THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY !

SECOND QUARTER 2009
SECOND QUARTER 2009

The FlightLine The Flight Line
CHANGE OF COMMAND

Capt. Risher Lewis (left) congratulates outgoing Delta commander Capt. Dan Katen following the change of command ceremony at the squadron’s Hooks Airport facility March 17. Katen, holding gifts of appreciation from the senior and cadet flights, had led the unit for the past five years. Additional photos from the ceremony may be found on page four.

!

PAGE 1

PAGE 1

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

SECOND QUARTER 2009

Recruiting and Retention
Recruiting and retention could best be described as human resource management, marketing, salesmanship and career development counseling. The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is constantly required to develop and maintain a strong membership base of volunteers that is well qualified, trained and experienced. The CAP Recruiting and Retention Officers are responsible for introducing new and prospective members to the many facets of our volunteer programs so they may gain an understanding of the dedication, professionalism and excellence required of each member when training and performing the Civil Air Patrol’s missions for America. The recruiting and retention program includes the coordination of the prospecting, recruiting, orienting, involvement and renewal activities required to keep the number of qualified personnel in our squadrons and groups in the Texas Wing at optimal operational levels. It also includes making presentations to civic groups, veterans organizations, school programs and at public gatherings to gain public awareness, admiration and respect for the services that the CAP and its members provide the nation, state and local communities. The overall goal is to ensure that membership in Civil Air Patrol is worthy of the prospective member, active member and inactive member’s time and commitment. While every member of Civil Air Patrol is charged with the responsibility of recruiting new members, appointed recruiting and retention officers carry the additional responsibility of the full-time active pursuit of finding and retaining qualified individuals to fill the needs of the unit they serve and, in an overall sense, the entire CAP organization. As the Recruiting and Retention Officer for the Texas Wing and Delta Composite Squadron, I have a responsibility to find and bring more members into our squadron, as well as the wing, so that we can accomplish our mission more effectively. What I ask of every member of Delta Squadron is to assist me in finding new potential members. For senior members, that means that we look for identifying signs that indicate that a person may be a good prospective member for our organization. It may be a T-shirt or a hat from a unit that he or she served with during their time on active duty or from a veterans organization in which they are members. You might be at a social function that you are attending and, through conversation, find that they are veterans or people that have skills that would fit our mission responsibilities. I would just ask for you to tell them about your involvement with CAP and how they can contact me for more information. Of course, if you can get them to fill out one of the contact cards that I have given you for your wallet, it would help the recruiting effort immensely. Cadets can always talk with their friends at school, or church, or if you know people who are in scouting programs, they might be interested in what we do. Some schools have military clubs that meet on a regular basis. Always look for an opportunity to tell people about the types of things we do in CAP and invite them to visit the squadron on a meeting night. In the near future, I will need some senior and cadet members to help me with the redesign of our recruiting kiosk and to participate in some middle school and public recruiting displays. If you are willing to help please see me on any Tuesday night to let me know you are available. Capt. Brian Callahan

PAGE 2

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

SECOND QUARTER 2009

CADETS OVERNIGHT ABOARD USS TEXAS
C/2nd Lt. Jessica Willis On March 14 a group of 17 Delta cadets traveled to San Jacinto Historic site where the battleship USS Texas is berthed. The Texas was, for a time, the most powerful weapon in the world. When it was commissioned in 1914, her 14 inch guns were the largest ever to be put on a battleship. Texas served with the British Grand Fleet during World War I and was the flagship for the entire U.S Navy. During the Second World War, the Texas led invasions of North Africa, Normandy, Southern France, Iwo Jima and Okinawa, earning a total of five battle stars. After her service was no longer needed, she was decommissioned, renovated to restore her to what she looked like in her prime and moved to the San Jacinto Historic Park. Three months and 225,000 dollars later she became the first historic ship museum in 1948. Delta cadets got a chance to tour the entire ship, including going as low as the boiler rooms! The tour guides were all members of the ship’s crew at some time and they shared their one-of-a-kind insight into the ship. The cadets got to to go into many areas that are closed to the public like the brig, inside the turrets of the two 14-inch guns and the navigation room, at the highest point of the ship. The first day of the visit, the tour took place in the bottom half of the ship, from the deck down. The second day the tour took place on deck. Having the opportunity to spend the night aboard gave cadets an opportunity to not only read and learn about life on the ship, but to actually experience it. At the end of the second day, departure day, the ship’s director led a graduation ceremony for all participants. Each cadet and senior member received a certificate and patch. But that’s not all the cadets left with that day -- they left with an abundance of historic knowledge and the experience of a lifetime.

