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British Tradition

Exceeding the Standards: Extension Activities, British Tradition Care has been taken to verify the accuracy of information presented in this book. However, the authors, editors, and publisher cannot accept responsibility for web, e-mail, newsgroup, or chat room subject matter or content, or for consequences from application of the information in this book, and make no warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to its content. Trademarks: Some of the product names and company names included in this book have been used for identification purposes only and may be trademarks or registered trade names of their respective manufacturers and sellers. The authors, editors, and publisher disclaim any affiliation, association, or connection with, or sponsorship or endorsement by, such owners. Cover Image Credits: Scene, John Kelly/Getty Images; plaque art, Rolin Graphics, Inc. ISBN 978-0-82194-377-9 2009 by EMC Publishing, LLC 875 Montreal Way St. Paul, MN 55102 E-mail: educate@emcp.com Website: www.emcp.com All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be adapted, reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission from the publisher. Teachers using Mirrors & Windows: Connecting with Literature, British Tradition may photocopy complete pages in sufficient quantities for classroom use only and not for resale. Printed in the United States of America 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 09 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Contents
Introduction Unit 1 from Beowulf, Anonymous, Verse Translated by Burton Raffel, Prologue Translated by Robin Lamb The Seafarer, Anonymous, Translated by Burton Raffel / The Wifes Lament, Anonymous, Translated by Marcelle Thibaux Unit 2 from Bonny Barbara Allan / Lord Randall, Anonymous from Le Morte dArthur, Sir Thomas Malory Unit 3 Speech to the Troops at Tilbury, Queen Elizabeth I Song (Go and catch a falling star) / Meditation 17 (Perchance he for whom this bell tolls), from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, John Donne Unit 4 The Tragedy of Macbeth, Act II, William Shakespeare from The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, Christopher Marlowe Unit 5 from The Pilgrims Progress, John Bunyan from Gullivers Travels / A Modest Proposal, Jonathan Swift Unit 6 London, William Blake Ozymandias / Ode to the West Wind / To a Skylark, Percy Bysshe Shelley Unit 7 The Darkling Thrush, Thomas Hardy The Mark of the Beast, Rudyard Kipling Unit 8 The Soldier, Rupert Brooke The Second Coming / Sailing to Byzantium, William Butler Yeats Unit 9 B. Wordsworth, V. S. Naipaul Telephone Conversation, Wole Soyinka / from Midsummer XXIII, Derek Walcott Answer Key
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v Collaborative Learning: Compare Cultures Media Literacy: Analyze Film Portrayals Lifelong Learning: Conduct an Interview Critical Literacy: Create a Map of Arthurs Britain Media Literacy: Compare Speeches Collaborative Learning: Ask the Author 1 3 4 6

7 8

Lifelong Learning: Research 9 the Effects of an Assassination Critical Literacy: Compare 10 Soul-Selling Themes Collaborative Learning: Create a Board Game Lifelong Learning: Write a Problem/ Solution Essay Media Literacy: Compile an Anthology Critical Literacy: Analyze Themes Critical Literacy: Conduct Literary Criticism Media Literacy: Create a Public Health Brochure Collaborative Learning: Compile a Poetry Booklet Lifelong Learning: Develop a Rsum Lifelong Learning: Present an Oral Report
British tradition

11 12

14 15

17 18 20 21

Media Literacy: Create a Poster 22 23 25


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Exceeding the Standards: Extension Activities

