You are on page 1of 33

OECS Environment and Sustainable 

Development Unit 

Fisheries 
Management 
and 
Data Collection Training 
Programme 

Prepared by 

Peter A. Murray 

for the 

Coastal and Marine Resources Management Programme 
September 2001 

Revised February 2008
1
Table of Contents 
Table of Contents  2 

Section 1 – Principles of Fisheries Management  3 

What is Fisheries Management?  3 

Why do we manage a fishery?  3 

When do we manage a fishery?  3 

How do we manage a fishery?  4 

Section 2 – Elements of Fisheries Biology  5 

Ecosystem and habitat concepts  5 

Growth of fish and how it affects fisheries management  5 

Overfishing – myth or reality?  8 

Section 3 – The Biology of Management and the Management of Biology  10 

Data collection  10 

Management measures  18 

People Management – working with fishers  22 

Section 4 – The Fisheries Management Team  26 

Section 5 – Lessons Learned in Fisheries Management  28 

Outside the Caribbean  28 

Outside the OECS  29 

Outside Your Country  29 

Within Your Country  30 

Section 6 – Building a Fisheries Management Team  31


Section 1­ Principles of Fisheries Management 
What is Fisheries Management? 
Fisheries Management is the pursuit of certain objectives through the direct or indirect 
control of effective fishing effort or some of its components.

·  It involves individuals, groups or both performing organized activities, in a 
coordinated manner, toward common objectives.
·  It assumes one or more objectives exists, towards which the organized activities are 
directed
·  Activities involve the establishment of formal and informal relationships among 
people to accomplish management objectives
·  Requires decision­making.  It involves the evaluation and selection of alternatives in 
an atmosphere which is often risky and uncertain 

Why do we manage a fishery? 
There are many possible objectives of fisheries management:

·  Increase profit to fishermen and their organisations
·  Increase revenue to Government
·  Increase foreign exchange earnings
·  Increase integration between and among fisheries and other sectors (e.g. Tourism)
·  Produce cheap source of protein for the nation
·  Ensure that future generations can earn a reasonable living, or obtain a reasonable 
amount of protein, from the fisheries sector
·  Assist in strengthening communities which are dependent on fishing for sustainable 
livelihoods 

When do we manage a fishery? 
Fishery management is an on­going process if it is to be successful in meeting the 
objectives set out for the industry.  Management should not wait until it appears that the 
fishery is no longer sustainable, but should be proactive and ensure sustainability. 
Rational fisheries management (and development) requires that a set of well­defined 
objectives are developed for the sector.  The policies and overall objectives must be 
identified for the sector as a whole, as well as for individual fisheries. 

This must be based on the best available understanding or the status of the fisheries 
resources at the time, and the costs and benefits of various management approaches. 
Management policies and objectives should also be based on the biological 
characteristics of each particular fisheries stock.  Fisheries resources and the socio­ 
economic conditions that affect their utilisation are dynamic.  This means that there is a 
constant need to monitor the effects of the methods used for catching fish and to make 
adjustments to the overall system as necessary in order to ensure sustainability of the 
resource and the viability of the fishery.


How do we manage a fishery? 
Usually, the overall objective for a particular fishery is to maintain the catch as high as 
possible without depleting the stock, while at the same time avoiding large catch 
fluctuations from year to year. 

The Fisheries Management Plan is ideally the overall tool for managing the fisheries of a 
country.  It identifies the status of the fisheries, and the actions needed to achieve 
management objectives.  These management measures may also include a variety of 
options for controlling the level of fishing effort (and hence the proportion of the fish 
population which dies as a result of fishing – the fishing mortality).  Measures may 
include legislation, rules, and agreements as well as education and enforcement 
programmes. 

The combination of measures selected and their effectiveness will depend on the:

·  Biological nature of the resource
·  Social nature of the particular fishery
·  Economic nature of the particular fishery
·  Policies guiding overall management and development of the sector


Section 2 – Elements of Fisheries Biology 

Ecosystem and habitat concepts 
An ecosystem is a community of living things and the environment in which they live.  In 
other words the habitat of a particular stock may be such that it is part of a particular 
ecosystem (and all the ecosystems of the world together form the biosphere).  Ecosystems 
are defined by the form of the environment (a reef, an estuary) and the major 
communities of things living there (a coral reef, a mangrove forest).  Both the living and 
non­living things are a part of this ecosystem. 

Living things in ecosystems occur in groups called species populations, each of which 
consists of individuals so similar that they can breed with each other.  The species 
population is a basic unit of nature.  When a fish population is fished by a particular 
group of people, it is called a stock.  The stock is the basic unit of fisheries management. 
The population of a species is always bigger than the stock of a fishery. 

Populations of different species form communities when they live together in particular 
regions of the marine environment called habitats (e.g. pelagic fish community, reef fish 
community, the fishing village).  It is an understanding of the habitat of various species 
that helps us determine what stock they come from. 

The marine ecosystems in which fish live include the plants and animals that fish eat, the 
other animals that eat fish, the rocks, the corals, sponges and plants in which fish take 
shelter, the water in which they swim, and the weather that moves the water.  Marine 
ecosystems have thousands of populations in them, each of which affects each other one 
(see figure 1), and each of which is affected by the environment. 

