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The Water Rudder…

The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

January 2010-Winter Issue Volume 4 Number 1

December 1 st Declared Civil Air Patrol Day in Alaska:

December 1 s t Declared Civil Air Patrol Day in Alaska: View the document at:

View the document at:

http://home.gci.net/~trout/cap/images/governors

_proclamation.jpg

Commanders Call:

LtCol. Ken Nestler

I would like to thank Bob Goetz for his great job as my acting Commander during my absence. Also thanks go to Steve Sztuk and Karl Marx as my deputies who carried on and assisted

Bob. Also noteworthy was the wrapping up of the furnace & sewer system projects by Martha DeFreest and Jon Ahlgren. Thanks to all the rest of you who kept things going.

We had a great turnout for the awards

banquet.

scenes folks of Bob & Sheila Goetz, Jon Ahlgren, Brooke Daly,& Shawn Damerval for their hard work to make it a success!

Thanks go to the behind the

Kudos to all those who participated in the missions. We are looking forward to many more missions during the upcoming year. Remember we need observers & scanners along with the pilots. We also need folks on the ground to support the rest of the Emergency Services. Remember there are two other components to our program: Aerospace Education and the Cadet program. We need folks to help with these programs also.

Cadet Activities:

Food Drive

By Major Sztuk Cadets worked hard on Juneau’s Food Drive. The goal was: 6,000 pounds of non-perishable food for the Southeast Alaska Food Bank in twelve hours. KINY Radio and three of its sister stations covered the event with Kelly Perez broadcasting the event the entire 12 hours!

The plan: To arrest “famous” people in Juneau (Senator Dennis Egan, Police Chief Greg Browning, City Manager Rod Swope, Representative Cathy Munoz, KINY’s Sharon Gaiptman, to

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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The Water Rudder…

The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

name a few), and find someone to bail them out using food as collateral. Some had to stay in jail for an extended period of time!!! The “jail” was made from cases of chili, with bars.

It went from “famous” to some “not so famous” people. One jail bird (Tom Henderson VP of Coeur Alaska Mine) took hostages.

The Casualties: Side aches from laughing so hard! There was a lot of whooping, hollering, and applause…akin to a carnival atmosphere.

The Result: Juneau raised 17,739 pounds of food in 12 hours!

This is the kind of community we have the pleasure of serving!

is the kind of community we have the pleasure of serving! Cadet Kiefer, Hostages helps unload

Cadet Kiefer, Hostages helps unload the 355 pounds of food collected by the cadets. Major Sztuk, Cadet Buzard, Cadet Myles Kiefer

Jeff DeFreest on a area familiarization flight. Rear Admiral Colvin and Captain Bert flew along on the ELT and FLIR training SAREX.

Captain Bert flew along on the ELT and FLIR training SAREX. Admiral Colvin Captain Bert Specialty

Admiral Colvin

along on the ELT and FLIR training SAREX. Admiral Colvin Captain Bert Specialty Track Highlight: Drug

Captain Bert

Specialty Track Highlight:

Drug Demand Reduction Officer By Capt.Marx

Most of us joined Civil Air Patrol because we wanted to get involved, to make a difference. CAP offers many varied opportunities to do just that, but sometimes the list of options can get

Operations:

Various SAREXs took place during the last quarter of 2009 in SE Alaska. On a November 2 nd SAREX two distinguished USCG visitors joined CAP Pilot Major

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

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For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

The Water Rudder…

The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

overwhelming. To help clear things up a bit, I’m beginning what I hope will become a regular feature in the Water Rudder, the Specialty Track Highlight. My hope is to give a brief overview of one specialty track in each edition to help members find an opportunity for service that will be a good fit with their personal goals and interests. I begin with Drug Demand Reduction in part

within the squadron and in the community.

To reach the Senior rating, the DDR officer focuses increasing attention outside the local squadron, either to larger groups within CAP through Wing

or higher level activities, or outside CAP through community activities. Another

12

months is required in addition to the

 

12

required to reach Technician.

because that office is currently vacant, and in part because substance use and abuse is a major issue in Juneau and throughout Alaska.

Drug Demand Reduction is a five-part program consisting of education and training, school outreach, community outreach, liaison with community organizations, and member support. This position is perfect for someone who has a passion for working to get and keep the members of our squadrons and community clean and sober. It focuses primarily on youth, including our cadets. The big event of the year is the Red Ribbon campaign in October, and there are many other chances to be involved year-round.