PAGE 3

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

SECOND QUARTER 2009

Photos From the Change of Command Ceremony

From top left: Capt. Bob Beeley, representing Group IV, passes the squadron guidon to new commander Capt. Risher Lewis; the squadron assembled on the pad; C/Maj. Collin Carstens presents outgoing Squadron Commander Capt. Dan Katen a plaque of appreciation from the cadet flight; Capt. Brian Callahan presents Capt. Katen a plaque from the senior flight; Capt. Katen poses with C/Capt. Jamie Douglas and C/Maj. Collin Carstens; Capt. Katen cuts a cake honoring his service as squadron commander following the change of command ceremony.

PAGE 4

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY
From the Safety Officer.... 1st. Lt. Ray Watson SAFE.

SECOND QUARTER 2009

It’s not just another four letter word. It’s a change of mind that you develop through training, listening to safety presentations, reading about lessons learned and by experience. In CAP we have to make it a way of life. A good number of our call-outs for actual search and rescue missions are because the aircrew or pilot involved failed to operate their aircraft in a safe manner and have now suffered the consequences of that action. The same holds true for call-outs for missing hikers and campers. Someone failed to either get a map of the area, have a compass on hand, or got into an area of bad weather because they didn’t use caution when listening to the forecast. If you are involved in an activity make sure you think about safety. Take the extra time to check fuel, look at the weather, gather the necessary equipment and to think about the safety aspects of your activity. Remember; “there are old pilots and bold pilots, but no ! old bold pilots.” For those who don’t fly; “look in the mirror. The person most responsible for your safety is YOU!”

Houston FSDO Moves to New Facility
The Houston Flight Standards District Office (HOU FSDO) has moved. The new address is: 12650 N. Featherwood Drive Suite 230 Houston, Texas 77034-4411 All telephone numbers will remain the same. Directions to the new building: · I-45, Exit #33, onto Fuqua Street · Turn East onto Fuqua Street (opposite Sam’s Club) · Turn left at signal light onto N. Featherwood Drive · The HOU FSDO is the white building on the right side.

PAGE 5

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

SECOND QUARTER 2009

CAP History Quiz
1. Who was the Director of the Civil Defense that signed the formal order that created the Civil Air Patrol on 1 December, 1941? 2. One of the founders of the Civil Air Patrol dropped sandbags on industrial plants to prove that saboteurs could cause much damage to our industrial infrastructure by using light aircraft as bombers. Who was he? 3. How many hours did CAP aircrews fly during WWII? 4. How many CAP pilots lost their lives defending our country during WWII? 5. Where were the first CAP Coastal Patrol bases located? 6. How many coastal patrol missions were flown by CAP air crews during WWII? 7. How many special convoy missions were flown by CAP air crews for the Navy during WWII? 8. How many CAP aircraft were lost during WWII? 9. During WWII, which state began using horses with the ground search teams as the preferred method of transportation? 10. What was the name of the flat bottomed boats powered by an aircraft engine that were used by the Florida Wing ground search teams during WWII? Answers on following page

Delta Cadets and Seniors Recognized at Group IV Banquet
Several members of Delta Composite Squadron were honored at the recent Group IV awards banquet. 1st. Lt. Ray Watson was named Safety Officer of the Year. Watson is seen here receiving his award from Group Commander Lt. Col. Dennis Cima. 2nd Lt. Mark Allison, not pictured, was named Group IV Logistics Officer of the Year. Also recognized were C/2nd. Lt. Jessica Willis, C/Capt. Jamie Douglas and C/ Maj. Collin Carstens, pictured here with Deputy Commander for Cadets Capt. Joyce Kassai and thenSquadron Commander Capt. Dan Katen. Willis was presented her Mitchell Award, while Douglas and Carstens received their Earhart Awards. Carstens also received his Silver Congressional Medal for volunteerism. The banquet was held Feb. 28.