Man is always a part of any ecosystem, not separate to it.  Man’s actions influence, and 
are influenced by the other parts of the ecosystem.  Communities of fishermen are as 
important as communities of fish in managing a fishery.  That is why it is important that 
we obtain certain types of information about the fishermen themselves.  The effect of 
man’s activities on the other parts of the ecosystem can be direct and obvious (e.g. how 
fishing kills fish), or it can be indirect and very difficult to measure (like how coastal 
construction affects fish behaviour) 

Growth of fish and how it affects fisheries management 
Growth can be considered as the difference between what enters the body and what 
leaves it.  It is a highly irregular process, varying with age, sex, season, climate, 
reproductive cycle, and population size.  After passing through the juvenile stage most 
fish species grow in a fairly regular way with growth slowing until it almost reaches a 
maximum size such that any further increase in size takes place so slowly as to be 
negligible.  The size where this occurs it is known as the “asymptotic size” or the “size of 
a very old fish”.  In the region we tend to focus on length of the fish, as the measure of 
fish size, because it is relatively easier to measure under regional field conditions than 
individual weights of


Figure 1.  In marine ecosystems each population affects each other one


fish; thus we speak about “asymptotic length).  The equation that models how fish grow 
is incorporated into the models that suggest to us the status of the stock. 

length 

age 

Figure 2. The “von Bertalanffy growth model, showing fish length going to an 
asymptote as the fish gets older 

The parameters from the growth model, called growth parameters, differ from species to 
species, from stock to stock, from sex to sex within the same species, and can take 
different values in different parts of the range of the species.  In other words, we say that 
growth parameters are “stock specific”.  These stock specific parameters provide the 
basis for determining the change in status of the stock as a consequence of fishing 
pressure (for example as shown in figure 3).  It is this determination that serves to 
provide us with guidelines by which we will put in place the appropriate management 
measures.  These measures, which will be discussed in more detail later, fall under a 
number of categories 

Figure 3.  Stock status changes with increased fishing pressure


·  Biological controls
·  Gear controls
·  Catch controls
·  Monitoring control and surveillance
·  Environmental controls
·  Sustainable fisheries measures 

Overfishing – myth or reality? 
Some years ago, two types of overfishing were recognised, however these days a larger 
number of manifestations of overfishing have been identified:

·  Growth overfishing, the easiest to grasp and to account for theoretically occurs when 
fish are caught before they had “a chance to grow”
·  Recruitment overfishing is what occurs when so few adult fish are left in an exploited 
stock that the production of eggs is reduced to the extent that recruitment of young 
fish to the fishery is impaired
·  Ecosystem overfishing is what takes place in an ecosystem when the decline (through 
fishing) of the originally abundant stocks is not fully compensated for by an increase 
in the biomass (weight of living material) of other exploited animals, for example by 
not compensating for the overall catch per unit of effort.
·  Economic overfishing occurs when less than maximum economic yield is obtained 
from a fishery, in other words, when fishing effort exceeds that needed to maximize 
the economic rent (simply put, the difference between the amount obtained from the 
activity and the cost of carrying it out) from the fishery.
·  Malthusian overfishing occurs as a result of the direct link between population growth 
(or density) and overfishing, such that with fishermen put short­term gain ahead of 
future benefit even if it is to the detriment of the habitat which supports the fishery on 
which they depend.  Put another way, Malthusian overfishing occurs because coastal 
systems cannot continue to serve as a convenient dump for excess labour and still 
produce ever increasing or even sustained amounts of goods and services. 

Some of the effects of overfishing are shown below.  We can thus see the link between what 
is happening in the fishery and its impact on the society as a whole, moving overfishing 
from the realm of myth to that of an urgent reality. 

In single­species fisheries 
I.  Reduction in size of the animals caught, hence 
a.  Usually a reduction in value per unit weight 
II.  Reduction of biomass on the ground, hence 
a.  Reduction of catch per unit of effort (and hence returns) of individual 
vessels 
III.  Reduction of total catch (at high levels of effort), hence 
a.  Lowered overall food supply

8
b.  Increased prices 
c.  Need to import substitutes and hence, increased nutritional deficiency 
among poorer segments of the human population 
IV.  Increased fluctuation of stock due to reduced number of age groups in the stock 
and to reduced ‘buffering’ of recruitment fluctuations, hence 
a.  More frequent occurrence of periods with extremely low catches 
b.  Increasing risk of occasional recruitment failure, inclusive of total collapse 
of stock and fishery 
V.  Lowered income among fishers, hence 
a.  A multitude of social ills such as violent conflicts between pauperized 
small­scale fishers and their ‘industrial’ competitors 
While in multi­species fisheries 
I.  Same as (I) to (V) above, plus 
II.  Massive changes in species composition of catch i.e. 
a.  Disappearance of previously important high­valued species 
b.  Increase of unmarketable species (trash fish), and hence 
c.  Reduction in average value of species mix 
d.  Loss of biological diversity


Section 3­ The Biology of Management and the 
Management of Biology 
Data collection 
A field data collection programme ideally has a number of components.  Catch and effort, 
biological, economic and sociological data are gathered.  In some instances, there is 
overlap between the types of data as a result of commonalities among them or their 
analytical requirements (Figure 4).  For example, for biological data to be properly 
analysed, there is need for some corresponding catch and effort information.  Thus, care 
must be taken to ensure that clear­cut guidelines are followed to allow for maximum 
utility of the data collected. 

Figure 4 Field Data Collection Programme 

General guidelines for the collection of all types of field data 
1.  Write clearly at all times.  Check data at the end of each interview to ensure that 
the relevant information has been collected 
2.  Use a pencil to record your information.  Writing in ink may become smeared if 
exposed to water 
3.  Record all information on the data sheets directly; do not transfer data from loose 
scraps of paper away from the data collection site 
4.  Keep your completed data sheets in a secure place at all times

10 
5.  Familiarise yourself with the target species for which you are required to collect 
field data if at all.  Ask yourself the following questions: 
a.  From which species are fisheries data to be collected? 
b.  How are these species caught by vessels that use the landing site? Do 
vessels use more than one fishing gear to catch the same species? 
c.  What types of data are to be collected for a particular species?  Is it catch 
(total weight) and effort data only? Length frequencies? Maturity and 
ageing? 
d.  If you are doing individual measurements you should ask yourself the 
following questions: are most of the fish landed for the species less than or 
greater than 30 cm?  Are most of the fish landed for the species less than 1 
kg; between 1 and 5 kg or greater than 5 kg? 

