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I. WHY G K I ?

A. Historv of Inquiries concernina the scouting profession.


1. Letters, phone calls, face to face questions from many people.
a. How?
A colleague and long-time (20-30 yr.) scout once asked: "Are we scouting pro ability or
are we scouting college ability?"
b. What?
Division of labor
Do you have to been a coach in high school? "I don't think so."
What you do have to have are a mechanical mind and social skills (understanding people)
c. When?
In the beginning it was the coaches who did the scouting. It was a collateral job until the
idea of the scouting department came about
The first scouting departments were staffed by retrenched coaches who 'couldn't coach'
and players who 'couldn't play'
Tom Landry and Al Davis came up with the idea of going out on the road
Today, there is a high energy quotient of people - younger people. Ron Wolf was a typist
and gopher at Pro Football Weekly when he entered scouting. From there, he went on to
Tampa Bay, the New York Jets, and now he's running the show in Green Bay
d. Where?
The true scouting world is about finding them, meeting them and testing them
You have to get out there. There is a lot of time involved
e. Why?
You're not just a resurrector of talent, but also an eliminator of talent.
f. Whom?
As a scout, NEVER ANSWER THE QUESTION "Who are you scouting?" Your token
answer should always be "Anyone who can play." Otherwise, you'll be known by others
as "The guy who has the information." ("a Pat Summerall or John Madden guy" - GK)

2. Why different levels of interest for a scouting job (scouting job motivation)?
a. NFL expansion and the possible realignment of teams
Also the annexation of the Arena League, the CFL, etc.
b. Scouting is conducive to a successful career in front office administration
(General Manager, Football Operations, etc.)
You can't work in the front office unless you're the owner or son of the owner, but the
people who come up work in personnel, and this cannot be denigrated
Bill Polian worked in the WFL and the AFL
John Beke went from a film evaluator for Kansas City onto Denver, eventually became
GM and is now VP Admin
Dwight Clark went from Player Relations onto personnel and is currently GM for Cleveland
c. Job retrenchment and/or career change
It's sad, but you still see really capable coaches (head coaches and staff coaches) looking
for jobs
But in scouting, you control the variables. If you do what you're told, you'll never get
fired. In fact, they'll never let you leave!
d. Job attraction - glamour

B. The reluctance of scouting directors t o hire YOU.


1. You lack scouting experience - how t o write a report
Explaining what you did -that's what it's all about in this profession

2. Not acquainted with your work habits

3. You would be looked upon as a trainee


...and no one likes to either train a trainee or keep training people
4. You don't really know what you are getting into
This course will dispel that

11. WHAT QUALITIES MAKE UP A GOOD SCOUT?

A. Self-Starter (but follow directions when given)


'I don't know of any scout who as soon as he receives his assignment ("here's your forms
- g o get 'em) turns and asks what to do from a long-time staff member who doesn't
know if we're evaluating college or pro ability'

B. "Can Do" Personality (EQ - Energy Quotient - rather than IQ)


The belief you can do it no matter how hard it is
A "go getter" - Finding a way to get to Hofstra, Seton Hall and Siena while you'd rather be
at or not missing Pitt and Penn State

C. Detailed (must be observant and perceptive)


Anecdote of waiting outside an interviewer's office only to come in and be asked in detail
of all the items he saw while waiting
Answer questions of what you saw and not what you did NOT see

D. Like to Work (love your job)


George C. Scott in Patton: "God, I love this job!"

E. Be Organized and Neat in your work


It carries over

F. Tenacity (to complete job needs)


'needs' as in 'need a time', 'need this', etc.
You'll have a lot of job needs. After the season, there are subsequent meetings where
you go back to school to get a time, measurement, etc.

G. Exercise your good judgement and not those of others


Watch out for the "pack mentality"
Beware doing what a 'Summerall' or a 'Madden' does - ex: film room study in a group of
scouts where one says aloud "Look at that! He looks great! ..."

H. Write informative reports (be descriptive)

I. Be a closer (get it done on time; don't procrastinate)


All reports have to be in by a certain date, such as the end of December (end of the
college season)

3 . People person (your ability t o communicate with others and being influential)
You've got to ask people to do something for you. Talk to doctors, trainers, chaplains,
policemen, coaches, head coaches and secretaries. You have to "strip them" of
information without them knowing it while having them want you back
You can't be abrasive

K. Decent moral and ethical behavior (being a good citizen)


loyalty, trustworthiness

L. Enjoy travelling (it's a big part of a scout's life)

M. Be accountable for your success or failure (on what you do or what you don't do)
111. WHAT I S FOOTBALL SCOUTING?

A. The science of gathering information utilizing an orqanized system of observation,


testing, and interviewinq to determine a football player's level of talent and to
afford a sound and prudent evaluation.
The scout does not make the selection decision - the head coach, GM, or owner does

B. Answer all questions about the player and his talent


Eliminate "I don't know", "I couldn't find out", "The coach said...", etc. from your vocabulary
The "I don't know" problem occurred in Atlanta when too many "I don't know" responses
led Dan Reeves to throw out Randy Moss' name due to lack of information

C. Scouting (with a sharp eye) is the lifeline for success on the gridiron
Great players make great plays
The best programs do not have bad recruiting seasons
Whatever's in that draft, recognize what's there and get the best of the best

IV. DEFINING FOOTBALL TALENT

A. Those specific natural and acauired abilities that measure qifted or talented
plavers

B. Abilitv - The quality of being able to perform or the power t o perform


I . Natural Abilitv = the condition or c a ~ a c i t vthat permits a player t o perform,
thus, an aptitude that must be measured via mental or physical testing
innate, God-given, born with it
"How do you coach a 4.24 on grass?"
"The 320 pounder who can't run 4.5 but can still run a 4.9 is great!" (you can't coach a
4.5, anyway)
Example: Dan Marino graded a highest-ever 8.9 out of a possible 9.0 by GK due to his
natural talent, not a product of coaching. He does a lot of things "wrong" but he does
those things anyway because of his natural ability.
Another example: Pitt's Tony Dorsett: "If he's got that hitch, step back and let him do
it ...Don't coach that out of him." His peripheral vision and quickness (his natural ability)
made him a quick back
a. How much does he have now?
Know how deep the well is. DON'T FORGET TO MEASURE THIS!
b. Can he hold or absorb more?
"You develop all players at all levels. You try to give more competency at the position" -
Bill Parcells
c. And if so, how much more?
Does the player have any more development?

2. Acquired Abilitv - Implies a $ levelior


J level of competency; a measurement
of proficiency or the e x ~ e r t i s eof the player at his position. Recognizing both
abilities, acauired and developed via:
a. Coaching
Big programs like Nebraska and Penn State do a great job of coaching and giving
expertise to their players. These players have production and great coaching -they even
know how to test! Large programs will often have two coaches for a position (you also
see this in the NFL: a CB coach, S coach and nickel back coach - the extra coach is hired
so the LB coach isn't overburdened) but not the Bloomsburg U's
However, if you plug one of these players out of his program and into the NFL he often
does not fit
Contrast this to the successful NFL players who came out of small schools like Howard,
Southern, and Mississippi Valley State (Jerry Rice). Why did they succeed? Their
natural ability (see above)
Example: Jim Haslett played for a small school and dominated his level of play. He had
natural ability. He became a great linebacker for the Buffalo Bills. It's not where they are,
it's the talent they have. Scouts must ask if a player has faced a certain level of
competition, and if not, why? Can that player develop?
Another example: In the 1983 Draft, Tony Eason and PSU's Todd Blackledge were rated
by most as "better" prospects than Dan Marino (Blackledge was considered the top-rated
QB). They had great coaching. What about the functioning of a great-coached player
once he's 'plugged in' to the NFL? As a scout, you've got to know that
b. Playing experience
c. The sum total of those natural and acquired abilities enabling a player to
a c c o m ~ l i s hsomething - (being productive, making plays, being an
achiever)
This is called TALENT. You look for a combination of the two
If a player doesn't have natural ability, you could still have acquired ability, but he'll only go
so far
Example: You could have a player who's tight, not athletic, but he's made plays in, say,
Ohio State. Plug him in the NFL against a Reggie White. He may no longer be the
overachiever he was in college - in fact, he may have nothing left over from college!
Don't give a guy credit for natura!ability if he doesn't have i t or if it's acquired
a-bxty
Can you find the key or button for the player to reach his natural ability? Without
motivation, desire, attitude, this won't happen
Is the player a thoroughbred or an imposter - the first round pick who suddenly can't
handle the pressure of being a first rounder?
Consider Player #I: the talented guy who's lazy. But also consider Player #2: the player
who snarls and has the competitiveness. That itself is not the engine - it is the key that
turns on the engine. The "engine" is classified as natural ability. Ex: Zach Thomas'
"motor" is really the key that turns on the vision, diagnose, angle of attack and hitting (his
naturdab-uity)

V. B E G I N N I N G THE S C O U T I N G PROCESS

A. Preparations for the school visit.


You need organizational skills
1. Pre-visit study.
a. On players - tapes, press guide, previous tests and measurables
Get any access to any information at all: last year's films, available timings from others,
etc.
The press guides tell you a lot. In fact, this is how scouting was done years ago (i.e., SI).
Today, a lot of scouts don't use it. READ IT!
b. On school - location, staff (changes)
Knowledge of the staff tells you a lot about the acquired ability available.
Find out what they did before they came there, etc. Ex: the DL coach who never played or
coached DL before. He can only take you so far
c. Develop a school staff list at this time
Keep a book - names, positions, home and office phone numbers, birthdays of staff and
their children, etc.

