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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

Assessment Exemplars for Higher National Units DH2W 35 Computer Hardware: Building a Network PC

1st edition: xxxx 2003 Price: xxxx Publication code: xxxx

Published by the Scottish Qualifications Authority, Hanover House, 24 Douglas Street, Glasgow, G2 7NQ, and Ironmills Road, Dalkeith, Midlothian EH22 1LE

The information in this publication may be reproduced to support SQA qualifications. If it is reproduced, SQA should be clearly acknowledged as the source. If it is to be used for any other purpose, then written permission must be obtained from the Support Materials Development Officer at SQA. It must not be reproduced for trade or commercial purposes.

© Scottish Qualifications Authority 2005

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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

Contents
1. Introduction 2. How to generate evidence 3. Assessment Exemplars

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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

1

Introduction

This pack must be used in conjunction with a copy of the Unit specification which details the standard of performance expected of the candidate. A copy of the Unit specification can be obtained from SQA. This pack supplements the assessment guidelines and support notes of the unit specification. It aims to provide an example of assessment that is valid, reliable and practicable. The assessment task(s) detailed in this pack correspond to the assessment guidelines outlined in the Unit specification. The example provided is intended for guidance only. It may be used in a variety of ways including, for example: ♦ To exemplify the standard of performance expected of candidates achieving the Unit, i.e. as a benchmark ♦ To help you develop your own assessment for the Unit ♦ To help you develop valid and practicable assessments for other Units within the subject area of the group award to which it contributes ♦ To give you new ideas ♦ As a staff development tool. It is important that you make sure that the Assessment Exemplar is used in a context appropriate to the delivery of the Unit and to the group award of which it forms a part. It is also very important that you note that using this Assessment Exemplar does not automatically guarantee successful external moderation. It is still your responsibility to make sure that all the appropriate internal quality assurance procedures are satisfactorily completed. For example, a valid, effective and approved internal moderation system must be in use at your centre.

Recommended Reading
Before using this material you might find it useful to look at some of our other publications, in particular: ♦ Guide to Assessment and Quality Assurance for Colleges of Further Education ♦ (December 2001, A0841/2) ♦ Guidance on Special Assessment Arrangements (December 2001, A0645/3) ♦ Quality Assurance Principles, Elements and Criteria, (December 1998, A0798) Details of these and other SQA publications are available in SQA Information, our publications catalogue which is updated and printed twice a year (tel: 0141-242 2168). SQA Information lists all published HN exemplar assessments. You could also visit our website at www.sqa.org.uk. A free copy of this pack is available to all SQA approved centres at the time of initial distribution. Additional copies can be obtained, price £15.00 from SQA Sales, Scottish Qualifications Authority, 24 Douglas Street, Glasgow, G2 7NQ (telephone: 0141-242 2168 or fax: 0141-242 2123).

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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

Other related Units
It is expected that the candidate will be studying this unit concurrently with or upon completion of DH35 44 Computing: Planning.

Prerequisites
Access to this unit is at the discretion of the centre, however candidates should have a good working knowledge of PCs and be capable of installing and configuring a network client operating system such as Windows 9x Windows 2000 Professional and Windows XP. This might be evidenced by the possession of DH2Y 34 Computer Hardware: Installation and Maintenance, DH33 34 Computer Operating Systems, DH2T 34Computer Architecture 1 and/or DH2V 35 Computer Architecture.

Open Learning
If this unit is delivered by open learning or distance learning methods, additional planning and resources may be required for candidate support, assessment and quality assurance. For further information, please see Assessment and Quality Assurance for Open and Distance Learning (SQA, February 2001 – publication code A1030).

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2

How to generate evidence

Introduction
The Scottish Qualifications Authority’s system of assessment measures the evidence of a candidate’s attainment of knowledge, understanding and skills against defined criteria. The assessment process must allow for evidence of each candidate’s performance to be generated and collected. This evidence must then be judged against the standards set out in the Unit specification. To achieve the Unit the candidate must successfully meet the standards and there must be evidence to prove this. The Unit specification defines the criteria you need to use to judge whether or not the candidate has met the standards. All units have the following: Outcomes These tell you what the candidate actually has to do. Knowledge and/or skills This section details the essential knowledge and skills which the candidate must attain in order to achieve each Outcome, combination of Outcomes or for the Unit as a whole. Evidence requirements Evidence requirements can be written for each Outcome, for a combination of Outcomes, or for the Unit as a whole. There is no standard format for writing evidence requirements. Provided that they state clearly and unambiguously the type, standard and amount of evidence which candidates have to produce in order to be judged competent, the evidence requirements can be written in the format which will be most easily understood by users of the Unit. NOTE: The national standard of achievement expected, which was previously specified as performance criteria, is now stated in the evidence requirements.

Where it is not possible to cover all the items listed under knowledge and/or skills through holistic assessment, sampling can be used as a method of gaining additional evidence. Sampling may also sometimes be an appropriate method of assessing very knowledge-based units. This type of assessment must always be carried out in supervised conditions. Where sampling is used, the evidence requirements must clearly state: ♦ The standard of evidence required for each knowledge and/or skills item so that satisfactory performance can be judged whichever items are sampled on any one occasion ♦ The proportion of knowledge and/or skills which can be sampled ♦ Whether any item(s) must be included in each assessment, ie if it is crucial to the achievement of the Outcome(s) or to an embedded core skill ♦ The fact that a different sample should be chosen on each assessment occasion to prevent candidates being able to foresee what they will be asked ♦ The conditions of assessment

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Assessment Guidelines This section should give guidance on how best to conduct the assessment to generate the evidence required, eg recommending the use of a particular assessment instrument. It should include guidance on how to integrate the assessment of the whole Outcome or, if appropriate, how to link assessment holistically with other outcomes in the Unit. Like evidence requirements, assessment guidelines can be written for each Outcome, a combination of Outcomes, or for the Unit as a whole. It is important to realise that it is up to the assessor to judge when and if the candidate has satisfactorily met the standards. This decision should be based on the quality and correct quantity of evidence collected, set against the standards in the Unit. The assessment instrument in this pack should not create any unnecessary barriers to achievement for open/distance learning delivery or candidates with special needs. However, you may need to adapt it so that you can assess candidates with special needs or candidates who are undertaking the Unit on an open/distance learning basis. Obviously, whilst taking into account the needs of the candidate concerned, the methods of assessment you choose must still be valid, reliable and practicable. If you have any questions or problems, or if you are in any doubt as to whether or not the alternative assessment you have chosen is still valid, please contact the Helpdesk at the Scottish Qualifications Authority on tel: 0141 242 2214.