Guidelines for collecting Catch and Effort Data 
General 
1.  Do not ask questions unnecessarily.  Fishermen are often suspicious of persons 
asking questions related to their income and are irritated after a long and 
frustrating fishing trip; and may be impatient in answering your questions. 
2.  Obtain as much background information for the landing site, this may be 
compiled over time based on your previous visits and should include information 
concerning: 
a.  How many vessels are based on the landing site? 
b.  Where are the fishing grounds located? 
c.  What is the predominant fishing gear used by the vessels at the landing 
site? 
d.  Is there any distinct pattern in the gear use (e.g. seasonal, diurnal etc.)? 
e.  Do vessels use more than one fishing gear during a fishing trip? (e.g. trap 
fishing may be combined with handline or trolling) 
f.  Does crew size vary among the vessels? 
3.  Minimise your interference with the natural flow of the post harvest fishing 
operations.  In some cases fishermen make special arrangements to dispose of 
their catch (e.g. catch may be sold to special vendors) it is a good practice for you 
to note the catch species composition and the total weight of each species sold. 
After the fisherman has conducted the transactions you may then obtain the 
relevant information for fishing effort and other catch information that you may 
have missed (e.g. discards, portions of catch retained for personal consumption, 
which species were caught by each fishing gear etc.) 
4.  Do not select a vessel to collect catch and effort data because the fisherman is 
friendly, or he always has a large catch.  Select your vessels randomly where 
possible. 
5.  If a vessel that you selected to be interviewed did not catch any fish, try to 
ascertain the reason for this as there may be valuable information (e.g. the trip 
was terminated due to bad weather, mechanical problems etc.) Remember the old 
saying, “every day is a fishing day, but not every day is a fish catching day”.  It is 
important to record the fishing effort that was spent.

11 
Specific 
1.  Note the time you arrive at the landing site 
2.  Determine the number of vessels that have gone to fish.  This may be obtained 
from your knowledge of the landing site based on your previous visits. 
3.  Decide on a sampling strategy. You should decide whether you can interview all 
the vessels that return to port; if not, you may wish to interview every n th  boat that 
returns (e.g. if 10 vessels are expected to return during your visit, you may decide 
to sample every third vessels that returns to port). 
4.  Record the vessel identification mark.  Remember, this is the only information 
that will allow you to trace your recorded catch and effort, and is also used to 
trace the origin of biological data that are collected. 
5.  Determine the type of fishery for which the vessel was involved. 
6.  Complete as many of the sections as you are able to based on your observations 
and knowledge (e.g. number of crew used, fishing gear etc.)  If you suspect 
deviations from the normal fishing activities ask the fisherman to verify this. 
7.  Determine if the trip was regular, if this was the case there may be no need to ask 
certain questions (e.g. days fished, days in/out etc.). 
8.  Decide on the primary (main) fishing gear that was used; this gear is associated 
with the target fishery. 
9.  Determine which species were caught by each fishing gear that was used.  You 
should rely both on observation and your knowledge of the fishing practices (e.g. 
you would not expect wahoo to be caught in a trap).  If you are uncertain ask the 
fisherman which species were caught by each gear. 
10. Record the total weight of each species caught by each fishing gear.  If you are 
unable to obtain this detailed information, you may wish to obtain total weights 
for the major species groups landed and obtain an estimate for the other species in 
the catch. 
11. Determine the total fishing effort for each gear deployed.  This is the amount of 
gear that was used to obtain the respective species. The units of fishing effort that 
are to be recorded are: 
a.  Trap fishing – total number of traps hauled and soak time 
b.  Line fishing – number of line fished, soak time and the number of hooks 
used on each line 
c.  Trolling – number of tows made by the vessel 
d.  Beach seines – number of hauls 
e.  Nets – number of sets/hauls made 
f.  Diving – number of divers and number of dives made by each person 
12. Note all vessels that have returned from fishing regardless of whether you 
obtained an interview. 

Guidelines for the collection of total weights (mass) 
General 
1.  Select a method that you find least time consuming.  Remember that you are 
required to obtain catch and effort information from as many vessels as possible. 
2.  Try to develop your skills in estimating total weights so that you become 
competent in using at least one of the methods available.

12 
3.  Use the post harvest process to your advantage.  You should rely on your 
background knowledge especially with respect to the stages involved in the post 
harvest stages of fish production. 
4.  Ask a fisherman to verify your estimates of total weight if you are uncertain of 
your estimates. 

Specific 
1.  Obtain an estimate of the total weight (gross weight) of the catch (i.e. all 
species combined). You may use one of the following methods to achieve 
this: 
a.  Obtain a visual estimate of the weight of the total catch.  This method is 
most convenient and with practice you will learn to perfect this art.  If you 
are uncertain ask the fisherman to estimate the total weight of the catch. 
b.  Sum the weights of known volumes.  This method is most convenient 
where the fish are transferred from the vessel using a standard container 
(e.g. a bucket, crate etc.); the total weight of catch is related to the number 
of the containers that are transferred.  In certain areas you may also find 
most of the fishermen use similar containers.  You may then determine the 
capacities of such containers and use this as the standard for that particular 
landing site.  Identify a common unit of measurement that may be used at 
a particular landing site; you may want to ask your supervisor to assist you 
in determining the capacity of such containers at a convenient time. 
2.  Obtain an estimate of the weight of each species group that was caught by 
each fishing gear.  This may be facilitated by any of the following methods: 
a.  Estimate the relative proportion of each species group in the total catch 
(start with the species group with the largest overall weight then work 
your way “downwards”); an estimate of the weight for each group is then 
determined based on your previous estimate of total weight. 
b.  Obtain a visual estimate of the weight of each species group 
c.  Note the weight of each species group as it is sold, then obtain totals for 
each species group at the end (as shown in figure 5, if you total weights of 
all the species groups that were sold, then you will obtain an estimate of 
the total weight of the catch (assuming there were no portions retained for 
any particular reason).  This method allows you to determine estimates of 
both the weights of the species groups and the total weight of the catch at 
the same time.  As this method is particularly time consuming you might 
wish only to use it when you have a lot of time to spare. 