Introduction
Exceeding the Standards: Extension Activities provides additional instruction to help students complete selected Extend Understanding (Grades 68) and Extend the Text (Grades 912) assignments from their Mirrors & Windows: Connecting with Literature textbook. The lessons in this supplement offer background, research suggestions, graphic organizers, tips for preparing presentations, and other useful information to guide students through the assignments from the textbook. Answers to concrete questions plus additional evaluation tools are supplied in the Answer Key at the back of the book. The extension activities in the Mirrors & Windows program are designed to engage students in multiple literacies (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), in keeping with the IRA/NCTE Standards for English Language Arts. Four types of activities are presented: Collaborative Learning, Critical Literacy, Lifelong Learning, and Media Literacy. Collaborative learning is an instructional approach in which students are organized into groups to complete a common task. As students determine and monitor the contributions of each group member, they encounter opportunities for meaningful communication and social interaction. Often, group members are assigned specific roles, and completing the project depends on everyone working together as they tackle a rich, challenging, or puzzling aspect of the literature selection they have read. In Collaborative Learning activities, students might roleplay what life would have been like for Romeo and Juliet if they had lived to middle age (considering Maxine Kumins poem Purgatory), speculate how to apply a writers argument to a new situation, or sketch out exactly where Anne Franks room was in the secret annex to better understand her living conditions. Critical literacy is the ability to analyze a text (written, oral, or visual) in terms of its content, meaning, form, author, purpose, and credibility and to explore the relationship between text, author, and reader. Readers are encouraged to question and discuss the text and to consider not only what the author has included, but also what he or she has left out. Critical Literacy activities require a deep reading of the text, as when students explore allusions in Martin Luther King Jr.s I Have a Dream speech or when they prepare to interview a minor character in a short story to gain a different perspective. Lifelong learning is the concept that learning occurs across a life span and that literate, educated people build a body of knowledge about the world in which they live. In Lifelong Learning activities, students apply study and research skills to real-world situations. They might use the Internet for research or interview family members to collect oral histories. Students demonstrate lifelong learning when they research Hispanic Americans who received the Medal of Honor in the Korean War and create a classroom Wall of Honor for those heroes. Media literacy is the ability to access, evaluate, comprehend, and produce a variety of media texts. Media Literacy activities help students build discernment skills as they evaluate media messages and analyze how those messages affect their own thinking. In these activities, students might conduct a TVtalk showstyle interview with a character from a literature selection, analyze a magazine article related to a literature selection, or summarize information from the Internet about a controversial topic related to a literature selection.

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BRITISH TRADITION

Exceeding the Standards: Extension Activities

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

from Beowulf, page 23

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

Compare Cultures
This lesson supports the Collaborative Learning assignment on page 54 of your textbook.

Get Started
Boasts are common in ancient epics like Beowulf, Homers The Iliad, and the Indian Ramayana. In contemporary culture in the United States, such ringing declarations of personal achievement and worth might be considered egocentric, selfish, and rude. At times, however, boasting is expected or even encouraged. Think, for example, of cheers like We are number one!meant to stir up emotions and encourage a football or basketball team to push harder for victory. For this assignment, you will work in a small group to compare and contrast the concept of boasting in Beowulf and in contemporary culture. You will use a dictionary to analyze the definition of the word boast, and complete a Compare-and-Contrast Chart to analyze boasting references in Beowulf and in contemporary culture. After summarizing your findings, you will participate in a class discussion to share what you have learned.

Define the Concept


Use an online or print dictionary to define the word boast before you start your analysis. Note that boast can be a noun or a verb and that its definitions have evolved over the centuries. Also trace the etymology (history) of the word, using a reference such as The Oxford English Dictionary. Fill in the definition and etymology box below. Definitions for boast
boast (as a verb): boast (as a noun): Etymology and usage examples:
For more on definitions, parts of speech, and etymology in a dictionary entry, see Language Arts Handbook 2.3, Using a Dictionary, in your textbook.

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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 1

Analyze the Concept


Use your working definition of boast to complete a Compare-andContrast Chart for boasting in Beowulf and in contemporary culture. Use the example below as a model for your own chart. Begin by rereading Beowulf, looking for references to boasting. Cite the reference by canto and line number, identify who boasts and why (the context), and work as a group to note your reactions. Is the boast justified? Does it serve a purpose or cause harm? Compare-and-Contrast Chart
Beowulf Canto and Line Number Canto 1, lines 1529 Who Boasts, and Why Hrothgar resolves to build a hall higher than anything ever built and this boast comes true Group Notes and Reactions Here boast seems to mean an ambitious goal that leads to an impressive achievement.

Purpose and value of boasting in Beowulf:

Next, work as a group to find examples of boasting in todays culture. Summarize these incidents in a Compare-and-Contrast Chart, as you did for Beowulf. Finally, compare the information in both charts and write a summary statement that answers the following questions: What are the differences and similarities in how boasting is regarded in Beowulfs time and today? How, if at all, has the concept changed?
Summary Statement:

Share Your Findings


Appoint one member of your group as spokesperson to share your findings with the class. After each group has reported its conclusions, work to develop a consensus statement that synthesizes, or brings together, the findings of the class as a whole.
For more on working in a small group, see Language Arts Handbook 7.3, Collaborative Learning and Communication, in your textbook.

BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 1

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

The Seafarer / The Wifes Lament, page 60

MEDIA LITERACY

Analyze Film Portrayals


This lesson supports the Media Literacy activity on page 69 of your textbook. This lesson asks you to analyze stereotypes about sailors and fishers in films. Begin by consulting a dictionary for a definition of the term stereotyping. Then brainstorm a list of stereotypical characteristics for sailors and fishers. Next, consider films that portray people who live and work on the sea, and choose one to watch.

Gather Information
View the film you have selected. As you watch, take notes about the main characters. Who is the protagonist and who is the antagonist? What are they like? Record your impressions on a copy of the following chart. Use your brainstormed list of stereotypical characteristics to help you decide whether each portrayal is stereotypical or fresh.

Review page 1297 of the Literary Terms Handbook in your textbook for a reminder of how a character is constructed in a literary work. Also review the terms protagonist (page 1305) and antagonist (page 1296).

Compare-and-Contrast Chart for Film Characters


Protagonist Title of Film (year released) Predominant Character Traits Stereotypical (S) or Fresh (F) Portrayal? Antagonist Predominant Character Traits Stereotypical (S) or Fresh (F) Portrayal?

Analyze and Present Your Findings


After filling in your chart, write a short summary of your findings. Answer the questions below to guide your writing. When you are finished, present your summary to the class. 1. To what degree did the film use stereotypical characters? 2. Did the degree of stereotyping differ for protagonists versus antagonists? 3. How did the use of stereotyping affect your impression of each character? (For example, did the stereotyping simply provide entertainment or comfortable predictability, or did it have a deeper effect on your impression of the character?) 4. What did you find most interesting about the protagonist? about the antagonist? Explain if and how stereotyping infuenced your answers.

For information about using a dictionary, see Language Arts Handbook 2.3, Using a Dictionary, in your textbook.

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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 1

Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

Bonny Barbara Allan / Lord Randall, page 101

LIFELONG LEARNING

Conduct an Interview
This lesson supports the Lifelong Learning activity on page 110 of your textbook. This lesson asks you to work with a partner to present an interview between a reporter and a medieval troubadour, exploring the role of mothers in medieval ballads. To begin, read the anonymous ballads Bonny Barbara Allan and Lord Randall in your textbook. Then, with your partner, discuss your initial ideas on the topic, jotting down notes as you talk. Address these questions in your discussion: What are the roles of mothers in the ballads you have read? How are they portrayed, and why do you think they are portrayed this way?

Research the Topic


With your partner, use the library or Internet to research the topic. Social class was a significant aspect of medieval society, and a mothers life and role were greatly affected by the class to which she belonged. The chart below is divided into three medieval social classes. Copy the chart onto a separate piece of paper and use it to guide your research on the different categories listed in the chart. Document your sources and save all research notes to turn in to your instructor. Roles of Mothers in Medieval Times
Working Class / Peasants Marriage Raising children Household responsibilities Employment Community contributions Friendships Other Middle Class / Merchants Upper Class / Landed Aristocracy
For information on documenting your research sources, see Language Arts Handbook 5.6, Documenting Sources, in your textbook.

BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 2

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Prepare for the Interview


After you and your partner have completed your research, use the information you have gathered to prepare an interview between a reporter and a medieval troubadour. Decide who will play the interviewer and who will play the troubadour. Then discuss the information you found and how it relates to the roles of mothers in ballads, specifically the ballads you read in your textbook. How does your research help to explain why mothers are included in these ballads? the way mothers are portrayed in these ballads? the ways mothers feel or behave in these ballads? the ways mothers are treated in these ballads? Use the responses you come up with to help you plan the questions and answers for the interview. If you are the interviewer, write down the questions you will ask; if you are the troubadour, take notes on how you will respond. Remember to keep the five Ws and an H (who, what, when, where, why, and how) in mind to ensure you are covering all the necessary information in your interview. The content of the interview should help to reveal the factual information you found in your research, but the troubadour may also express his or her opinions on the topic. You may want to include aspects of comedy or conflict to make the interview more interesting for the audience. Consider incorporating music or props if they are available to you.

Present the Interview


Perform your interview for the class. It should take about five minutes, and the interviewer and troubadour should contribute equally to the performance. Remember to speak clearly and loudly and to leave time for questions from the audience at the end. When you are finished, hand your research notes in to your instructor.

For information on elements to consider when giving a presentation, see Language Arts Handbook 7.1, Verbal and Nonverbal Communication, in your textbook.