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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

Assessment exemplars
Assessment Tasks
The table below summarises how each exemplar assessment task relates to coverage of the Outcomes detailed in the Unit specification. It also indicates the evidence which should be retained for external moderation. Outcome 1 2 Suggested Task Suggested Evidence to be retained 20 multiple-choice questions Candidate responses to multiple choice testing knowledge and/or skills. test. 15 extended-response questions Candidate responses to to test candidates' understanding extended response questions of safety and ESD issues multiple

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A series of short assignments Logbook(s) completed by candidate. testing a candidate’s investigative, design and practical abilities. Will consist of a short report on Logbook(s) completed by candidate. Peer to Peer networking for the chosen operating system, designing a suitable network solution. Implementing the network will involve a practical group activity

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Conditions of Assessment

Outcome 1 – 20 Multiple Choice Test Candidates must answer at least 60% of the questions correctly in order to obtain a pass. Testing must take place in a closed-book environment where candidates have no access to books, handouts, notes or other learning material. Testing can be done in either a machine-based or paper-based format and must be invigilated by a tutor or mentor. There must be no communication between candidates and communication with the invigilator must be restricted to matters relating to the administration of the test.
NOTE: If a candidate requires to be reassessed, a different selection of questions must be used. At least half the questions in the reassessment must be different from those used in the original test

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Outcome 2 – 15 Extended Response Questions Candidates must answer ALL questions correctly. Assessment must be undertaken in supervised conditions and is closed book. A candidate should complete this assessment within two hours. Candidates may not bring to the assessment event any notes, textbooks, handouts or other material. In the event of the need for re-assessment, candidates need not be re-assessed on questions they have previously completed successfully Outcome 3 – 2 Short Reports Assessment is open book under supervised conditions. Candidates who have access to a suitable workplace can base their assessment work on suitable installation and fault-finding situations drawn from their place of work. Practical activity logs should be based on a pro-forma given to candidates, but must as a minimum be properly titled with the candidate’s name and date, and signed by the assessor confirming that each task is the candidate’s own work. Each Log should record :     A brief outline of the task presented Outline notes of all work carried out Note of problems (if any) encountered and their solutions Testing carried out

Any relevant sketch diagrams, (e.g. component locations, connector orientations, jumper settings). Assessors should assure themselves of the authenticity of each candidate’s submission. Outcome 4 – 2 Short Reports Assessment is open book under supervised conditions. Candidates who have access to a suitable workplace can base their assessment work on suitable installation and fault-finding situations drawn from their place of work. Although it is expected that students will be working in groups, ideally in pairs, each student should submit a single short report, completed on an individual basis and a completed practical activity log. Practical activity logs should be based on a pro-forma given to candidates, but must as a minimum be properly titled with the candidate’s name and date, and signed by the assessor confirming that each task is the candidate’s own work. Each Log should record :    A brief outline of the task presented Outline notes of all work carried out Note of problems (if any) encountered and their solutions

 Testing carried out Any relevant sketch diagrams, (e.g. component locations, connector orientations,

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jumper settings). Assessors should assure themselves of the authenticity of each candidate’s submission. ANY REFERENCE MATERIAL SUCH AS BOOKS, MAGAZINES, USER GUIDES, or WEB BASED MATERIAL MAY BE REFERRED TO AT ANY TIME DURING THE ASSESSMENT. Microsoft and Windows XP are the proprietary trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation and are included in the sample answers insofar as they are intended to be representative of the answer of a typical student who be allowed to use them in completing an assessment. The use of a Microsoft operating system is not mandated for this unit and any other appropriate operating system would be acceptable.

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Assessment Task Outcomes(s) Covered

1

1

Assessment Task Instructions

Describe the Major Subsystems of a Modern Personal Computer

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COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 ASSESSMENT 1 Instructions to Candidates
        This assessment is closed book This test covers Outcome 1 All Questions must be attempted Some Questions require multiple answers You may start and stop only when directed to do so by the invigilator You may not leave the examination room before 30 minutes of the examination time has elapsed You may not enter the examination room if more than 30 minutes of the examination time has elapsed You have 1 hour (60 minutes) to complete the examination paper

No reference material is permitted Question 1 What type of expansion slot would you expect to find in a modern computer? Choose the two best answers A. B. C. D. E. MCA AGP EISA VESA PCI

Question 2 Which of the following statements is true of Socket 7? A. B. C. D. It works with Slot 1 to increase the CPU internal clock speed It uses a ZIF lever to remove DIMMs It is a socket into which a type of pin-grid array CPU can be inserted It is a type of expansion bus socket.

Question 3 What type of memory structure was developed to minimise the delay of accessing RAM on the motherboard? A. B. C. Processor-resident pipeline L1 and L2 cache CMOS memory

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D.

Duplex memory

Question 4 Which of the following components would you expect to find connected the North Bridge of a chip set? Choose the two best answers A. B. C. D. E. SDRAM USB 0 The IDE drives AGP slot The COM ports

Question 5 You are a hardware support specialist. A user telephones you and tells you that they have replaced a faulty floppy disk drive in their PC. Unfortunately they can’t read from or write to the drive. In addition they tell you, the LED on the drive comes on when they start the PC and remains lit. What should you tell them? A. B. C. D. They ribbon cable has been installed the wrong way around The driver for the floppy disk needs to be re-installed The CMOS configuration needs to be altered The ribbon cable has been connected to the IDE connector on the motherboard

Question 6 Which IRQ is normally used by COM1 / COM3? A. B. C. D. 15 3 4 9

Question 7 The INTEL 800 series of chipsets introduced the Accelerated Hub-Architecture (AHA) chipset architecture. Which of the following were technical innovations introduced by AHA? Choose two best answers A. B. C. D. The IDE channel has a direct connection to the chipset without having to pass through the PCI bus It allowed Laptops to connect to docking stations It removed the PCI bus as the main component-interconnect It allowed computers to use LCD monitors

Question 8 You are working as a hardware technician. You are asked to install a second hard disk onto the primary IDE connector of a PC. You unplug the PC, open the case and remove the original IDE ribbon cable and replace it with a ribbon cable with two connectors. Next you need to configure the jumpers on the drives. How should you do it? A. Configure the drive at the end of the cable so it has a logical unit number (LUN) of 1 and the drive in the middle of the cable has a LUN of 2
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B. C. D.

There is no need to adjust the jumpers the BIOS will auto-detect the drive parameters Configure the drive at the end of the cable so it has a logical unit number (LUN) of 2 and the drive in the middle of the cable has a LUN of 1 Configure one drive as the master and the other as a slave

Question 9 What improvements did the ATX form factor make over the AT form factor? Choose the two best answers. A. B. C. D. E. Improved cooling It uses only faster RAMBUS memory It supports better power management It enabled the use of low-profile cases It removed the need for ISA slots

Question 10 You work as a hardware technician for a third-party hardware maintenance company. You have been called to a client to assist with the installation of new file server. You have installed a SCSI host bus adapter (HBA) and connected two hard drives and a CD-ROM to the bus. You know need to terminate the bus. Assuming that the HBA is at one end of the bus how should the bus be terminated? A. B. C. D. On the HBA and at the far end of the bus On the HBA only On the device at the far end of the bus Termination is not required for modern SCSI devices

Question 11 What is the primary purpose of the computer Power Supply Unit (PSU) A. B. C. D. To convert Direct Current (DC) to Alternating Current (AC) To convert Alternating Current (AC) to Direct Current (DC) To Eliminate spikes in the electricity supply Eliminate brownouts in the electricity supply