Guidelines for measuring individual weights 
1.  Record all individual weights in grammes only 
2.  For cases in which the species landed are generally less than 1kg in weight, 
measure the weight to the nearest 1g. 
3.  For cases where the species landed are generally between 1 and 5kg in weight, 
measure the weight to the nearest 10g. 
4.  For cases where the species landed are generally greater than 5kg in weight, 
measure the weight to the nearest 100g.

13 
Figure 5

14 
5.  When rounding to the nearest measurement, use the lower reading at all times 
(e.g. whether the fish weighs 400.7g or 400.2 g it should be recorded as 400g if 
you are measuring to the nearest 1g; a fish of 4kg 567g would be recorded as 4kg 
560g (or 4.56kg in other words) to the nearest 10g, etc). 

Guidelines for the collection of length frequencies 
General 
1.  Know what species you are required to measure. Remember, if you collect length 
frequencies for the wrong species your time will be wasted 
2.  Ensure that the relevant catch and effort data is collected.  If you are uncertain, 
proceed to collect the relevant catch and effort data.  If this information is not 
made available, the biological data you have taken the trouble to collect will only 
be of limited use and again you would have wasted your time (except for the 
practice gained in making the measurements, the data will be of little use to 
anyone without the relevant catch and effort data). 
3.  Check whether fish was caught from more than one fishing area.  If this was the 
case, you will need to fill out the data sheet for each fishing area where fish was 
caught.  Do not measure fish from vessels where fish from more than one area has 
not been separated by area. 
4.  Check whether more than one gear was used to catch the species that you intend 
to measure.  If this is the case you will need to fill out a data sheet for each gear 
that was used to catch that species. 
5.  Record the total weight of the species caught on the trip for any given fishing 
gear. 
6.  Determine whether the catch has already been sorted.  If the catch was sorted by 
size, only measure the fish if you can do so for the whole catch of that species. 
7.  Decide whether you can measure all the fish of a given species in the landing.  If 
so, proceed to measure and record the length frequencies.  If not, you must take a 
representative (fig.6) sample as 
follows: 
a.  Separate the catch into 
smaller equal piles; ensure 
that each pile contains 
roughly the same number 
of individuals, and spans 
similar size ranges 
b.  Determine the total weight 
of a pile 
c.  Select at least one pile and 
measure and record the 
lengths of all the fish 
contained in the pile 

Figure 6.  A representative sample

15 
If it is not possible to conveniently sample a particular catch in this manner, 
do not measure any fish from this catch 
8.  Measure the fish in your sample in the following order: 
a.  Measure the smallest individuals first 
b.  Measure the largest individuals next 
c.  Measure the sizes that fall in between last 
9.  It is better to collect small amounts of data from a (relatively) large number of 
vessels, rather than collecting large amounts of data from a few vessels. 

Guidelines for measuring individual lengths 
1.  Use fresh specimens where possible 
2.  Place the fish flat on a measuring surface so that its snout is at the headboard 
3.  For fish species with a forked tail, measure the distance from the snout to the 
notch in the tail (this is called “the fork length”: figure 7) 
4.  For all other fish species, bring both edges of the tail together, then take your 
reading of the longest measurement (called “total length”: figure 7). 
5.  Take all length measurement readings in cm only for all species. 
a.  Methods of measuring lengths of other types of marine animals other than 
fish are also shown in figure 7. 
6.  For the cases in which the species landed are generally less than 30cm long you 
are required to measure each fish to the nearest 0.5 cm. 
7.  For the cases where the species landed are generally greater than 30 cm long, you 
should measure each fish to the nearest 1.0 cm. 
8.  Round each to the nearest unit below at all times (also shown in figure 7). 

Guidelines for delivery and encoding length frequencies 
General 
1.  Record all the relevant background information that will be required to complete 
the data collection exercise for a given vessel.  In compiling this information you 
will need to find out 
a.  Where were the fish caught? 
b.  How were the fish caught? 
c.  Were the fish caught using more than one gear? 
d.  How much fish was caught by each gear? 
2.  If a species is caught from more than one fishing area by the same vessel, you 
should use separate data sheets to record the fish caught in different areas. 
3.  If a species is caught using more than one fishing gear by the same vessel, you 
should use separate data sheets to record the fish caught in different gear. 
4.  Ensure that the minimum catch and effort data are collected for the fish that you 
measure. 
Specific 
1.  Take the length measurement reading for each fish 
2.  Enter the relevant size class in the appropriate column on the data sheet (for fish 
generally less than 30 cm use a 0.5cm size interval, i.e. 15.0, 15.5, 20.0, 20.5 etc.; 
and for fish greater than 30 cm use a 1.0cm size interval i.e. 40, 41, 42, 43 etc)

16 
Figure 7 

3.  Denote each individual that you measure in each size class by a single vertical 
stroke 
4.  Tabulate the individuals measured in each respective size class in groups of five 
by making the fifth mark diagonally across the preceding four. 
5.  Note the sex of the fish where possible.  You should use your knowledge of the 
differences in external features for appropriate species (e.g. in most parrotfishes

17 
the male has a very different colour from the other sex).  Tally the sexes 
separately once you can distinguish between them. 
6.  At the end of each interview, write in the total number of individuals for each size 
class. 
7.  Check to verify that you have completed all the sections on the data sheets. 

Management measures 
The decision on the type of management measure to be utilised for a particular fishery is 
often based on the best available scientific information on the status of the stock that is 
exploited by the fishery.  Consistent with this, there must be conceptual criteria which 
capture (in broad terms) the management objective for the fishery.  These are know 
generally as Conceptual Reference Points, where a reference Point can be defined as “a 
conventional value, derived from technical analyses, which represents a state of the 
fishery or population, and whose characteristics are believed to be useful for the 
management of the unit stock”.  In practical terms reference points may frequently 
assume arbitrary values and are often specified without indicating the probability of error. 

Two of the more common conceptual reference points are: 
ü  Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) 
§  When the objective is to maximize the catch obtained from the fishery 
(maximum yield), a conceptual reference point known as MSY is frequently 
used.  MSY can be considered to be the maximum constant yield that can be 
taken year after year. 
ü  Minimum Biologically Acceptable Level (MBAL) 
§  This is the point beyond which “overfishing” is said to occur.  Overfishing 
itself can be described in a number of ways as we saw earlier. 