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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 2

Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

from Le Morte dArthur, page 190

CRITICAL LITERACY

Create a Map of Arthurs Britain


This lesson supports the Critical Literacy activity on page 201 of your textbook. For this lesson, your class will create a map of Arthurian England, using historical atlases and information from Le Morte dArthur. You will begin by working on your own to gather information.

Gather Information
Copy the chart below and record information under the appropriate headings as you read the excerpts from Le Morte dArthur on pages 190 198 of your textbook. If the story mentions a distance between markers, such as when Merlin (while at the pavilions) states, Castle of Tintagel is but ten miles hence, include that information as well. If the distance is mentioned as a measure of time, note the time and guess the distance that might be covered in that amount of time.
Geographical Markers (including rivers, mountains or mountain ranges, and forests) Human-Built Structures (such as castles, bridges, cathedrals, and siege pavilions)

As you read the story, take notes on historical structures and people because these items might lead you to additional geographical markers. For example, if you see the Archbishop of Canterbury, look up Canterbury in an atlas. You will find that it is a city and an administrative district.

Historical Places (general regions, such as cities or counties)

Historical People (including kings, queens, knights, and bishops)

When you have finished reading the excerpts in your textbook, use the Internet or library to locate one or more atlases and maps of Britain from the time of the story, around 1470. Also find or draw an outline of England from this time period. Then search the historical atlases and maps for each item that you listed in your chart, and place each item in the correct spot on your map of England. Be aware that you are not likely to find all of your listed items.

Create and Discuss a Class Map


Work with your classmates to prepare a comprehensive map of Arthurs Britain, using the information from all of your individual maps. Include a key with a distance scale and explanations of any symbols or figures you created. When you are done, discuss how the map helps you understand what happened in the story. Share any surprising things you learned while working on the map. Also pose any questions you have, and respond to any that your classmates raise.
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To create the class map, you might tape several sheets of poster board or a large piece of paper on a wall, create a transparency to display on a screen, or work in an electronic drawing program and then display the map in a PowerPoint slide.
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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

Speech to the Troops at Tilbury, page 238

MEDIA LITERACY

Compare Speeches
This lesson supports the Media Literacy assignment on page 244 of your textbook. For this activity, you are to compare and contrast one of those inspirational speeches with the speech by Queen Elizabeth I in your textbook. The table below contains a sample of speeches that can be found online. Choose one of these or find one on your own.
Topic Freedom / equal rights Speaker Sojourner Truth Mohandas Gandhi Nelson Mandela Martin Luther King Jr. Hillary Clinton Winston Churchill Harry S. Truman Ronald Reagan Title of Speech Aint I a Woman? Quit India No Easy Road to Freedom I Have a Dream Womens Rights Are Human Rights Iron Curtain Doctrine Tear Down This Wall Year 1851 1942 1953 1963 1995 1946 1947 1987 1941 1944 1941 1966 2001 1928 1970
For more information on writing a compareand-contrast essay, see Language Arts Handbook 4.1, The Writing Process, in your textbook.

World peace

Many great leaders have delivered inspirational speeches. Some of these speeches gave hope and direction to nations teetering on disaster; some gave voice to populations silenced by intimidation; others rallied individuals to work toward a common goal. All had one thing in common: words that could move people toward change.

Military Human spirit / patriotism Sports / competition

Franklin D. Roosevelt Day of Infamy Dwight D. Eisenhower D-Day Order of Battle Harold Ickes Robert Kennedy George W. Bush Knute Rockne Vince Lombardi What Is an American? On Courage 9/11 Win One for the Gipper What It Takes to Be Number One

Use these questions to help establish similarities and differences between the speeches you chose and Queen Elizabeth Is speech. Use your answers to write a compare and contrast essay. 1. What are the occasions and purposes of the speeches? 2. How do the speeches provide insight into the characters and convictions of the speakers? 3. How are the speeches relevant to the lives of the listeners? 4. How effectively do the speakers use the rhetorical triangle (ethos, pathos, and logos) to persuade and inspire listeners? 5. How are figurative language, repetition of ideas, rhetorical questions, and point of view used to persuade and inspire listeners? 6. How would you describe the tone of each speech? 7. What common threads or concepts do the two speeches share? 8. What calls to action are issued? How effective are the messages?
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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 3

Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

Song (Go and catch a falling star) / Meditation 17 (Perchance he for whom this bell tolls), from Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, page 305

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

Ask the Author


This lesson supports the Collaborative Learning assignment on page 310 of your textbook. For this activity, you are to work in a small group and brainstorm a set of interview questions to ask John Donne. Before you can formulate questions, you need to familiarize yourself with his life and his writings. On your own, review the background information that is provided in your textbook on pages 294295 and 305. Also locate and read biographical material online or in the library. Use the categories in the table below as reference points for your research. John Donnes Background
Personal Life Childhood (family dynamics, early influences) Education (Oxford, Cambridge, the Oath of Supremacy, religious training) Relationship with Anne More (marriage scandal, imprisonment, influence) Varied pursuits (military, law, politics, diplomacy, writing, religion) Religious faith (persecution, conversion, influence on writings) Hardships (finances, illnesses, deaths) Obsession with death (tragic family events, portrait in burial shroud, funeral sermon) Identities (radical, free spirit, prisoner, devoted husband, spiritual leader, sexist, metaphysical poet, religious zealot, diplomat, iconoclast, realist, intellect, humorist) Personal commentary about his life/works Writings Influence of historical context on writings Themes of love, loss, religion, and death evident in poetry Writing process (inspirations, challenges, routine) Social commentary on English society evident in poetry Canon of literature (sonnets, religious poems, songs, sermons, satires, elegies); gamut of human experiences/emotions Metaphysical ideas in writings (intellectual view of physical world; references to science, mathematics, politics, and religion in imagery and symbolism) Gender roles in writings Humor in poetry (puns, wordplay, satire) Literary circle and influences Literary manuscripts (unpublished writings, anonymity until the late nineteenth century)

In your small group, brainstorm a list of questions you would like to ask Donne. After you are done brainstorming, use your ideas to write out thoughtful questions for a formal interview. As you develop the questions, keep the following tips in mind: Write open-ended questions that cannot be answered with a yes or no response and therefore encourage elaboration. To avoid confusion, formulate simple questions and focus on one main concept in each question. Write clear, unbiased questions. Formulate questions that cover many facets of Donnes life experiences and writings.
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For tips on developing interview questions, see Language Arts Handbook 7.4, Asking and Answering Questions, and 7.5, Conducting an Interview, in your textbook.

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

The Tragedy of Macbeth, Act II, page 361

LIFELONG LEARNING

Research the Effects of an Assassination


This lesson supports the Lifelong Learning assignment on page 374 of your textbook. An assassination is a deliberate murder of a prominent figure. Although it is typically done for political or ideological reasons, an assassination can also be motivated by military control, financial gain, revenge, or mental illness. For this activity, you are to research the assassination of the individuals in the table below, or choose another with your teachers approval.
For more information on conducting research, see Language Arts Handbook 5.2, Research Skills, and 5.3, Internet Research, in your textbook.

Assassinated National and World Leaders Philip II of Macedonia (336 ) Franz Ferdinand (1914) Anwar el Sadat (1981) Julius Caesar (44 ) Mohandas Gandhi (1948) Benigno Aquino Jr. (1983) Thomas Becket (1170) John F. Kennedy (1963) Indira Gandhi (1984) Abraham Lincoln (1865) Malcolm X (1964) Chris Hani (1993) Alexander II of Russia (1881) Martin Luther King Jr. (1968) Yitzhak Rabin (1995) William McKinley (1901) Robert F. Kennedy (1968) Benazir Bhutto (2007) In your investigation, take notes on the time, place, and circumstances of the assassination; the identity of the victim; and the profile of the assassin. Also examine immediate and long-term effects of the event, using the questions in the table below. Be aware that some of the questions may not apply to the assassination you are investigating.
Historical Political 1. 2. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2.

Social Legal

Emotional/ Psychological

Impact of the Assassination What was the impact of the assassination on the course of history? How did the assassination affect the international community? What was the impact of the assassination on the political landscape of the nation and the world? Did existing political instability serve as a motivating factor? Explain. How did the assassination affect the government-citizen relationship? How did the assassination affect the behavior of citizens? How did media coverage affect societys reaction to the assassination? What legal proceedings occurred following the assassination? What legal investigations (conspiracy theories, cover-ups) occurred? What changes in legislation, if any, resulted from the assassination? What effect did the assassination have on individual and national security and mental health? What role did collective guilt play after the assassination?