Question 12 What is the result of installing the LED connectors on the motherboard incorrectly? A. B. C. D. The motherboard will short out The LEDs will work anyway The LEDs will not work correctly The computer will beep constantly when performing its POST diagnostics

Question 13 What is the standard resolution for a VGA monitor? A. 480 horizontal x 640 vertical B. 800 horizontal x 600 vertical C. 640 horizontal x 480 vertical
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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

D. 600 horizontal x 400 vertical Question 14 In laser printer technology, what happens during the transfer stage? A. B. C. D. Residual toner is removed to the waste receptacle The toner is attracted to the paper from drum using the secondary coroner All residual charge is removed from the drum The image is permanently fixed to the paper

Question 15 Which peripheral port type was designed to transfer data at high speeds to printers only? A. B. C. D. DVD USB IEEE 1394 IEEE 1284

Question 16 Which type of ROM memory chip has a small window that allows the chips to be erases using ultra violet light? A. B. C. D. PROM EPROM EEPROM APROM

Question 17 Which bus signal line allows a device to send data directly to a computer’s memory bypassing the CPU? A. B. C. D. I/O address DMA address Clock address Interrupt request (IRQ) line

Question 18 Which type of mouse interface technology uses an interrupt (other than the ones the PC is normally using)? Choose the two correct answers. A. B. C. D. Bus PS/2 Serial Microsoft

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Question 19 Which motherboard form-factor places expansion slots on a special riser card in order to fit into a low profile case? A. B. C. D. AT “Baby” AT ATX NLX

Question 20 Which type of memory found in desktop computers stores information as charges in very small capacitors and needs a constant refresh signal to keep the information in memory? A. B. C. D. E. F. SRAM DRAM EDORAM ROM PROM EPROM

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COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 MARKING GRID Introduction Conditions
Closed book. Time allowed: 1 hour Question
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

A

B
X

C
X

D

E
X

F

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COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 – OUTCOME 1 ASSESSMENT GRID Introduction Conditions
Closed book. Time allowed: 1 hour Question
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

A

B

C

D

E

F

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Answers with Explanations Q1: Answers b and e are correct. Most modern systems boards include PCI and AGP slots. The MCA bus developed by IBM never caught on because it was not backwards compatible with ISA. VL-buses were predominantly used prior to the adoption of PCI and AGP and suffered from timing problems. EISA busses although backwards compatible with ISA became primarily a network file server niche market. ISA busses are occasionally still seen on fairly recent motherboards but have largely been replaced by PCI slots on the most modern motherboards. Q2: Answers c is correct. Socket 7 is a type of socket designed to take a flat, pin grid array (PGA) CPU. They are much less common than they used to be but are occasionally still seen. PGA CPU, including, Socket 7 uses ZIF or Zero Insertion Force as a mechanism for inserting and removing the CPU package without the use of force and for locking the CPU into place. It has nothing to do with SIMMs. Slot 1 is an INTEL-designed architecture for mounting a CPU on a printed circuit board, which is then plugged by means of an edge connector into a slot on the motherboard and has nothing to do with increasing or decreasing the CPU clock speed. Q3: Answers b is correct. Cache is an intermediate area of high-speed SRAM that is positioned between the CPU and the RAM. When the CPU requests a piece of data from RAM, the request is intercepted by the cache controller, which searches the cache first. Only if the data is not in cache is a request made to the RAM. A combination of optimising algorithms, and judicial sizing of the cache means that very high hit-rates for the cache are achievable. The L1 cache is integrated on the CPU die. As processor speeds increased additional high-speed memory was required ands this became known as L2 cache. Typically, though not invariably L2 cache was not located on the CPU die. The new 64-bit processors from INTEL and AMD use a further level of caching known as L3 cache. CMOS is used to store configuration settings for the PC. Duplex memory and a processor-resident pipelines do not exist. Q4: Answers A and D are correct. The North Bridge sits between the Processor bus and the PCI bus and handles the medium-fast devices including SDRAM and AGP slot. The USB ports and the IDE drives are attached to the South Bridge and the COM ports are attached to the Super I/O chip. Q5: Answer A is correct. This is a classic symptom of the ribbon cable being connected the wrong way around. Floppy disk drives do not require additional drivers. You cannot connect the floppy ribbon cable to the IDE connector as they are different sizes. This is not a symptom of the CMOS being incorrectly configured. Q6: Answer C is correct. IPQ 9 is used for vectoring to IRQ 2. IRQ 15 is the Secondary hard disk controller. IRQ 3 is required by COM 2 and COM 4. Q7: Answers A and C are correct. A significant technical enhancement for the 800 series of chipsets was the adoption of Intel's new Accelerated Hub Architecture, which removed the PCI bus as the main component-interconnect. This allowed areas such as the IDE channel to have a direct connection to the chipset without having to pass through the PCI bus.

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The integration of the I/O controller also meant that the North Bridge/South Bridge controller division could be dispensed with, which is key to Intel’s plans to end support for the legacy ISA architecture. Q8: Answer D is correct. The controller for a hard drive is on the circuit board attached to the drive. Thus something is deeded to arbitrate between the drives when they are using the same IDE channel. Setting the jumpers on the drives so that one drive is a master drive, and the other drive is a slave drive does this. Logical Unit numbers (LUNs) are associated with SCSI devices. The BIOS can only correctly auto-detect the drives if the jumpers have already been correctly set. Q9: Answer A and C are correct. The ATX introduced greatly improved power management, including a new fool proof keyed 20-pin Molex connector, and a 3.3v supply in addition to the +/-5V and +/-12V connections, which obviated the need for an on-board voltage regulator Another feature of the ATX design was the integration of the I/O Port Connectors and PS/2 Mouse connector directly on to the motherboard in the form of a double-height, external I/O connector panel. This meant ribbon cables were no longer required to connect pin-headers on the motherboard to the ports on the back of the case. The reduction the number of ribbon cables and general clutter greatly improved air flow around the case and hence cooling. Although some ATX form-factor motherboards support RAMBUS many do not. In general low-profile cases are used with LPX or NLX motherboards that support riser cards, which allow expansion cards to be inserted horizontally rather than vertically, thus reducing the height of the case. A key factor in the disappearance of the ISA slot was that the ISA bus is too slow for modern devices and the introduction by Intel of the AHA architecture chip set. Q10: Answer A is correct. The bus needs to be terminated at either end. This is true whether the HBA is at one end of the bus as in this case or in the middle of the bus in which case it is the device at either end that is terminated and not the HBA. Q11: The correct answer is B. The PSU takes in an AC power supply and converts it to ± 12v DC, 5.5v DC and 3.3v DC. Quality PSUs have limited capabilities to smooth out spikes but that is not their primary function Q12: The correct answer is C. The motherboard will not short out. AT motherboards shorted out if the power connectors were connected the wrong way around. Constant bleeping at POST almost invariably means a memory problem. Q13: The correct answer is C. A standard VGA monitor has a resolution of 640 pixels horizontally and 480 pixels vertically. Q14: The correct answer is B. Residual toner is removed to the waste receptacle during the cleaning phase. The toner is attracted to the paper from drum using the secondary coroner during the transfer phase. All residual charge is removed from the drum during the conditioning phase. The image is permanently fixed to the paper during the fusing stage

