pressure cooker

THE

COOK BOOK

homemade meals in minutes
TO R I R I TC H I E

contents
pressure cookers for today 7

soups & stews 19 beans & grains 39 meat 53 vegetables 81
basic recipes 98 tips for pressure cooking 101 glossary 102 menu ideas 107 index 108 acknowledgments 112

pressure cookers for today
Everyone seems to be looking for a new way to save time in the kitchen, but the solution has been there all along: pressure cookers. These ingenious devices, originally marketed in the early 1900s, were designed to speed up cooking by using a simple principle: seal the lid to create pressure, which causes the temperature in the pot to rise past boiling, and food cooks faster. No invisible microwaves, no food-altering science, just simple, clean steam. Fast-forward to today and pressure cookers have many compelling reasons for their renewed popularity. Many dishes that are too often relegated to Sunday dinner or ordered in restaurants because they take too long to prepare at home—pot roast, short ribs, baked beans—can be prepared in one-half to two-thirds the time it takes to cook them conventionally. You don’t even have to plan ahead. But pressure cookers also help the home cook save money. The foods cooked in a pressure cooker are generally tougher and less desirable than more tender foods, and thus less expensive. Finally, pressure cookers keep in foods’ nutrients. While these cooking vessels allow you to make comforting meals on a weeknight schedule, pressure cookers are also a perfect addition to a healthy lifestyle (see right). Pressure cookers aren’t limited to just soups, stews, and sauces. Using the recipes in these pages, you’ll learn how to make a shortcut risotto as good as the original in just six minutes, or butternut squash purée, orange-scented beets, braised artichokes, chicken thighs, and even corned beef—all in a flash. Flavors vary widely from the chiles of Mexico, to the soy glazes of Asia, to the creamy sauces of France.
A HEALTHIER WAY TO COOK

Because everything cooks faster in a pressure cooker, and only a small amount of liquid is needed, fewer nutrients are leached or evaporated away as they are in other types of cooking. Some people have a cooker on hand just to make high-fiber, protein-rich beans weekly or even daily, or to cook whole-grain brown rice or farro at the last minute, both of which contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

average pressure cook times
FOOD COOK ING TIME LEVEL RELE A SE METHOD

Black Beans Chickpeas, dried Lentils Navy Beans, dried Pinto Beans, dried Barley Risotto Wild Rice Chicken Breast Chicken Thighs Chicken, Whole Turkey Breast Bone-in Pork Shoulder Boneless Pork Shoulder Boneless Lamb Meat Beef Brisket Beef Round Artichokes, quartered Beets Butternut squash, cut into 2-inch (5 cm) cubes Cauliflower florets Mustard Greens, 1-inch (2.5 cm) strips Pearl Onions Potatoes, 1 ⁄ 4 inch (6 mm) chunks Red cabbage, cut into thin strips

25 minutes 40 minutes 8 minutes 25 minutes 18–20 minutes 15–18 minutes 6 minutes 25 minutes 7–10 minutes 8–12 minutes 10 minutes 30 minutes 40–50 minutes 15 minutes 15 minutes 50–60 minutes 18–20 minutes 4 minutes 20 minutes 8 minutes 2 minutes 6 minutes 3 minutes 4 minutes 5 minutes

high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high high

natural steam release natural steam release natural steam release natural steam release natural steam release natural steam release quick steam release quick steam release natural steam release natural steam release quick steam release natural steam release natural steam release natural steam release natural steam release quick steam release quick steam release quick steam release quick steam release quick steam release quick steam release quick steam release quick steam release quick steam release quick steam release

10 pressure cookers for today

the right pressure cooker for you
With the various types of pressure cookers on the market today, both stove top and electric models, cooking under pressure is just a shopping trip away. Your decision on which model to choose will probably be based on three factors: which size pot suits your household; price; and the amount of storage space in your kitchen. Both types of pressure cookers have advantages and either is a good choice. It’s a matter of individual taste and preference.
Stove-top pressure cookers Stove-top models are generally available
ABOUT THE RECIPES

The recipes in this book were developed for a six-quart pot, which is the perfect size for family meals of four to six servings, plus the occasional recipe for larger crowds or when you want leftovers, such as with soups, stews, beans, or brisket.

in aluminum or stainless steel, the former being more inexpensive and lightweight, the latter being of a heavier gauge and costing slightly more. While the choice is individual, the recommendation is the same as with all pots and pans: a heavy, durable metal with a sturdy base will distribute heat evenly, yield good results, and last for a long time. Stainless steel pots provide all these qualities. Plus, they often have the advantage over aluminum pots of being dishwasher safe.
Electric pressure cookers Electric models offer unique features.