As with all specialty tracks, there are three levels: Technician, Senior and Master. The training to reach Technician level focuses on getting training and support through the National Headquarters Civil Air Patrol Drug Demand Reduction (NHQ CAP/DDR) program, and involves 12 months of service under the guidance of a higher-level DDR officer. That service includes helping the unit commander develop a DDR program and making presentations on drug-related topics

Master level training focuses on awareness of trends in substance use and abuse in the community, and helping the local unit as well as the Wing and Region respond to those trends. It involves helping train new DDR officers, presenting workshops and seminars, and interpreting policies as needed to keep the DDR program current and effective.

If you think you would be interested in the Drug Demand Reduction specialty track, the core information can be found in CAPP 228, available online by going to eServices, clicking on Forms and Publication, then Pamphlets. Other important documents are regulations CAPR 51-1 CAP DDR Program, and CAPR 50-17, CAP Senior Member Professional Development Program.

As with all specialty tracks, getting signed up is as easy as catching me at the hangar or dropping me a note by email. My address can be found by going to eServices. Under AK-022 Stats, click on the highlighted number to the right of Senior Members. It will bring up a list of all senior members in the squadron and their email addresses. Once I know you are interested, I can

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

complete the paperwork online. I look forward to hearing from you!

Visit from Wing Commander

Charlie Palmer is the new Wing Commander Designee and was able to join the Juneau Wing for the Christmas banquet. A big thank you to all who helped out with the banquet!

A big thank you to all who helped out with the banquet! Charlie Palmer, and Jeff

Charlie Palmer, and Jeff DeFreest in the CAP hangar discussing the Guardian Angel mission flight just completed by DeFreest and his air crew, Lisa Marx, Carol Huber.

by DeFreest and his air crew, Lisa Marx, Carol Huber. Wing Commander Designee Charlie Palmer examining

Wing Commander Designee Charlie Palmer examining the new FLIR system on the squadron's C-206 during his visit

to Juneau to attend the annual awards banquet.

Safety News:

Submitted by 1LT Rob MacDonald; Safety Officer

Space Blankets:

I recently came across some information in the December 2009 Field & Stream magazine that I wanted to share about Space Blankets, an essential survival item.

Most of us are familiar with space blankets. Space blankets are extremely lightweight and are an essential survival item that can provide shelter, warmth, and signaling capabilities.

This year marks the 45th anniversary of the space blanket’s introduction. But the material (essentially plastic sheeting vapor-coated with metallic particles) was first used commercially in the 1950’s as an avant-garde wall covering in bathrooms. The fad might have easily died out in the bathroom, but NASA saw the advantages of a material that could both repel the intense heat of the sun and protect the dark side of a spacecraft from the subzero temperatures of space. By the Time Apollo II touched down on the moon in 1969, the fabric had advanced. In fact, Neil Armstrong’s suit was made of space blanket material that included a layer of pure gold and the lunar module that delivered Armstrong and Aldrin to the moon was covered in space blanket material.

While the metal may be cheap, the end results aren’t. No other material has the

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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The Water Rudder…

The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

ability to reflect body heat so efficiently. And, because life insurance never came at such a minimum weight and low price, the space blanket rapidly became a staple in nearly every outdoorsman’s pack.

There are countless ways a space blanket can be configured to one’s advantage. It is best known as a wraparound blanket. Besides slowing sweat evaporation and blocking wind, it reflects 90% of body heat, minimizing cooling through convection and radiation.

To be effective, a space blanket must be used properly. The shiny side must face your body as the dull silver side reflects only 65% of radiated heat. And, duct tape can be used to snug it into place. One caribou hunter’s reminder of surviving a night out are the frostbitten fingers he got while pinching together the space blanket draped over his body.

Space blankets also serve as a great ground cloth under a tent and as a cover to increase the warmth of a sleeping bag (in essence, a bivvy sack). You can also use one as a signal mirror by wrapping it around a green limb bent into a circle and faced into the sun. And, one of the most practical uses of a space blanket is to make a lean-to.

Two other date-facts for space blankets are: 1) In 1978, marathon runners were draped in space blankets as they crossed the finish line to prevent hypothermia, an earlier problem; and 2) In 2009, a breathable space blanket material is used to line clothing.