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Q15: The correct answer is D. The IEEE 1284 standard defines the ECP parallel port to use a DMA and the buffers in order to be able to transfer data at high speeds to a printer Q16: The correct answer is B. An Erasable Programmable ROM (EPROM) is erased with a special ultraviolet light shone through a small window on top of the chip. This can be done only a limited number of times. Q17: The correct answer is B. A DMA channel allows a device like a hard disk to send memory directly to the computer’s memory by passing the CPU. The CPU tells the DMA controller how much data is required and where to put it in memory. The DMA controller does this using the bus during clock-cycles when the CPU is not using it to transfer data to and from memory, for example when it is adding two operands. This is known a cycle stealing since the DMA steals cycles on the bus when not used by the CPU to transfer data. Q18: The correct answers are A and B. The PS/2 and bus mouse technology use a separate interrupt Q19: The correct answer D. The NLX and the earlier LPX form factor both used riser cards so that the expansion cards could be installed parallel to the motherboard to facilitate installation into a low profile case. Q20: The correct answer B. This storage method has gained widespread popularity over SRAM, and as the name implies requires a constant re-charge to maintain the information

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.

Assessment Task Outcomes(s) Covered

2 2

Assessment Task Instructions

Identify Risks and Use Safe Working Practices

The following page details instructions to

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COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 ASSESSMENT 2 Instructions to Candidates
        This test is closed book This test covers Outcome 2 All Questions must be attempted Each answer requires and answer consisting of four (4) or five (5) sentences You may start and stop only when directed to do so by the invigilator You may not leave the examination room before 30 minutes of the examination time has elapsed You may not enter the examination room if more than 30 minutes of the examination time has elapsed You have 2 hours (120 minutes) to complete the examination paper

No reference material is permitted Question 1 What are the four categories of fire extinguisher and what types of fire would you fight with them? Question 2 Carbon Dioxide Extinguishers can be used to extinguish class B and C fires. Why are they not suitable for fighting class A fires? Question 3 What is the purpose of Portable Appliance testing and how often should it be done? Question 4 The legislation relating to Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) specifies that testing must be done by someone who is "competent to do so". What does this mean? Question 5 What is the purpose of a fuse and how would you calculate a fuse rating? Question 6 What is the purpose of a residual current device (RCD) and how does it work?

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Question 7 What are the essential differences between LSZH cables and PVC cables? Question 8 Where would you expect to deploy LSZH data cables in preference to cables with PVC sheathing? Question 9 What is an ESD wrist strap and how is it used to protect ESD-sensitive devices from damage? Question 10 Under what circumstances can wearing and ESD wristband be dangerous? Question 11 What are the types of climatic conditions that favour the build-up of static electricity? Question 12 Give two examples of items of electrical equipment than involve greater of damage risk when in use and hence are a potential source of an electric shock. Question 13 Outline the principles of safe working practice when working with electrical equipment as defined by the Health and Safety executive. Question 14 Explain the purpose of the earth wire in a plug. Question 15 Which two items commonly associated with a PC should you never attempt to open and repair without special training?

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Answers with Explanations Question 1 There are four classifications of fire and an extinguisher A, B, C and D Class A extinguishers are used to deal with fires involving materials such as paper, wood, cardboard, and most plastics. Class B extinguishers are for fires involving flammable or combustible liquids such as petrol, kerosene, grease and oil. Class C means the extinguishing agent does not conduct electricity, which is why class C extinguishers are used on electrical fires. Water should never be used on a electrical because of the risk of electric shock. Class D extinguishers are used on fires involving involve combustible metals, such as magnesium, titanium, potassium and sodium and are therefore commonly found in chemical laboratories Some extinguishers have a multi-purpose rating such as ABC, the exception are class D extinguishers which may be used only on class D fires. Only class B, C or D extinguishers can be used to fight a fire involving a computer or a computer monitor. Question 2 Carbon Dioxide is a non-inflammable gas. Carbon dioxide extinguishers do not work by displacing the oxygen feeding a fire in order to extinguish it. This may not work very well on class A fires because they may not be able to displace enough oxygen to put the fire out properly so that it subsequently re-ignites. Question 3 The purpose of PAT is too regularly test portable electrical equipment such as computer base units, printers, and monitors are safe to use. The legislation does not define how often "regular" is. Good practice presumes regular testing is done once a year and no less than three years apart. Question 4 The IEE Code of Practice states that states that the tester must be, "Competent to undertake the inspection, and where appropriate, testing of electrical equipment and appliances with due regard to their own safety and others." A number of organisations undertake to train PAT testers to meet the IEE Code of Practice, and the City and Guilds 2377 Code of Practice. Question 5 The purpose of a fuse is to protect the mains-cable, not as commonly supposed the device itself. Sometimes, when an electrical device develops a fault a surge may occur in the cable. The purpose of the fuse is to blow and break the circuit when the surge becomes large enough to compromise the integrity of the mains-cable.