They don’t take up space on the stove top, which leaves your range free for other purposes. They have built-in timers that are very precise, eliminating the margin of error in cooking times. Electric pressure cookers also ensure consistent heat; with a stove top model, you need to adjust the gas or electric burner to maintain the cooking pressure at the optimum level, while an electric cooker does this automatically (see Adjusting Pressure, page 15). In short, you can walk away from an electric model while it cooks, but it is better to keep an occasional eye on a stove top model. The downsides to owning an electric pressure cooker include storage constraints (not everyone has space on his or her counter or in the cupboard for another appliance) and that these models generally cost more than stove top pressure cookers.

pressure cookers for today 13

soups & stews
moroccan-style tomato-rice soup 21 easy beef & barley soup 22 potato-leek soup two ways 25 curried cauliflower soup with spicy croutons 26 tuscan farro & lentil soup 29 smoky split pea soup 30 texas-style chili 31 pork chile verde 32 black bean chili 35 springtime irish stew 36

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moroccan-style tomato-rice soup
small yellow onion, 1, finely chopped olive oil, 3 tbsp ground cumin, ground ginger, and ground coriander, 11⁄ 2 tsp each paprika, 11⁄ 2 tsp salt cayenne pepper, 1⁄4 tsp ripe red tomatoes, 2 lb (1 kg), peeled, seeded, and crushed (about 3 cups) low-sodium vegetable broth, 4 cups (32 fl oz/1 l) tomato paste, 1⁄4 cup (2 oz/60 g) sugar, 1 tbsp short-grain white rice, 1 ⁄ 3 cup (21 ⁄ 2 oz/75 g) bay leaf, 1 chopped fresh cilantro for garnish
MAK E S 4 SERV INGS

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A Moroccan spice mix called ras al hanout traditionally gives this soup extra warmth. Here, you can blend your own for a rich vegetarian soup that is ready in only 9 minutes instead of the usual half hour. Arborio rice works well in this recipe.
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In the pressure cooker pot, sauté the onion in the oil until golden, about 3 minutes. Stir in the cumin, ginger, coriander, paprika, 1 ⁄ 2 teaspoon salt, and the cayenne. Cook for 30 seconds. Stir in the tomatoes, then add the broth, tomato paste, and sugar and stir until blended. Add the rice and bay leaf. If using an electric pressure cooker, switch off the sauté function. Lock the lid into place and cook on high pressure for 9 minutes. Quickrelease the steam (see page 17). When the pressure valve drops, remove the lid, tilting it away from your face to allow residual steam to escape. Let the soup stand for 5 minutes to cool down, then discard the bay leaf. Ladle into bowls, garnish with cilantro, and serve right away.

soups & stews 21

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potato-leek soup two ways
leeks, 2 lb (1 kg) russet potatoes, 11⁄ 2 lb (750 g) butter, 2 tbsp salt low-sodium chicken broth, 5 cups (40 fl oz/ 1.25 l) chives, snipped

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This classic duo of potatoes and leeks can be served cold, as vichyssoise, or sipped warm. The mild base cooks for a fraction of the usual 30 minutes. Add enrichments such as cooked ham and garnish with chives after puréeing to make the flavors pop.
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for the hot soup
half-and-half, (12 fl oz/375 ml)

frozen corn kernels, 1 cup (6 oz/185 g), thawed cooked ham, chopped, 1 cup (6 oz/185 g)

for the cold soup
cucumber, 1 half-and-half, 1 cup (8 fl oz/250 ml) sour cream, 1 cup (8 oz/250 g)
MAK E S 6 – 8 SERV INGS