PAGE 6

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

SECOND QUARTER 2009

National Emergency Services Academy
Applications are now being accepted for the 2009 National Emergency Services Academy (NESA) to be held at Camp Atterbury in Edinburgh, Indiana from the 27th of June until the 11th of July 2009. There are courses for all members interested in emergency services, and this is a great opportunity for both new members as well as experienced members to come train with hundreds of their peers from across the country. Apply online at: https://ntc.cap.af.mil/ops/nesa/ or download an offline application form from: http:// nesa.cap.gov/Documents/2009_NESA_Offline_Application_Form_-_Fillable.dot. Slots will be filled on a first come first served basis through the 17th of May 2009 or until slots are filled, whichever comes first. Personnel are encouraged to apply soon to get into the course or courses they desire. Some courses fill up faster than others and there are a few that are nearly full already. The following fifteen courses will be offered this year at NESA: National Ground Search And Rescue School (NGSAR) NGSAR Basic Course – 28 June to 4 July 2009 NGSAR Basic Course – 5 to 11 July 2009 NGSAR Advanced Course – 28 June to 4 July 2009 NGSAR Advanced Course – 5 to 11 July 2009 NGSAR First Responder Course – 4 to 11 July 2009 NGSAR Ground Team Leader Course – 4 to 11 July 2009 Incident Command System School (ICSS) ICSS Basic Course – 28 June to 4 July 2009 – Includes ICS-300 Training ICSS Advanced Course – 5 to 11 July 2009 – Includes ICS-400 Training ICSS Mission Communications Course – 28 June to 4 July 2009 – New in 2009 Mission Aircrew School MAS Basic Course (Mission Scanner & Airborne Photographer) – 28 June to 4 July 2009 MAS Intermediate Course (Mission Pilot or Observer Track) – 27 June to 4 July 2009 MAS Intermediate Course (Mission Pilot or Observer Track) – 4 to 11 July 2009 MAS Advanced Course (Mission Pilot or Observer Track) – 4 to 11 July 2009 MAS ARCHER Course – 28 June to 4 July 2009 MAS ARCHER Course – 5 to 11 July 2009 Additional pre-requisites and information about NESA and the above courses can be found at: http:// nesa.cap.gov/.

Answers to History Quiz
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Fiorello La Guardia Earle L. Johnson 500,000 30 Atlantic City, New Jersey, Rehobeth, Maryland, and Lantana, Florida 86,685 coastal patrol missions 5,684 special convoy missions 90 Aircraft Nevada Glade Buggies

PAGE 7

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

SECOND QUARTER 2009

Aerospace Education
Algebra: Friend or Foe?
Lt. Col. Steven Mathews

At some point, some of you have taken algebra, are taking algebra, or will be taking algebra. Many people who encounter algebra believe they are receiving first-hand knowledge of purgatory. This article is to show you that algebra is your friend, not your enemy. The word "algebra" is named after the Arabic word "al-jabr”, meaning “union” . This mathematical process was written in a book in 820 by the Islamic Persian mathematician, Muhammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī (also considered “The Father of Algebra"). Elementary algebra is the most basic form of algebra. It is taught to students who are presumed to have no knowledge of mathematics beyond the basic principles of arithmetic. In arithmetic, only numbers and their arithmetical operations (such as +, −, ×, ÷) occur. In algebra, numbers are often denoted by symbols (such as a, x, or y). The most common complaint against algebra is that it has no relationship to everyday life. Consider this situation. You are on the dance committee, and you’re in charge of providing the balloons. The committee has decided that they want to have blue and red balloons. However, the committee wants twice as many blue

balloons as red balloons. You have a budget of $100.00. The balloons are 5 cents apiece. How many blue and red balloons can you buy? How much money is left over? Assume a sales tax of 7%. You can start with a wild guess and take 5 to 10 frustrating minutes to get the correct answer. Or, you can use elementary algebra to get the correct answer in 1 minute. Most jobs require using tools. Algebra is a tool, just like a hammer and saw; it is a different type of tool. Many technical jobs, inside and outside of the military, use elementary a l g e b r a . A p i l o t , n a v i g a t o r, maintenance officer, avionics officer, logistics officer, jet engine mechanic, radio operator, nurse, dental assistant, doctor, dentist, accountant, etc., will use some amount of elementary algebra in their occupation. Your mastery of elementary algebra will enable you to be the outstanding performer in your future job. At the very least, you can buy the correct number of blue and red balloons for the next dance. Answer: 1,240 blue balloons, 620 red balloons; 0 cents.

