You are on page 1of 36

CONTENTS 

Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................ 3 

1  Overall Design Aspects ........................................................................................................................................ 5 

Choose appropriate authoring software ........................................................................................................ 5 

Design appropriate templates ........................................................................................................................ 6 

Choose fonts wisely ........................................................................................................................................ 6 

Use linked graphics ......................................................................................................................................... 6 

Techniques for managing text expansion ....................................................................................................... 7 

How to Improve the efficiency of translation tools .......................................................................................... 7 

Misuse of carriage returns .............................................................................................................................. 8 

Placement of index markers ........................................................................................................................... 8 

Manual hyphenation ...................................................................................................................................... 9 

Conditional text .............................................................................................................................................. 9 

2  Writing Documentation .................................................................................................................................... 10 

Keeping content simple ................................................................................................................................ 10 

Be consistent ................................................................................................................................................ 11 

Ensure that content is culturally acceptable ................................................................................................ 12 

Guidelines for the document translation process .......................................................................................... 13 

Translating Adobe FrameMaker files ............................................................................................................ 14 

Translating Microsoft Word files .................................................................................................................. 15 

collateral and marketing material ................................................................................................................ 16 

Collateral authoring tools ............................................................................................................................. 18 

3  Writing Online Help .......................................................................................................................................... 22 

Guidelines for the Help translation process .................................................................................................... 23 

XML guidelines .............................................................................................................................................. 23 

Translating and localizing body text ............................................................................................................. 24 

Guidelines for JavaHelp ................................................................................................................................ 25 

What translation involves ............................................................................................................................. 26 

Page | 1  
 
4 Preparing for Web Site Translation ................................................................................................................... 28 

Global design issues ...................................................................................................................................... 28 

Style and layout ............................................................................................................................................ 30 

Electronic commerce .................................................................................................................................... 30 

Ongoing website management ..................................................................................................................... 31 

5 Brand name issues ............................................................................................................................................. 33 

6 When things go wrong ....................................................................................................................................... 34 

   

Page | 2  
 
INTRODUCTION 
 

This  guide  has  been  developed  by  the  technical  staff  of  Academy  Translations  to  give 
technical  writers  a  comprehensive  overview  of  how  to  structure  and  write  documents  in 
such a way that it will be easier to translate them.  

Some  basic  modifications  to  typical  technical 


writing  will  have  a  marked  positive  impact  on  the  “Localization is the process of 
speed  and  cost  of  future  localization  and  making a product 
translation.   linguistically and culturally 
appropriate to the country, 
In  brief,  use  controlled  terminology,  use  a  simple  region and language where it 
unambiguous  style,  allow  for  extra  space  in  tables  will be used.” 
and  illustration  and  avoid  country‐specific 
references.  

Controlled terminology 

Uniform terminology will minimise translation effort, maximise consistency and accuracy of 
the translated document and allow for the most efficient use of translation support tools. 
Terminology  is  best  controlled  by  creating  a  glossary  of  terms  relating  to  the  product  and 
actions  required  by  the  software  (for  example,  click,  select,  and  so  on),  and  applying  this 
consistently throughout each document and between documents relating to a product or a 
suite of products. In particular, electronic and printed documentation should use the same 
set of terms.  

Simple, unambiguous writing style 

Controlling  writing  style  is  also  worthwhile.  This  includes  avoidance  of  jargon,  long 
sentences,  cultural  references,  acronyms  and  abbreviations.  Use  concise  sentences, 
preferably in the active voice. All dates need to include a written name of the month as the 
date and month order varies between countries, and abbreviated dates can be confusing. 

Controlled language 

These  issues  have  been  addressed  by  the  development  of  “controlled  English”  or  easy 
English standards for writing documentation. This is a modification of English that uses a set 
of standard terms and phrases and simplified grammar. For example, there is no use of the 
passive tense, a maximum number of words per sentence and so on. There are also lists of 
words and phrases to be avoided.  

Page | 3  
 
Controlled  language  reduces  ambiguity  and  promotes  readability.  It  makes  writing  initially 
more  difficult,  but  translation  is  much  simpler,  and  allows  for  optimal  use  of  translation 
software. It can reduce translation time by as much as 25%. There are several commercial 
software tools for writing controlled English.  

For further information about controlled language, consider these sources: 

• Information on Controlled English – KANT (Knowledge‐based Accurate Natural 
language Translation) 

• Controlled language software ‐‐ MAXIit by SMART Communications – 
www.smartny.com  

 
   

Page | 4  
 
 

1 OVERALL DESIGN ASPECTS
    

• Choose appropriate authoring software 
• Design appropriate templates 
• Ensure that chosen fonts are localizable into the target language 
• Link graphics rather than embedding in the document 
• Techniques for managing text expansion 

CHOOSE APPROPRIATE AUTHORING SOFTWARE 
It is wise to be aware of translation issues when choosing word processing software to 
produce documentation. The same application should be used for all language versions 
of the document, but to do so, the application has to support all the target languages. 
Verify with the translation vendor that your software is compatible with computer aided 
translation tools they use. Ideally the chosen software should: 

• Suit the document type 
• Support all target languages 
• Support the right output formats 
• Be compatible with computer aided translation tools 
• Support single‐sourcing if required (one source for Print, Online Help and Web) 

From experience we recommend to avoid using low‐end word‐processing software (such 
as  MS‐Word).  Whilst  there  would  be  an  initial  cost  saving  by  using  such  software 
because  all technical  writers  are  familiar  with  it  to  some  degree,  the  added  cost,  time 
and  frustration  of  ongoing  formatting  problems  in  other  languages  makes  it  an 
uneconomical choice. 

We  recommend  using  authoring  software  such  as  Adobe  FrameMaker  (structured  file 
format  if  possible)  or  HelpStudio  (www.innovasys.com)  or  similar.  HelpStudio,  for 
example,  allows  you  to  export  the  translatable  text  in  XML  format.  The  translation 
vendor will use a Translation Memory (TM) tool to process and translate the files, and 
return  the  translated  files  in  XML  format  for  you  to  import.  All  formatting  will  remain 
intact. 