Compare your chosen assassination with King Duncans in The Tragedy of Macbeth, Act II. Use your research to predict how the killing will affect Scotland and its citizens. Write one or two paragraphs explaining your reasoning and supporting it with examples from your research and from Act II of the play.
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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 4

Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

from The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus, page 442

CRITICAL LITERACY

Compare Soul-Selling Themes


This lesson supports the Critical Literacy assignment on page 448 of your textbook. Selling ones soul to the devil is a common theme in Western art and literature. For this activity, you are to choose a story that has this theme, and compare it with the excerpt from Christopher Marlowes The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus in your textbook. Refer to the table below for suggested works to use in your comparative analysis. Works with Soul-Selling Themes
Category Literature Title The Devil and Tom Walker, by Washington Irving Young Goodman Brown, by Nathaniel Hawthorne The Devil and the Shoemaker, by Anton Chekhov The Devil and Daniel Webster, by Stephen Vincent Bent Angel on My Shoulder (1946) Damn Yankees! (1958) Doctor Faustus (1967) Bedazzled (1967; remake, 2000) Twilight Zone, Season 1, Episode 6: Escape Clause Twilight Zone, Season 4, Episode 9: Printers Devil Cross Road Blues, by Robert Johnson The Devil Went Down to Georgia, by the Charlie Daniels Band

Film

Television Music

Use the guiding questions below to help you establish similarities and differences between your selection and the Doctor Faustus selection. Use a Venn diagram to record your findings, and share your observations with your classmates. 1. How do the selections reflect the historical periods and cultures of their creators? 2. What is the devil called? How is the devil portrayed? If the devil is in disguise, what identifying clues are given? 3. What is the turning point for the main character? What choice does the character make? What factors drive his or her decision? 4. What pact does the main character make with the devil? How is the pact sealed? 5. What actions, if any, does the main character take to try to get out of the pact with the devil? 6. What is the outcome of the pact with the devil? 7. Is the main character a tragic hero? Why or why not? 8. What is the selection saying about temptation and human nature? Why do you think the pact with the devil theme is popular among writers?
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A Venn diagram, which consists of two overlapping circles, is a good way to visually express similarities and differences. The outer parts of the circles show the differences between two things, and the area where the circles intersect shows the things they have in common.

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

from The Pilgrims Progress, page 511

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

Create a Board Game


This lesson supports the Collaborative Learning assignment on page 518 of your textbook. The Pilgrims Progress is a journey tale in which the main character, Christian, embarks on a religious pilgrimage to find salvation. Christian encounters obstacles that test his fortitude, but he ultimately receives enlightenment from his adventures. These factors make the tale an ideal base for a creative board game. Form a group with two or three other students. Your task is to design a board game for other students who are familiar with the allegory. The object will be to navigate through several obstacles, encounter several characters, and, finally, reach the Celestial City.

Design the Board Game


To focus on the design of the game, consider these questions: Which settings from the story will you include? Place them in a logical path on your board. How might you portray the characters as pawns? More than forty characters are mentioned in Parts I and II of the allegory. Identify your main pawns and when they will encounter one another. How can you incorporate the plot of the story? What are some important decisions that had positive or negative outcomes? How can you use that information to move players around the board? How is symbolism used in the allegory? How might your group incorporate symbolic objects from the story into your game? What playing pieces are necessary? Will you make cards to give clues, to tell where to move, or to award or take prizes? Will you have play money, a spinner or dice, a timer, or tokens?

Write the Playing Directions


To write clear directions for your game, follow these six steps: 1. Begin each step with an action verb. Avoid using the pronoun you. 2. Break your instructions into single, numbered steps. 3. Place relevant explanations after each instruction. These may describe what will happen after the step, explain why the step is important, or give a brief definition of an unfamiliar term. 4. Follow chronological order and use transitional words, such as first and next. 5. Include precise measurements, landmarks, and spatial orientation words (for example, up, down, under, and above). 6. Repeat key words to move your reader from one step to another.
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Test Your Game To test the effectiveness of your game and the preciseness of your directions, have another group in your class play the game. Use their feedback to improve the game.