To implement fishery management, these conceptual criteria must be converted to a 
technical point of reference that can be calculated or quantified on the basis of biological 
or economic characteristic of the fishery.  Thus all Conceptual Reference Points to be 
used are represented by one or more Technical Reference Points, for which the 
methodology of derivation and measurement is clearly specified.  These reference points 
must also have a means of verification (MOV: i.e. where do we find the information that 
lets us know when we have reached the reference point?) and an objectively verifiable 
indicator (OVI: what value of which parameter tells us that we have reached the reference 
point?), defined and agreed upon in advance, so that they can be acted upon without the 
necessity for negotiation.  It has been found over the decades that it is more important 
that the basis for fishery management action be clear and indisputable (or maybe: 
“undisputed”) than that it should claim to be precise and accurate. 

The many technical reference points that have been suggested to allow rational 
exploitation of fishery resources can, in terms of their use, be placed into two categories: 
Target Reference Points (TRPs) and Limit Reference Points (LRPs). 

ü  A Target Reference Point indicates to a state of a fishery and/or resource which is 
considered to be desirable and at which management action, whether during

18 
development or stock rebuilding should aim.  Thus, managing a fishery 
corresponds to adjusting the inputs to, or outputs from, a fishery until one or more 
of the primary or secondary variables corresponds to the TRP chosen.  TRP 
management requires active monitoring and continual readjustment of 
management measures on an appropriate (usually annual) time­scale. 
ü  Limit Reference Points indicates a state of a fishery and/or a resource which is 
considered to be undesirable and which management action should avoid.  In 
other words a LRP may either correspond to some minimum condition or some 
maximum condition at which point a management action which has been 
(previously) negotiated by all stakeholders is automatically triggered.  Where 
information necessary to use complex mathematical models is not available (like 
in developing countries or for new fisheries) qualitative or semi­quantitative 
criteria also can be used directly as LRPs. 

The TRPs and LRPs can be incorporated into a set of management criteria.  These can be 
developed most effectively if based on a sequence of questions and answers, and if one or 
more of the criteria are infringed, a preset management response is triggered (figure 8). 
The management action triggered often takes the form of instituting a management 
control measure. 

Figure 8.  Triggering management action based on reference points

19 
Some of the different forms of control measures are outlined below. 

Biological controls 
Objectives: 
1.  Preventing harvest of juveniles 
2.  Protecting breeding and nesting areas and activities 
3.  Reducing the harvest of over­exploited or threatened species 
4.  Reducing damage to critical habitats 

Options 
ü  Size limits 
§  A minimum legal size for each species can be set so that it allows individuals 
to reproduce several times before they can be caught legally. 
ü  Closed areas 
§  Fishing and other forms of “extractive use” of fish stocks can be prohibited in 
areas which are particularly important as breeding grounds or nursery grounds 
ü  Protection of eggs and nesting females 
§  Harvesting eggs, or disturbing nesting females and the nesting activity can be 
restricted 
ü  Complete protection 
§  There may be need to completely protect a resource that has been seriously 
reduced in terms of abundance or distribution.  Such a ban may remain in 
place until scientific research proves that the population has recovered 
significantly to allow some stipulated level of harvesting to start again. 

Catch controls 
Objectives 
1.  Controlling the level of catch over time 
2.  Maintaining fish stock productivity 

Options 
ü  Limited entry 
§  Licensing all existing vessels and/or fishers provides the opportunity to 
control or limit the number or type of new entrants into a particular fishery 
ü  Close seasons 
§  Prohibition of the use of a resource during a specified part of the year is often 
used to protect particularly vulnerable/critical biological activities 
ü  Fishery periods 
§  Similar to close seasons, these periods are more flexible in terms of when they 
start and stop.  This option is suitable for fisheries that target a reproductive 
phase of the life cycle. 

Gear controls 
Objectives

20 
1.  Controlling gear efficiency 
2.  Preventing the use of destructive gear and practices 
3.  Preventing the harvest of juveniles 

Options 
ü  Mesh size regulation 
§  Fishing gear do not capture all sizes and all species of fish with equal 
efficiency.  If it becomes necessary to avoid capture of small juvenile fish, the 
size of the mesh used in various types of nets and traps can also be regulated 
ü  Location of use 
§  Gear which tend to capture small sizes, or are destructive when used in certain 
types of sea bottom, can be prohibited from certain areas by zoning these 
areas as non­fishing zones 
ü  Total ban 
§  For particular non­selective or very destructive gear a total ban can be 
imposed.  If these gear are imported, additional controls can be placed at the 
port of entry 
ü  Duration of use 
§  The time a gear is allowed to remain in the water between sets can be limited, 
reducing wastage resulting from individuals dying as a result of starvation, 
injury or predation 

Monitoring, Control and Surveillance 
Objectives 
1.  Determining the resources available 
2.  Monitoring levels and impacts of use 
3.  Establishing effective framework 
4.  Enforcing laws, regulations and agreements 
5.  Fostering user compliance and co­operation 

Options 
ü  Data collection 
§  Collecting data and information from catches, and on levels of fishing effort, 
can yield early warning signs and allow for management action well before 
fishery collapse leads to drastic social and economic hardship 
ü  Research 
§  Research is needed to assess the overall status and nature of the resource. 
Through this, the “bigger picture” can be obtained and management decisions 
can be made on the extent and condition of the overall resource 
ü  Fisheries legislation and agreements 
§  The legal framework needs to address all the components related to fisheries 
policy and development 
ü  Authorised officers 
§  Fisheries laws are upheld by personnel authorised to do so under the relevant 
legislation.

21 
Environmental controls 
Objectives 
1.  Avoiding marine pollution 
2.  Reducing habitat destruction 

Options 
ü  Pollution control 
§  Prohibitions can be placed on pollution of the fishery waters.  Polluters can be 
made to pay for remedial action that has to be taken 
ü  Ban on noxious and other destructive substances 
§  Prohibitions are placed on poisons or explosives that are particularly 
destructive to all sizes and species of fish, as well as causing damage to 
habitats. 