So, after 45 years of emergency use, the space blanket is as valuable as ever.

Aircraft Status:

Beaver N5142G

Mission Ready at JNU

Cessna N4950R

Mission Ready at JNU

Training Opportunities:

Look for the FY-2009 Training Plan in the Ops Room & Classroom; or call Commander Nestler @ 789-1492 for info…

Scholarship: If you want to sign up for a scholarship this year, you need to have your application in by the 5 th of January 2010 at wing headquarters in Anchorage.

Our classroom has taken on a new look with the recent acquisition of new tables and chairs. Good work on acquisition and transport of the furniture and a big Thank You to all who helped!

of the furniture and a big Thank You to all who helped! The Quarterly Newsletter of

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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The Water Rudder…

The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

ECI-13 and the new Officer Basic Course

By Lisa Marx

As many of you know, we have been planning to hold a classroom-based ECI- 13 class. The ECI-13 (also called ADL- 13) has been required for promotion to Captain, and has been a common thing that holds people back from promotion. It is a four section self-study course followed by a closed-book test.

As of 31 December 2009, the ECI-13 will no longer be available, much less required. It is being replaced by an online program called the Officer Basic Course, or OBC. Here’s the run-down of what to expect:

There are three sections: the Personal

Dimension of Leadership; the Professional Dimension of Leadership, and the Organizational Dimension of Leadership. It is anticipated to take about 20 hours to complete (as compared to almost 40 for ECI-13).

Each section is followed by an open- book online quiz.

Once you pass all three quizzes, you will be able to print a certificate that can go in your file as proof of completion.

It follows a 90-day cohort model with a set start date. You must complete all three sections within your assigned 90 days. Cohorts start:

Jan. 1

Feb. 15

April 1

May 15

July 1

Aug. 15

Oct. 1

Nov. 15

You must sign up for the cohort by filling out the form located at http://members.gocivilairpatrol.com/

media/cms/OBC_Enrollment_AF233

CDFEA71D.pdf

and emailing that form to

officerbasiccourse@capnhq.gov.

You must have already completed Level I before you can sign up for the OBC i .

If you have already taken the ECI- 13, you cannot take the OBC, at least not at present. According to the website, when demand levels out, it will be opened to those who have already had ECI-13.

Cadet Officers will have access to OBC, but it will not count towards the Phase IV requirements. ECI will continue to be available to cadets until 1 March 2010 ii .

For more information, see the website at http://members.gocivilairpatrol.com/ cap_university/officer_basic_course. cfm.

If you complete the OBC, please inform both the Professional Development Officer, Lt. Goetz, and me so that we can make sure it is documented in all the correct locations. You can place a copy of your completed certificate in my box (labeled Personnel) in the office in the hangar, and I will make sure it gets recorded in your file.

Endnotes

i Level I is generally completed during your first few months of membership, and includes the Cadet Protection Policy, OPSEC, setting up your eServices account, and a foundations program on what CAP is and does. ii Cadets who have completed their Mitchell Award can continue to enroll in ECI-13 through 1 March 2010, and it will count toward the Leadership

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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The Water Rudder…

The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

Academy training requirement for Phase

IV. The OBC will not count towards

Phase IV, but Cadet Officers who choose to take it will receive credit for it if they transition to senior members in the future.

the rank of Cadet Master Sergeant in the Juneau Civil Air Patrol as Cadet Executive Officer. His peers wrote, “He knows that school is a big thing to advance in C.A.P. and life after. He works very, very hard to maintain a balanced routine with CAP and school. He is a hard worker in everything that he commits to.”

Lio also enjoys playing video games, socializing with friends, discussing politics/philosophy, and writing short stories and poetry. He says thanks to his parents for putting up with him for 17 years!

Australian Air Safari October 2009

LtCol. Nestler

As you know, Gen & I took a short vacation this fall and visited New Zealand and Australia. The highlight of the trip for me was an “Australian Air Safari” (Gen’s highlight was to go shopping for quilting material). It truly was an adventure of a lifetime; 39 hours of cross country in 13 days. There were four couples, each in our own aircraft (3 Cessna 172’s, 1 Piper Archer) along with the tour director, Mick, & his dad in a Cessna 182.

