Accident That's About To Happen!

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________

Topic #134

Date_________________

LOOK OUT FOR YOUR CO-WORKERS
Take a look around at your co-workers. Some are your friends during work hours, and even after work. You know about their families, what they like and don't like, and what they do for fun. So, be on the lookout for unsafe conditions and correct them, or report them to your supervisors as soon as possible. Help your fellow workers get through the shift without an accident:
• • • • • • • • • •

I'll help you lift those heavy items, so you don't have to do it by yourself. I know a back injury can mess up your home life, as well as your ability to work. I'll be sure to inspect those slings before you lift a load. I know that you are depending upon them to hold the weight of the load until it is set down. I'll inspect that ladder and make sure it is in good condition before I set it up for you to use. I will set it at a good 4:1 angle so it won't slip while you're on it. I'll be certain that the guardrails, mid rails and toe boards are in place before you get up on that scaffolding, because I know a fall could lead to your serious injury or death. I'll make sure that all passageways and walkways are clear so you won't slip, trip or fall. I'll label all containers in the workplace, so you don't use the wrong product for a job by mistake. I'll check the backup alarms on our heavy equipment, because I can't always see you, and I want to make sure you can hear me. When I'm welding, I will always set up the welding shields so the flash won't burn your eyes. I'll tag and report all tools that aren't working properly so you won't be injured by plugging in a tool that has a faulty wire. I'll know and practice the emergency evacuation procedures, so we can both get out of an unsafe condition together.

Finally, I want to see you leave work exactly the way you arrived. So, if I see you doing something the wrong way, I'll show you the right way to do it. Of course, I expect you will do the same for me-after all, shouldn't everyone on the crew watch out for each other?

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________

Topic #135

Date_________________

EQUIPMENT HAZARDS --REPORT UNSAFE EQUIPMENT
Your employer does its best to keep equipment in good condition, but maintenance personnel are only human and can't keep up with all the problems in the field. Some defects will go unnoticed in spite of every effort made. Those of you who work with and around machines and equipment are in a good position to notice hazardous conditions. Get in the habit of reporting things that can lead to accidents so that corrections can be made before they result in costly accidents and/or employee injuries. Keep in mind that the person who sees a situation that should be fixed and fails to report it may well end up being the victim of his/her own neglect. Watch out for the loose or missing machine guard; the moving part with too much play; the unlubricated machine; the missing nut or bolt; the slipping belt; the loose or cracked shaft housing; or the moving part that can and should be guarded, but has never had attention. On the electrical side of the picture, watch for the continually sparking motor, the broken switch on a tool, the damaged extension cord, the missing face plate, loose conduit, loose conductors, the burned switch, broken plugs and receptacles. For conveyors, watch for sharp corners; lack of crossovers, or crossovers in poor repair; unguarded parts on powerdriven conveyors; or the lack of a jump-out or idler roller where two conveyors meet. Naturally, forklift truck operators are supposed to report things that go wrong with their vehicles, just as drivers of trucks. Those who use hand trucks should be on the watch for flat or frozen wheels, broken cross members, loose toe plates and broken or slivered handles. All workers should keep these ideas in mind. Do not hesitate to report a condition that may result in an accident or injury to yourself or one of your fellow employees. A pro-active preventive approach should be encouraged, as safety is everyone's business.

Prepared by: Justin Robinson

Toolboxtopics.com

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful