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Q1 CY2012

Less than Half of People Surveyed Think About How Their Online Activities Impact Their Online Reputations
Adults and children may be placing their online reputations at risk
New research commissioned by Microsoft suggests adults and children may want to be more mindful of how their digital activities impact their online reputations. Only 44% of adults and children aged 8 17 years old surveyed think about the long-term impact of their online activities on their personal reputation, and only 38% of adults and 39% of children think about the long-term impact of their online activities on the reputations of others. The research also indicates those who dont think about the consequences of their online activities are less likely to actively manage their online reputations or create positive influences on their reputations through their online activities. Its possible that people who dont actively think about the consequences of their activities also might underestimate how much they can impact their own online reputations and those of others.

Thinking About the Impact of One's Online Activities (Always/Often %)


TakeTake steps to keep your personal work/school online steps to keep your personal and and work/school online profiles separate profiles separate Information that you might bebe exposing or leaving behind Information that you might exposing or leaving behind while engaging in online while engaging in online activities activities Consider your own online profile when you edit post content Consider your own online profile when you edit or or post content How your online activities might bebe exposing information How your online activities might exposing information about others about others The long-term impact that your online activities might have on The long-term impact that your online activities might have on your personal reputation your personal reputation Consider other peoples online profile when you edit or post Consider other peoples online profile when you edit or post content content The long-term impact that your online activities might have on The long-term impact that your online activities might have on your work/school reputation your work/school reputation The long-term impact that your online activities might have on The long-term impact that your online activities might have on the personal others the personal reputation of reputation of others The long-term impact that your online activities might have on The long-term impact that your online activities might have on the work/school reputation the work/school reputation of others of others

52%

57%

57% 55% 49% 53% 46% 43% 44% 44% 43% 44% 40% 39% 38% 39% 36% 34% Adults Children (8 - 17 yrs.)

Some online activities with high participation rates are not seen as big contributors to online profiles
Social networking activities are ranked as only the 4th highest contributor to online profiles. Yet, photos and comments posted on a social network, web page or blog are considered the leading positive AND negative influences on peoples online reputations. Uploading photos in general is not seen as a big contributor to online profiles (adults-6%, children-12%), but photos are considered one of the biggest positive/negative influences on online reputations.

Prepared by blueocean market intelligence & Telecommunications Research Group for Microsoft Corporation

Children could use more help from their parents managing their online reputations
Less than half (43%) of parents surveyed help their children manage their online reputations. Children 8-14 years old are twice as likely to receive parental help as children 15-17 years old (66% vs. 33%). It may be risky to assume that older children need less help especially since the reported incidence of harm from online information is higher for the older group (19%) than for younger children (16%). According to the survey, greater parental help in managing online reputations coincides with children having: Greater concern about their own online reputation Stronger consideration for the long-term consequences of their online activities on their personal reputation (57% among children whose parents provide all the help needed vs. 35% among children whose parents dont help at all) A higher reported percentage of positive influences on their reputations from their online activities
The amount of help children get from their parents managing their online reputations matters.
Children - Q3a. How concerned are you about your online reputation?

70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

% Reporting Positive Influences on Online Reputation from Online Activities


Help Completely

49%

56%

68%

67%

No help at all

Parents don't Parents help Parents help Parents give help me at all me a little me a lot all the help I need

Very/Somewhat Concerned (%) Perception is reality


Online reputation management has two important parts: what you post online and what others post about you. As this research shows, people often dont think about the long-term consequences of their online behavior and forget that what ends up in cyberspace can last a lifetime. The rise of social networking sites makes it easy for anyone to form an opinion about you based on whats online. Many employers use Facebook to assess job candidates, and colleges and insurance companies may search for photos and web postings to help evaluate applicants. The more proactively you manage your online profile, the more opportunities you have to ensure your online reputation is one you can be proud of. Monitor your reputation - Monitoring is an essential part of reputation management. Search your name and email address regularly in search engines. Talk with your children Children need help and greater involvement from their parents to better understand the consequences of their online activities. Go to the source If you fear a friend or family member is having a negative influence on your online reputation, consider talking to the person directly. If needed, you may wish to block further online engagement. Use privacy settings Adjust privacy settings to allow approved friends, family and the public varying levels of access to your profile e.g., to post to your Wall, tag you in photos or videos, make comments, etc.

For more information Microsoft offers a free downloadable Take Charge of Your Online Reputation brochure. Microsoft also provides guidance on how to be a better digital citizen in our Digital Citizenship in Action Toolkit.
This material is provided for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied.

Prepared by blueocean market intelligence & Telecommunications Research Group for Microsoft Corporation