First task was an English Proficiency test to validate our temporary Australian pilot license. This was a culmination of over 20 pages of paper work, declarations etc., plus notarized copies of everything except the kitchen sink including my passport, driver’s license,

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Promotions

Cadet Promotions:

Chatham D. Holt, C/SMSgt; 27 September Cameron D. Perry, C/SSgt; 27 September Justin M. Hatch, C/Amn; 10 October Myles S. Keifer, C/CMSgt; 17October

Senior Promotions:

Kenneth A. Nestler, Lt Col; 29 October Sheila J. Goetz, 2Lt; 18 November Bryan C. Rice, 2Lt; 18 November Kirt D. Stage-Harvey, 2Lt; 18 November K. Steve Sztuk, Lt Col; 18 November

Meet Our Members:

Cadet Buzard was one of three young people to be selected as the Fourth of July Grand Parade Marshall for 2010. Russell Buzard was born in Sitka 17 years ago. Russell (aka “Lio” by friends) is a junior at Thunder Mountain High School and, ‘loving it’ he says. His achievements in life are too many to mention but a few are:

He was ecstatic to be stage manager for the operatic “The Mikado.” Most of his training was at Sitka Fine Arts. He was a member of the Rifle Team, the Boy Scouts where he held the record for ‘the most popcorn sold in the State of Alaska for two consecutive years.’ He holds

birth certificate, US pilot’s license, medical & the last 3 pages of my The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

The Water Rudder…

The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

logbook. All this paperwork had to be processed by the folks in Australia. The license is valid for 90 days VFR daylight only.

The license is valid for 90 days VFR daylight only. After we passed the English proficiency

After we passed the English proficiency test we started in with a class room presentation of Australian rules of the air and flying in and out of the home base of Bankstown Airport. Bankstown Airport, located in Sydney, is probably the busiest in Australia and a real challenge with all the restricted airspace in the area. We then took a check ride in our aircraft with the main emphasis being accuracy in navigating to and from the airport. The initial VFR approach point is about 30 miles from the airport. The tower has no radar and depends on accurate position reporting at specific locations when about 5 miles inbound to sequence traffic. (Golly, sounds like Juneau!)

Airport communications used the Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF). There was no tower, no radar, and usually no one at the airport. Landings amounted to: listen to automatic weather, make periodic radio calls, enter left pattern, land. The only other tower on our trip was Alice Springs which also has radar.

The next day saw us packing up and departing Bankstown for Moree. Upon arrival at Moree, we had lunch in the shade of a DC-3 mounted on posts. We also got to go inside it. After a tour of the local farmlands, we took a soak in a mineral hot spring pool. We had a great dinner at the Returned and Services League (RSL). It is sort of the Australian version of the VFW.

Next day we headed off to Charleville. We flew at 1,000 to 3,000 feet and saw lots of kangaroos. Moderate turbulence unless you went below 1,000 feet. There were a lot of stations (ranches) with dirt strips. The roads run in perfectly straight lines for miles. Charleville has an astronomical observatory/science center. It is the home of the Royal Flying Doctors which provides medical services in the outback. There was a bomber training base for the US Army Air Force located there during WWII.

The following day we headed off for Longreach. Longreach is the original home of Qantas (Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services Limited). There is a large museum of Qantas history. Several aircraft are on display including a 747, 707 & DC3 which are available to tour. The nearby Stockman’s Hall of Fame shows early life on the cattle range & history of the area. Sunset dinner was around a campfire following a river cruise on a paddle wheel boat.

The next stop was Birdsville. Landed, taxied to tiedown, walked across the street to pub (check into motel). Birdsville has a population of about 150 folks. Not much there except for the

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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The Water Rudder…

The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

pub, small museum & medical clinic. Like the old saying; Birdsville is not the end of the earth, but you can see it from there.

Leaving Birdsville the next day, we crossed the Simpson Desert, nothing but sand and small shrubs as far as the eye could see. We got up to 6,000 feet & still hot! At 1,500 ft it was over 95F. We had lots of up & downdrafts. There was also an abundance of landing areas. As we approached Alice Springs tower traffic area, we came under radar observation. They have specific routes and reporting points that are to be followed approaching and departing the airport. Radio calls had a mandatory sequence and terminology which was to be used. The tower was kind to the Yanks who were having trouble sorting out which sand dune was which. It probably was the most excitement that tower in a long time. I understand the reason for the tower is the presence of a US defense base located in the area.