2. Notifying school (contacting liaison coach).


a. Phone call
b. Confirm by letter or postcard
It sets you apart from most scouts. It changes the agenda

3. Trip itinerary (master plan)


You make your itinerary, no one else.
Your itinerary changes all the time. Make two schedule sheets: "What I Plan To Do" and
"What I Actually Did" (filled in at the end of the day). It'll give you an idea of time
management. Remember, you're accountable for your time, success and failure

4. Travel plans (air, drive - hotel, etc ...)


You make your own travel plans

6. Arrivins at the school. (Do's and Don'ts)


1. You are a guest on campus (don't f o r ~ e it)
t
Don't come uninvited. Always g o through the proper channels
Get your work done but be nice to people; people will help you when you're nice

2. Abide by the rules and requests of the school


a. Visit only when permissible
b. Follow directions of Pro liaison coach
c. No parking violations
d. Enter and exit football facility via reception area

3. Introduce yourself.
a. Secretary (remember her name)
GK would bring in donuts to the secretary to give to the staff
b. Liaison coach
c. Other staff members when permissible

4. Know the backgrounds of the coaching staff (Location).


a. Head Coach
Ever wonder why a certain team has a great D but can't throw downfield? Or maybe the
head coach puts his best players on 0 first
b. Assistant Coaches (position coaches)
You only ask two questions: the player's character and how smart he is (mental alertness)
Be nice and listen to the coaches, and then interject and get what you want out of them
c. Graduate Assistants
One of your most important cogs in the wheel of scouting. You may have to rely on them
to get players for you
Also, you never know; these guys can climb up the coaching ladder. You could be making
friends for life

5. Know the backgrounds of training staff (Location).


a. Head trainer
Sit down and just shoot the breeze with them. And listen. In time, they may feel
comfortable enough to clue you in on some important facts, but it requires a rapport.
Example: anecdote about GK's first time of hearing about steroids. It was a head trainer
that informed him of a prospect that was taking them
b. Assistants

6. Know the backgrounds of equipment staff (Location).


a. Head equipment man
Here's the opportunity to see a side of a player you haven't seen before
Example: anecdote about talking to the head equipment man as players come in from
practice. A chance to see the behavior of the players off the field
b. Assistants
Do something original for these guys. They just may be from your hometown, or know
your Mom and Dad, etc ...

7. Know the backgrounds of Sports Information (Location).


As a scout, you must get information about production (how many tackles, etc.)
Ask the secretary to have weekly stats mailed to you from the following people:
a. Director
b. Assistants, especially secretary's name

8. Know the backgrounds o f Athletic Director (Location).


a. Director
b. Assistants, especially secretary's name

9. "NEVER" forget t o say thank you after a school visit.


a. Thank you card
b. Letter
c. Always say goodbye

10.Always be a credit t o your team. Do the right things, be kind, courteous,


considerate and above all, very appreciative of the opportunity t o visit that
school. You will always be welcomed back again.
It sets you apart

VI. SCOUTING THE PLAYER

A. Disclosure #1 - OBSERVATION
1. Viewing tapelfilm.
a. Be organized and neat in your work
Be organized; you've got to have a way to watch a lot of people
Be neat in your work so YOU can read it
b. Utilize functional worksheets (notes, production charts, etc ...d o they
answer your questions - outline o f your report)
Whatever's good for you, use it
Viewing sheets
one for offense, defense
Sheets are divided into six player sections
GK's Offense Sheet lists two OL, one OE, QB, and two RB's; Defense sheet lists two
DL, two LB's, and two DB's
Each segment holds the player's name, height, weight and speed, then the factors
common to all players, and then the positional specifics
Log which times the player did or did not perform a specific (ex: 1,0,1,0,0,1...)
Just make sure you don't grade a player high for, say, pulling when he doesn't pull
Information sheet
Get down all of the school's seniors ("I want them all") - you don't want to be the one
who didn't get down a player that someone else resurrected
The sheet has columns for grade, jersey number, name, position, height and weight,
speed, date of birth, marital status, year entered, home address and phone, and
comments
It's also good to have info on an agent (name, address, phone ...) iflwhen one is
procured by a player after the season, to make sure if a player may have a problem
playing for you
c. Be able t o read your notes (today and tomorrow)
d. Don't be repetitive
If you keep writing down "he's on the ground a lot... on the ground...", you may miss
something else while seeing he was on the ground
e. Familiarize yourself with the player
Be prepared to have the following list of information (it takes just 3 minutes to ask the
coaching on your phone call with him):
1. Jersey #'s (light and dark jersey)
2. Postion(s) played, stance, flip, games missed
Stance: does he use a right-handed or left-handed stance? Does he always use
that stance, even when he flips?
Flip: Is he a RDEILDE on the tackle or is he over C? Is he undershifted? Does
he kick out?
3. Visual identification marks
Something you can identify (runs with a limp, etc ...) including the following:
a. Tape on wrist, hand, arm, knee, etc.
b. Neck brace - collar, etc ...
c. Towel hanging from hip
4. You can never view enough tape
5. Gain a strong feeling about a player's playing ability (you're
shaping your evaluation)
6. Get your questions answered
7. Grade only what you see (not what others see)
8. First impressions are usually correct. Don't discount them - they
belong to you
9. Don't be swayed by others (no pack mentality)

Practice and Games.


More mistakes are made evaluating players when you don't see them LIVE. Make sure
you see the player
Is he stiffer, looser, slower, faster... or the same, than what you perceived on film?
a. Conduct yourself accordingly.
1. Taking notes, utilizing tape recorders - discretion (coaches paranoia)
Use a little pocket-sized book. Turn your back to the action or while walking away
when you write. You don't want to be seen as "the enemy" by the coaches
Tape recorders: same protocol as taking notes - turn away
Also, don't clown around with other scouts. Keep quiet, do your job, and share
your times with nobody
2. Don't leave practice until over
3. Always say goodbye - thank you
b. Player's appearance in uniform
c. How does he play live? Slower? Faster? Smoother, stiffer, etc ...
d. What does he do when he's not participating
Observe things you don't see on film
Example: Is that the QB sitting on the far end of the field by himself?

3. Other athletic events


Example: Herschel Walker at the Penn Relays
Get that perspective of the person you're trying to evaluate
Example: Harris Barton on film played the G and T positions very well. Witness him live
and he was described as "the dumpiest looking guy" who looked like he needed weight
room work. This is what you see, but not on film. Pads hide things
a. Better acquainted with player's athletic ability
b. Body structure and body type
Is he cut high (long legs), medium (proportionally), or low (short legs i.e., Howie Long)?
You will be asked what his body structure is like. The needs of OBSERVATION must be
fulfilled

Disclosure # 2 - TESTING = Validitv


TESTING = Validity: what you are looking at to see how deep the well is
A proper measurement. How valid were the conditions of a certain measurement?
1. Measureables (How to?)
a. Height - Weight.
The universal language of height: 4 digits -feet, inches, eighths
6103=6'10318"
6013=6' 1318"
6003 = 6' 318"
6004 = 6'%" (418 = %)
How to accurately measure height: GK's height chart
1. What are the conditions?
Conditions: You don't want to measure on a sinking surface like a rug. Use a
hard surface: concrete, asphalt, ceramic tile
Have the player strip down in shorts. Everything else off - no socks
Make sure the shorter players do what you ask - in the past, shorter players
have come up with creative ways to pad their feet to gain a fraction of an inch
(hence, "no socks")
2. How do you check the accuracy?
3. How do you get one player?
Measurement Technique
1. Take an area - set the course up and tell the players what you want them to do
2. Run a strip of masking tape on the floor 2 inches from the wall and parallel to it
3. From the center of that strip, put down another piece angled 45" to the right
4. From the center of the first strip, again put down a piece, this time 45" to the left
5. Measure vertically 6 feet from the tape but not flush on the wall
6. Make a mark on the wall at the 6 foot mark
7. Take the adhesive height card and mount it even with the 6 foot mark
8. Never let a player line up with shoes on
9. The player faces you. Never let the player face the wall
10. The player places his feet upon the angled " V tape strips, heels together on the
first strip of tape parallel to the wall
11. Relax the player. Break him down; keep him from tensing vertically. Have the
player points his toes up - he can't elongate his neck that way
12. Place your foot between his two feet. Take the square and bring it down until it is
flat upon the player's head
13. Hold the square firmly with your thumb underneath (and your forefinger above)
14. Have the player drop down and move out
15. Measure how many inches above the 6' mark you made (if you don't have the
adhesive card)
16. Also look at the player's legs, arms; determine his body type to know what he
looks like
Weight - Measurement Technique
1. Player in shorts only
2. Player with his back turned toward you
Now you will get a view of his back body structure
3. Have the player stand in the middle of the scales
4. Measure to the nearest pound
Nothing more precise due to the normal variation of weight (eating, etc ...)
Always weigh a player before timing them. Anytime you time a player, you niust weigh
them
b. Hand span.
Can't play football with small hands (receiving, DL grabbing, OL punch and hold, etc ...)
Measurement Technique
1. Hand must be outstretched on the table flat
2. Measurement from the end of the thumb to the end of the pinky
3. Measure to the nearest eighth of an inch
Measure BOTH hands
For a right-handed person, the left hand is either the same size or slightly smaller, and
vice versa
If the right hand is slightly smaller than the left hand, there's atrophy present. Ask the
player if he's ever had an injury to his hand: "Ever break your hand?"
Grading
Keep in the back of your mind that the following are descriptive terms of strength:
11 %"- 12": a "mitt"
10"- 11 %": Big hand
8 %"- 10": Average
< 8 %": Small
c. Arm length.
Measurement Technique
1. Player starts with his arm down by his side
2. Measure from the drop of the bone on the shoulder
3. Have the player bring his arm up slowly
4. Measure to the tip of the longest finger
5. Turn him around to measure the other arm
If the right arm is shorter than the left arm for a right handed person, atrophy present (AC
joint out of place at one time? etc ...). Same principle as hand span
Grading
Keep in the back of your mind that the following are descriptive terms of strength:
Arm length is dependent on proportional body size
Shorter than 32": Small arms regardless
34 %" or longer: Is he built proportionally to his body?
t 34 %"+ long and 6' tall: arms down to knees = long arms, good reach