Sustainable fisheries measures 
Objectives 
1.  Ensuring sustainability of the sector 
2.  Ensuring sustainable use of fisheries and marine resources 
3.  Facilitating effective consultation with interest groups/stakeholders 
4.  Ensuring social and economic stability for sectoral development 

Options 
ü  Fisheries management planning 
§  The means of considering the short term impacts of day to day use of and 
impacts on the resources, on its long term future 
ü  Fishery advisory mechanisms 
§  A key institutional arrangement to be established for effective consultation in 
developing and managing the sector can be an inter­agency body such as a 
Fisheries Advisory Committee (FAC) 
ü  Collaborative management/ co­management 
§  This allows for fisheries management and development to be integrated into 
other national policies and plans.  Co­management can include mechanisms 
where specific rights and responsibilities are granted to management agencies 
or user groups. 

Most, if not all, of the control measures mentioned above are essentially geared at 
changing the behaviour of people.  Thus it is essential that fisheries managers have at 
least some “people management” skills. 

People Management – working with fishers 
Fishermen spend a great deal of time observing nature while at sea.  There is a lot we can 
learn about the lives of the fish, their relationships to the environment, and their response 
to man simply by talking to fishermen.  The best fishermen retain and use not only what 
they have learned in a lifetime of working on the sea, but also the knowledge of their 
predecessors.  Thus, in the course of work as a fisheries officer, a person will have 
opportunity to acquire some of the special knowledge of fishermen.  This knowledge

22 
should be treated with respect.  It may prove useful, not only to you as a part of the 
fisheries management team, but also to you personally.  If a fisherman is forthcoming 
about the habits of fish and the patterns of their occurrence: write them down. 

One thing you will hear a lot from fishermen are complaints.  Remember that unlike a 
farmer who (most likely) owns his land, the fisherman does not own the sea, or the fish in 
it.  This means that as well as suffering the changes in the weather and the market, the 
fisherman has to share the resource with everyone else who wants to fish.  He knows that 
the fish he does not catch today may well be caught by someone else tomorrow. Thus, 
there may seem to him to be no strong reason to be careful not to take too many, or too 
small fish, unless he is sure that his fellow fishermen will respect nature as well.  Bear in 
mind though, that regardless of how they may appear to behave, most fishermen are 
aware of what is happening, and want to hunt fish in a way that leaves enough for their 
future livelihood, and even for their children.  There are three problems, however, that 
make it hard for even the most forward thinking fishermen to achieve this goal. 

1.  Fishermen do not always have a good way of knowing how much fish of what 
size is enough, and how much is too much.  By the time they see the obvious 
signs like greatly reduced catches and sizes, it is often too late to save the fishery 
2.  They cannot be sure that other fishermen will respect the rules designed to protect 
the fish stock and sustain the fishery, even if those rules are clear.  This is a 
question of “human nature” and its effect on the enforcement of laws 
3.  Fishermen cannot count on a guaranteed access to the fish resource, unlike the 
farmer who has a fixed amount of land that (only) he can use.  If too many people 
join the fishery, no matter how prudent they are, there simply will not be enough 
to go around 

These problems exist in your country, the Caribbean, and indeed, most of the tropical 
world.  The information you gather from the fisherman is a first, important step in solving 
these problems because: 

1.  The numbers and sizes of fish recorded in the field will/can are used to inform the 
fishermen themselves of change in their fish stock as it happens, so that 
management measures such as fishing seasons and mesh sizes can be used to 
protect fish stocks before they decline too far. 
2.  It is impossible to get people to obey laws they do not believe in.  The data 
collector on the abundance of fish stocks and the amount of fish taken by man 
will educate society about the value of rules to manage the fisheries, and will 
provide fisheries managers with some of the information they need to choose 
more wisely among different management options 
3.  One of the hardest decisions facing politicians is how to divide up scarce 
resources fairly.  These decisions can never be fair until it is known how much 
fish there is to divide up, how much of it different groups in society are getting 
already, and how much effort it takes to get it.  Fish are relatively scarce in the 
Caribbean (as compared to temperate waters) but we do not know how scarce

23 
they are compared to the demands of the people.  The field information collected 
is vital in helping alleviate this situation. 

The role of a fisheries data collection/extension officer 
Given all that we have just said, the role of a data collector cum extension officer is very 
much that of a partner with the fisherman and other stakeholders as well as a facilitator 
(figure 9), a liaison officer, an information gatherer, and often and advisor, all rolled in 
one.  This means that the officer must: 
1.  Build trust with empathy and humility  Figure 9.  Acting as facilitator 
a.  Try to understand the person from 
their perspective 
b.  Listen for feelings; don’t 
concentrate on the facts as these 
are often less important than how 
the person feels 
c.  Use re­stating to ensure that you 
understand what is being said to 
you 
d.  Try not to express shock or judgment: accept the person and their feelings 
e.  Be aware of body language, both yours and the person you are listening to 
f.  Try to see yourself as the fisherman sees you 
g.  Be friendly and polite (while fostering a few good informants) 
h.  Express concern, acceptance and friendship 
2.  Respect privacy, confidentiality and the speaker’s knowledge 
a.  If no one else is in ear­shot of your conversation then assume that what 
you have heard is only for your ears (and the data collection supervisor’s 
computer) 
b.  Fishermen are (understandably) cautious about certain types of 
information, such as gear type and fishing ground.  They may only reveal 
such information to you after a long period of assessing your discretion. 
Betray this trust and you will have lost a valuable partner. 
c.  Most fishermen know more about what they do than you! Respect his 
knowledge even though you may not understand all of it, or if you think 
he is wrong 
3.  Know his/her place and know his/her job 
a.  A fisherman’s partner not a superior.  Neither is the fisherman simply a 
source of data. 
b.  A junior scientist, not a policeman.  When you collect data on a 
fisherman’s catch, you are collecting data for scientific research.  The 
information you collect is to be used exclusively to estimate the status of 
the fish stocks, and how much the entire fisher is exploiting the resource, 
not how much a particular individual takes or how much money that 
individual makes.  A much as is practicable, you share an obligation to 
keep the fisherman informed of the results of your work and to help them 
better appreciate the value of good fisheries data and scientific research.