Page | 5  
 
If  done  correctly  by  your  translation  vendor  there  is  no  need  for  cutting,  pasting  and 
reformatting of each language. The Table of Contents (TOC) and Index files will also be 
automatically  updated  because  all  marker  text  was  extracted  and  translated  together 
with the visible text. 

Whilst an  Index at the end of a manual is common practice for English and European‐
language manuals, this is not always so in languages such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean 
and Arabic as these scripts do not allow alphabetical listing of key words. Your regional 
sales  manager  in  these  countries,  or  your  translation  vendor,  should  be  consulted  to 
advise what the convention is for your particular document. 

As stated before, none or only minimal formatting adjustments should be necessary for 
most languages after translation. The only exception is the Thai language, which requires 
the manual adjustment of line endings by the translator and will therefore cost a little 
more. 

DESIGN APPROPRIATE TEMPLATES 
If  low‐end  word‐processing  software  has  been  selected  to  start  with,  the  page  layout 
needs  to  be  chosen  carefully  to  minimize  the  cost  of  the  post‐translation  formatting. 
This can sometimes represent up to 40% of the total translation cost, and attending to 
layout issues can affect price significantly.  

Use  a  ‘universal’  page  format  that  contains  enough  room  for  text  expansion  in  tables, 
paragraphs  and  leading.  Generous  white  space  in  the  English  version  (which  will  be 
pleasing to the eye), will accommodate text expansion in the foreign language versions. 

A  simple  and  cost‐effective  template  design  approach  is  to  use  automatic  rather  than 
manual generation of tables of contents and indexes.  

CHOOSE FONTS WISELY 
Choose fonts that also include all the appropriate characters for most target languages. 
Doing so will preserve the document’s look‐and‐feel. 

USE LINKED GRAPHICS 
Avoid  embedding  graphics  in  documents  but  link  them  instead.  They  will  be  easier  to 
modify for a particular locale, if necessary.  

Page | 6  
 
Ensure  that  any  captions  are  a  part  of  the  document,  not  the  graphic  itself.  This  will 
minimize updates to graphics by translators. 

TECHNIQUES FOR MANAGING TEXT EXPANSION  
 

• Prepare English document template with additional space 
• Be aware of average expansion and contraction rates  

When  preparing  the  layout  of  documentation,  aim  to  account  for  approximately  35% 
expansion  of  text  in  translation.  To  do  so,  the  most  efficient  way  is  to  prepare  a 
document template for English that has some reserved space.  

Some helpful techniques include: 

- Having a slightly shorter text body in the English version, thus reserving 
additional white space at the bottom of the page 
- Always setting up the footer space so that it can include at least two lines of text 
- Making columns in tables slightly wider than necessary 
- Avoiding a justified paragraph style, especially when no hyphenation is to be 
used. Justification in languages with longer word length can produce 
unpleasantly large white spaces between words 
- Avoiding deeply nested lists as these tend to reduce column width 

If  these  guidelines  are  observed,  your  translation  vendor  will  be  able  to  import  the 
English  version  into  a  translation  memory  (TM)  tool  such  as  Atril’s  Déjà  Vu  X  (DVX)  or 
SDL  Trados,  translate  it  then  export  a  formatted  translation  using  the  original  English 
layout. 

HOW TO IMPROVE THE EFFICIENCY OF TRANSLATION TOOLS 
 
• Do not place manual carriage returns at the end of each line of running text 
• Do not place index markers inside sentences or words 
• Use ‘fields’ with caution 
• Avoid manual hyphenation 
• Avoid the pitfalls of conditional text 

Page | 7  
 
MISUSE OF CARRIAGE RETURNS 
Instead of pressing Enter at the end of line, allow the authoring software to insert a 
soft line break that can be adjusted automatically to accommodate changes in text. 
Manual carriage returns will be propagated to all translations by the TM software of 
the translation vendor and will result in extra formatting cost. 

PLACEMENT OF INDEX MARKERS 
Index  markers  are  used  in  authoring  packages  to  automatically  generate  indexes. 
Each index term has a corresponding index marker on the page where the associated 
text appears. It is good practice to insert these markers before or after the relevant 
heading and not in the middle of sentences so that these can be easily identified for 
translation by your translation vendor’s TM software. 

USE MS‐WORD FIELDS WITH CAUTION 
Fields in MS‐Word are a great time‐saving feature to propagate recurring words and 
phrases  throughout  the  document.  This  is  true  provided  that  the  document  will 
never be translated. 

However, when a translation of such a document is attempted it becomes clear very 
quickly that this feature must be used with the utmost caution. Consider this real‐life 
example: 

The author of a manual used Fields to refer to a menu option called “Save records”: 

Save records – This feature is used to save your records. 

This was translated into Dutch as: 

Records opslaan – Met deze functie kunt u records opslaan. 

However,  now  the  translation  of  “Save  records”  was  set  in  concrete.  It  was 
automatically  applied  throughout  the  rest  of  the  manual  wherever  “Save  records” 
appeared in English. Now consider this sentence: 

To save records, use the Save Records option in the File menu. 

This would normally be translated into Dutch as: 

Om records op te slaan, gebruikt u de optie Records opslaan in het menu ‘Bestand’. 

However, the Fields option forced the translation in this way: 

Om records opslaan, gebruikt u de optie Records opslaan in het menu ‘Bestand’. 

Page | 8  
 
The  problem  is  obvious.  The  Field  caused  an  automatic  wrong  Dutch  translation 
simply because Dutch grammar doesn’t work like English grammar does. 

As  a  result  the  entire  manual  had  to  be  edited  and  the  use  of  Fields  restricted  to 
sections where it couldn’t cause any inadvertent mischief. 

MANUAL HYPHENATION 
Authoring packages provide the option to automatically hyphenate when necessary. 
This  is  preferable  to  manual  hyphenation  because  hyphenation  rules  change 
between languages, and automatic hyphenation deals with this.  

CONDITIONAL TEXT 
• Conditional text has the advantage of making it easier to re‐purpose your text, or 
provide different variants of a document to suit different contexts (for example 
User  Manual  versus  Online  Help).  However,  be  aware  that  this  can  add  an 
additional layer of complexity to the translation task if not done properly.  

• The  point  of  concern  is  to  tag  whole  paragraphs  as  conditional  rather  than 
narrowing  the  scope  to  individual  sentences  or  words.  This  provides  more 
context  to  the  translator  and  avoids  problems  due  to  differences  in  grammar 
between  English  and  the  target  language.  By  keeping  conditional  text  at  the 
paragraph  level,  you  give  the  translator  adequate  ‘space’  or  context  to  work 
with. 

• If  done  properly,  conditional  text  can  actually  reduce  the  translation  effort, 
because  text  that  is  common  to  a  number  of  documents  only  needs  to  be 
translated once. Remember, however, that each item of documentation should 
still be proofed independently.  

   

Page | 9  
 
 

2 WRITING DOCUMENTATION
    

When  developing  a  software  package, 


remember  that  the  documentation  is  as 
much a part of the product as the code. As  “Keep content simple, 
soon as a software glossary or a preliminary  consistent and culturally 
build  of  the  localized  software  is  available,  neutral.” 
translation  of  the  online  help  and 
documentation can start. 

For product documentation to be globalized and localizable, the content (text, art or 
multimedia) should be: 

• Written as simply as possible  
• Written as consistently as possible  
• Culturally acceptable and inoffensive to an international audience 

KEEPING CONTENT SIMPLE 
 
The following guidelines help to keep your content simple: 
• Be concise 

This assists speakers of your own language and also makes it easier to translate. 

• Use active voice 

This shortens sentences and is more familiar to international readers. 

• Avoid long‐winded expressions 

For example, instead of writing ‘in order to’ just write ‘to’. 

• Use simple verb forms 

For example, write ‘select’ instead of ‘make a selection’.  

Page | 10  
 
BE CONSISTENT 
 

• Use words with a precise meaning 
• Use the same term to express a specific meaning 
• Include ‘optional’ words 
• Use consistent capitalization 
• Use more punctuation, not less 
• Avoid alphabetical lists that cannot be generated automatically 
• Do not use nouns as verbs 
• Avoid words that have opposite meanings 

 
The following guidelines will increase comprehensibility and make 
localization easier: 
• Use words with a precise meaning 

Unambiguous terminology aids understanding. For example, use ‘Install the 
application’ rather than ‘Set up the application’. 

• Use the same term to express a specific meaning 

For example, do not use ‘remove’ and ‘delete’ interchangeably.  

• Include ‘optional’ words 

There is a tendency to omit words in sentences, which increases the chance 
of misunderstanding. For example, ‘You can change the sysdb file using the 
BRG utility.’ This can mean either: ‘You can change the sysdb file that uses 
the BRG utility.’ or ‘You can change the sysdb file by using the BRG utility.’  
Also, avoid omitting articles such as ‘a’, ‘an’, and ‘the’ to add clarity. 

• Use consistent capitalization 

This will help to standardize terminology for the localizer. 

• Use more punctuation, not less 

This reduces confusion for both the reader and the translator by breaking 
complex sentences into parts for easier understanding. 

• Avoid alphabetical lists that cannot be generated automatically 

Page | 11  
 
Unless lists (such as commands, keyboard shortcuts and glossaries) can be 
generated automatically, compiling these alphabetically for each language 
will be very time‐consuming. 

• Do not use nouns as verbs 

For example, ‘This function gives an analysis of the problem and offers a 
solution.’ The nouns ‘analysis’ and ‘solution’ convey most of the meaning in 
this sentence, while the verbs ‘gives’ and ‘offers’ are practically meaningless. 
A better sentence would be: ‘This function analyzes the problem and solves 
it’. 

• Avoid words that have opposite meanings 

For example, ‘sanction’ can mean either ‘to approve’ or ‘to punish’.  

ENSURE THAT CONTENT IS CULTURALLY ACCEPTABLE 
 
• Remove text that may be culturally sensitive 
• Avoid culture‐specific metaphors 
• Avoid humor 
• Avoid ambiguous words and jargon 
• Spell out acronyms 
• Avoid clip art 

 
Use the following guidelines to ensure that content accounts for the 
wide spectrum of cultural differences among international readers: 
• Remove text that may be culturally sensitive to ensure neutral, culture‐
independent content 

Do not use slang or colloquial expressions; readers may not be able to 
distinguish the idiom from the literal meaning. Idiomatic expressions are also 
difficult, sometimes impossible, to translate. 

• Avoid culture‐specific metaphors 

Metaphors can have cultural associations that are not relevant outside of 
your country.  

• Avoid humour 

Page | 12  
 
Even within your own country, people have differing views about what is 
funny. Humour does not add clarity to international content, and is often 
idiomatic.  

• Avoid ambiguous words and jargon 

Jargon is technical terminology that has been modified by those in a 
particular profession. It assumes both technical and local knowledge and is 
idiomatic to a particular professional ‘culture’. Jargon is a ‘short‐cut’ but only 
for those few who know it, and is inappropriate for international content. 

• Spell out a term’s acronym on the first occurrence, followed by the acronym 
in parentheses 

Subsequent usage can be confined to the use of the acronym. In non‐linear 
documentation (such as on‐line help), where material is unlikely to be read 
sequentially, a term should be spelled out on the first occurrence for each 
topic in which it appears. 

• Avoid clip art 

Clip art is usually inappropriate for international customers. For example, clip 
art should not be used to represent currency, which has different graphical 
representations from country to country. Likewise, icons are rarely culturally‐
neutral (such as mailboxes, road signs and forks and knives). Wherever such 
items are used, the localizer must replace the graphic with an equivalent; in 
most cases, none exists.  

GUIDELINES FOR THE DOCUMENT TRANSLATION PROCESS 
 

• Generated files are not translated 
• Hidden text may or may not be translated 
• Provide a formatting style guide 
• Provide a language style guide & terminology glossary  

• Generated files 

These include such items as the table of contents and index. 