2. Athletic Tests
A scout shows the player how t o do the test but does not teach the player the ins
and outs of the test
a. Speed - Timing 40-20-10 y d dashes.
The first 20 yards of a 40 yd dash involve the start and acceleration. In the last 20 yards,
the player is "flying"
The 20 yd dashes are used primarily for WR, RB
The 10 yd dashes are used primarily for OL to measure what kind of initial quickness and
burst an OL has
A player may be timed in the 40 - 10, or the full 40 - 20 - 10
Be aware that the player is coming quickly to the finish on the 20 and 10 yd dashes
Using the stopwatch
Change the batteries every 45 days whether you used the stopwatch (in all kinds of
weather) or not
To test the accuracy, run a little test with two stopwatches, one in each hand.
Always use either the index finger or the ring finger to press the stopwatch - NEVER
THE THUMB
Some timers like to hold the watch parallel to the ground with an outstretched arm.
Otherwise, outside the finger selection, there is no prescribed way to hold the watch
Always keep the lanyard down. This will prevent slippage
Don't presuppose that eight 5-yd lines will equal exactly 40 yards - Always measure for
yourself:
1. Grab the tape measure and lay the line down
2. Put a mark straight down using carpenter's marker
3. Place a nail in inside the hole of the tape measure on the front of the line (Always
measure from the front of the line)
4. Place a nail down exactly 20 yards downfield. Mark a line so it runs over the nail
5. Repeat Steps 1-4
Player Conditions
The player has to dress the way you want him to dress
The ideal dress is nothing but shorts
Never let a player run in bare feet (no footing)
Never let a player run in track spikes
Always ask the player "let's see your shoes"
When recording the time, mark down the dress and shoes the player was wearing
t FIS = football shoes
t TIF = turf shoes: soles are rippled on the side, like Nike-style shoes
t TIS = tennis shoes, sneakers: flat-based soles, like a walking shoe
t S/S = track spiked shoes: avoid
t Example: SHORTS TIS = Player wore shorts and Rat-based sneakers
Timing the Speed Test
1. Time a player twice. Unless you were at fault, you never time a player more than
twice
2. Don't line up too close to the end line. Get back far enough - 7 or 8 feet
3. The player's hand must be on the line and must be still for at least one full count
4. The is n o stop-and-go permitted
5 . The is n o movement permitted (ex: arm jerking)
6 . The moment the hand moves - any trigger, any jump - activate the watch
7. As the player is running, watch the way he's carrying himself: Is he running high or
low, feet to the ground, knees not out, etc. Is he keeping his arms and feet inside the
plane of each shoulder?
8. Keep your eye on the finish line. Block out anything coming so you don't
overcompensate and stop the watch early. Some use their open hand to physically
block out the view, or just keep your eye on the line
9. The player has to hit the wall, like the plane of the goal line, and not g o through it.
The finish line is the "touchdown" - as soon as he hits it, stop the watch
Field Conditions
Conditions can vary from dry, cut grass to high grass, wet grass, dirt, Astroturf, track,
asphalt, even hardcourt and carpet
Anything that is not grass is defined as artificial
Conditions are described using a three-character code: Surface, Location, Condition
4 GO1 = Grass, Outside, 1 = ideal (sunny, not cold, no wind, well manicured)
4 A 0 2 = Artificial, Outside, 2 = not ideal (heavy cross-wind, wet grass, slippery,
high grass, bumpiness, etc ...) but not outright bad
4 GO3 = Grass, Outside, 3 = bad; "got everything" (rain, wind, high grass, cow
pasture, etc ...)
4 A121A13 = Arti.ficial,Inside, 2 and 3 for Al includes mushy turf with tendendcy to
slide, running downhill. The Astrodome plus .the facilities at Penn State and Ohio
State have been described as A12 or A13. The Rutgers Bubble with its soft,
spongy surface, is an A12
In windy conditions, have the player run his second test in the opposite direction to
his first run (not always possible)
Code: WNV = "with the wind", A/W = "against the wind", NIW = no wind
Split the difference in times to get the player's time: 4.70 WIW 4.80 AMI = player time
of 4.75
Timing adjustments
If the player is wearing SIS (track spiked shoes), Add . I 0 seconds
If the player is blocked from behind before he takes off (ex: starting block-style):
Add .08 seconds
Conversion from artificial surface to grass - two methods:
4 If the player weighs under 200 Ibs., Add . I 0 seconds. If the player weighs over
200 Ibs., Add . I 5 seconds
4 Or simply Add .08 seconds regardless of weight (supposedly comes out the
same as the first method)
Recording the time
(E) = Estimated Time: if someone gives you an estimate, mark an (E) above the time.
Never put an estimated time on your report - leave it off
(V) = Verified Time: this is your time. On your scouting report, we know it's verified
so we don't need to place a (V) mark above the time
(B) = Borrowed Time: Someone else's verified time. Also write the date of the timing
and the organization and scout you borrowed the time from (Ex: 4.86 GKI 4/97)
Example of a corr~pletedrecord: 4.85 GO1 75", sunny, cut grass, NIW Shorts FIS
b. Vertical jump.
Measurement Technique - t o measure the jump, you first have to know the player's reach
1. Have the player mark the wall with the reach of his hand
2. The player lines up and gets down - no jumping or skipping is permitted
3. Tell the player to try to "sky" and try to go as high above the mark as he can
4. Put more chalk on his jump
5. Subtract the reach from the height of his jump
6. The player is tested on two jumps. Ideally, he would jump once with his right body
and once with his left
7. Record whatever his BEST jump is - the player gets the benefit of the highest jump.
There is no averaging like speed timing
Grading
40" and above: Exceptional to Rare
36"- 3 9 : Outstanding
32"- 36": Good
Below 32": Average
c. 20 yd shuttle.
The most misunderstood and abused test, and also one of the best
A measure of agility
On grass, only FIS shoes are permitted (no T/F or TIS) - no slippage
On artificial surfaces, use the applicable shoes
Have the player perform this test twice - once to the left, once to the right
A 20 yard shuttle run to the right would entail 5 yards from center to right line, 10 yards all
the way across to the left line, and 5 yards back to the center to finish = 20 yards
Measurement Technique
1. You always face the player, and he must always face you throughout the test
2. The player places his hand on the center line
3. The player must be motionless for at least one full second
4. When the player goes to the right, he must touch the outer line with his right hand
(and vice versa)
5. No slipping or sliding is permitted. If it occurs, the test is over the same way an
offsides penalty kills the play. But don't mention penalties to the player
6. The two times are averaged
7. Add .08 seconds to the player's second time if he failed the first time (when recording,
code DQ = disqualification)
Grading (WRTTEIRB)
3.97- 4.09: "Pretty darn good"
4.10- 4.29": From unusual to good to average
above 4.29": Leveled off to average
If a player is schooled on the test, you must observe it. You can tell if you see him
work on it well
t YOIJdon't penalize him, though, because he still has the athletic ability to do it
d. 60 yd shuttle.
In comparison to the 20 yd shuttle, this test measures body balance and conditioning
This test is performed only once
The player faces forward and touches every line with his right hand
If the player falls, the test is over
The 60 yd shuttle is run 5 yards ahead, touch, and return, 10 yards, touch, and return, 15
yards, touch, and return = 10 + 20 + 30 yards = 60 yards
e. 3 cone drill.
GK's favorite drill
A good look at agility
"Better" than the shuttle runs, they are closely aligned to the 40 yd. dash
The test is performed right-handed only
Three cones are aligned on three corners of a square of 5 yards a side in an inverted "L"
Timers line up on the side between the starting cone and the 'empty corner' of the square
The player starts from the first cone, touches the second cone and returns to touch the
first cone. He then runs outside and touches the second cone, runs around and touches
the third cone, runs back on the outside and touches the second cone, and back to touch
the first cone
The player must touch the cones
No sliding or slipping is permitted
Remember to show the player but don't coach him
f. Long jump.
Measurement technique
1. Take the measuring rod and stretch it out 10 feet. Tape it down
2. Stand on the right side
3. The player jumps out as far as he can
4. The player's heels must catch on landing. No falling is permitted
5. Two tests are performed
g. BP drill - 225 Ibs.
A measure of bench press strength, NOT functional strength
The minimum number of bench presses required can be 15 or as much as 25 depending
on your team
Measurement technique
1. When counting, the player must lock out every lime - proper lifts -continuous
2. No shortarming is permitted, but the player is allowed to touch on the down part
Grading
15 is the cutoff at every position
Below 15: Lacks BP strength; hasn't worked weights
15- 25: Very Good
Above 25: Excellent

3. Written Tests
A team cannot accept a low test score without reading the particular signals
a. Wonderlic (1942)
Zimmerman's The New Thinkina Man's Guide to Pro Football includes a Wonderlic Test
Test Issuing Technique
1. Tell the players "Do nothing until I tell you to turn it over."
2. Tell the players "Turn it over. Do not open it."
3. Keep an eye on the players who have trouble following these directions
4. Tell the players "Print your last name first"
5. Tell the players "Put the name of your school on the right hand corner"
6. Ask the players "Is this the first time anyone has taken the test?"
7. Read the directions over. Read with the players
8. Tell the players "Once we begin, no talking"
9. Tell the players "You have 12 minutes, then stop and close the book"
Grading Technique
Knock off 2 points for every additional time the player took the test
* How many questions were attempted? In the Wonderlic Test, the questions grow
progressively harder:
+ If a player got 19 questions right but skipped questions up to Question 50 (he
answered Question 50), his score is 19150
+ If a player only answered the first 19 questions but answered them correctly, his
score is 19119
b. Standard progressive matrices (1938). Originates, develops, or is
contained within - Spatial relationships.
The test includes progression, numbers and shapes
A measure of verticallhorizontal vision alertness, awareness
Matrices grow progressively harder

C. Disclosure # 3 - INTERVIEWS (Answer your auestions about character and mental


alertness only)
Character - how a player gets along with others and on campus
Mental alertness - the player's football savvy, smarts
See the column in the 9118198 issue of USA Today for some insight
Remember, this is YOUR report and it's what YOU think - you're the filter
Can your club supply the support group? Are you built to take that?
1. Player.
You have to ask him, confront him, but don't be abrasive. Blend it in
Look at the way he handles himself (body language, reaction, etc ...)