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To calculate a fuse rating two pieces of information are required the mains-voltage, 240 volts in the UK, and the power consumption of the device in watts. The maximum wattage is then divided by the mains-voltage. Question 6 An RCD is a safety device designed to immediately switch of the electricity when electricity "leaking to earth" is detected at level harmful to the person using electrical equipment. It works by continuously monitoring the current flow in both the Active (supply) and Neutral (return) conductors of an electrical circuit. An RCD operates if too much of the current in the active conductor is not returning through the neutral conductor. An RCD will disconnect within 10 - 50 milliseconds of detecting the harmful leakage, which would typically be about 30 milliamps. Question 7 LSZH cables, sometimes referred to as LS0H cables are designed to emit no toxic fumes and little or no smoke when exposed to flame. In addition, LSZH cable does not emit corrosive acids when burned. By contrast PVC cable contain chlorine, which emits toxic fumes when burned. If these cables are sprayed with water when burning corrosive acids will be formed. Question 8 Given the characteristics of LSZH cabling it is used anywhere where toxic fumes and smoke from burning cable could endanger life, for example, in tunnels, enclosedrooms, aircraft and minimum ventilation areas. In many countries local building codes require LSZH cabling in the plenum space as well, which is typically between a structural ceiling and a suspended ceiling or under a raised floor. Question 9 An ESD wrist strap is an elasticated wristband that has a metal pad worn next to the skin. It also contains a large resistor in order to protect the wearer from an electric shock. A cable from the strap runs to a ground connector, which may fit into a plug that connects to earth in the mains or to a specially fitted earth circuit. When working inside a computer the wrist strap should be earthed by connecting it to an electrical outlet or to an anti-static mat that is connected to a mains outlet. Question 10 There are three circumstances in which the use of an ESD wristband can be lethal: when working on a computer chassis that is connected to the mains-supply, when working on a monitor, and when working on a laser printer. The PSU in a PC converts the 240 v mains-supply down to 12 v or less. The capacitors that are used in this process store a large quantity of electricity, which, if discharged, through a human being could be fatal. A monitor converts the mains-voltage from 240 volts to 2000 volts to charge the cathode ray tube. A shock from this would almost certainly be fatal. Finally, a laser printer also uses a charge of over 2000 volts to attract the toner. This is
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a static charge, and concentrating it to the ESD wrist strap uses the wearer as the earth and this is, therefore, potentially dangerous. Unless working on a computer that is disconnected from the mains, any repair activity using an ESD strap is too dangerous. Question 11 Static electricity can build up in environments where humidity is very low. The problem is most likely to occur during the winter months when it is cold and the humidity is low or in extremely dry climates where the humidity is low all year around. Question 12 Flexible leads, particularly those connected to portable equipment that is moved a great deal, can become frayed and the plugs and sockets are also vulnerable to damage. Extension leads, an all too common feature around PCs and in workshops, are similarly liable to damage Question 13 Ensure that people working with electrical equipment have been properly trained and are competent to do the job and have a thorough knowledge of the hazards of working with electrical equipment Suspect or faulty equipment is taken out of use, labelled 'DO NOT USE' and kept secure until examined by a competent engineer Whenever possible, equipment and mains-supply sockets must be switched off before equipment is plugged or unplugged. Switch off and unplug equipment before cleaning it servicing it Question 14 If the live wire becomes loose and touches the chassis of the PC, it becomes live. If you then touch the metal, the currents will flow through you and give you an electric shock. The earth wire prevents this by completing the circuit as soon as the live wire touches the metal. A large current flows to earth and blows the fuse. Question 15 You should never open a PSU or a monitor unless specially trained to do so. They both contain very large capacitors capable of storing a potentially lethal charge long after being switched off. In fact a PSU should never be repaired. They are relatively inexpensive and should be replaced with a new one.

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.

Assessment Task Outcomes(s) Covered

3 3

Assessment Task Instructions

Design and Build a PC Configuring Hardware Components and Peripherals as Required

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COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 ASSESSMENT 3 Instructions to Candidates
   This test is open book This test covers Outcome 3 You are required to prepare two short reports as directed. Your reports should consist of a Title Page, a Contents Page, Terms of Reference, Findings and Recommendations. You should sign and date you report at the end of your recommendations. You are required to keep a logbook detailing your practical work on the pro forma supplied by your tutor. You are a technician working for your college Computer Support Unit. Your Head of Department has asked you to investigate the compatibility of motherboards with CPUs, and PSUs. You are to submit your findings in the form of a short formal report. You have been engaged by a small charity to advise them on purchasing some PCs, which will subsequently be connected to form a small peer-to-peer network. The organisation want to use Microsoft XP Professional as the operating system and to use Microsoft Office 2000, together with SAGE Instant Accounts accounting software on selected machines. You are to submit your findings in the form of a short formal report. You are required to build and test a PC as directed by your instructor, detailing your work in the pro forma logbook provided

 (A)

(B)

(C)

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Report into the Compatibility of Motherboards, CPUs and PSUs
Presented by X.X. Xxxxxxxxxx Thursday 6th June 2005

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1. Terms of Reference
A survey of the computer hardware marketplace revealed that was a large number of competing systems. On the 18th May 2005, Mr XXXX XXXX, the head of the college Computer Services Unit commissioned a report to investigate the compatibility of motherboards with CPUs and PSUs

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2.

Procedure

The general principles of motherboards, CPUs and PSUs was obtained from a variety of sources including Upgrading and Repairing PCs by Scott Mueller, ISBN 0789725428, Computer published by the IEEE, PC Magazine and PC World. Specific Product Information was obtained from vendor’s Web sites and critical reviews. Information about compatibility with the Microsoft Products deployed by the college was obtained by referring to the Microsoft Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) at the Microsoft Web site.

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3.

Findings

3.1. Motherboards
A survey of motherboards indicates that there are 4 basic types, AT, ATX, LPX and NLX. AT and ATX motherboards are found in standard desktop and tower cases where as LPX and NLX are found in slim line cases. ATX and NLX motherboards were designed to address a number of issues associated with the AT and LPX motherboards. For example, power was supplied to the older motherboards via two nearly identical six-pin plugs, which could easily be connected the wrong way around. This had the effect of destroying the motherboard when it was powered up. In addition, connectors such as the serial ports and LPT ports were mounted on blanking plates at the rear of the motherboard and connected via ribbon cables to pin-headers on the motherboard. This tended to obstruct the flow of air around an AT system leading to problems associated with overheating. The expansion slots were located in front of the processor. Before heat sinks and fans became necessary long expansion cards could extend over the CPU. With the advent of heat sinks and fans the processor assembly prevented the use of long expansion cards in up to three of the expansion slots. The location of memory in the form of DIMM and SIMM modules was also inconvenient. The ATX form-factor motherboard addressed these issues by moving the expansion slots so that they were beside the CPU socket. In addition, the serial ports and LTP port were built onto the motherboard obviating the need for some of the ribbon cables inside the case, and hence improving the flow of air around the case. A foolproof 20-pin, keyed, Molex power supply-connector and a built-in voltage regulator and soft power to the motherboard were also useful improvements introduced by the ATX and NLX form-factors.

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3.2. CPUs
There are two principal manufacturers of CPUs AMD and Intel. Processor sockets may be slotted or Pin-Grid-Arrays. Processors were originally in PGA format but in an effort to speed up the transfer of data from the Level 2 cache, to the L1 cache and

the processor processors were mounted on small expansion cards that plugged
into a slot on the motherboard. PGA form factor. AMD and Intel slotted processors looked very similar, however the electrical and signalling characteristics of the slots were very different and Intel and AMD devices were not interchangeable. Modern PGA processors have differing numbers of pins. For example socket 370 has 370-pins. Intel uses Socket 423 and 478 for its Pentium 4 chips and Socket 603 for its Xeon chips. AMD use sSocket 462 for its Athlon and Duron chips and Socket 754 for it new 64-bit processor. PGA is a generic term and there are several identifiable versions of the PGA form factor including FC-PGA Flip Chip-Plastic Grid Array (FC-PGA), which is physically but not electrically compatible with Socket 370. However the physical changes put the core closer to the surface, allowing better cooling as the processor core comes in closer contact to the heatsink. Another variant is the SPGA or Staggered Pin Grid Array, which is so-called because in which the pins are staggered on the underside of the chip rather than in standard rows and columns. Particular CPUs will often only work with particular motherboard chipsets. As technology improved, particularly with the introduction of high-speed front-side busses, modern processors are built using the

3.3. PSUs
A survey of PSUs indicates that there are 4 basic types, AT, ATX, LPX and NLX. ATX and NLX are more modern that AT and LPX power supplies and support a number of features common to ATX and NLX motherboards. These include a 20-pin Molex power connector and soft power to the motherboard. The PSU is an important component. A poorly built PSU will cause the system to perform erratically and may even catch fire. The power supply should have a sufficiently high power rating to support all of the components in the system. A good starting point for a modern system is a rating of at least 300 Watts.