• Hidden text 

Page | 13  
 
Hidden text in the document may or may not need to be translated, depending on 
the file type. This text may therefore need to be audited and the relevant items for 
translation identified.  

• Formatting 

Provide the localization vendor with a formatting style guide (e.g. all references to 
GUI buttons should be in boldface).  

• Terminology  

Provide your translation company with a language style guide and terminology 
glossary.  

 
 

TRANSLATING ADOBE FRAMEMAKER FILES 
 

• Change bars  

Ensure that change bars are switched off.  

• Fonts and images  

Ensure that there are no missing fonts or images before issuing the files.  

• Table of contents, index and cross‐references  

Ensure that the table of contents and index generate correctly and that there are no 
unresolved cross‐references.  

• Headers and footers  

Headers and footers often contain variables that automatically insert items such as 
chapter numbers or section titles. These do not require translation.  

• Markers  

Headers and chapter titles are often included in markers. Index entries also use 
markers. Text contained in markers will need to be translated. If your translation 
company uses the latest TM software, these markers will be extracted and translated 
automatically.  

• Cross‐references  

Page | 14  
 
Cross references are automatically updated and do not need to be translated. 
However text contained in the cross reference definition will need to be translated 
(such as the words “on page” which precede the page number).  

• Conditional text  

Conditional text is text that appears or is hidden depending on certain conditions. 
This enables a document to be repurposed, depending on context. For example, 
platform‐specific information could be hidden or revealed in the case of a multi‐
platform product. Confirm which text is to be translated, though in general all text 
should be translated.  

TRANSLATING MICROSOFT WORD FILES 
 

• Styles  

Most TM tools support Microsoft Word by default. However, ensure that styles have 
been set up and no manual style overrides are used. After translation with a TM tool, 
the original style sheet may need to be attached.  

• Revisions  

Ensure that files contain no revision marks.  

• Headers and footers  

Headers and footers need to be translated.  

• Index entries  

Indexes  tend  to  be  generated  from  index  entries  or  markers,  which  have  been 
inserted in the main body of the text. The generated index is never translated, as the 
translation will be lost the moment it is regenerated. The index entries and markers 
that are used to generate the index are translated instead. 

As  discussed  earlier,  indexes  are  only  useful  in  languages  that  can  be  sorted 
alphabetically.  They  are  often  omitted  in  languages  such  as  Japanese,  Chinese, 
Korean,  Thai  and  Arabic.  Please  consult  your  local  sales  office  or  your  translation 
vendor for country‐specific advice. 

• Cross‐references  

Page | 15  
 
Cross  references  are  automatically  updated  and  do  not  need  to  be  translated. 
However  text  apart  from  the  heading  text  and  page  number  will  need  to  be 
translated (such as the words “on page” which precede the page number). 

• Fields 

Use this feature with the utmost caution. See page 9 for details. 

COLLATERAL AND MARKETING MATERIAL 
 

• Avoid text in graphics 
• Be mindful of cultural differences 
• Allow space for text expansion 
• Avoid metaphors and complex examples 

Collateral material is often market‐oriented (e.g. packaging and promotional 
material) or country‐specific (e.g. specifics of product registration). The following 
points should be taken into consideration:  

• Do not include text in graphics 
• Be aware of culture‐specific responses to images, for example: 
• Keyboards, and therefore their images, differ between countries 
• Female faces or figures may be inappropriate in Muslim countries 
• Colors have specific meaning in different cultures 
• Allow space for text expansion 
• Aim for clear communication without metaphors or complex examples 
• Be aware of cultural issues in advertising 

Types of collateral material 

• CD labels 
• Product packaging 
• Reference cards and Order forms 
• Marketing material 
• Registration cards 
• Installation procedures 
• Promotional materials 
• Warranty cards 

Page | 16  
 
 

Characteristics of collateral material 

• Many images 
• Complex layout 
• Text minimal but often very market‐oriented 
• Creates the first impression of the product 
• May contain country‐specific technical or legal material 

Collateral material usually contains little text, but often entails complex layout and 
numerous images. Do review the images for cultural appropriateness. 

Some collateral material may not be suitable for TM tools because:  

• There is too little text to justify the effort of importing into a TM 
• Translators need to see the text in context 
• Rewriting of content may be required 

An example for this would be a CD label that may come as an .EPS or .AI file for 
translation. 

Ensure that the translation vendor can use the software tool that the material was 
created with, and assume that there will be a post‐translation layout and desktop 
publishing phase before publishing. 

Other collateral material may well be suitable for TM tools. This may include 
marketing and promotional material and installation instructions that contain quite a 
substantial amount of text and were formatted in packages like Adobe InDesign or 
QuarkXPress. A good translation vendor will have the technical know‐how and 
software to extract the translatable text from these file formats automatically, 
perform translations using a TM tool and then export the translations in the original 
file format, fully formatted. 

Using this method, the DTP effort is greatly reduced, all translations are reusable 
because they are in memory, and the completion time is much faster than using the 
old copy & paste method. This saves you a substantial amount of money and time 
over the life of the product. 

Guidelines for translating collateral material 

• Clear, straightforward text is the easiest to translate 
• Minimize marketing slogans – they can be difficult to translate effectively 
• Be aware of culture specificity of images 

Page | 17  
 
• Do not include text in graphics 
• Allow space for text expansion 

Collateral  material  is  more  culture‐specific  than  the  rest  of  the  product.  Marketing 
material is often geared to a specific market and marketing slogans are notoriously 
hard  to  translate  well.  Attempting  to  translate  marketing  slogans  is  not 
recommended. Instead, engage a copywriter from the target country to write a new 
one that is appropriate for the country or region. 