The Alice Springs stop lasted two days for recuperation. We toured & shopped the town, visited a casino, went shopping again, had dinner at a game restaurant, went to a didgeridoo concert, and spent one afternoon at the horse races.

Our departure headed off for Ayres Rock. Another flight with a bumpy ride, but spectacular scenery made up for it. We stayed at about 3,000 ft, but lots of hills and ridges & even a meteor crater. Sightseeing the “Rock” has specific flight paths and altitudes to follow due to the high air traffic density. A special chart is published for just that purpose. The “Olga” is another rock formation

that is about 15 miles to the West. It is

quite a sight in its own right.

as spectacular and is included in the

aerial tour. Landing at the “Rock” airport was a bit more challenging with a 20+kt cross wind compared to the 7 to 12 kt crosswinds at earlier airports.

It’s almost

the 7 to 12 kt crosswinds at earlier airports. It’s almost Leaving the “Rock”, we headed

Leaving the “Rock”, we headed off to mining country of Coober Pedy and the Australian opal fields. A good part of the population lives underground. The mining equipment bores or grinds out tunnels and chambers underground for housing. We stayed in a “5 star” hotel

with bare rock for walls. It’s hard to see the sunrise from your room. A number

of miners have become wealthy from the

opals discovered when constructing their

homes. The landscape sure looks strange. The dark ground covered with light colored circles of dirt (tailings) with a dark hole in the center. The

miners search for opals by boring a 3 ft

diameter hole.

miner is then lowered down the hole to search for opals on the side of the hole.

Using a winch, the

The next day’s flight was to Broken Hill.

A fuel stop was planned since headwinds

were forecast. Original planned stop was out of fuel so an alternate stop

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

called Marree was used. There was no fixed facility, instead gas barrels were hauled around in a small trailer. Fuel was pumped out of a barrel through a filter into 20 liter jugs & poured into wing tanks. Fuel was about $10/gal. The landing at Broken Hill was interesting with large updrafts along final requiring a go around @ 800 ft AGL. Broken hill is known for its large silver, lead and zinc lodes. We visited an outdoor art museum.

On the following day we were off to Griffith. A challenging gusty cross wind landing added to the fun. Lots of lush farming country helped along with irrigation. We visited the Yellow Tail winery, but no sampling.

Off to Cessnock which is 80 miles North of Sydney. The first day of low clouds for the trip. We had to skirt some low hanging stuff to stay VFR. The terrain was rugged rock walls broken by ravines. Yup, the restricted airspaces appeared again over the low terrain so we had to stay over the hills. Still the air was smooth which was a big help. We landed at Cessnock and had two days to visit the Hunter Valley. This area is renowned for its many wineries (over a hundred). We took in 4 tasting rooms. Had lunch at microbrewery-pub combination. We also visited a small zoo with its unique Australian animals.

also visited a small zoo with its unique Australian animals. The last day of the trip

The last day of the trip we got to fly down the coast and sightsee Sydney and the surrounding shoreline. Wonderful views, with lots of picture taking opportunities. Then continue on to land at Bankstown. We finished off the trip with a dinner cruise of the Sydney Harbor.

The whole trip we had very few glitches. One of the planes had a plugged pitot tube on take off and had to return to have it cleared out. On the last day, a plane couldn’t get started. Ken got to demonstrate how to hand prop a plane. (No one else knew how to do it!) The weather was beautiful the whole trip except for the day noted above. Communications were maintained between aircraft on 123.45. In fact, this seemed to be the universal frequency. There were VOR’s & NDB’s, but a lot of flying was done out of range of the ground stations. GPS is a wonderful piece of equipment to use for navigation over this country.

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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The Official Newsletter of the Civil Air Patrol’s Southeast Composite Squadron Juneau, Alaska

CAP Supporters & Sponsors:

Squadron Juneau, Alaska CAP Supporters & Sponsors: Terry Papf, owner of See Gee donated their Weight

Terry Papf, owner of See Gee donated their Weight & Balance Calculator for both the U206 and the Beaver that we fly here in Juneau. The device makes a weight and balance calculation before every flight an easy operation.

balance calculation before every flight an easy operation. The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron

The Quarterly Newsletter of the Southeast Composite Squadron - Juneau, Alaska

For further information contact Major Jeff DeFreest, Public Affairs Officer, PCR-AK-022 at: jdefreest@gmail.com

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