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Cut the roots and green tops off the leeks. Slice the white parts of the leeks in half lengthwise, then thinly slice crosswise. Put the sliced leeks in a bowl of cold water and swish vigorously to rinse them of grit. Lift out the rinsed leeks with a sieve and set aside. Discard the water. Peel the potatoes and cut them into 1-inch (2.5-cm) cubes. In the pressure cooker pot, sauté the leeks in the butter until soft, about 4 minutes. Sprinkle lightly with salt, then add the broth and the potatoes. If using an electric pressure cooker, switch off the sauté function. Lock the lid into place and cook on high pressure for 4 minutes. Quickrelease the steam (see page 17). When the pressure valve drops, remove
cups

11⁄ 2

the lid, tilting it away from your face to allow residual steam to escape. Let the soup stand until it has slightly cooled and is no longer steaming, then purée it in batches in a blender (or with an immersion blender directly in the pot) until smooth. To serve the soup hot, pour the puréed soup into a clean saucepan. Add the half-and-half and corn and cook over medium heat, stirring often, until hot, about 5 minutes. Stir in the ham. If you like a thinner soup, add more broth. Season with salt, ladle into bowls, and sprinkle with the chives. To serve the soup cold, cool the puréed soup to room temperature, transfer it to a large container and refrigerate, covered, until chilled. Meanwhile, peel, seed, and finely dice the cucumber; set aside. Whisk in the half-and-half and sour cream until smooth. If you like a thinner soup, add more broth. Stir in the cucumber, season with salt, and ladle into bowls. Sprinkle with the chives.

soups & stews 25

beans & grains
chickpeas with lemon, oregano & olives 41 maple baked beans 42 brown rice & bean casserole 43 parmesan risotto 44 mexican-style pot beans 47 barley risotto with wild mushrooms 48 confetti wild rice salad 51

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Like most beans, chickpeas can take 2 hours to cook. Here, they quickly emerge with a meaty texture and flavor that’s more satisfying than canned. Serve with grilled lamb, chicken, or fish, or alone as a vegetarian entrée.
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chickpeas with lemon, oregano & olives
dried chickpeas, 11⁄ 2 cups (9 oz/280 g) garlic, 4 cloves, peeled bay leaf, 1 salt olive oil, 5 tbsp (3 fl oz/80 ml) fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves, 11⁄ 2 cups packed (11⁄ 2 oz/45 g) fresh oregano leaves, 2 tbsp chopped fresh lemon zest, 1 tbsp coarsely grated freshly squeezed lemon juice, about 2 tbsp pitted good-quality green olives, 1⁄ 2 cup (21⁄ 2 oz/75 g), roughly chopped
MAK E S 6 SERV INGS

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Rinse the chickpeas in a sieve under cold water. Pick over and remove any stones or misshapen chickpeas. In the pressure cooker pot, combine the chickpeas, 6 cups (48 fl oz/1.5 l) water, 2 of the garlic cloves, the bay leaf, and 1 ⁄ 2 teaspoon salt. Drizzle 1 tablespoon of the oil over the liquid. Lock the lid into place and cook on high pressure for 40 minutes. Let the steam release naturally (see page 17). When the pressure valve drops, remove the lid, tilting it away from your face to allow residual steam to escape. Test a chickpea for doneness: it should be cooked through, but not soft. If it is too firm, lock the lid into place again and cook on high pressure for 5 minutes more; quick-release the steam (see page 17). Drain the chickpeas in a colander, reserving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaf. Clean and dry the pressure cooker pot. (At this point, the chickpeas and liquid can be cooled, covered, and refrigerated separately for up to 1 day. To continue, let them come to room temperature before proceeding with the recipe.) On a cutting board, mince together the parsley, oregano, remaining 2 garlic cloves, and lemon zest. In the pressure cooker pot (or a sauté pan on the stove, if chickpeas were made ahead), sauté the herb-garlic mixture in the remaining 4 tablespoons (2 fl oz/60 ml) oil until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the cooked chickpeas, lemon juice, 1 cup (8 fl oz/250 ml) reserved cooking liquid, and the olives; stir for a few minutes until the flavors are blended, adding more cooking liquid if the mixture seems dry. Season to taste with salt and more lemon juice to taste, then serve.

beans & grains 41

meat
beer-braised chicken thighs with onions 54 braised chicken in lemon-basil sauce 57 beef stroganoff 58 turkey breast with cranberry-ginger relish 61 barbecue-style brisket sandwiches 62 classic pot roast with root vegetables 65 quick bolognese sauce 66 greek-style lamb shanks with white beans 68 soy-glazed chicken thighs 69 traditional corned beef & cabbage 71 pork tacos with cilantro slaw 72 spanish-style pork chops with vinegar 75 sticky asian-style short ribs 76 hungarian-style cabbage rolls 79

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beer-braised chicken thighs with onions
large bone-in chicken thighs, 6, about 6 oz (185 g) each, skin removed salt olive oil, 2 tbsp butter, 1 tbsp yellow onions, 2, thinly sliced brown sugar, 1 tbsp all-purpose flour, 1 tbsp lager beer, 1 bottle (12 fl oz/375 ml) coarse-grain mustard, 2 tbsp tomato paste, 1 tbsp bay leaf, 1 freshly ground pepper cooked egg noodles for serving (optional)
MAK E S 6 SERV INGS

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This recipe evolved from carbonnade—a classic Belgian beef stew, which is also delicious with meaty chicken thighs. Normally braised for 45 minutes, pressure cooking cuts the time by more than one-third. Serve the chicken and sauce over wide egg noodles.
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Season the chicken lightly all over with salt. In the pressure cooker pot, brown the chicken in the oil in batches, turning with tongs as necessary; transfer each batch to a plate as it is browned. After removing the final batch, add the butter to the pot. When it melts, add the onions and sugar. Cook, stirring, until the onions are soft and golden, about 7 minutes, turning down the heat as necessary to keep them from scorching. Sprinkle the flour over the onions, then cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Pour in the beer and let it come to a boil. Stir in the mustard, tomato paste, and bay leaf. Return the chicken to the pot and turn with tongs to coat with the sauce. If using an electric pressure cooker, switch off the browning function. Lock the lid into place and cook on high pressure for 11 minutes. Quickrelease the steam (see page 17). When the pressure valve drops, remove the lid, tilting it away from your face to allow residual steam to escape. Remove the bay leaf and discard. Let the chicken stand for a few minutes to settle the flavors, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve right away over egg noodles, if desired.

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Authentic Mexican-style pork tacos are made with carnitas, chunks of tender meat that have been braised for about 3 hours, then browned. Cooking them in the pressure cooker allows you to enjoy this traditional Mexican treat any day of the week.
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pork tacos with cilantro slaw
for the pork
bone-in pork shoulder roast (pork butt or Boston butt), 21⁄ 2 lb (1.25 kg) salt yellow onion, 1, quartered chili powder, 1 tbsp dried oregano leaves, 1 tbsp garlic, 3 cloves, minced

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for the tacos
flour tortillas, 12 Cilantro Slaw (page 99) purchased salsa, 1 cup (8 fl oz/250 ml) jack cheese, 1 cup (4 oz/125 g) shredded Lime wedges for garnish (optional)
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Cut the pork into 2 large chunks and pat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt. In the pressure cooker pot, combine the onion, chili powder, oregano, garlic, and 2 cups (16 fl oz/500 ml) water. Add the pork pieces. Lock the lid into place and cook on high pressure for 50 minutes. Let the steam release naturally (see page 17). When the pressure valve drops, remove the lid, tilting it away from your face to allow residual steam to escape. Test the meat for doneness by prodding it with a fork; it should be easy to pull apart. If not, lock the lid into place again and cook on high pressure for 10 more minutes; quick-release the steam. Transfer the meat to a cutting board and let it stand until cool enough to handle. While the meat is cooling, preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C). Line a baking sheet with foil. Using 2 forks, pull the meat into shreds, discarding any bones and fat. Spread the shredded meat on the lined baking sheet and spoon enough juices from the pot over the meat to just moisten. Place the baking sheet in the oven and roast until the meat begins to sizzle and brown at the edges, about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, wrap the tortillas in foil and warm them in the oven. To assemble the tacos, have diners put some shredded pork in a warm tortilla, top with a little of the slaw, and garnish with salsa, cheese, and lime wedges as desired.