In  fact,  the  more  clever  the  marketing 


slogans  and  marketing  images,  the  more 
difficult  they  are  to  adapt  to  international  Beware of slogans! 
markets.  
“For example, ‘saving 
Symbols and metaphors are culture‐specific 
and  need  to  be  replaced  with  the  relevant  effort’ is not a positive 
equivalent  for  each  locale.  In  many  cases,  feature in Japan, where 
there  are  no  equivalents  due  to  idiomatic  effort is one of the main 
differences.  The  materials  that  translate  virtues.” 
easily  are  straightforward  product 
descriptions that do not use catchy phrases 
and metaphors. 

Legal  text  (warranty  and  disclaimers)  should,  after  translation,  be  checked  and 
edited  by  a  legally  qualified  person  in  the  target  country  to  avoid  infringement  of 
local laws and statutes. 

It is worthwhile spending some time checking the appropriateness of graphics at this 
point, so that these do not need to be changed when the software is localized. Also, 
it is important to include any text in a separate layer of the graphics, so that it can be 
easily substituted with the translation. 

Collateral  material  often  has  complex  layout,  and  it  is  particularly  important  to 
remember the additional space requirements of translated text.  

Be aware that some legal or technical details may change between countries. Try to 
ensure  that  such  details  do  not  appear  in  multiple  locations,  so  that  only  one 
document needs to be updated by technical or legal specialists in a given location.  

 
COLLATERAL AUTHORING TOOLS 
Popular tools used to develop collateral include: 

Page | 18  
 
• QuarkXPress – for packaging, quick reference cards and documents of one or 
two pages. 
• Adobe InDesign – for multi‐page documents, such as introductory guides 
• Adobe PageMaker –for multi‐page documents  

What follows are guidelines for localizing material authored with these tools. 

Preparing QuarkXPress files 

• Save previews of images.  
• Ensure images that contain text are issued to the translator.  
• Save Quark files in multilingual format to assist translation (QuarkXPress 4 or 
later). 
• Resize text boxes to allow for text expansion (preferred), or unlock them to 
enable expansion. 
• Do not use the Text to Box command (QuarkXPress 4 or later).  
• Index entries will need to be translated (QuarkXPress 4 or later).  

QuarkXPress is a powerful tool with high‐end graphic, typographic and printing 
capabilities.  

Quark is also available in a multilingual version, called QuarkXPress Passport, the 
interface of which can be run in different languages and enables hyphenation and 
spell checking in many languages. Documents created with QuarkXPress 4 and later 
can be saved in multilingual format for use by QuarkXPress Passport.  

It is not necessary for you to invest in the Passport version of QuarkXPress, but 
saving files in multilingual format will assist the translation process.  

  

Guidelines  

• Save a preview of an image when saving a document. This will ensure that 
the image is displayed in the document even if the original image file is 
absent. However, if an image contains translatable or localizable text, ensure 
that the image file is included.  

• Save Quark files in multilingual format to assist the translation process. 

• Resize text boxes to allow for text expansion (preferred), or unlock them to 
enable the translator to expand them as necessary. Resizing in advance 
means layout will not change significantly as a result of translation. 

Page | 19  
 
• Do not use the Text to Box command, which saves text as outlines 
(QuarkXPress 4 or later). Affected text cannot be edited or restored. 

• Index entries will need to be translated (QuarkXPress 4 or later).  

Preparing Adobe InDesign files 

What to send to the translation vendor: 

• The INDD file or files 
• All images files 
• All fonts that occur in the document 

Allow sufficient room for text expansion in stories and tables.  

Adobe InDesign is a page layout tool for medium‐sized documents. It integrates with 
Adobe InCopy, a professional writing and editing program that fosters a collaborative 
workflow  with  authors  and  graphic  designers.  However,  these  products  do  not 
include tools for the translation process. 

Creative  work  is  organised  into  ‘stories’.  A  story  is  a  useful  analogy  in  the  design 
world; it is a collection of text objects, such as those contained in a magazine article. 
Typically a story is a text box. 

Translation of an InDesign file involves:  

1. Exporting all stories in the InDesign file to a generic format such as Rich Text 
Format (RTF) or HTML 
2. Having the generic file translated by a third party 
3. Importing the translated text into the InDesign file 

Unfortunately, neither InDesign nor InCopy provide a means to export all ‘stories’ at 
once.  This  means  that  exporting  material  is  a  piecemeal  process  that  is  prone  to 
error through the omission of text.  

Importing the translation into  InDesign is  similarly problematic, with the additional 


difficulties in retaining all the original formatting. 

Nevertheless,  there  are  plug‐ins  by  third  parties  available  to  handle  this.  One 
example  is  ECM  Engineering’s  InDesign  filter  (http://www.ecm‐e.de/).  A  good 
translation  vendor  will  have  this  plug‐in,  which  makes  the  translation  of  InDesign 
files  very  quick  and  less  labour‐intensive  in  terms  of  reformatting,  thus  saving  you 
time and cost. The added advantage is that TM tools can be used in this process. 

Page | 20  
 
If  you  allow  sufficient  room  for  text  expansion  in  text  boxes,  and  in  particular  in 
tables,  the  translation  vendor  will  take  care  of  the  rest  and  should  deliver  a 
translated and fully formatted InDesign file to you. A translation memory will have 
been  created  along  the  way,  which  will  save  you  costs  in  translating  an  updated 
document at a later stage. 

Localizing Adobe PageMaker files 

• Ensure images that contain text are issued to the translator.  
• If a TM is to be used: 
– all ‘stories’ should be contained in a single text flow, and  
– all paragraphs should have a tag.  
• Index markers will need to be translated.  

Adobe PageMaker is a page layout tool for medium‐sized documents.  

PageMaker enables you to generate a table of contents and an index that spans 
several documents. 

  

   

Page | 21  
 
 

3 WRITING ONLINE HELP
    

Online help is often the largest translation component of a localization project.  

Online  help  files  and  online  manuals  have  largely  replaced  traditional  printed 
documentation for a number of reasons, including the following: 

• Context‐sensitive help gives users instant access to documentation from the 
software.  
• Hypertext and index keywords provide fast navigation to detailed information  
• Online help can include multimedia features such as animation, movies and 
sound.  
• Updates can be distributed easily via the web.  
• Online documentation provides significant savings in production costs.  
 