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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 5

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

from Gullivers Travels / A Modest Proposal, page 521

LIFELONG LEARNING

Write a Problem/Solution Essay


This lesson supports the Lifelong Learning assignment on page 535 of your textbook. A problem/solution essay is a type of expository writing that identifies a problem and proposes one or more solutions. This type of essay is similar to a persuasive essay in that the writer takes a position (in this instance, a problem that the writer believes merits attention), outlines aspects of the problem and its urgency, offers possible solutions and persuasive evidence, and convinces readers to take action. Jonathan Swifts A Modest Proposal is a problem/solution essay that offers a satirical solution to problems suffered by Irish peasants under British rule. For this activity, you are to write a problem/solution essay about a school issue. Your essay may be ironic, like Swifts, or it might offer a serious, practical solution. Choose a problem that you are passionate about. Consider the broad topics listed below, and narrow your focus to address a specific problem in one of these categories.
bullying/tolerance dress code class schedules standardized testing absenteeism high-school dropout rates student driving/parking concerns grade point average/weighted classes discipline/zero-tolerance policies extracurricular activities

For more information on persuasive writing, see Language Arts Handbook 4.2, Modes and Purposes of Writing, in your textbook.

crime/safety homework grading policies plagiarism scholarships

Research the Topic


Gather as much information about it as possible. Copy the following graphic organizer and then use the questions to help focus your research. Note-Taking Chart
Guiding Questions Who Who is involved in the problem? Who knows about the problem? Who could provide insight into the problem? Answers

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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 1

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Guiding Questions What What is the problem? What do you know about the problem? What evidence confirms the problem and supports the solutions? What background information is necessary to understand the problem? What has been done in the past to try to solve the problem? What are the possible counterarguments to solving the problem? What are the responses to these counterarguments? When When does the problem occur? Where Where does the problem occur? Why Why does the problem matter? Why does the problem occur? Why have previous solutions failed? How How do you view the problem? How do others view the problem? How can the problem be solved?

Answers

Write, Revise, and Publish Your Essay


To structure your essay, follow the guidelines below. After writing your essay, proofread it for errors in grammar, spelling, and mechanics, and make any necessary revisions. When you have completed these tasks, submit your problem/solution essay to your school or local newspaper.
Section I. Introduction

For more information on revising and proofreading your draft, see Language Arts Handbook 4.1, The Writing Process, in your textbook.

Format Guidelines Components of Section Open with an attention-gettera personal anecdote, hypothetical situation, shocking or interesting fact or statistic, vivid description, or relevant quotation. Define the problem, address its importance, and state the urgency of a solution.
Further define the problem by providing a history of the problem, the publics awareness of the problem, the reason for the problem, and the extent of the problem. Discuss other solutions that have been proposed. Analyze the successful and unsuccessful components of those solutions. Present a specific solution that is realistic and reasonable. Outline the components of your solution. Provide reasons and evidence to justify your solution. Address possible counterarguments and offer appropriate responses. Summarize the main points of your essay. Encourage readers to accept your views and to take action to reach the proposed solution.
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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 5

II. Body A. Problem

B. Past solutions C. Your solution D. Evidence for solution III. Conclusion

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

London, page 659

MEDIA LITERACY

Compile an Anthology
This lesson supports the Media Literacy assignment on page 661 of your textbook. During the Romantic Period, from 1798 to 1832, several gifted writers used London as inspiration. Each author sought beauty in the bustling city, but not all found it. William Blakes poem London describes the suffering that could be seen on the streets of the great city. For this activity, you are to research Romantic literary works set in London, and then to compile an anthology using your findings.

Read and Analyze Romantic Works


Go online or to the library and find Romantic poems or prose set in London. The following poems are a sampling of the works available: Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Frost at Midnight William Wordsworth: The Sun Has Long Been Set, London (1802), Composed Upon Westminster Bridge Letitia Elizabeth Landon: Scenes in London, St. Georges Hospital, Hyde-Park Corner, Changes in London, The Country Retreat Mary Darby Robinson: Londons Summer Morning George Gordon, Lord Byron: Don Juan, Canto X, Verses 8283 William Blake: London, Jerusalem Anna Letitia Barbauld: Eighteen Hundred and Eleven Joanne Baillie: London Select at least three works and record their titles and authors. After reading each piece, respond to the following questions on a separate piece of paper: 1. How does the selection reflect the historical context of London during this period? 2. How does the speaker or author feel about London? How is this attitude revealed through word choice, sentence structure, and imagery? 3. How does the selection reflect the hallmarks of Romanticism?

Compile an Anthology
Meet with your classmates to determine which selections to include in your class anthology. Use the guidelines listed in the margin to organize the collection.