24 
c.  A representative of the fisheries division, not of government policy or 
politics.  Do not attempt to explain, interpret or rationalise government 
policy when you are out collecting catch related data, that is for another 
person or another time 
d.  A listener, not a mediator 
i.  Do not interrupt, unless you are doing so to block or safely re­ 
direct potential confrontation 
ii.  Use open­ended questions to encourage the stakeholder to speak 
more about their concern 
iii.  When listening, indicate that you are doing so by vocalizing (e.g. 
mmm, uh­huh, yes, oh, etc.) 
iv.  Provide help to allow the other person to elaborate on their 
expression of feelings 
v.  Do not talk more than you have to (we have one mouth and two 
ears!) 
e.  A data collector, not a tax collector.  You are not there to determine how 
much a particular fisherman earns.  You may, however, have to gather 
information about the value of the catch and the cost of fishing.  These are 
not to be seen as being the same as determining how much he earns! 
4.  Minimize inconvenience and intrusion 
a.  Be sensitive to fishermen’s lives, they can be very hard 
b.  Also be sensitive to his moods and preoccupations 
c.  Don’t interfere with marketing activities 
d.  Apologise for any perceived imposition 
5.  Avoid confrontation 
a.  Do not take sides in any fishermen’s disputes 
b.  If a bad situation develops, back off and report to your supervisor 
6.  Enjoy the work being done; it can be interesting, pleasant and even exciting.

25 
Section 4­ The Fisheries Management Team 
We must bear in mind that effective management of the fisheries sector is the 
management of the use of fisheries resources so that it can contribute to the livelihoods of 
the people of the nation over the long term in a way that future generations do not lose 
the ability to enjoy the resources (and their use) that the current generation enjoys (let’s 
call it “sustainable use”).  This means that a number of people or groups of people have a 
role to play.  The fisheries management team is made up of all the persons whose 
decisions and/or behaviour can impact on sustainable use of fisheries resources: 

ü  The Fishermen and other members of the Community who elect government 
representatives (and pay your salary) 
ü  The Minister with responsibility for fisheries and other members of cabinet who 
respond to their electorate’s wishes and enact legislation 
ü  The Director of Fisheries and Marine Resources (DF&MR) who provides 
options for management to the minister and advises him on fisheries matters 
ü  The Fisheries Advisory Committee (FAC) members who advise on the 
management and development of the fisheries sector (figure 10). 

Figure 10.  Members of the FAC are an important part of the team 

ü  Scientists locally, regionally and internationally who design data collection plans, 
use the data to determine the status of fish stocks, and recommend fisheries 
management measures to the Chief Fisheries Officer (and through him to the FAC 
and the Minister)

26 
ü  Public servants from other divisions and/or ministries whose decisions impact on 
the utilisation of fisheries resources 
ü  The data collection supervisor who oversees data collection, organizes the data 
and transfers it to the relevant scientists 
ü  The field data collector/extension officer who collects data from the fishermen, 
and who may be called upon to assist with passing the results of data analysis 
back to the fishermen and/or any training activities geared to improve the lot of 
fishermen 
ü  The fisherman, who answers your questions, brings fish in from the sea and for 
whom we all work!

27 
Section 5­ Lessons Learned in Fisheries Management 
Outside the Caribbean 
Research in collaboration with fishing communities in Great Britain and experience of 
West African fisheries, suggest that a lack of suitable information greatly contributes to 
small and medium scale fishers being unable to “internalize” resource scarcity.  Quite 
often, when information is made available to the smaller vessel owners by government 
agencies, it has been processed and aggregated to a national or regional scale.  As a result 
it often contradicts the fishers’ intuitive and local knowledge of the fisheries even though 
they are the main providers of primary data. 

Another problem lies in the lack of coherence among messages put forward by different 
information providers, whether public or private.  For example, government fisheries 
development policy measures may still encourage investment that lead to increasing 
fishing mortality, even though the resource is already fully exploited.  Similarly, banks 
may encourage investments even though government policy measures are reducing 
fishing opportunities. 

Fishers collect and process quantities of ecological information while fishing.  These 
range from the ocean climate, the seabed habitat, depth and topography to marine life 
above and under water.  Information is collected at the fishing grounds level, for specific 
fish stocks, and on the time scale of the fishing trip, daily or weekly basis.   However, 
apart from shipping weather forecasts, government and fisheries management agencies 
provide little information on marine ecosystems back to fishers. 

There are many types of economic data collected and produced at the level of a small 
fishing company.  They range from the costs of capital investments, the costs of inputs, 
cost of labour and micro­financing of fishing trips, to revenues from sales of key species 
at different fish markets.  The spatial scale of interest and level of information 
aggregation and processing are different from those for ecological information. 
Government agencies may undertake regular coats and earnings surveys, and collect 
statistics of prices and availability of key inputs, in a way similar to any other productive 
sectors.  While some data are collated and published, these are little used by fisheries 
policy makers. 

Even in countries where a national fisheries policy explicitly means to support the 
artisanal sector, fishers have little input into the policy­making process. In many cases, 
even actual numbers of fishers are not precisely known, and part­timers are ignored.  The 
sheer numbers of small operators means that both information collection and 
dissemination bear high administrative costs.  The small­scale sector may be constrained 
by resource access and conservation measures, but it evolves with little direct steering 
from the fisheries policy itself.  Fisheries policy measures are nearly always modified by 
other government policies.  Social Policy, regional development, transport, 
environmental protection, national and international trade policies all have great

28 
potentials to combine and produce incoherent measures at the level of small fishing 
operators. 