-
Possible questions (these were used at the Hutton interview):
"Tell me about your family"
"Is football important to you?"
"Who are your heroes?"
"Do you drink or use drugs?"
"Were you ever in jail?"
Who was your High School coach?
Is he still w/[the high school]? The [name] County League? (if any)
What was your best moment while playing college football?
When you talk to a recruit, how do you sell them on the school?
Who are your assistant coaches?
What kind of (training) program did you work on?
How do you feel about the weight room?
Are you involved in any extracurricular activities?
Are you an individual?
What kind of music do you like?
What do you like to do?
Do you play any basketball?
Would you go back to [your school] again not knowing the offense you played?
Were you in on running plays? Did you block? Go in motion?
Where do you want to be next year?
Are you doing well academically? Decent GPA?
Do you feel you had a great practice?
How important is football to you?
If the NFL does not take you, where would you go (Canada, Europe, Arena...)?
Would you play for $50,000?
Would you play for free?
Do you motivate yourself to lift weights?
Do you do speed work?
Have you played special teams? (If so) Where? Do you like it?
How did you feel when you were injured? (if applicable)
When your coach left, what was going through your mind? (if applicable)
How do you motivate yourself during a losing streak?
Have you received any other scholarships?
Why did you choose [your school]?
Did you have a problem playing away from home?
Do you go to church (have a faith)?
How would you rate your college career on a scale from 1-10?
If I were to ask (your coachlex-coach) about (your name), what do you think he would
say?
If there's something on your mind about a player, try using pertinent questions to uncover
the answers:
Do you think he's a liar, telling you otherwise, or not telling you everything?
Don't ask the same questions that lead to the same answers
Other players - teammates and opponents.
They may know opponents from high school

3. Coaches (includes high school coaches).

4. Parents, relatives.
Sometimes, parents tell you what they really think

5. Girlfriend

6 . Trainers, doctors.

7. Secretaries.

8. Teachers, counselors.

9. Priest, rabbi, minister.

10. Roommate.
11. Classmates.

12. Equipment men, janitors.

13. Police departments - campus, town, home.

VII. WRITING THE REPORT.

A. Kev to the evaluation process.

8. A road maD to the plaver's talent.


1. Be descriptive - paint a word picture of the player's talent. Final grade
involved.

2. Relate all you know about the player.

3. This is the culmination of your work. The fruit of your labor.

4. You are not writing the report for yourself.


Others need to read what you did

5. Let players fall into place. Grade them as you see them and according to the
system.
This system should be a complete roadmap to the players

6. Don't make players something that they're not. Your signature is on the
report.

C. Positional Reauirements.
You have to know what requirements your club has
GKI Minimum Size For Position table
If a player does not meet the position height and weight, he is a 300 player (lacks size
for that position)
t Example: 300-(Wt) - lacks weight for that position
A player can overcome his lack of size from the way he plays

D. Rating Scale.
GKI Scouting Scale and Guide for Rating Football Talent
9A001, 9A002: Strong: Rare Ability
t Highest grade; GK never graded one
88003-88005: Strong: Exceptional or Near Great Ability
t No matter how good the player is on that Championship team, the 88 rookie can
move him out except for the QB position
7C006-7C015: Strong: Outstanding or Very Good Ability
t Player must have a critical factors grade of 7; different from having 7 strong
critical factors
t You can't project a player to another position with a grade of 7 or higher
6D016-6D030: High Marginal: Good Ability
t Highest level that permits projection
t Late 3rdround category
5E031-5E060: Low Marginal: Above Average Ability
t Something is missing and you have to find out what it is
t Can he overcome it? If "Yes", grade 5E031-5E045Y. If "Not", grade 5E046-
5E060N
t "U" = underachiever; "0" = overachiever. Can both have code Y or N
4F061-4F090: Weak: Slightly Above Average Ability
t Late 5thand 6throunds
3G091-3G099: Weak: Average Ability
+ Maybe he has size, athletic ability, tough as hell, and you want to bring him in
t Position coach might fall in love with this guy and can get him to make the team
2: Weak: Below Average Ability
1: Weak: Poor Ability
t A reject - n o second thoughts about i t
"Chance to Make" = chance to make over a prolonged period (5+ years)
Example grade: 7C306
7C = Strong: Outstanding or Very Good Ability

. 3## = 300 player: lacks size for that position


#06 = 6thplayer off the board
200 player = low test score
t Example: 200-(TS) - low test score
100 player = drug use
t Example: 7C106 - same player as above but is a "druggie"