vegetables
scalloped potatoes with cheddar 82 creamy mashed potatoes 84 sweet & sour red cabbage 85 squash purée with brown butter & sage 87 braised artichoke hearts with peas & mint 88 orange-glazed beets with fresh herbs 91 southern-style braised greens with ham 92 creamed pearl onions with peas 95 fennel niçoise 96

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braised artichoke hearts with peas & mint
lemon, 1 large artichokes, 4, about 10 oz (315 g) each leek, 1, roots and green top removed olive oil, 2 tbsp dried thyme leaves, 1 ⁄ 4 tsp kosher salt low-sodium vegetable broth or water, 1 cup (8 fl oz/250 ml) fresh or frozen peas, 1 cup (5 oz/155 g), not thawed butter, 1 tbsp fresh mint leaves, 2 tbsp minced, plus whole leaves for garnish
MAK E S 4 SERV INGS

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You can make an impressive dish in minutes by using just the artichoke hearts. They’ll be ready in one-sixth the usual cooking time. Pair them with Parmesan Risotto (page 44) for a vegetarian meal (cook the artichokes first).
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Grate the zest from the lemon and set it aside. Fill a bowl with water and squeeze the juice from the lemon into it. Working with 1 artichoke at a time, snap off the dark green leaves until you reach the tender yellow inner leaves. With a small sharp knife, pare away any tough green leaf patches from the bottom of the artichoke, then trim the leaves 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the top. Cut each artichoke into quarters and, with a paring knife, trim away the fuzzy choke. Drop each quarter into the bowl of lemon water to prevent discoloring. Slice the white part of the leek in half lengthwise, then thinly slice crosswise. Put the sliced leek in a bowl of cold water and swish to rinse it of grit. Lift out the leek with a sieve and set aside. Discard the water. In the pressure cooker pot, sauté the leek in the oil until softened, about 3 minutes; stir in the thyme. With a slotted spoon, lift the artichokes out of the lemon water and add them to the pot; add a pinch of salt and pour in the broth. If using an electric pressure cooker, switch off the sauté function. Lock the lid into place and cook on high pressure for 4 minutes. Quick-release the steam (see page 17). When the pressure valve drops, remove the lid, tilting it away from your face to allow steam to escape. With a slotted spoon, transfer the artichokes to a bowl; set aside. Add the peas and butter to the pot and bring to a boil over medium-high heat (or use the sauté function on an electric cooker). Cook, stirring, until the peas are just tender and the liquid in the pot has reduced, about 3 minutes. Stir in the minced mint and reserved lemon zest. Pour the peas, leeks, and juices over the artichokes and stir. Garnish with the whole mint leaves.

415 Jackson Street, Suite 200, San Francisco, CA 94111 Telephone: 415 291 0100 Fax: 415 291 8841 www.weldonowen.com Weldon Owen is a division of

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THE PRESSURE COOKER COOKBOOK Conceived and produced by Weldon Owen Inc. Copyright © 2010 Weldon Owen Inc. All rights reserved, including the right of reproduction

VP and Publisher Hannah Rahill Executive Editor Jennifer Newens Editor Donita Boles Editorial Assistant Becky Duffett Associate Creative Director Emma Boys Art Directors Alexandra Zeigler and Kara Church Senior Designer Ashley Lima Junior Designer Anna Grace Production Director Chris Hemesath Production Manager Michelle Duggan Color Manager Teri Bell Photographer Sheri Giblin Food Stylist Karen Shinto Prop Stylist Christine Wolheim

in whole or in part in any form. Color separations by Embassy Graphics in Canada Printed and bound by 1010 Printing, Ltd. in China First printed in 2010 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication data is available. ISBN-13: 978-1-74089-983-3 ISBN-10: 1-74089-983-0

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Weldon Owen wishes to thank the following people for their generous support in producing this book: Linda Bouchard, Ken Della Penta, Shay Harrington, Cathy Lee, Fanny Pan, and Ann Rolke.

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