From this brief review of information use, together with consideration of fishers’ 
decisions, capital investment and fishing trip planning, it appears that in Great Britain and 
West Africa at least small scale fishers gather and use a large variety of information, at 
various time and space scales.  This, however, is not acknowledged by fisheries 
management agencies.  The lack of shared understanding between government, fishers, 
and marine resource conservationists, could be reduced through the production of 
integrated information systems, incorporating an ecosystem­based concept of 
sustainability. 

Outside the OECS 
The success of fisheries management depends on the support of research to provide the 
necessary data and information in order to properly identify and priories management 
issues, and on an effective communication between all stakeholders.  The main challenge 
facing Caribbean governments is to ensure that decentralization and civil service reform 
does not dilute accountability and weaken government functions in areas that need to 
remain centralized.  Such areas include monitoring the fisheries resources and the 
environment, and the formulation of fisheries policies.  It is also very important, no 
matter where the fisheries sector is located within government’s administrative system, 
that the sector be given its appropriate share of development resources. 

In the Caribbean, most of the fisheries resources are either fully exploited or 
overexploited.  So, a critical question is how much fisheries research should focus on the 
stock assessment, biology and ecology of the resources species, and how much on the 
socio­economic conditions of the fisher communities, co­operatives, and other factors 
that can be expected to influence unsustainable exploitation patterns.  Currently, in most 
Caribbean countries, fishers play an increasing role in management or the setting research 
priorities and in evaluating research results. If greater emphasis is going to be placed on 
involving stakeholders in the management of fisheries, then priority should be given to 
the organizational and socio­economic aspects of the primary stakeholders, the fishers. 
Therefore, research (and by extension data collection) priorities should be set on the basis 
of the information fisheries administrations and fishers require and must share in the 
interest of good fisheries management. 

Outside Your Country 
The  fisheries  industry  has  been  described  as  being  over­capitalised,  and  while  in  the 
Eastern Caribbean  it  may  be that the  fishing  industry  in the  Caribbean  has  been  “badly 
capitalised”  rather  than  “over­capitalised”.    There  is,  however,  little  doubt  that  the 
nearshore  fisheries  are  most  likely  over­exploited.    Additionally,  the  fishery  science 
practiced  in  the  region  in  general,  and  the  OECS  in  particular,  has,  until  recently,  paid 
inadequate attention to the management and development of the industry within a holistic 
framework.    The  view  is  evolving  in  the  Caribbean  that  while  great  emphasis  has  been 
placed  on  stock  assessment,  there  has  possibly  been  insufficient  attention  given  to  the 
industry itself.  The need for a fisheries (the industry as a whole) assessment, as opposed

29 
to stock assessment, is based on the necessity to have a comprehensive and holistic view 
of  the  industry.    Such  a  view  in  turn  will  better  inform  a  development  policy  and 
management  plan  for  the  fisheries  industry.    It  is  felt  that  the  management  and 
development  of  fisheries,  especially  of  the  small  island  states  that  make  up  the  OECS, 
must be objective driven rather than driven by simply the assessment of the fish stocks. 
The  apparent  overemphasis  on  stock  assessment  has  unfortunately  diverted  attention 
away  from  fishery  assessment,  and  the  consequent  implementation  of  a  development 
policy and strategic plan for the entire industry.  An integrated approach which considers 
fisheries  within  the  context  of  the  whole  island  system,  will  facilitate  such  a 
comprehensive  and  holistic  view  of  the  industry,  diverting  attention  more  towards  the 
stated  developmental  objectives  of  the  country  and  the  role  that  the  fisheries  play  in 
attaining those objectives. 

Within Your Country 

YOU TELL US!

30 
Section 6­ Building a Fisheries Management Team 
Invocation 
[To call on the Almighty to assist in the building of the Fisheries Management Team 
(FMT) – 1 min.] 

Lord in working to build an efficient fisheries management team, give us the strength to 
change the things we can change, the courage to face the things we cannot change, and 
the wisdom to know the difference.  Help us to carry out this exercise with openness, 
confidence and honesty.  Amen 

Relaxation/Ice­breaking exercise 
[To provide an initiating experience promoting communication and relationship among 
team members – no more than 15 min] 

Participants separate into pairs.  Each partner conducts a (no more than) one­minute 
interview of the other.  The objective is to get important information about each other, i.e. 
name, age, occupation, personal aspirations, perception of role in the team, and other 
general background information.  Each member of the pair then makes a (no more than 
one minute) presentation of his/her partner before the general grouping. 

Character simulation 
[To allow persons within the group to appreciate how they are perceived by others – no 
more than 15 min] 

Participants present a (1 min) simulation of another character (who is not identified) 
within the grouping.  The idea is to bring out as much of the person’s features as possible. 
This presentation is then evaluated and assessed by the general grouping, after identifying 
the individual, as to whether the simulation is accurate. 

Chinese telegraph 
[To help participants appreciate how easy it is for misunderstanding to occur and 
misinformation to be spread – no more than 5 min] 

Participants stand in a circle.  A person is chosen to send the message.  That individual 
tells the message to the person to his/her immediate right.  As soon as possible the 
receiver passes on (what he/she thinks is) the message to the person to his/her immediate 
right.  This is continued until the message returns to the original sender, who then 
conveys the message out loud, then recites the original message. 

Defining the team 
[To determine the parameters which will drive the fisheries management team – 1 hr 40 
min]

31 
With the assistance of the facilitator, the participants will come to a consensus on what 
they expect the Fisheries Management Team to be/look like in ten (10) years time.  This 
will be coalesced into a “vision” statement. 

Based on this vision, the participants will develop a “mission” statement for the FMT. 

Based on the mission statement, participants will decide the four (4) priority areas of 
focus for the remainder of the current fiscal year or, if the year has less than three (3) 
months left, up to the end of the coming fiscal year. 

Evaluation 
[To evaluate the usefulness of the entire training exercise – 10 min] 

Each participant will express his/her frank and honest opinion on the usefulness of the 
training session to him/her; whether it met his/her expectations; what follow­up (if any) is 
necessary; what he/she will do (if anything) in furtherance of the priorities decided on. 

Close

32