Online help source files 

• Text and formatting  
• Images  
• Multimedia  
• Document layout  

Most online help is created from a set of source files, which are compiled into one 
central binary help file. Source files typically include:  

• Text and formatting  

For example, RTF files (WinHelp), HTML files (HTML Help) and XML/HTML files 
(JavaHelp)  

• Images  

For example, .bmp files (WinHelp) and .gif or .jpg files (HTML Help)  

• Multimedia  

For example, movies and sound effects  

• Document layout  

Page | 22  
 
For example, Cascading Style Sheet (CSS) files for HTML‐based help 

GUIDELINES FOR THE HELP TRANSLATION PROCESS 
 

• Hidden text and coding are not translated 
• Provide a formatting style guide 
• Provide a language style guide & terminology glossary 
• Hidden text and coding  

Hidden text in the document will not be translated; neither will codes, such as 
references to screen shots, index markers, encoding and formatting tags.  

• Formatting  

Provide the localization vendor with a formatting style guide (e.g. all references to 
GUI buttons should be in boldface).  

• Terminology  

Provide the localization vendor with a language style guide and terminology glossary. 
Alternatively, the localization vendor can create a terminology list with translations 
of terms that occur frequently in the source text; you should approve this list before 
translation proceeds. A software user interface glossary is also highly recommended. 

XML GUIDELINES 
eXtensible  Markup  Language  (XML)  is  both  a  procedural  and  descriptive  markup 
language. 

XML’s  descriptive  tagging  enables  the  types  of  information  in  a  document  to  be 
defined, and how the information interrelates. 

XML  is  a  metalanguage:  it  enables  you  to  create  your  own  markup,  defined  in  a 
Document Type Definition (DTD). 

Considerations: 

• Files requiring localization 
• Translating and localizing the Header 

Page | 23  
 
• Translating and localizing body text 

As  with  HTML,  the  procedural  markup  defines  the  layout  of  text  (such  as  heading 
styles).  XML  was  created  as  an  alternative  to  HTML,  which  proved  too 
unsophisticated  for  interactive  web  sites  and  web‐based  applications.  XML’s 
descriptive tagging means that the types of information contained in the document 
can be defined, and how these items of information interrelate.  

For example, a recipe would likely include several categories of information: a title, a 
description of the dish, ingredients, and a method. Each item of content is a tagged 
element  of  the  XML  document  (for  example  ‘1  egg’  would  be  tagged  as  an 
‘Ingredient’).  

Apart from being able to include both descriptive and procedural markup, XML is a 
metalanguage: it enables you to create your own markup.  

Tags  used  by  an  XML  document  are  defined  in  a  customized  Document  Type 
Definition (DTD). Although the XML document usually contains all of the translatable 
text, the associated DTD may also contain material for translation or localization, and 
therefore should also be issued for translation. 

Files that are likely to be included in an XML‐based online help system and require 
localization are as follows:  

• Active Server Page file (.asp) 
• Cascading Style Sheet (.css) 
• Graphics (.gif, .jpg) 
• HTML file (.html) 
• JavaScript file (.js) 
• XML file (.xml) 
• XML stylesheet (.xsl)  

   

TRANSLATING AND LOCALIZING BODY TEXT  
 

• Text  

Paragraphs are generally enclosed in markup that is defined in the DTD and 
describes the content, for example: 

<Translator> 
<First Name>Jean</First Name> 

Page | 24  
 
<Last Name>Vioget</Last Name> 
<Language1>French</Language1> 
<Language2>English</Language2> 
<Specialty>Chemistry</Specialty> 
</Translator>  

• Graphics  

Graphics  are  linked  to  the  document  in  a  number  of  ways,  however  the  HTML 
<img src= tag is often used. Any text in the linked graphic needs to be translated.  

• Comments  

Comments are enclosed in <!‐‐ and ‐‐> tags, and are generally not translated. For 
example: <!‐‐ My comment ‐‐>' 

If  there  is  embedded  code  in  the  document,  comments  within  the  code  are 
instead indicated by a double slash (//).  

• Embedded code  

XML documents can include embedded code, such as JavaScript. This code may 
be  embedded  in  the  XML  document  or  contained  in  an  external  file  that  is 
referenced, for example: 

<html:script src="translate_me.js" encoding="UTF‐8"/> 

To  localize  web‐based  applications,  as  with  regular  software  localizations, 


translators need to have access to the associated program resource files. 

GUIDELINES FOR JAVAHELP 
 

JavaHelp is a platform‐independent help system for Java‐based applications that 
works with either normal or compressed HTML (.jar) files. 

Considerations: 

• Files requiring localization 
• What localization involves 
– Help text 
– Help settings 
– Table of Contents & Index 

Page | 25  
 
JavaHelp  is  a  platform‐independent  help  system  for  Java‐based  applications.  It 
includes a viewer and works with both normal and compressed HTML files. The 
compressed  form  is  the  recommended  format,  and  has  a  .jar  extension.  It 
encapsulates  all  HTML  files  and  images  into  a  single  compressed  file,  similar  to 
the .chm format used by Windows HTML Help. 

Source files for JavaHelp projects include HTML documents, .gif and .jpg images. 
JavaHelp is compiled using a project file with the extension .hs. This is an XML file 
that contains all settings for compilation. The project file is compiled by running 
the  JAR  command,  which  is  available  with  the  Java  Development  Kit  (JDK).  For 
further details, please browse to Java.sun.com. 

The  HTML  files  in  a  JavaHelp  project  can  be  edited  using  any  HTML  editor,  but 
they  should  ideally  be  edited  using  the  tool  that  was  used  to  create  them. 
Typically  the  compiler  is  run  through  a  macro  shell  application,  such  as 
WebWorks Publisher or RoboHelp HTML. Such tools provide additional authoring 
facilities.  