PAGE 8

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

SECOND QUARTER 2009

SQUADRON ENJOYS ‘FIFTH TUESDAY’ WITH COOKOUT
Delta Composite Squadron members gathered at the unit’s David Wayne Hooks Memorial Airport facility March 31 to celebrate the fifth Tuesday of March with a cook out. Squadron Commander Capt. Risher Lewis (pictured, left) and Deputy Commander for Seniors Capt. Tim Ragulsky (bottom, right) served as chief cooks. Cadets furnished beverages and Senior Members brought chips and desert. Additional activities included touch football and volleyball. The highlight of the evening came when Lewis presented a plaque of appreciation to airport General Manager Jag Gill (below).

PAGE 9

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY

SECOND QUARTER 2009

The Power of Heritage
Capt. Brian Callahan When I was first interested in joining the U.S. Navy, there was a recruiting poster that was very simple but carried a very powerful message. With three images and two words it connects the historical birth of our nation with the USS Constitution and conveys the idea that the heritage of serving in the U.S. Navy will be passed from one generation to the other through the figures of the sailor and child holding hands. One of the first things I noticed, after I had gotten over the initial shock of being processed into my company in boot camp at Great Lakes Naval Training Center, was that the first weeks of training included a thorough orientation that included the history of the United States Navy, its organization and its customs and traditions. All of that could be summed up in one word; Heritage. Our heritage included the heroism of all those who served so distinctively since the founding of our nation, but more importantly, it connected all of us to that heritage and fostered in us an appreciation for the service we were now part of and instilled in us a resolve to become faithful stewards of that heritage. Our company commanders, our instructors and all personnel involved with our training at Great Lakes made it abundantly clear to us that we were ambassadors of the U.S. Navy 24/7. They impressed upon us that everything we did, from the way we wore our uniform, performed even the smallest task, or conducted ourselves in public was all a reflection how we integrated the Navy traditions, customs and heritage into our habits and lives. They also made it clear that, no matter how well we did in other training subjects, if we couldn’t prove that the values that reflected our adherence to the Navy’s heritage were part of our everyday conduct, we would not graduate from basic training and would be released from the service. As a member of the Civil Air Patrol, we also have a proud heritage that connects us with our core values, customs and traditions. As the officers in our organization, we are the stewards of that heritage. More importantly, just as in the picture of the sailor holding the child’s hand, we are responsible for connecting the cadet members of our program to our heritage, our core values, our customs and traditions and our humanitarian mission. We are the ambassadors of the Civil Air Patrol and now, with the eyes of more governmental agencies on us, the manner in which we adhere to our customs and traditions, wear our uniforms, communicate with others and demonstrate our professionalism in carrying out our missions is a reflection of our desire to be honorable stewards of our proud heritage.

PAGE 10

THE DELTA COMPOSITE SQUADRON QUARTERLY
is geared toward air operations; however, I have initiated a new Ground Team Training Unit to meet the increasing mission requirement for ground team operations. Delta has struggled in this area in the past but I think we can develop a number of qualified teams to meet the operational needs of the Texas Wing. I encourage everyone to hold minimum qualifications in both air crew and ground team specialties in order to enlarge the pool of recourses that WILL be required in the event of an emergency.

SECOND QUARTER 2009

Contributors
C/2nd Lt. Jessica Willis Capt. Brian Callahan Capt. Risher Lewis Lt. Col. Steven Matthews Capt. Ray Watson

FROM THE COMMANDER...
It doesn’t take long to realize why our operational tempo has been slowly increasing over the past 24 months. Just read the headlines in the news and compare them to the ongoing operations the Texas Wing is being tasked to do. We know what they are and understand the importance of each tasking, relevant to our emergency services mission. In order to keep up the pace, we need to continue to train for new skills and stay proficient in the skills we have already developed.

Photography
Capt. Jim Douglas C/2nd Lt. Jessica Willis 1st. Lt. Brandy Willis 2nd Lt. David McCollum Laurie Green

In order to fulfill the current mission requirements from the wing, we need highly trained resources capable of planning and executing tasks from the Incident Commander. Our unit has the resources and training to do just that. Please make every effort to take advantage of the opportunities offered so that when our unit (squadron, group and wing) is tasked for a mission, we stand ready and equipped to act quickly There are m a n y without delay. opportunities being offered within our unit and at the Simper Vigilans, group and wing levels, too. Capt. Risher Lewis Much of the training at Delta

Editor
2nd Lt. David McCollum

PAGE 11

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful