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Teacher: Katherine Stocking Subject: World History

Date: Feb. 20-24, 2012 Topic: Transition to a Modern World

WIDA ELP Standard 5: English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of Social Studies. Interpreting CAN DO Descriptors: These describe how English Language Learners process and use language in each language domain (L=listening; S=Speaking; R=reading; W=writing) and each level of proficiency (1=entering; 2=beginning; 3=developing; 4=expanding; 5=bridging; 6=reaching).

DAY

STANDARDS

ESSENTIAL QUESTION (S)

Learning Tasks

ASSESSMENT

Tuesday, 2/21

SSWH7 a. Explain the manorial system and feudalism; include the status of peasants and feudal monarchies and the importance of Charlemagne. c. Explain the role of the church in medieval society. CAN DO Descriptors: S4. Explain content-related issues and concepts R2. Match sentence-level descriptions to visual representations W1. Label content-related diagrams, pictures from word/phrase banks; Produce short answer responses to oral questions with visual support

Unit EQ: How did the power of individual citizens change from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? Daily EQ: What is feudalism and why did it arise in Medieval Europe? How did the Catholic church survive during the Medieval Era? Key Vocabulary: feudalism, manor, knight, clergy, lord, serf, peasant, scarce, rural, alliance, secular, monastery, selfsufficient

Opening (Activate): Students will be given a blank feudal pyramid (with images) and a set of terms and definitions. Students will first infer which terms and definitions go with each image on the pyramid. They will then use texts to locate the appropriate definition and placement of remaining unidentified terms. Finally, review as a class and ask students to make predictions about medieval society based on the pyramid. Record predictions on the board. (For struggling students, reduce the size of the task by matching at least half of the words and definitions beforehand.) Work Session (Engage): Presentation: Use the PPT to provide students with images and explanations of the manor system and the structure of feudal society. Place the rise of Medieval Europe in the context of the fall of western Rome. Practice: Think Pair Share The life of peasants was harsh. What kinds of benefits did a manor provide to the serfs who lived and worked there? Record student responses on board. Specialized Instruction/Differentiation: Tier A - Match phrases about Medieval Europe to create sentences (i.e., The Middle Ages were also called the Dark Ages because is matched with wealth and learning declined). Tier B Provided with sentence starters, create sentences to describe Medieval Europe (i.e., The Middle Ages were also called the Dark Ages because). Tier C Describe the manor system in Medieval Europe (orally or in writing). Explain how manors were self-sufficient. Give an example of a modern day system that is similar in some way to a manor. Reading/Vocabulary Strategy: Point out the location of the clergy on the feudal pyramid (review student predictions from beginning of class if relevant). The students will silently preview a reading passage about the role of the church in medieval society and then listen as the passage is read aloud. As they listen, students will selectively highlight words they do not understand. Students will share a few of the words they have highlighted and the teacher will record the words on the board while explaining, linking, and categorizing the terms selected by students. Follow up with power point slide explaining the role of the church in medieval society. Touch on political alliances and explain the importance of Charlemagne by showing a map of his empire. Closing (Summarize): Students will respond to one or both of the following

Students will define vocabulary related to feudalism using visual supports. Students will identify social & political roles in the feudal pyramid. Students will formulate oral and written statements about the manor system. Students will discuss the status of peasants with peers (+/- of life on the manor). Students will clarify the meanings of words they do not understand while reading about the role of the church. Students will write about the freedoms that peasants sacrificed in exchange for protection.

questions in writing: 1. How would you explain feudalism in your own words? 2. What were some things the church did to remain powerful during the Middle Ages?

Wednesday, 2/22

SSWH7 b. Describe the political impact of Christianity; include Pope Gregory VII and King Henry IV of Germany (Holy Roman Emperor). CAN DO Descriptors: L3. Distinguish main ideas from supporting points in oral, content-related discourse R3. Identify topic sentences or main ideas and details in paragraphs; order paragraphs or sequence information within paragraphs

Unit EQ: How did the power of individual citizens change from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? Daily EQ: How did the Catholic church expand its political power during the Middle Ages? Key Vocabulary: secular, lay investure, sacrament, cannon law, salvation, clergy, pope, emperor, excommunicate, alliance

Opening (Activate): Students will complete a Frayer model for the word secular. Have volunteers complete a large version of the Frayer model on the board. (For struggling students, give them a copy of a Frayer model that is partially completed.) See if students can recall from yesterdays lesson how the church maintained its power during the medieval era. Recall that the church took on a more secular role by making political alliances (such as naming Charlemagne the Holy Roman Emperor). Work Session (Engage):

Students will define, explain, and give examples of secular. Students will sequence events by listening. Students will identify supporting details in a text. Students will practice silent reading and oral reading in pairs. Students will write a list of (or identify) 3 examples of how the church exercised secular power.

Presentation: Explain that as the political role of the church grew, conflicts
arose between religious and political leaders. Tell the students how a major conflict arose between Henry IV and Pope Gregory VII. Explain the meaning of lay investure.

Practice: Give students a list of events that took in the struggle for political
power between Henry and Pope Gregory. Read a passage of text describing the conflict, and ask students to put the events in order as they listen. Read the passage as many times as necessary until all students are able to complete the sequence of events.

Specialized Instruction/Differentiation & Reading Strategy: Give each student a


blank tic-tac-toe chart. Students independently read an assigned text related to the secular role of the church and record one important detail in each square of a tic-tac-toe diagram. (Give Tier A and low-B students an adapted text and a diagram with some of the details already filled in.) Students then pair up and the teacher hands each pair a baggie containing nine tokens, one for each tictac-toe square (the tokens can be colored pieces of paper, etc.). Next, the students exchange papers containing the details they have written down. Then, students take turns reading the passage of text out loud to one another while their partner listens and covers a detail with a token each time they find one written on their partners paper. The goal is to place three tokens in a row horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. Once the students have finished, they can switch partners and begin again. (Begin by pairing students in like pairs, and see if lower proficiency students can partner with more advanced speakers/texts as they become comfortable with the activity.) Closing (Summarize): On a small slip of paper, students will write three examples of how the church exercised secular or political power. (For struggling students, provide a list of examples and see if they can select three that pertain to the information provided in class.)

Thursday, 2/23

SSWH7 d. Describe how increasing trade led to the growth of towns and cities. SSWH9 a. Explain the social, economic, and political changes that contributed to the rise of Florence and the

Unit EQ: How did the power of individual citizens change from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? Daily EQ: How were the ideas of humanism and realism revealed in Renaissance art

Opening (Activate): Students will take a quiz requiring them to complete a feudal pyramid and complete a Frayer model for the word secular. As students finish the quiz, they will begin the directed reading activity. Work Session (Engage): Directed Reading Students will independently preview a text about the end of the Middle Ages and use text features to make predictions about why the Middle Ages came to an end. If necessary, review text features before beginning this activity (titles, images, bold or highlighted words etc). Ask for

Feudal Pyramid Quiz (matching) Students will predict and discuss factors that contributed to the end of the Middle Ages in text. Think-Pair-Share (How might art and literature also be

ideas of Machiavelli. b. Identify artistic and scientific achievements of Leonardo da Vinci, the Renaissance man, and Michelangelo. c. Explain the main characteristics of humanism; include the ideas of Petrarch, Dante, and Erasmus. CAN DO Descriptors: L4. Compare traits based on visuals and oral descriptions using specific and some technical language S3. Estimate, make predictions, or pose hypothesis from models R2. Classify or organize information presented in visuals or graphs; Compare content-related features in visuals and graphics W1. Produce short answer responses to oral questions with visual support W2. Take notes using graphic organizers or models

and literature? Key Vocabulary: guild, urban, urbanization, Renaissance, humanism, idealism, realism, city-state, merchant, Renaissance man, printing press

volunteers to share their predictions with the class and record the predictions on the board. Then, read the text aloud. Read to a natural stopping point. Pause and review predictions. Ask the students if the predictions written on the board need to be refined based on what they have already read. Finally, finish reading and discuss whether or not predictions were correct. Point out the usefulness of text features for finding meaning. Presentation Use PPT to review factors that brought about the end of the Middle Ages and the beginning of the Renaissance. Touch on the increase in food supply and thus, population, the increase in trade, the rise of guilds, and urbanization. Explain the Renaissance as a rebirth of culture. Cover major developments/individuals that came from the period. Present the students with visual examples of the secular topics covered by Renaissance artists, and point out how these artists used elements of realism and humanism in their work. Students will record basic notes in a graphic organizer as they listen. Practice: Ask the students to recall the meaning of the word secular. As a class, discuss: How might art and literature also be secular? See if students can give examples of secular art or literature with which they are familiar (ThinkPair-Share). Specialized Instruction/Differentiation: Tier A Given a set of images, sort them into two groups (Middle Ages and Renaissance). Orally identify elements that caused you to make your classifications. Tier B Provided with a group of images from the Renaissance period, identify in writing a list of factors that the images have in common. Tier C Given a particular Renaissance work of art, identify in writing which elements embody the concepts of realism and humanism. Defend your writing orally. Closing (Summarize): Given two works of art, select the one that most likely came from the Renaissance period. Explain orally or in writing why you chose the work of art that you did. Homework: Assign flashcards for Middle Ages/Renaissance. Preview rubric for Renaissance project.

secular?) Students will verbally identify elements of realism and humanism. Students will identify elements of realism and humanism in writing.

Friday, 2/24

SSWH9 c. Explain the main characteristics of humanism; include the ideas of Petrarch, Dante, and Erasmus. CAN DO Descriptors: L3. Evaluate information in academic conversations L4. Analyze content-related tasks or assignments based on oral discourse S4. Analyze and share pros and cons of choices R1. Use references (e.g., dictionaries, technology)

Unit EQ: How did the power of individual citizens change from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? Daily EQ: How were the ideas of humanism and realism revealed in Renaissance art and literature? Key Vocabulary: Renaissance, humanism, realism

Opening (Activate): PPT Quiz (whole group) Students will review information learned through a series of multiple choice questions related to major artists and writers from the Renaissance period. Work Session (Engage):

Students will review information learned through an interactive PPT Quiz. Students will use a rubric to evaluate another students work. Students will work independently or in pairs to research an artist or writer from the Renaissance period and create a presentation about their selected individual. Students will write a progress list of tasks accomplished during their lab time.

Presentation: Review the rubric for the Renaissance project orally with the students. Provide them with an example of former student work. Practice: Students will use a copy of the rubric and work in pairs to grade the example of former student work. Pairs will compare grades assigned to each category and discuss/defend their decisions to award points. Specialized Instruction/Differentiation: Provide the students with lab time to begin research. Students will choose a Renaissance artist or writer and select a work of art or a piece of writing that was created by this individual during the Renaissance period. They will create a presentation analyzing how elements of humanism and realism are evident in the piece art or writing selected. Presentations must include the following elements: 1. Simple background information on an individual artist or writer from the

W3. Compare and reflect on performance against criteria (e.g., rubrics)

Renaissance Either of the following: a visual representation of a piece of art created by your individual OR a written excerpt from a piece of writing created by your individual 3. A written description of the art/writing you have selected (What year was it created? What is it about?) 4. A written analysis of how the elements of humanism and realism are evident in the art/writing 5. A set of guided listening questions that each student must answer as they listen to your presentation (multiple choice, fill in the blank, etc) *This list may be simplified for struggling students. Students with lower language proficiency may provide oral description and analysis as opposed to writing. An alternative assignment would be to ask students to create a Venn diagram comparing a Renaissance artist to a modern day figure. 2. Closing (Summarize): Students will submit the name of their selected artist in writing to the teacher, along with a checklist of at least three things they accomplished in the lab (examples might be the title of the work of art selected, bits of background information they located, some guided listening questions created, etc). Homework: Review for vocabulary quiz on Monday. Work on Renaissance projects. Guided listening questions will be due on Monday by the end of class.

Monday, 2/27

SSWH9 b. Identify artistic and scientific achievements of Leonardo da Vinci, the Renaissance man, and Michelangelo. c. Explain the main characteristics of humanism; include the ideas of Petrarch, Dante, and Erasmus. CAN DO Descriptors: S3. Suggest ways to resolve issues or pose solutions R1. Use references (e.g., dictionaries, technology) W3. Compare and reflect on performance against criteria (e.g., rubrics) W4. Revise work based on narrative or oral feedback

Unit EQ: How did the power of individual citizens change from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? Daily EQ: How were the ideas of humanism and realism revealed in Renaissance art and literature? Key Vocabulary: Renaissance, humanism, realism

Opening (Activate): Students will take the first 5-10 minutes of class to review for the vocabulary quiz on the Middle Ages/Renaissance. Students will then take quiz. After students complete the quiz, they will quietly begin working on their Renaissance projects. Work Session (Engage):

Vocabulary Quiz (Matching) Students will work independently or in pairs to research an artist or writer from the Renaissance period and create a presentation about their selected individual. Students will assess their progress by grading their own projects with the rubric. Students will pose suggestions on ways they can improve their projects. Students will reflect on the meaning of a Renaissance man by reviewing the achievements of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo.

Presentation: Orally review the requirements of the project using the rubric for the second time. Explain that by the end of class, students will be required to grade their own progress using the rubric. In addition, they must submit their guided listening questions by the end of class. Practice: Students will use the majority of class time to work on completing their Renaissance projects. Specialized Instruction/Differentiation: Each pair or individual will conference with the teacher to review their self-assessment and discuss how to improve upon their work. The teacher will collect the self-graded rubrics and hold on to them in order to return them to students with their final grade.

Closing (Summarize): Provide students with a written description of both Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo and give them a few minutes to read it. Draw two large boxes on the board. Write the name of an artist in each box. Give students a post-it note and ask them to write their name on it. As they leave class, tell the students that they need to place their post-it note in the box of the artists that they feel best represents a Renaissance Man. Homework: Renaissance projects due tomorrow. Students will present their projects to the class and administer their guided listening assessment.

Tuesday, 2/28

SSWH9

Unit EQ:

Opening (Activate): Review the closing activity from yesterdays lesson

Students will discuss

b. Identify artistic and scientific achievements of Leonardo da Vinci, the Renaissance man, and Michelangelo. c. Explain the main characteristics of humanism; include the ideas of Petrarch, Dante, and Erasmus. CAN DO Descriptors: S2. Describe persons, places, events, or objects S5. Give multimedia presentations on grade-level material W5. Produce research reports from multiple sources

How did the power of individual citizens change from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? Daily EQ: How were the ideas of humanism and realism revealed in Renaissance art and literature? Key Vocabulary: Renaissance, humanism, realism

through a class discussion. Is there a clear favorite? If so, why? Ask students to volunteer explanations about why they feel that one individual vs. the other is a better Renaissance man. Work Session (Engage):

characteristics of a Renaissance Man. Students will present Renaissance humanism projects to the class. Students will complete guided listening activities as they view each presentation. Students will reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of their presentations through a series of written responses. Students will recall previously learned content in closing activity.

Student Presentation & Reflection: Students will present their Renaissance projects to the class and administer their guided listening assessments. At the end of student presentations, each group will collect the guided listening assessments from the other students and meet with their partner to grade the assessments. Based on the grades to their guided listening assessments, students will answer the following questions in writing. They will submit the guided listening assessments as well as the answers to these questions with their work. 1. What were the strengths of my presentation? 2. Were students able to answer the questions I gave them? Why or why not? 3. Was there anything about my presentation that remained unclear to students? 4. If so, how could I improve my presentation? Work Session/Flex Time: The remainder of the class period will be protected as flex time. This time can be used for several purposes: Students who were unable to complete their projects in the allotted time may have additional time to complete them. Students who have completed and presented their projects as well as submitted their reflections may conference with the teacher on their final grade and use remaining class time to work on the Unit 3 Exam Review.

Closing (Summarize): Hang several pieces of chart paper around the room. On each piece of paper, write a word or concept related to the unit (examples: feudalism, secular church, Renaissance Man, humanism, etc). Ask students to walk around the room with a marker, and write one thing (word, fact, or detail) that they remember related to each concept on the piece of paper. Accompany struggling students. If they are unable to write their own detail, ask them to try and articulate it orally and write their response for them. Homework: Students will use remaining class time to begin working on the Unit 3 Exam review.

Wednesday, 2/29

SSWH9 d. Analyze the impact of the Protestant Reformation; include the ideas of Martin Luther and John Calvin. e. Describe the Counter Reformation at the Council of Trent and the role of the Jesuits. f. Describe the English Reformation and the role of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. CAN DO Descriptors:

Unit EQ: How did the power of individual citizens change from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? Daily EQ: What were the major criticisms of the Catholic church during the Reformation? How did the Catholic church respond to the Reformation? Key Vocabulary:

Opening (Activate): Guided Reading: Why did many people criticize the practices of the Catholic church (p. 488)? (Allow students to write their responses on a mini white board). They felt that church leaders were too interested in worldly pursuits, such as gaining wealth and political power. See if students can recall examples of secular church power from the beginning of the unit. As they volunteer recalled material, write their responses on the board. Work Session (Engage):

Students will recall previously learned characteristics of an increasingly secular church. Students will recall background knowledge on Protestant denominations. Students will record important facts in a graphic organizer while listening. Students will classify causes of the Protestant reformation. Students will analyze

Presentation: (Advance organizer) Review the diagram of Christianity on page 491. See if students can recall what caused the split (schism) between the eastern and western Christians (from Unit 2). Provide the students with an advance organizer of the Christian denominations that resulted from the Protestant Reformation. See if the students are familiar with any of the denominations. Introduce the concept of Reformation and briefly discuss the causes of the Protestant Reformation. Touch on the differences between

L3. Categorize content based examples described orally. S2. Give features of content based material. S3. Compare/contrast features, traits, characteristics using general and some specific language. S4. Take a stance and use evidence to defend it. R3. Identify topic sentences or main ideas and details in paragraphs. W2. Take notes using graphic organizers or models. W3. Outline ideas and details using graphic organizers. W4. Justify or defend ideas and opinions.

Protestant Reformation, Counter-Reformation, Anglican Church, Lutheranism, predestination, indulgences, Council of Trent, Jesuits, inquisition, heresy

Lutheranism, Calvanism, and Anglicanism. Ask students to record notes in a graphic organizer as they listen.

Practice/Differentiation:

similarities/differences in the Protestant faiths by creating a Venn diagram. Students will evaluate the strengths of protestant beliefs. Students will identify actions of the church during the counter reformation using a graphic organizer. Students will write about which action of the counter reformation was most impactful.

Tier A Using the table of Protestant denominations on page 491 of the text, students will complete a three-way Venn diagram comparing Lutherans, Anglicans, and Calvanists. Tier B Given a list of causes of the Protestant Reformation, students will classify the causes as economic, political, religious, or cultural. Tier C - Decide whether Lutheranism or Calvanism would have been more attractive to the masses. What elements of each belief system made it more or less attractive to people? Prepare an oral defense supporting your decision.

Reading Strategy: (Using a graphic organizer) Explain that the Catholic church
could not stand by while people challenged its authority and instead made several moves to counter reforms to the church. Tell the students that these efforts were known as the Counter-Reformation. Show them images of the Inquisition to illustrate the time period. Provide the students with a passage of text and a graphic organizer. Ask them to read and identify things the Catholic Church did to counter reforms (including the Jesuits, Inquisition, and Council of Trent), and specifically identify the four decisions reached at the Council of Trent. Process as a class and write student responses on the board. (For struggling students, provide a leveled text appropriate for their language proficiency. In addition, reduce challenge of task by giving them a partially completed graphic organizer.) Closing (Summarize): Ask the students to look over the actions of the Catholic Church during the counter-reformation and decide which action may have had the most impact. Ask them to write their answer on a separate piece of paper, being careful to give at least two reasons supporting their decision. Homework: Students should continue to review for the Unit 3 exam.

Thursday,3/1

Opening (Activate): Students will use the first 25-30 minutes of class to work through a series of stations reviewing different aspects of the unit. Station 1. Feudalism pyramid (students will be asked to identify roles in the feudal pyramid) Station 2. Secularization of the Church Timeline (students will be asked to sequence events) Station 3. Birth of the Renaissance classification (students will be asked to classify which factors which brought about the end of the Middle Ages and birth of the Renaissance) Station 4. Renaissance humanism (students will be asked to identify works of Renaissance art containing elements of humanism) Station 5. Protestant Reformation classification (students will sort characteristics of Lutheranism, Calvanism, and Anglicanism into respective groups) Station 6. Counter-Reformation (given a list of characteristics, students will identify those that characterize the counter-reformation) Work Session (Engage): Give students 10-15 minutes to finish up review sheets. Using the completed review sheets, navigate through sample test questions using iRespond. Print student reports so that students receive individualized feedback about review strengths and weaknesses. See if students improve scores during a lighting round of i-Respond. Concept/Vocabulary Review: Write a series of words, concepts, and individuals relating to the unit on the white board. Have students take turns coming to the front of the classroom to compete. Read an explanation/definition for the word or concept aloud, and allow students to ring a bell or hit a buzzer to answer the question first. As the words are select, remove them from the board. Closing (Summarize): Administer three multiple choice questions related to SSWH9b, considering the selection of this standard as a data point for the World History

Students will work in small groups to review specific concepts related to the unit. Students will work individually to practice selected-response questions related to the unit. Students will review words and concepts related to the unit through a whole-class review game. Students will answer three multiple choice questions from the test (related to the SSP standard SSWH9b).

SSP.

Friday, 3/2

Unit 3 Assessment