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3.4. Software Compatibility
3.4.1 PSU
Reference to the Microsoft HCL indicates no significant compatibility problems with power supplies

3.4.2

Motherboards

Reference to the Microsoft HCL indicates that there are a number of excellent ATX standard motherboards that are full Windows XP compliant. For example the ABIT IS-10, which is a micro ATX form factor main board based on the 865G chipset, supporting the Intel Pentium 4 CPU and the ABIT VA-10 described by Microsoft as “the ultimate multimedia and cost effective platform for AMD CPUs” Offerings from ACHATES include the SY-7VBA133U (VIA 694T ATA100) a 66/100/133MHz FSB socket 370-based ATX motherboard and the SY-P4IS2 (845 AGPset) P4 Socket 478-based ATX motherboard. Other major vendors offering Windows XP compatible motherboards include ASRock, ASUSTek, BIOSTAR and CHAINTECH

3.4.3

CPUs

There are a number of excellent CPUs that are fully Windows XP Compliant. Compatible processors include the Duron, Athlon, Opteron, Sempron and Athlon MP from AMD and from Intel the Celeron, Xeon and P4.

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4.

Conclusions

Only high-quality PSUs with an adequate power rating for installed devices should be used and it should match the form factor of the motherboard and case CPUs need to be matched to the chip set and socket or slot type of the motherboard. If used with Microsoft Operating Systems, the Microsoft Hardware Compatibility List should be consulted to ensure that the hardware is compatible with the operating system of choice.

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5.

Recommendations

Before purchasing a motherboard, CPU and PSU make sure that they are of good quality and that the form factor of the motherboard is compatible with the form factor of the case and of the power supply. Make sure that the processor is electrically and physically compatible with the processor socket and slot Make sure that all of the hardware is compatible with the operating system of choice. In the case of Microsoft operating systems by checking the relevant Hardware Compatibility List at the Microsoft Web site.

X.X. Xxxxxxxx Thursday, 6th June 2005

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Report Into the Purchase of PCs For A Small Charity
Presented by X.X. Xxxxxxxxxx Thursday 6th June 2005

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1. Terms of Reference
A small charity was given a donation of money to purchase a small number of computer systems to create a small peer-to-peer network. On the 18th May 2005, Mr XXXX XXXX, Treasurer of the charity commissioned a report into the most appropriate type of system for the charity needs. Connection to other networks, including the Internet is not an option at this time.

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2.

Procedure

Specific Product Information was obtained from vendor’s Web sites and critical reviews. Information about compatibility with the Microsoft Products deployed by the college was obtained by referring to the Microsoft Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) at the Microsoft Web site.

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3.

Findings

3.1. Types of System
There are two types of system available to the charity: proprietary systems manufactured by companies such as Compaq and DELL and IBM PC clone systems. The advantage of purchasing a proprietary system is that it can be delivered tailored by the manufacturer to meet the specification laid down by the charity, with the operating system and application software pre-loaded and with a variety of warranties ranging on-site fix to return-to-base. The major disadvantage with proprietary system is that they frequently have non-standard components, notably the motherboard and therefore have a very limited upgrade path. The advantage of an IBM clone is that it is built around a standard form-factor motherboard, for example ATX and, as a result, has a better upgrade path. Although most PC clone hardware has a return-to-base warranty, on site fix is often not an option. Furthermore, the purchaser is usually required to install and configure any software. The proprietary system-option is often slightly more expensive to purchase but by the time the software has been purchased for the clone there is often little overall difference in price of the two types of system.

Processing Power
3.2.1 The Operating System The charity wishes to use Microsoft Windows XP professional, together with Microsoft Office and the SAGE Instant Accounts accounting package. As a minimum Microsoft recommend that Windows XP requires: a minimum of a Pentium Class processor or equivalent running at 233 MHz, 64MB of RAM, a 2GB hard disk partition with 640MB of free space. They also recommend a minimum of a 12 x CD-

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Reader a VGA class video adapter a keyboard and pointing device such as a mouse or roller-ball. A more realistic specification might be a 1.5 - 2GHz processor, 512MB of RAM, with the disk size determined not only by the requirements of the operating system, but including the disc space required by the applications and the amount of user data the charity expects to store on each PC. In addition a VGA adapter does not offer much in the way of either resolution or number of colours and a SVGA adapter would be more appropriate. Since an increasing amount of software is being distributed on DVD a DVD reader/writer might be a better choice than a CD-Reader. 3.2.1 The Microsoft Office 2000/XP Suite The specification noted above is also perfectly adequate for running the Microsoft Office Suite. 3.2.2 The SAGE Instant Account package for Small Businesses The minimum specification for the accounting package is a 400MHz Pentium Classprocessor 128MB or RAM and 150MB of disk space for the application files. There is also a requirement for an SVGA adapter card capable of supporting 256 colours at 800 x 600 pixels. Although SAGE will run with a 400MHz processor and 128MB of RAM and 150MB of disk space, SAGE recommend that this be increased to a 2GHz processor, 512MB of RAM, 500MB of disk space and an SVGA monitor capable of supporting 24-bit True-Colour at 1024x768 pixels. In addition, a copy of Internet Explorer v 6 must be installed on the computer.

Hardware Compatibility
The hardware selected must be, for trouble-free operation totally compatible with the software. The suitability of the hardware for Windows XP can checked against the Windows XP Professional hardware Compatibility List on the Microsoft Web site. Although some proprietary systems are billed a "Windows XP compatible", and when they are delivered Windows XP will be up and running, the drivers for certain hardware components are not in the XP drivers CAB file. This means that should it ever become necessary to re-install Windows XP, the drivers for these devices must be obtained from the hardware vendor's Web site. A typical example is the Intel PRO/100 VR Fast Ethernet NIC found in some IBM Thinkpad Systems. SAGE specifically state on the Web-site that a Pentium class processor is preferred.

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4.

Conclusions

The advantages of a proprietary system are that they can be delivered "ready to go" and frequently come with an on-site fix warranty. The disadvantages are that they may be slightly more expensive and have a poor upgrade capability. In addition some of the components while they are "XP-compatible" the drivers for some of the hardware devices may not be in the XP driver CAB file. The advantages of a clone are that they are built around standard components such as an ATX motherboard and will almost certainly have a better upgrade path. They are likely to be cheaper than a proprietary system. probably not be as good. Given the recommended hardware requirements for the accounting package a Pentium class processor of 2.5 - 3GHz would not only meet current requirements but would have some future proofing to meet potential additional processing power required by upgrades to the operating system and the application software. Although the Operating system, Office Suite and the accounting package will fit into 3GB of disk space, this makes no allowance for user data. Given the relative cheapness of modern hard disks, a disk of 100GB should be considered. In addition a high quality video adapter supporting 24-bit True Colour at 1024x768 pixels and a DVD reader/writer would be appropriate. Any purchase of hardware should be checked to ensure full compatibility with the operating system and the application software by consulting the software vendor's Web sites. The disadvantages are that the purchaser is often required to install and configure the software and the warranty will

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5.