The Actual R e ~ o r t .
The Player Report Form - you may accumulate information until the end of the year
Heading - first two lines
t For RU's Hutton, under "Speed" put down his converted time of 4.94
t You don't have to write "G02" or say it is "converted" to this figure
Critical Factors - the heart of the player
Position Specifics
Summary and Final Grade
1. The 7 critical factors.
1. Confirmed Speed : see VI.B.2.a: Speed -Timing 40-20-10 yd dashes
Hutton entry: 4.86 A12 SHORTS - TIS
t "He's worked on that turf more than anybody... he knows what shoe to wear."
Until you time a player, put a 4 down under Confirmed Speed (Final Grade no higher
than 5E031)
Grade is determined using the GKI Speed Requirements For Position table which
assigns a grade to a range of speeds for each position
2. Play Speed: How fast you think he plays in practice and games
Is he any faster or slower than how he ran?
Example: "He plays like he runs a 4.55"
GK: "I don't know a guy who can be fast without having production."
GK: "If you can't run, you can't play."
3. QAB (Quickness, Agility, Balance): The athleticism of the player; the "heart of the heart"
a. Stride
L = Long Stride: Randy Moss-like
M = Medium Stride
S = Short Stride: short-striders don't cover ground; 4.6, 4.7 timers often have
short strides
b. Quickness: ignition, explosiveness, any sudden movement, ability to catapult or
leapfrog
c. Agility: nimbleness, adroitness, ease of movement, ability to move
Agility grade is a check on Quickness grade
d. Body Balance: basic equilibrium, ability not to fall on face
e. Quick Feet: "Happy feet" - ability to move feet so quickly, nimble, adroitly to get
the job done
Athleticism starts at the feet and goes all the way up:
Pigeon-toed feet (toes point inward): Feet come down straight. OK as
long as the player is not knock-kneed
A pigeon-toed, knock-kneed player cannot change direction no matter
how quick the feet are
Bow-legged knees: usually (but not always) short-striders
Splay feet (toes point outward): Can't change direction. Can't
backpedal
OL can play with splay feet and bow-legs for their broad base
You have t o know what is QAB and what is being coached:
Example: OL widen base as part of their technique
Example: DB coach tells player to widen back foot to stop backpedal,
plant, and move forward
f. COD (Change of Direction): see discussion of feet above
g. Acceleration: a seen quickening of speed; burst
h. Flexibility: elastic, pliable as opposed to stiff, starchy, rigid
Flexibility as in functional flexibility; football flexibility
i. Ease of Movement
j. Overall Body Coordination
Agility and Quick Feet are almost identical
= Body Balance and Ease of Movement go together
Check Acceleration with Confirmed Speed
These reported attributes almost have a binary quality to them; either he haslhasn't
this attribute
You'll put down a number that you think fits; that you are going to describe him with
You are summarizing what you saw. There is no averaging, here
GK never uses the word "good" because that word is too subjective
The further out from the middle guys play, the better athletes they must be
From the C and MB outward through the RB, to the TE, DE, 0 6 and all the way out to
the WR, CB: QAB athleticism increases
4. Competitor
a. Toughness: plays with pain, resilient
b. Win at all cost: fierce, do anything to win.
Is he a loser? He gets a grade of 1
c. Aggressiveness: he initiates the action, vicious, combative, a hitter
d. Clutch Player: doing the right thing at the right time in the ballgame, making the
plays when you need them
e. Determined to be the Best: you hear a lot of this from the position coach, weight
coach plus what you perceive
f. 2ndEffort: no quit, never say die
Put the number that summarizes what you put down
GK: "Don't shovel shit" - don't try to throw something negative into a player until
you're absolutely sure of it
5. Character
A lot of players with Final Grades 5E041-5E046 get a Character grade of 1 by GK
Example: Randy Moss - "do we give him a 3rdchance?"
a. Coachable
b. Bad Actor
c. Shows Leadership Qualities: both by example and as a kick-ass leader
d. Lazy Player: lacks desire to do it, you'll never get them to do it to take to next
level
You hear this from weight room and position coaches
If he has to be super-motivated, can the coach devote time for him or could
only the college coach do it?
e. Enjoys Football
f. Quitter: burnout? Did he lose the desire?
g. Training Habits
h. Stability: only 3 scores given here
If you think the player's stable and he's not on drugs/alcohol - give him a
stability grade of 9
If you have reasons to suspect (" 'better check this guy, he's doing slippery
or crazy things") - give him a 5
If you absolutely KNOW he's on drugslalcohol -grade of 1
i. Team Player
If you don't have anything bad to say about a player, the lowest grade he
should get is a 7
t Example: If the coach said "he should work harder but he's not lazy" or that he's
"not the hardest worker", don't take it the wrong way and ding the guy! It's
NOT a negative, but it's not an 8 or a 9, either.
+ Example: A player who is extroverted i s not "mouthy" or an automatic "locker
room lawyer"
Grading (how it works):
+ 7 or higher: A "good kid"
+ 6: just above alcohol
+ 5: suspect
Be aware of team's training habits when evaluating; maybe the coach isn't worth a
damn
6. Mental Alertness
In situations applying to football and everyday life, not the classroom:
a. Learns Quickly
b. Need Repetition: If the player does not learn quickly, does he need repetition?
Everyone needs it, but the guy who needs it 15-25 times...and may still
repeat mistakes (see below)
c. Repeats Mistakes: you see this by watching the film to see if he's making the
same mistakes over
Does he finally respond positively or negatively?
d. Retains Once He Has It: Once he has it, does he retain it?
e. Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations (Alertness): Ex: he's working all
week vs. the 3-4, now he faces a 4-3 Man Defense on the opening play. Can he
make the adjustment
f. Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness): we call it INSTINCT (and
LB's must have it). Is he aware before it happens? Does he understand angles?
Where to run, where to break, where to throw, etc...
Example: WR who cuts 8 yds on 3rdand 9 or who runs out of bounds
Coach will tell you about a player's Football Intelligence (Learns Quickly) and
Reptition
As a scout, first evaluate what you see on tapeslworkoutslgames, ,then make an
evaluation
+ What you saw: is it correctable?
7. Strength and Explosion
At the combine, you'll summarize the player's body as you measure him
Describe the body
+ Example "...not tight, slim calves, big feet, small ankles ..."
First thing to mention: whether he's a 300 player or not
Second thing: overall musculature
+ Hutton case: "long-muscled", "looks like basketball 2-guard", "needs bulk upper
body", "great quads and hamstring, legs look good", "lack BP strength" (note: we
don't know about the functional strength, here)
You'll see b) Arm Strength (Upper Body Development), c) B.P. Strength, and d) Leg
Strength (Lower Body Development)
For the other attributes (which you won't see), put down a @ (a circle 6) meaning
"he's good" - this rule is used for all Critical Factors attributes
a. Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He Hits)
b. Arm Strength (Upper Body Development)
c. B.P. Strength
d. Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)
e. A Hitter
f. Durability
g. Functional Strength: Does he stay square when he hits someone or does he roll?
Does he anchor?
A player has to be functionally stronger or gets bounced around a lot - long
muscles, high cut
Critical Factors Grade: number of critical factors that are not WEAK (either MARGINAL or
STRONG)
If a player has 7 Critical Factors with a grade of 5 (MARGINAL) and better: 7
If a player has a 4 in Confirmed Speed and 6's and 7's all the way down: 6
Randy Moss: 8's in all categories but a 4 in Character: 6
2. Positional specifics.
Each individual specific is graded from 0-10
To fill the Average Specifics score, add up .the individual specifics and divide by the
number of specifics
Position specifics are a check on the Critical Factors
= What you put in Position specifics should be in accord with what's mentioned in
Critical Factors
Did you overgrade? Did you grade wrong? Or perhaps he's an overachiever?
4 You can't have too many overachievers on your team otherwise you'll have no
achievers. Having one or two of them is OK
A player can't play very well at his position if he has weak critical factors
Answers the question "How does he play in college ability?"
t You're evaluating college ability and have to project it to the pros
In your descriptions, remember "lacks" means "he doesn't have it"
The Stance (all positions)
1. Where he lines up
Formation specifics (left, right, slot, up on LOS; does he flip?, etc ...)
2. Then, how he lines up
Heels high? Hips high? Too far forward?
Does anything look different with his other-side stance?
Look at the feet and the distribution o f weight
Wide Receivers
Stance
t Is he always on the right? Does he always stay on the left (i.e. Biletnikoff)? Is he
always a flanker? In the slot? Does he go in motion occasionally?
t Is his inside foot up on the line?
t What is his stance?
t Is he slow getting off the line?
Initial ~ u i c k n e s sability
: to get off the line of scrimmage with no wasted motion
t Does he have a hitch kick? (change his stance)
Blocker: willing to block? Is so, will he go after people?
t crack block
+ seal block
+ block downfield
+ pass protection on motion
Release: ability to beat the jam and get into the pattern
Swim or dodge technique?
t Can he be held up?
t Has he faced the jam in college?
+ Hutton: "good separation against 'weak DB's'
React to Ball: eye-hand coordination, adjust to the ball in flight, flexibility, pluck it at
the last second wlthat awareness
t When the ball's in the air, how do you adjust to it?
React to Crowd: ability to catch in a crowd, go over the middle, aggressiveness to
come down with it
t Can he sky? Is he a leaper?
Hands: Does he catch the ball with his hands?
t "Semi-soft" hands = basket catch
t Good hands = palms are up when the ball is above the jersey #, down when
below the jersey #
t How does the other hand coordinate with the primary hand?
t Hard hands, "boards" = 4
Receive Short: ability to beat the underneath coverage
t Does he make sharp, quick cuts?
t Can he isolate on a zone?
Example: If the WB drops to the flat and the MB drops to the middle, does
the WR have the sensibility to stop in the seam and come back to the ball?
* Receive Long: ability to line up correctly, run the correct route (ex: 9 route)
4 Does he have the speed to beat the S? To go all the way? To get deep to a
point?
4 Does he fade out of bounds when adjusting to the ball?
4 GK: "If a guy's a 4.96 but is getting beyond the S, his Play Speed's faster than
his Confirmed Speed"
Run After Catch: ability to immediately move up the field, ability to skirt the defenders
Change of direction?
Burst when running with the ball?
PuntIKO Catcher: In the event your normal return man is hurt, does he have the
qualities to move into the position?
If he can't, just leave a grade of 0
PR qualities - scatbacks who can weave, dart, looking for blockers
4 KR qualities - Slams it for the opening wlburst and courage
Tight Ends
Same specifics as Wide Receiver except for Stance and Blocker details:
Stance
Look at his hand on the ground. Is it a right-hand stance on the right sidelleft-
hand stance on the left side or opposite?
Does he have his heels off the ground or one foot on the ground? (the right heel
is flat on a left-handed stance and vice versa) Does he have too much weight
forward?
Blocker: Ability to knock the guy off the ball, next hit the down block, then shadow
block on the corner
+ Has to be a square guy like an OL
Is he lost? Does he miss?
+ Can he get to the secondary?
Quarterbacks
Arm Strength
+ Does he have an NFL arm?
4 Can he hit receivers on the break?
4 Does he have to wind up to throw the ball beyond 40 yards?
+ From the short field (college hashmarks) can he throw the deep out to the far WR
W/Ohim adjusting?
Is it a rope? (a "super-Howitzer arm") or does it have too much air under it?
Poise: How does he carry himself?
4 Does he get rattled? Do blitzes bother him?
Judgement: Good decision making
The ability to know when to run and when to throw
4 Ability to make snap decisions to win and why
Quick Set-up: Stopwatch the 3-, 5-, and 7-step drops
+ Example: 3-step drop: 1.1s; 5-step drop: 1.5s
4 He has to get the ball off in 3 seconds or consider it a sack
Does it take him 2.5 seconds to set up? Forget it!
Quick Delivery: The arni comes back
+ Is there wasted motion bringing up the arm to throw? Or is it a dart like Esiason?
Does he bring it back low like Marino?
4 Is there a hitch in the delivery?
Release: The arm comes over, forward, and follows through
4 Follow through problems?
+ Is it a shotput push?
Find 2"dReceiver
4 What's his horizontallvertical vision like?
Can he see if the S forgot to drop deep after CB rolls up?
+ Can he change the receiver if he sees a busted coverage?
Accuracy Short
+ Do his receivers have to adjust to his passes?
4 Does he put the ball where the receiver should be? Or do they have to make the
QB look good?
Accuracy Long
t Can he throw the fade route?
t How far can he throw deep?
Avoid to Pass: Quickness in the pocket, ability to get away from all the trash
Scramble to Run
t Is he good enough to put a spy on him? If so, you've got a secret weapon
Leadership
t Is he in control of the team?
t Does he take initiative and lead on his own? Or does he stay away from
everyone?
Offensive Linemen
Stance
t Different coaches teach different stances (right side, inside stagger, kick steps,
etc.)
1. Inside foot anchored, drop step foot parallel
2. Kick step
t Different positions use different stances
Did player ever play RG or LG?
Initial Quickness: Ability to gain position, get the advantage
Position and Sustain: For all blocks
t Does he take position and keep it?
t Does he lack balance? Tenacity?
t Does he give one shot or is he square dominating?
Run Block
t Type of blocker: Finesse? Smash-mouth?
t Type of blocks: Is he a good drive blocker and why?
Trap: Ability to adjust on the move
t Is it a quicklsmoothlhighljerky out move?
t Does he take the desired angle on the insideloutside?
Pulling: Ability to work and hit in space
+ How does he worklhit in space? Can he worklhit in space?
Downfield: Ability to handle space in the screen
t Can heldoes he pummel LB's?
Pass Block
+ Quickness: Can he I ) set 2) pop and 3) drop (reset)?
t Can he mirror the movement of linemen?
a Can he prevent the defender from taking the anglelcorners?
Is he bad on the inside or outside corner?
Punt Snap
t Does he take punt snaps in the game?
t What is his snap time?
a Measure a snap at 13 yards from snap to catch
a Running Backs
Stance
t How does he line up? (I upright, LHB, RHB, slot, etc ...)
t Hand and heel placement
Initial Quickness: burst to the hole, time to the hole
t Is he a slow starter?
Inside Runner
t Does he have the power to run inside?
t Can he see, pick and slide, follow daylight, veer?
Power Runner
Outside Runner
t Can he string it out wide, beat the outside guy, wait until daylight opens, and
burst it deep all the way?
Make 1" Miss: elusive, ability to change direction after breaking tackle
Fumble: Is he a fumbler? Look at the stats:
t Why is he fumbling? Answer why!
Switching hands?
a Bad hands?
Holding ball like a loaf of bread?
Receive Short: Ability to beat under coverage, LB's
8 Hands
Willing to Block: what he does when he doesn't have the ball
t Does he have the same enthusiasm?
Block-Pass-Run: ability to turn out, kick out, isolate
Punt CatcherIKO: see Wide Receiver
Punter
8 GK: "We'd always reject all P's and K's until the end of the season. Then we'd go on
production."
Leg - Right Left Both: The foot he kicks with
Leg Strength
t Does he have NFL leg strength?
Punt Steps
t Is he a one-footer, two? A leg-stepper? One hitch? ,
t Does he drop low or high?
t Is there something he's doinglnot doing?
Punt Distance
t What distances is he capable of?
Punt Hang
Punt Direction: ability to coffin corner
Punt Pooch
t Example: From the 40, can he punt the ball up 39 yards with a 6.0s hang time?
ClutchlGame
RunlPass
t Does he have the athleticism?
Holder
t If he's not a holder, why? (P's are usually holders, unless they also kick)
Kicking Ability
Kicker
See GK's comment under Punter
Leg - Right Left Both
Soccer/Conventional
Leg Strength
KO Distance: ability to put the ball in the endzone
KO Hang: ability to get hangtime
KO Direction: ability to kick the ball in the far corner and pin the S back in there
KO Onside
FGIGet OfflStepslRise
FGlDistancelAccuracyIRange: actual stats used
ClutchlGame
t Has he wonllost games? How often?
RunlPass
Punting Ability: ability to come in and punt if P goes down wlinjury
Defensive Linemen
Stance
t Example: for a RE, you want a left-hand stance (left leg back, right hand down)
t If he can make the plays, he can use the same stance
Initial Quickness: ball reaction, reaction to movement, cat-like quickness
Recognition: ability to see the blocks and react positively
Neutralize: ability to knock back, control, and deliver a blow on the blocker
Escape Run Block: ability to disengage and get out of the block; secondary quickness
Vs. Run: concerned about the effort the player uses to get out of the block
t Does he dance?
Pursuit: ability to recognize and use angles, ability to locate ball
Tackling: type of tackles dealt
t Is he a collision type? Does he wrap up? Or is he a grabber?
Pass Rush: ability not only to get the sack but to push the pocket and disturb the
QB; ability to get the hands up and bat the pass
t Can he get to the corner and go around it?
Linebackers
Stance
t Where does he line up? Inside or outside? Over TE? Wide?
+ Does he declare? If so, where?
Initial Quickness: see Defensive Linemen
Recognition: read and react, ability to find the ball before it gets there
Neutralize
Escape Run Block
t Can he use his hands? Does he keep a low shield?
+ Can he get back into the pattern?
Vs. Inside Run: for plays run right at him
t Can he stack the runner at the point of attack? Can he attack the POA?
t Can he take on the isolation block? Double-team block?
Ward o f f 2"* Block: see Defensive Linemen "Escape Run Block
Pursuit Outside: see Defensive Linemen "Pursuit"
Tackling: see Defensive Linemen
t Collision-tacklers that unload on people. Does he wrap up?
BlitzIRush
+ Timing blitz from the LOS: Does he hit the LOS when the ball is snapped?
t Can he take on and knock back a blocker and then super-accelerate?
Zone Coverage
+ Athletic ability to drop, crossover and plant backpedal
+ Awareness of knowing what's going on
Man to Man Coverage: speed to stay w/TE, HB. FB
+ How far downfield can he stay with the man?
Hands
+ How many INT's?
Special Teams
+ Does he play? Where does he play?
+ Where do you think he should play and why?
Example: R3 on KR? Or L4?
Defensive Backs
Stance
+ SSNVS? RClLCNVide ClShort C? (short corner liniits what he has to do)
+ SS on the LOS or squirmed? Declared?
+ On the best receiver every week?
+ Is he turned in on parallel? 6 yds off the ball?
KeyIDiagnose: ability to read and react wlo hesitation; ability to read run or pass
Run Support: ability to understand and intercept angles
WardOff
+ Does he get kick out by the FB or can take on? Can he use a low shield?
Tackling
Closing Quickness: athleticism
+ Does he have the quickness?
Range
Ball Reaction: ability to react to the ball upon seeing the ball
= Hands: see Linebackers
Zone Coverage: see Linebackers
Man to Man Coverage: backpedaling ability
+ How well can the player backpedal, use his feet, and come out of the backpedal?
t Can he drop the backpedal? How long does it take for him to get out of it?
+ Can he turn and run with no wasted motion?
+ How is his close on the ball once he sees it and reacts?
Punt CatchiKO

3. Summation.
A summation of what you feel about the player.
Capsule the player based on the grade you will give him
= Explain your final grade. Describe the category he's in
Do you think he'll make it and why?
+ To consider: Do you feel your team can reach a player wlgreat ability but is
burdened by work, drugs, etc.?
Tell why he's worthy of bringing in as a free agent or just pull out another player sheet
You have to:
1. Feel comfortable about your grade
2. Support it
One Major Weaknesslstrength: one word description (at most two)
Examples: "Can't run", "Lacks speed", "Athleticism", "Hadn't been pushed",
"Outstanding talent"
GK's player example: He copied the statement under the Scouting Scale and Guide for
Grade 7C and didn't leave anything to chance
4 Added in example: "Football's not important enough to him"

F. Plaver Sequential List.

V I I I . CLASS ASSIGNMENT.

IX. F I N A L REVIEW.

GK on Hutton: "No NFL team came here this year due to his lack of speed. If he had high
production, someone would've come in - and closed the book after getting his 40 time"
GK's grade: 1R - reject
"If you can't run, you can't play"
Charles Jordan anecdote: GK got him just by timing him
A player like Chris is actually hard to evaluate
Reject wlno second thoughts?
Age (as well as speed) is also a problem for a player
Reminder: "Don't make things out of players that they're not. Let them fall."
GKI Scouting Scale and Guide for Rating Football Talent

as a Rookie For Any Team That Does Not Already Have an Exceptional Player at His Position."
8Bao3 No m d e r how p o d fie player is on Shat Ch.rmpiws/, jp
learn,+he rookie cw mow him out, e ucepf &P QB.
,%%?? Chance to make: 80-90%
7 OUTSTANDING OR VERY GOOD ABILITY. Player performs the specifics and characteristics of his position
C006-C015 consistently and naturally without any abnormal effort. Player must have a critical factors grade of "Z". Player may have as
STRONG many as 3 high marginal critical factors and positional specifics between 6.0 and 7.0. Player must qualify for a specific
position - no projections. "He Will Make a Championship Team, May Not Start as a Rookie But Has the Capability to
Become a Starter Eventually. '"
p,a,,er c-;fica[ FdOrS9rq& 4 7 which i8 d ; f f k n t b m seven sffoo7 crijtbs/ fqcfors.
%U c s n . f p r o j i c t a player fo 73, 813end 91s(project fos dd'fhlenf po8;hon). Chance to make: 70-80%

6 GOOD ABILITY. Player performs the specifics and characteristics of his position usually without any abnormal and extra
D016-Do30 effort. Player must have a critical factors grade of "2"and positional specifics in the 6.0 to mid-range 5.0. Player may be
HIGH projected to another position. "He Will Make a Team, Not Particularly a Championship Team. "
MARGINAL TAc level %f perm,* pr"Je~fibnN o m + k ,o.uif,b$
&ah 3rd-m u d &feqo/y. Chance to make: 60-70%
-5 ABOVE AVERAGE ABILITY. Player performs the specifics and characteristics of his position versus most opponents but
5E031-5E045 is not consistentlv dependable versus equal or better opposition (usually the type of player who reserves his ability and
(Y) effort to perform). He must have a critical factors grade of "6". Because of his one factor, the player cannot be
graded any higher unless the player can overcome his weakness. Positional specifics must be graded 5.0 or better. Player
5E046-5EM0 may be projected to another position. LETTER "Y": Player will overcome and play inspite of his weakness (5EY03 1-
(N) 5EY045). LETTER "N" : Player will goJ overcome and will not play inspite of his weakness (5EN046-5EN060).
LETTER "U" : Player is an underachiever, does not play up to his potential, but shows flashes of performing. Has the
LOW necessary talent but lacks one of the physical or mental skills to make him a productive player (Y or N). LETTER "0" :
MARGINAL Player is an overachiever, he performs above his natural talent but is extremely productive (what you see is what you get)
(Y or N). "He Has a Better Than Average Chance to Make a Team as a Rookie. " ."

4 SLIGHTLY ABOVE AVERAGE ABILITY. Player performs the specifics and characteristics of his position only
F061-Fog0 occasionallv. Player shows flashes of performing while only exhibiting above average ability. Players skills are not yet
WEAK fully developed. A late round draft choice or class "A" free agent but in both cases, well worth bringing to camp. Player
cannot be graded any higher than 4F if he possesses two weak critical factors. His specifics should be in the 4.0 range. "He
May Make it With Some Clubs but a Doubiful Chance to Become a Starter With a Contending Team, Possibly and
Usually. a Spot
- Player. "
L& 5 % dfhmunds-
~ Chance to make: 40-60%
AVERAGE ABILITY. Player performs the specifics and characteristics of his position only if it requires a normal effort.
Player cannot be graded any higher than 3G if he possesses four or more weak critical factors. His specifics should be in the
WEAK 3.0 range (the class "B" and class "C" free agents). "A Slim Chance to Make it. "
~ a y d chas s&, o7"h/ef/b ~b,7,iL~, . -
. QS he/[ b&y~u wIInf fo dr~' Aim Chance to make: 30-70%
Pos/'Jion cwch m~hhf./5//,ir
+ii@
wdh X l r n nnd cl.4him fo mkz ge horn.
BELOW AVERAGE ABILITY. Player performs the specifics and characteristics of his position and exhibits very little
WEAK ability when performing. (Not utilized as a graded potential.)

1 IPOOR ABILITY. Player performs the specifics and characteristics of his position and exhibits no ability to perform. A
WEAK - no second thoughts about it.
POS STRONG MARGINAL WEAK POS MINIMUM
9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Ht Wt
WR 4.45 4.50 4.55 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 WR 5110 175
4.49 4.54 4.59 4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79 4.84
TE 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 4.95 5.00 TE 6020 230
4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79 4.84 4.89 4.94 4.99
OT 5.05 5.10 5.15 5.20 5.25 5.30 5.35 5.40 5.45 OT 6040 270
5.09 5.14 5.19 5.24 5.29 5.34 5.39 5.44
OG 4.95 5.00 5.05 5.10 5.15 5.20 5.25 5.30 5.35 OG 6030 270
4.99 5.04 5.09 5.14 5.19 5.24 5.29 5.34
C 5.00 5.05 5.10 5.15 5.20 5.25 5.30 5.35 5.40 C 6020 270
5.04 5.09 5.14 5.19 5.24 5.29 5.34 5.39
QB 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 4.95 5.00 5.05 5.10 QB 6010 185
4.74 4.79 4.84 4.89 4.94 4.99 5.04 5.09
FB 4.55 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 4.95 FB 6000 225
4.59 4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79 4.84 4.89 4.94
RB 4.45 4.50 4.55 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 RB 5110 195
4.49 4.54 4.59 4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79 4.84
DE 4.80 4.85 4.90 4.95 5.00 5.05 5.10 5.15 5.20 DE 6040 270
4.84 4.89 4.94 4.99 5.04 5.09 5.14 5.19
DT 4.90 4.95 5.00 5.05 5.10 5.15 5.20 5.25 5.30 DT 6030 270
4.94 4.99 5.04 5.09 5.14 5.19 5.24 5.29
ILB 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 4.95 5.00 5.05 5.10 ILB 6020 235
4.74 4.79 4.84 4.89 4.94 4.99 5.04 5.09
WLB 4.55 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 4.95 WLB 6010 220
4.59 4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79 4.84 4.89 4.94
SLB 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 4.95 5.00 SLB 6020 230
4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79 4.84 4.89 4.94 4.99
SS 4.50 4.55 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 SS 6000 205
4.54 4.59 4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79 4.84 4.89
WS 4.50 4.55 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 4.85 4.90 WS 5110 195
4.54 4.59 4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79 4.84 4.89
DC 4.40 4.45 4.50 4.55 4.60 4.65 4.70 4.75 4.80 DC 5100 185
4.44 4.49 4.54 4.59 4.64 4.69 4.74 4.79
MOVIE ANALYSIS - OFFENSE
vs Date
Date
Date
VIEWING REMINDERS:
QUARTERBACKS OFFENSIVE BACKS RECEIVERS OFFENSIVE LINE
1. SET UP SPEED TECH 1 GET OFF TECH I . LOS RELEASE 1 . STANCE
2 . RELEASE FOOTWORK 2 LANE DECISION 2 BREAKPOINT CONTROL 2. GET OFF FOOTWORK
3. RELEASE ARM HANDS 3 POWER RUNNER 3 BALL ADJUSTMENT 3. LOS CONTROL
4 ARM STRENGTH 4 . OUTSIDE RUNNER 4 CONCENTRATION-EYES 4 EXPLOSIVENESS
5 THROWING JUDGEMENT 5 . ACCELERATION 3 HAND BODY CATCHER 5. PASS BLOCK
6 AVOIDABILITY 6 MAKE TACKLER MISS 6 CATCH O N FEET JUMP 6 PULLING TECH
7. PASSES TYPES 7. RECEIVER HANDS 7. RECEIVE INSIDE 7 BLOCK O N MOVE
8. POCKET POISE 8. RECEIVER PATTERNS 8. PATTERN TECH 8. BALANCE
9. TEAM CONTROL 9. RUN STYLE INSTINCT 9. RUN AFTER CATCH 9. TENACITY
10 BODY STRENGTH 10. DURABILITY 10. BLOCKER 10 TOUGHNESS
- -

QUICKNESS 8 CONTROL COMPETITIVENESS STRENGTH 8 EXPLOSION


STRIDE TO U G H N ESS DELIVERS BLOW
QUICKNESS CLUTCH PLAYER ARM STRENGTH
AGILITY AGGRESSIVENESS LEG STRENGTH
BALANCE A HITTER
QUICK FEET BODY TYPE, UPPER
COD LEG TYPE
ACCELERATION
FLEXIBILITY
I
Pos #

Name -I-----
Test 40

Playing Speed
I
Quickness & Control 1
Competitiveness - 1 I

Strength & Explosion ,

Pos #
Name

Ht. Wt

Test 40

Playing Speed

Quickness & Control

Competitiveness
I
Strength & Explosion I I

- -.
GKI ASSIGNMENT SHEET
(REPORT FORM)

HEADING AND THE SEVEN CRITICAL FACTORS

1 Heading 2 Confirmed Speed


SCOUT SCOUT

3 Play Speed 4 QAB


SCOUT SCOUT

5 Competitor 6 Character
SCOUT SCOUT

7 Mental Alertness 8 Strength


SCOUT SCOUT

- POSITION SPECIFICS (WIDE RECEIVER)


B.

9 Stance 10 Initial Quicks


SCOUT SCOUT

11 Blocker 12 Release
SCOUT SCOUT

13 React to ball 14 React to crowd


SCOUT SCOUT

15 Hands 16 Receiving short


SCOUT SCOUT

17 Receiving long 18 Run after catch


SCOUT SCOUT

19 PuntlKO catcher
SCOUT

-
C. SUMMARY AND GRADE

20 23
SCOUT SCOUT

21 24
SCOUT SCOUT

22 25
SCOUT SCOUT
GKI Player Report Form Quarterbacks
dame School
(Last) (First)
College Pos Pro Pos Height Weight Speed DOB Jersey#
7 Critical Factors
i ) Confirmed Speed Grade -
(Dress and Condins)
2) Play Speed Grade -
I)QAB a) Stride L M S b) Quickness- c) A g i l i t y d) Body Balance- e) Quick F e e t 9 COD- g) Acceleration- h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination-

I)Competitor a) Toughness- b) Win at all cost- c) Aggressiveness- d) Clutch Player- e) Determined to be the Best- 9 2nd Effort- Grade -
Summation
5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy Player- e) Enjoys Football- f) Quitter- Grade p

g) Training Habits- h) Stability- i) Team Player-


Summation
6) Mental Alertness a) Learns Quickly- b) Needs R e p e t i t i o n c) Repeats Mistakes- d) Retains Once He Has It- Grade-
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) 9 Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-
Summation
i )Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He H i t s ) b) Arm Strength (Upper Body D e v e l o p m e n t ) c) B.P. Strength- Grade -
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength-
Summation
Critical Factors Grade-
Position Specifics
Arm Strength Grade-

'oise Grade-

udgement Grade-

Quick Set-up Grade-

luick Delivery Grade-

7elease Grade-

Find 2nd Receiver Grade-

rccuracy Short Grade-

Iccuracy Long Grade-

Avoid to Pass Grade-

icramble to Run Grade-

Leadership Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
h e Major Weakness One Major Strength
Summation

k o u t Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Running Backs
Name School
(Last) (First)
College Pos Pro Pos Height Weight Speed DOB Jersey#
7 Critical Factors
1) Confirmed Speed Grade -
(Dress and Contiibons)
2) Play Speed Grade
3) QAB a) Stride L M S b) Quickness- c) Agility- d) Body Balance- e) Quick Feet- f) C O D g) A c c e l e r a t i o n h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination -
Summation
4) Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost- C)Aggressiveness- d) Clutch Player- e) Determined to be the Best - 9 2nd Effort- Grade p

Summation
5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy P l a y e r e) Enjoys Football- f) Quitter- Grade -
g) Training H a b i t s h) Stability- i) Team Player-
Summation
6) Mental Alertness a) Learns Quickly- b) Needs Repetition- c) Repeats Mistakes- d) Retains Once He Has It- Grade -
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) f) Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-

7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He H i t s ) b) Arm Strength (Upper Body D e v e l o p m e n t ) c) B.P. Strength- Grade -
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength -

Critical Factors Grade-


Position Specifics

Initial Quickness Grade-


-

Inside Runner Grade-

Power Runner Grade-

Outside Runner Grade-

Make 1st Miss Grade-

Fumble Grade-

Receive Short Grade-

Hands Grade-

Willing to Block Grade-

Block-Pass-Run Grade-
--

Punt CatcherlKO Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
One Major Weakness One Major Strength

Scout Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Wide Receivers
Name School
(Last) (F~rst)
College Pos Pro Pos Height Weight Speed DOB Jersey#
7 Critical Factors
1) Confirmed Speed Grade -
(Dress and Ccndfions)
2) Play Speed Grade -
3) QAB a) Stride L M S b) Quickness- c) Agility- d) Body Balance- e) Quick Feet- f) COD- g) A c c e l e r a t i o n h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination -

4) Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost - C) Aggressiveness- d) Clutch Player- e) Determined to be the Best - 9 2nd Effort- Grade p

5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities - d) Lazy P l a y e r e) Enjoys F o o t b a l l 9 Quitter- Grade -
g) Training Habits- h) S t a b i l i t y i) Team Player-

6) Mental Alertness a) Learns Quickly- b) Needs Repelition- c) Repeats M~stakes- d) Retains Once He Has It- Grade -
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations (Alertness)- 9 Shows That He Sees Thlngs Happening (Awareness)-
Summation
7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He Hits)- b) Arm Strength (Upper Body Development)- c) B.P. Strength- Grade -
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength-

Critical Factors Grade-


Position Specifics

- -

Initial Quickness Grade-

Blocker Grade-

Release Grade-

React to Ball Grade-

React to Crowd Grade-

Hands Grade-

Receive Short Grade-

Receive Long Grade-

Run After Catch Grade-

PunUKO Catcher Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
One Major Weakness One Major Strength
Summation

Scout Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Tight Ends
Name School
(Last) (Rnt)
Coilege Pos Pro Pos Height We~ght Speed DOB Jersey#
7 Critical Factors
1) Confirmed Speed Grade -
(Dress and Condbns)
2) Play Speed Grade -
3) WB a) Stride L M S b) Quickness- C)A g i l i t y d) Body Balance- e) Quick Feet- f) COD- g) A c c e l e r a t i o n h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination -

4) Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost - c) Aggressiveness- d) Clutch Player- e) Determined to be the Best - f) 2nd Effort- Grade -

5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy P l a y e r e) Enjoys Football- 9 Quitter- Grade p

g) Tra~ningHabits- h) S t a b i l i t y i) Team Player-

6) Mental Alertness a) Learns Quickly- b) Needs Repetition- c) Repeats M i s t a k e s d) Retains Once He Has it- Grade -
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) f) Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-

7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He H i t s ) b) Arm Strength (Upper Body D e v e l o p m e n t ) c) B.P. Strength- Grade -
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength-

Critical Factors Grade-


Position Specifics

Initial Quickness Grade-

Blocker Grade-

Release Grade-

React to Ball Grade-

React to Crowd Grade-

Hands Grade-

Receive Short Grade-

Receive Long Grade-

Run After Catch Grade-

PunUKO Catcher Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
One Major Weakness One Major Strength
Summation

Scout Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Offensive Linemen
Aame School
.(Last)
. (F~rst)
College Pos Pro Pos Height Weight Speed DOB Jersey#-
7 Critical Factors
1) Confirmed Speed Grade -
(Dress and Condtions)
2) Play Speed Grade -
3) QAB a) St~ide L M S b) Quickness- c) A g i l i t y d) Body Balance- e) Quick Feet- f) C O D g) Acceleration - h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination -
Summation
1)Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost - C)Aggressiveness- d) Clutch Player- e) Determined to be the Best - f) 2nd Effort- Grade -
Summation
5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy Player- e) Enjoys Football- f) Quitter- Grade -
g) Training H a b i t s h) Stability- i) Team Player-

6) Mental Alertness a) Learns Quickly- b) Needs Repetition- c) Repeats Mistakes- d) Retains Once He Has It- Grade -
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) f) Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-
Summation
7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He H i t s ) b) Arm Strength (Upper Body Development)- c) B.P. Strength- Grade -
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength-
Summation
Critical Factors Grade-
Position S~ecifics

nitial Quickness Grade-

'osition and Sustain Grade-

Run Block Grade-

[rap Grade-

?ulling Grade-

Downfield Grade-

'ass Block Grade-

Dunt Snap Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
h e Major Weakness One Major Strength

Scout Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Defensive Linemen
Name School
(Last) (First)
College Pos Pro Pos Height Weight Speed DOB Jersey#
7 Critical Factors
1) Confirmed Speed Grade
(Dress and Condmons)
2) Play Speed Grade
3) QAB a) Stride L M S b) Quickness- c) A g i l i t y d) Body Balance- e) Quick Feet- f) C O D g) Acceleration- h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination -
S~~mmation
4) Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost- c) Aggressiveness- d) Clutch Player- e) Determined to be the Best - f) 2nd Effort- Grade -
Summation
5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy Player- e) Enjoys Football- f) Quitter- Grade -
g) Training H a b i t s h) Stability- i) Team Player-
Summation
6) Mental Alertness a) Leams Quickly- b) Needs Repetition- c) Repeats Mistakes- d) Retains Once He Has It- Grade -
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) f) Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-

7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He H i t s ) b) Arm Strength (Upper Body D e v e l o p m e n t ) c) B.P. Strength- Grade -
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength-

Critical Factors Grade-


Position Specifics

initial Quickness Grade-


-

Recognition Grade-

Neutralize Grade-

Escape Run Block Grade-

Vs. Run Grade-

Pursuit Grade-

Tackling Grade-

Pass Rush Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
One Major Weakness One Major Strength
Summation

Scout Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Linebackers
Name School
(Last) (Rrst)
College Pos Pro Pos He~ght We~ght Speed DOB Jersey#
7 Critical Factors
I)Confirmed Speed Grade -
(Dress and CondLons)
2) Play Speed Grade -
3) QAB a) Stride L M S b) Q u i c k n e s s c) Agility- d) Body Balance- e) Quick Feet- f) C O D g) A c c e l e r a t i o n h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination -
Summation
4) Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost- c) A g g r e s s i v e n e s s d) Clutch Player- e) Determined to be the Best- f) 2nd Effort- Grade -
Summation
5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy Player- e) Enjoys Football- f) Quitter- Grade -
g) Training Habits- h) S t a b i l i t y i) Team Player-
Summation
6) Mental Alertness a) Leams Quickly- b) Needs RepeUtion- c) Repeats Mistakes- d) Retains Once He Has It- Grade p

e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) f) Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-
-

7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He H i t s ) b) Arm Strength (Upper Body D e v e l o p m e n t ) c) B P. Strength- Grade -
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Funct~onalStrength-
Summation

Position S~ecifics Critical Factors Grade-


Stance

Initial Quickness Grade-

Recognition Grade-

Neutralize Grade-

Escape Run Block Grade-

Vs. Inside Run Grade-

Ward Off 2nd Block Grade-


-- --

Pursuit Outside Grade-

Tackling Grade-

BlitzlRush Grade-

Zone Coverage Grade-

Man to Man Coverage Grade-

Hands Grade-

Special Teams Grade-


Total-
Summary Average Specifics-
One Major Weakness One Major Strength
Summation

Scout Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Defensive Backs
Name School
(Last) (First)
College Pos Pro Pos Height Weight Speed DOB Jersey#__
7 Critical Factors
1) Confined Speed' Grade -
(Dress and Contiins)
2) Play Speed Grade -
3) QAB a) Stride L M S b) Quickness- c) A g i l i t y d) Body Balance- e) Quick F e e t f) COD- g) Acceleration - h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination -
Summation
4) Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost- c) Aggressiveness- d) Clutch Player- e) Determined to be the Best- f) 2nd Effort- Grade p

5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy Player- e) Enjoys Football- f) Quitter- Grade p

g) Training Habits- h) Stability- i)Team Player-

6) Mental Alertness a) Leams Quickly- b) Needs Repetition- c) Repeats Mistakes- d) Retains Once He Has It- Grade -
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) 9 Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-
Summation
7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He H i t s ) b) Arm Strength (Upper Body Development)- c) B.P. Strength- Grade-
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- 9 D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength-

Crlical Factors Grade-


Position Specifics

KeylDiagnose Grade-

Run Support Grade-

Ward Off Grade-


- -

Tackling Grade-

Closing Quicks Grade-

Range Grade-

Ball Reaction Grade-

Hands Grade-

Zone Coverage Grade-

Man to Man Coverage Grade-


-

Punt CatcherlKO Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
One Major Weakness One Major Strength
Summation

Scout Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Kicker
Name School
(Last) (Fmt)
College Pos Pro Pos Height Weight Speed DOB Jersey#
7 Critical Factors
1) Confirmed Speed Grade -
(Dressand Contiilions)
2) Play Speed Grade -
3) QAB a) Stride L M S b) Q u i c k n e s s C)Agility- d) Body Balance- e) Quick Feet- f) C O D g) Acceleration - h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination -

4) Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost - c) Aggressiveness d) Clutch P l a y e r e) Determined to be the Best - f) 2nd Effort- Grade -
Summation
5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy P l a y e r e) Enjoys Football- 9 Quitter- Grade p

g) Training Habits- h) Stability- i)Team Player-


Summation
6) Mental Alertness a) Learns Quickly- b) Needs Repetition- c) Repeats Mistakes- d) Retains Once He Has It- Grade-
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) f) Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-
Summation
7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He H i t s ) b) A n Strength (Upper Body D e v e l o p m e n t ) c) B.P. Strength- Grade-
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength-
Summation
Critical Factors Grade-
Position Specifics
-
Leg Right Left Both Grade-

Leg Strength Grade-

KO Distance Grade-
- - --

KO Hang Grade-

KO Direction Grade-

KO Onside Grade-

FGlGet OfflStepslRise Grade-

FGlDistancelAccuracylRange Grade-

ClutchlGame Grade-

RunlPass Grade-
-

Punting Ability Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
One Major Weakness One Major Strength
Summation

Scout Name Final Grade


GKI Player Report Form Punter
Name School
(Last) (F~rst)
College Pos Pro Pos Height Weight Speed DOB Jersey#
7 Critical Factors
1) Confirmed Speed Grade -
(Dress and Condmonsl
2) Play Speed Grade -
3) QAB a) Stride L M S b) Quickness- c) A g i l i t y d) Body Balance- e) Quick F e e t 9 COD- g) A c c e l e r a t i o n h) Flexibility- Grade -
i) Ease of M o v e m e n t j) Overall Body Coordination-
Summation
4) Competitor a) T o u g h n e s s b) Win at all cost - c) Aggressiveness- d) Clutch Player- e) Deterr~inedto be the Best - f) 2nd Effort- Grade -
Summation
5) Character a) Coachable- b) Bad A c t o r c) Shows Leadership Qualities- d) Lazy Player- e) Enjoys F o o t b a l l 0 Quitter- Grade -
g) Training Habits- h) Stability- i) Team Player-
Summation
6) Mental Alertness a) Learns Quickly- b) Needs Repetition- c) Repeats M i s t a k e s d) Retains Once He Has it- Grade -
e) Adjusts Quickly to Strange or New Situations ( A l e r t n e s s ) f) Shows That He Sees Things Happening (Awareness)-
Summation
7) Strength and Explosion a) Delivers Blow (Does He Pop Leather When He Hits) - b) Arm Strength (Upper Body Development)- c) B.P. Strength- Grade -
d) Leg Strength (Lower Body Development)- e) A Hitter- f) D u r a b i l i t y g) Functional Strength-
Summation
Critical Factors Grade-
Position Specifics
-
Leg Right Left Both Grade-

Leg Strength Grade-


--

Punt Steps Grade-

Punt Distance Grade-

Punt Hang Grade-

Punt Direction Grade-

Punt Pooch Grade-

ClutchlGame Grade-

RunlPass Grade-

Holder Grade-

Kicking Ability Grade-

Total-
Average Specifics-

Summary
One Major Weakness One Major Strength

Scout Name Final Grade