 Localizable files that may be included in a JavaHelp localization kit are as follows:  

• Cascading Style Sheet (.css) 
• Graphics (.gif, .jpg) 
• HTML file (.html) 
• Java file (.java) 
• JavaHelp HelpSet file (.hs) 
• JavaHelp window definition (.hsw) 
• JavaScript file (.js) 
• Properties file (.properties) 
• XML file (.xml) 
• XML stylesheet (.xsl)  

WHAT TRANSLATION INVOLVES  
It  involves  translating  the  help  text  contained  in  the  HTML  source  files,  images 
and  the  XML  files  that  contain  the  project  settings,  the  table  of  contents,  the 
keyword index, and file mappings. Each of these files has an associated DTD that 
defines markup and structure. These can be found in the JavaHelp development 
environment in \doc\spec\dtd. 

• Help text  

Page | 26  
 
HTML  files  are  either  translated  using  a  TM  tool,  or  by  editing  them  with  the 
authoring  tool  used  to  create  them.  For  more  information,  refer  to  ‘HTML 
Guidelines’.  

• Help settings  

The HelpSet (.hs) file is an XML file that contains all compilation settings for the 
JavaHelp project. It can be edited using either a text or XML editor. Parts of the 
.hs file that may need translation include the following. 

• JavaHelp Title 

The words between the <title> and </title> tags are displayed in the help’s title 
bar and need to be translated. 

• View definitions 

The view definitions are contained within the <view> and </view> tags the can 
contain  labels  for  the  table  of  contents,  index  and  full‐text  search.  These  will 
need translation.  

• Table of Contents and Index files  

The  Table  of  Contents  and  index  are  each  defined  by  an  XML  file  (eg. 
IdeHelpIndex.xml and IdeHelpTOC.xml). Each of these contains lines of text with 
the text= attribute. In each instance of this attribute, text following text= is to be 
translated. 

   

Page | 27  
 
 

4 PREPARING FOR WEB SITE TRANSLATION  

• Global design issues 
• Style and layout 
• Electronic commerce 
• Management of a multi‐lingual website  

Translating web sites is much more integrated with the process of localization and is 
often referred to as web site globalization.  

Globalization of a website includes: 

• choice of software that supports multilingual hosting, 
• preparing  an  appropriate  multilingual  website  structure  and  navigation 
system, and 
• allocating content to be either translated or rewritten for a given country.  

Another  important  component  is  the  design  of  an  effective  multilingual  navigation 
system – one that can possibly track a user’s language preference through use of a 
cookie. This needs to be accessible on every page because of the potential to access 
the site through a search engine. 

Optimally, an internationalized web site:  

• Minimises the use of text within graphics 
• Supports international characters through the use of Unicode  

Some useful resources include: 

• World  Wide  Web  consortium,  which  provides  a  Localization  and 


Internalization web page: www.w3c.org/international  
• Mark Bishop’s book on “How to Build a Successful International Web Site” –
 www.multilingualwebmaster.com  

GLOBAL DESIGN ISSUES 
 

Page | 28  
 
• An appropriate development platform and hosting environment 
• An appropriate file structure 
• Identifying material for translation and re‐writing  
• Separation of text and code where possible 

Multilingual web sites are sometimes the most easily accessible information about a 
product  or  a  company.  Their  dynamic  character,  with  hypertext,  frequent  updates 
and  current  local  information  make  updates  frequent  and  local  information  quite 
important. The right choice of hosting environment and site structure can determine 
the ease and cost of converting and managing the site in a multilingual form. 

Development platform and hosting environment 

One  of  the  most  fundamental  decisions  to  be  made  is  the  choice  of  appropriate 
hosting  environment  and  development  platform.  At  the  very  least,  multilingual 
scripts should be supported through the use of Unicode.  

However,  there  are  tools  that  enable  easy  content  creation,  maintenance,  and 
automatic translation management using a centralized text database architecture.  

Some of these tools include Webplexer and Global Mirror. 

Although  many  issues  with  website  structure  are  addressed  by  these  tools,  there 
may be cases where a website development tool is not used. Key issues are briefly 
surveyed below.  

File Structure 

An  issue  to  address  at  the  outset  of  website  planning  is  file  structure.  It  is  wise  to 
create  folders  dedicated  to  each  locale,  each  with  its  own  subset  of  pages  and 
images, each with its links adjusted to lead to pages within this language setting. In 
some cases, it may be easier to create separate websites for each language, in other 
instances, one website with duplicate pages for each language is more appropriate. 

Identifying material for translation 

While deciding on a file structure, it is worthwhile to decide which pages are to be 
translated  and  which  need  to  be  re‐written  for  each  locale  to  reflect  the  relevant 
local data, such as contact and distribution details, warranty information and other 
country‐specific issues. 

Separation of text and code 

It  is  worthwhile  to  set  up  a  database  structure  for  the  website,  so  that  the  text  is 
separated  from  the  code.  This  will  increase  the  ease  of  translation  and  future 
updates, as the translator or website owner won’t have the added task of separating 

Page | 29  
 
text  and  code  and  testing  the  website  to  ensure  that  no  contamination  of  source 
code has taken place. 

However,  keeping  text  in  a  separate  file  is  not  always  possible  or  feasible.  A 
translation  vendor  with  the  appropriate  TM  tools  can  quite  easily  handle  HTML  or 
XML files where code and text are mixed, without the danger of corrupting the code 
during translation. 

STYLE AND LAYOUT 
 

• Use of style sheets 
• Multilingual  navigation system 
• Appropriate use of graphics  

Style sheets 

Formatting issues can affect the ease of translation and the quality of the final 
product. 

The best practice is the use of style sheets for formatting. This provides global 
control and avoids local code that can complicate the translation process. Be 
aware of the potential for text expansion as a result of translation, and account 
for this when preparing language‐specific style sheets. 

Multilingual navigation 

It is also important to design a multilingual navigation system that is accessible 
from each page. This caters for visitors accessing the web site from search 
engines. The names of languages should be written in the appropriate language 
and font, and optimally the user’s language choice should be tracked by a cookie. 

Use of graphics 

Images on a website often need to be localized for both content and text. It is 
wise to limit such images, and to keep them in separate image folders for each 
language for easy access. 

ELECTRONIC COMMERCE 
 

Page | 30  
 
• Foreign currencies, currency conversion 
• Varying time, date and number formats 
• Local addresses for shipping 
• Shipping costs 
• Awareness of local legal and commercial issues  

Web  sites  that  provide  worldwide  electronic  commerce  have  their  own  set  of 
requirements above and beyond basic localization issues. Although this is not a 
focus of this guide, a few of the key issues are highlighted. 

There is no question that being able to support worldwide purchases is essential, 
and yet many websites are incapable of dealing with customers from around the 
world. It is important to recognize the issues that need to be handled faultlessly 
for international commerce. These include: 

• Dealing with foreign currencies and supporting currency conversion 
• Supporting local time, date and number formats 
• Dealing with local scripts (preferably through Unicode), so that names and 
addresses can be encoded even if written in a non‐Roman script 
• Safe and effective credit card processing 
• The ability to calculate shipping costs 

ONGOING WEBSITE MANAGEMENT 
 

• Frequent updates 
• Use of translation tools 
• Automatic multilingual update tools 

Websites should be updated on a regular basis. They are much more dynamic than 
printed  information,  and  users  expect  good  websites  to  be  up‐to‐date.  As  a 
minimum, they need to reflect current contact information. 

For larger websites and those in multiple languages, the use of tools for multilingual 
management is the recommended option. Such tools will flag updated text, and may 
even  automatically  initiate  the  required  translations.  Some  of  these  tools  include 
Webplexer and Global Mirror. 

If the use of such a tool is not feasible, you can minimise costs and translation time 
through an ongoing localization vendor relationship. The translation of any updates 
can be supported by previously translated text through use of a translation memory 
(TM) tool. In addition, a formal update plan that includes translation of updated text 

Page | 31  
 
needs  to  be  used  to  ensure  that  data  is  correct  and  up‐to‐date  on  the  non‐English 
pages of the website. 

   

Page | 32  
 
 

5 BRAND NAME ISSUES
   

Brand names are a very special case. Don’t assume that just because the meaning of 
a  name  is  obvious  in  your  language  and  your  country,  that  it  will  be  recognized  in 
other countries as well. 

Brand names must be ‘re‐engineered’ for another language and culture to have the 
meaning  and  impact  desired  by  your  marketing  department.  Failure  to  do  so  will 
most likely result in a failed product launch. 

 
A real life story 
Apparently Coca‐Cola's initial transliteration of their name into Chinese produced a 
rendering with the meaning "bite the wax tadpole."  

When  Coca‐Cola  first  entered  the  Chinese  market  in  1928,  they  had  no  official 
representation  of  their  name  in  Mandarin.  They  needed  to  find  four  Chinese 
characters  whose  pronunciations  approximated  the  sounds  "ko‐ka‐ko‐la"  without 
producing  a  nonsensical  or  adverse  meaning  when  strung  together  as  a  written 
phrase.  

Written Chinese employs about 40,000 different characters, of which about 200 are 
pronounced with sounds that could be used in forming the name "ko‐ka‐ko‐la." 

While  Coca‐Cola  was  searching  for  a  satisfactory  combination  of  symbols  to 
represent their name, Chinese shopkeepers created signs that combined characters 
whose  pronunciations  formed  the  string  "ko‐ka‐ko‐la,"  but  they  did  so  with  no 
regard for the meanings of the written phrases these formed. The character for wax, 
pronounced "la," was used in many of these signs, resulting in strings that sounded 
like  "ko‐ka‐ko‐la"  when  pronounced  but  conveyed  nonsensical  meanings  such  as 
"female horse fastened with wax," "wax‐flattened mare," or "bite the wax tadpole" 
when read. 

Coca‐Cola had to avoid using many of the 200 symbols available for forming "ko‐ka‐
ko‐la"  because  of  their  meanings,  including  all  of  the  characters  pronounced  "la." 
They compromised by opting for the character lê, meaning "joy," and approximately 

Page | 33  
 
pronounced as "ler." When transliterating the name 'Coca‐Cola' they finally settled 
on using the following characters:  

 
 

This  representation  is  literally  translated  as  "to  allow  the  mouth  to  be  able  to 
rejoice”.  However,  it  acceptably  represents  the  concept  of  "something  palatable 
from which one receives pleasure”. 

It  was  the  real  thing,  with  no  wax  tadpoles  or  female  horses,  and  Coca‐Cola 
registered it as its Chinese trademark in 1928.  

6 WHEN THINGS GO WRONG  
 

Mistakes do happen. So a collaborative relationship with your translation company is 
essential for ironing out any problems. 

Incorrect translation  

If both translation and proofing are performed by the same organization, a reputable 
provider  will  use  different  translators  to  ensure  independence.  However,  some 
clients  may  choose  to  use  a  different  provider  to  proof  the  work,  or  even  do  the 
proofing in‐house by using someone from the regional office in the target market.  

Bear  in  mind  that  there  is  some  permissible  variation  in  translation  as  a  result  of 
personal  preference.  As  long  as  the  meaning  is  accurate  and  clear,  and  the  tone  is 
faithful to the original, a professional linguist will not make corrections purely on the 
basis of personal preference. Proofing by a native speaker who is not a professional 
translator may result in spurious corrections.  

Page | 34  
 
If  errors  are  found  in  the  translation,  these  should  be  forwarded  to  the  original 
localization  company  for  action.  Bone  fide  errors  are  typically  corrected  free  of 
charge.  

Culturally inappropriate material  

Idiomatic or culturally specific material such as jokes and cartoons should not simply 
be translated into the target language without considering how it will be received in 
the target country. The result may be misunderstood or worse, considered offensive. 
The localizer should identify such items during internationalization.  

Such risks are minimized by adopting the same sales and marketing strategies as you 
would in your own country; that is, the use of market surveys, focus groups and pilot 
releases.  

This paper is available at no cost from the Academy Translations web site. Please go to www.academyXL.com,  
enter your name and email address and download. 

Page | 35