Recommendations

The charity should purchase hardware to meet the following specification:          2.5 - 3GHz Pentium class processor 512MB RAM 100GB Hard disk drive 1.44MB Floppy disk drive SVGA video adapter capable of supporting 24-bit True colour at 1024 x 768 100Mb/s Fast Ethernet Network Interface card DVD reader/writer Minimum of 4 USB ports Keyboard and pointing device

Given the nature of a small charity and the likely lack of in-house expertise, a proprietary system might be appropriate if sufficiently future-proofed when purchased. All hardware to be checked for compatibility with the operating system and application software. In addition a good virus checker such as Norton or AVG should be installed and kept up-to-date in case a virus is introduced to the network on the inevitable floppy disk "brought in from home".

X.X. Xxxxxxxx Thursday, 6th June 2005

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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 – OUTCOME 3 PRO FORMA LOGBOOK

Attach additional notes, sketches or printouts as necessary Candidates Name: Assessor’s Name Assessors Signature on completion: Class: Date:

Task and Planning
Title Outline of task to be undertaken

Outline the procedure you plan to adopt

Record the details of any work carried out including testing

Outline the nature of any problems encountered & their solution This task was relatively straightforward and presented no major problems

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COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 – OUTCOME 3 PRO FORMA LOGBOOK

Attach additional notes, sketches or printouts as necessary Candidates Name: Assessor’s Name Assessors Signature on completion: Class: Date:

Task and Planning
Title To build a PC Outline of task to be undertaken        Install the motherboard Install a processor and heat sink Install the memory Install a floppy drive Install a hard disk Install a CD-Reader/Writer Test the machine

Outline the procedure you plan to adopt                Open the case and on a correctly grounded workbench Connect the anti-static wrist strap to the PC chassis Install the brass spacers and then mount the motherboard in the case Install the motherboard Connect the PSU to the motherboard Install the processor and heat sink Install a 128 MB DIMM Install a 40 GB HDD Install A FDD Install A CD-Reader/Writer Attach the EIDE and FDD cables and the necessary power connectors Connect the LED cables to the correct pin-headers on the motherboard Disconnect the wrist strap Close the case Connect the PC to the mains and test it

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Record the details of any work carried out including testing  I put the case on a properly grounded workbench and removed the cover by removing the four screws on the back of the PC and pulling the case backwards and upwards. Next I connected my anti-static wrist strap to a bare-metal part of the PC chassis. I screwed the brass spacers into the base plate of the case to correspond with the mounting holes in the motherboard. At one end of the motherboard there was a hole that did not correspond to a hole in the base plate. In here I put a plastic stub-spacer to prevent the possibility of the motherboard coming into contact with the case by accident. I then put the motherboard into the case and screwed it firmly into place. I aligned the processor up with the PGA-ZIFF socket aligning the corners of the processor that did not have pins with the corners of the socket where there were no pin holes a dropped it into position. I closed the ZIFF socket by pushing the lever at the side of the socket down and locking it into place. I put a measured amount of thermal conduction paste on the underside of the heat sink and fan and placed this on top of the processor and locked it into place using the lugs on the ZIFF socket provided for this purpose. I made sure that the power supply for the fan was in the CPU FAN pin-header. It is important to use this pinheader for this purpose because when the machine powers up the BIOS will look for a load on this circuit. If it doesn’t find it, it will assume the fan is not connected and shut the PC down after a few seconds. Next I installed the memory. This was a DIMM module, which I inserted into the socket as shown below.

 

Next I set the jumpers on the hard drive to CSEL (cable select) and mounted in the drive bay in the case using the four screws provided with the drive. I then installed the floppy drive in its drive bay and the CD-Reader/Writer into its drive bay after ensuring it was configured as a master drive. Then connected the EIDE cable to the hard drive. Since the hard drive and the motherboard support ULTRA-ATA I used an 80 conductor cable making sure the blue end of the cable was plugged into the blue IDE pin-head connector (IDE 1) on the

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motherboard and the opposite end, the black end into the drive, making sure that the red-stripe on the cable was correctly aligned with pin 1. See below for typical jumper settings.

 

As the CD-ROM device was a standard device I used a standard IDE cable to connect it to IDE 2. Finally I connected the FDD to the motherboard using an FDD cable. I then connected the power connectors to the drive units. I then connected the 20-pin molex connector from the power supply to the motherboard and as the motherboard was an ATX motherboard I connected the soft-power connector to the motherboard. Finally, I connected the connectors the LEDs and reset-button. After showing what I had done to the instructor I closed the case. The instructor then tested the PC using MICROSCOPE 2000 PC diagnostic software.

Outline the nature of any problems encountered & their solution There were no problems. There were no soundcards or video cards to install as these together with a LAN adapter and 4 USB ports were built into the motherboard. This particular motherboard used an Accelerator Hub chip-set rather than the North Bridge/South Bridge chipset so it did not have any ISA sockets only a limited number (three) PCI shots in addition to an additional AGP socket.

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.

Assessment Task Outcomes(s) Covered

4 4

Assessment Task Instructions

Research Design and Configure a PC for Peer-toPeer Networking

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COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 ASSESSMENT 4 Instructions to Candidates
   This test is open book This test covers Outcome 4 You are required:  To investigate the peer-to-peer networking capabilities of Windows XP, including the essential differences between XP Professional and XP Home Edition.  Investigate the advantages and disadvantages between NetBeui and TCP/IP as a peer-to-peer networking protocol.  Configure and connect a PC to a test network and test it connectivity to other computers in the network.

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Report Into the Differences between NetBEUI and TCP/IP
Presented by X.X. Xxxxxxxxxx Thursday 6th June 2005

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1. Terms of Reference
A small charity was given a donation of money to purchase a small number of computer systems to create a small peer-to-peer network. On the 18th May 2005, Mr XXXX XXXX, Treasurer of the charity commissioned a report into the most appropriate type of Networking Protocol for use of The Charity's peer-to-peer network.

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2.

Procedure

The information for this report was taken from a variety of sources including TCP/IP Illustrated Volume 1 - The Protocols ISBN 0-202-63346-9, Data Communications, Computer Networks and Open Systems, ISBN 0-1201-5606-4, PC WEEK Switched and Fast Ethernet, ISBN 1-562-76426-8 and High-Speed Networking with LAN Switches, ISBN 0471-18444-6.

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3.

Network Protocols

A protocol is a set of rules. A computer networking protocol is a set of rules for communicating across computer networks. This report will consider two computer networking protocol NetBEUI and TCP/IP

3.1. TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is the de facto standard for Internetworking. Unlike the ISO OSI model it has four layers, but they map more or less onto the eight-layer OSI model as shown In Figure 1.

Figure 1 also shows that TCP/IP is a much larger suite of protocols than the name suggests there are in fact fourteen separate protocols shown in the Figure and there are more. TCP operates in Transport layer of the model while IP operates at the Internetworking layer. IP is a routed protocol, which means that IP packets are transmitted across network paths discovered by routing protocols such as the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) or Open Shortest path First (OSPF), which are included in the diagram under the generic heading of "Routing protocols". TCP is a connection oriented protocol that supports error correction and guaranteed delivery, the other transport protocol in the Host-to-Host layer User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is connectionless and does not support error correction. As a result, UDP is faster but less reliable. UDP can be used where the error correction capabilities of TCP are not required, for example if the application using the services of TCP/IP has its own error correction capability. Other protocols in the suite include Domain name Service (DNS), used to convert
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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

friendly DNS names like microsoft.com into IP addresses and vice versa. Dynamic Host Configuration Service (DHCP) is used to automatically distribute IP addressing information to host on the network. File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is sued for The Address transferring files across a network connection using TCP as a transport protocol. By contrast, the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) uses UDP. resolution Protocol (ARP) is used to convert IP address into the unique physical address known as the MAC address that identifies a network interface. TELNET is a terminal emulator. For example it can be used to connect a PC to UNIX system so that the PC becomes a dumb terminal to the UNIX system. TCP/IP standards are moderated by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) and associated bodies such as Internet Society (ISOC). An IP address has two parts a network address and a host address. A subnet mask is used to identify the network address portion of an IP address. 255.255.255.0. As the Internet has grown larger the original method of categorising IP address into Classes A, B, C, and the special classes of D and E caused a shortage of IP addresses. The introduction of the private IP address space using a special subset of IP addresses that are non-routable in the public domain and classless inter-domain routing (CIDR) has staved off the immediate crisis although a new version of IP known as IP v 6 defined in rfc 2460 and using a preferred format of x:x:x:x:x:x:x:x where the 'x's represent hexadecimal values of the eight 16-bit values that make up the address. For example FEDC:BA98:7654:3210:FEDC: BA98:7654:3210. For example 192.168.1.0 is the network portion of IP address 192.168.1.10 with a subnet mask of

3.2. NetBEUI
NetBios, Extended User Interface (NetBEUI) is an enhanced and extended version of the NetBios protocol designed by IBM for LAN Manager and was subsequently extended by Microsoft to be used with operating system like Windows for Workgroups and Windows 95. NetBios upon which NetBEUI was built is was an applications programming interface (API) that augmented the DOS BIOS by adding functions for LAN working. NetBEUI is a non-routable protocol. There are two circumstances under which NetBEUI can usefully be deployed. The

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first is when using the multiple IP method. In this case, all of the network cards should have TCP/IP for Internet connectivity and NetBEUI for file and printer sharing. The other occasion is if the LAN has the protection of a separate network and a firewall or proxy but it becomes necessary to open ports in the firewall or add TCP or UDP mapping services to a proxy server. Under these circumstances, there will be direct connections to the LAN for at least some data from the Internet. For example opening ports TCP or UDP ports 137, 138, and 139 will allow access to a LAN's computers from the Internet when using TCP/IP for File and Printer sharing. Under these circumstances, NetBUEI can be a good option for File and Printer sharing.

3.2. The Key Differences
The key differences between TCP/IP and NetBEUI are: IP is routable and NetBEUI is not TCP/IP is a suite of networking protocols whereas NetBEUI is really an extended API. NetBEUI is less complex than TCP/IP in an environment that may be short in computer networking expertise.

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4.

Conclusions

Given that the charity's LAN is not connected to the Internet and is a single segment peer-to-peer network NetBEUI would represent a simple and relatively non-technical solution to their networking needs.

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5.

Recommendations

Implement NetBEUI on the charity's computers to facilitate File and Printer sharing.

X.X. Xxxxxxxx Thursday, 6th June 2005

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COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 – OUTCOME 4 PRO FORMA LOGBOOK

Attach additional notes, sketches or printouts as necessary Candidates Name: Assessor’s Name Assessors Signature on completion: Class: Date:

Task and Planning
Title Outline of task to be undertaken

Outline the procedure you plan to adopt

Record the details of any work carried out including testing

Outline the nature of any problems encountered & their solution

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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

COMPUTER NETWORKING: BUILDING A NETWORK PC DH2W 35 – OUTCOME 4 PRO FORMA LOGBOOK

Attach additional notes, sketches or printouts as necessary Candidates Name: Assessor’s Name Assessors Signature on completion: Class: Date:

Task and Planning
Title: To configure a peer-to-peer PC Outline of task to be undertaken     To install a Realtek RTL 8139B PCI Fast Ethernet Network Interface Card (NIC) into a PC Connect the PC to a Fast Ethernet switch that is part of the peer-to-peer network To configure TCP/IP onto the network 192.168.1.0/24 Test the installation by testing the loop-back address and pinging another PC on the network

Outline the procedure you plan to adopt            Switch of the PC and disconnect it from the mains Open the case and on a correctly grounded workbench Connect the anti-static wrist strap to the PC chassis Remove the NIC from its antistatic bag Insert the NIC into a vacant PCI slot and screw it into place. Disconnect the anti-static strap Close the case Attach the NIC to the hub Reconnect the PC to the mains and restart Configure the TCP/IP properties of the NIC Test it

Record the details of any work carried out including testing  Having disconnected the PC from the mains I put the PC on a properly grounded work bench and removed the casing by removing the four screws on the back of the PC and pulling the case backwards and upwards. Next I connected my anti-static wrist strap to a bare-metal part of the PC

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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

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chassis. I opened the anti-static bag containing the NIC and laid it on the bag on the bench within easy reach. I unscrewed and removed one of the blanking plates adjacent to a vacant PCI slot. This I replaced with the NIC, which I gently but firmly pressed into the slot to ensure that it was correctly seated. I then screwed it into place I disconnected my wrist strap and replaced the case. I used a straight-through CAT 5 drop-lead with RJ-45 connectors at either end to connect the NIC in the PC to the switch and powered up the PC. The computer was running Windows XP Professional so after logging in as the Administrator I clicked Start | Setting | Network Connections and selected Properties from the drop-down menu. This brought up the Local Area Connection Properties dialogue box as shown.

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I highlighted Internet Protocol TCP/IP and clicked the Properties button to bring up the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialogue box. As the peer-to-peer network was not connected to any other subnets, and did not have DHCP or DNS Servers I had to configure a static IP address and a subnet mask but not a default gateway or a Preferred DNS Server as shown

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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

To test the installation, when I first connected the NIC to the hub and powered up the machine I checked the NIC to make sure that both the ACT and LINK lights were lit. Next I ran ipconfig at the command prompt to make sure I had configured the IP address correctly. See below

Next I performed a loop back test by attempting to ping the IP address 127.0.0.1 as shown below.

Finally I attempted to ping another PC with IP address 192.168.1.201 as shown below.

Outline the nature of any problems encountered & their solution This exercise was simple and straightforward. Once the NIC was installed in the PC,
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DH2W 35 Computer Networking: Building a Network PC - Assessment Exemplar

Windows XP Professional installed the Realtek 8139B NIC automatically using a driver in its CAB file.

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