Anthology Elements a cover with the title of the collection, the name of your class, and an illustration an introduction offering observations about the Romantics views of London and explaining why you selected and organized the works the way you did a table of contents listing the titles, authors, and page numbers of your selections the selections, organized by the authors views of London, the topics they wrote about, or another principle, each typed in a unique font and accompanied by an illustration
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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 6

Exceeding the Standards: Extension Activities

Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

Ozymandias / Ode to the West Wind / To a Skylark, page 725

CRITICAL LITERACY

Analyze Themes
This lesson supports the Critical Literacy assignment on page 737 of your textbook. The inspirations for Percy Bysshe Shelleys poetry came from his own observations and experiences in a world that favored totalitarianism over democracy, mechanization over craftsmanship, reason over imagination, and the collective over the individual. Shelley believed the individual could find salvation and restorative power by celebrating the beauty, uniqueness, resilience, spontaneity, and transience found in nature and humanity. Shelleys perceptions can be seen in the themes of his poems. A theme is the central message or idea about life revealed through a literary work. Often, several themes can be inferred from one literary selection. For this activity, you are asked to uncover the unique and shared themes of the poems by Shelley that are included in Unit 6 of your textbook. To do so, you will need to combine your background knowledge with textual evidence and make inferences.

Read and Analyze


Use the guidelines below to help you analyze Ozymandias, Ode to the West Wind, and To a Skylark in your textbook. Take notes as you read the poems and background information. 1. To understand Shelleys life and the time period in which he wrote, read pages 646649 and 724 in your textbook. 2. Read the poems to find clues to their themes. Look at each poems title, subject, diction, imagery, symbolism, and tone, and use this textual evidence to make inferences about possible themes. 3. Find connections between the poems and your life (text-to-self), the poems themselves (text-to-text), and the poems and the world (textto-world).
Common Poetic Themes beauty power truth duty love pain loneliness obedience sacrifice bravery happiness nature right/wrong honesty greed life/death survival freedom dreams choices

Establish Themes
Using the information that you have gathered, establish the unique, shared, and Romantic Period themes for Shelleys three poems. Fill in the designated items in the graphic organizer on the next page.

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Unique Theme(s) of Ozymandias

Unique Theme(s) of Ode to the West Wind

Unique Theme(s) of To a Skylark

Shared Theme(s) of Shelleys Poems

Romantic Theme(s) of Shelleys Poems

Draw Conclusions
When you have finished filling in the graphic organizer, answer the following questions on a separate piece of paper: 1. How do Shelleys poems reflect the historical context (political, social, economic, and cultural climate) of the Romantic Period? How do they reflect his life experiences? 2. In what ways are Shelleys poems typical and atypical of the Romantic Period? 3. Choose one of the following quotations by Shelley and apply its meaning to the themes of any of the three poems: (1) Poetry is a mirror which makes beautiful that which is distorted, (2) The great instrument of moral good is the imagination, (3) Reason respects the differences, and imagination the similitudes of things.

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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 6

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

The Darkling Thrush, page 832

CRITICAL LITERACY

Conduct Literary Criticism


This lesson supports the Critical Literacy assignment on page 836 of your textbook. Literary criticism is an informed and analytical evaluation of a work of literature. Some literary critics believe that a work of literature should be interpreted using only the literary elements of the work itself. Others believe that examining issues outside a literary work provides important insights into the work. In this assignment, you will be using a combination of biographical and historical criticism to analyze Thomas Hardys poem The Darkling Thrush. The chart below outlines these types of literary criticism.
Biographical Criticism In biographical criticism, the critic relates events in the authors life to the work itself. For example, as a child, Charles Dickens experienced poverty. Later, Dickens wrote about the effects of poverty on his characters and on society in general. In using biographical criticism, readers must be careful not to assume that all events and attitudes in an authors work are taken from his or her own life. Historical Criticism In historical criticism, critics relate aspects of a literary work to events and issues present in society at the time it was written. In applying history to interpreting a literary work, readers recognize that the state of society and the state of the world affect the language, characters, and events of the work.

Begin by researching and answering the following questions to learn more about biographical and historical influences on Hardy. Then use your answers to write a biographical-historical criticism of the poem. 1. Describe Hardys use of personification in the poems second stanza. What attitude does the stanza suggest toward the century that had just ended? What other details in the poem suggest this attitude? 2. Identify five events of the nineteenth century that may have affected Hardys attitude toward it. 3. Find answers to the following biographical questions about Thomas Hardy: a. What were Hardys religious beliefs? How did they change throughout his life? b. Describe Hardys first marriage. In what state was his marriage in 1899 when he wrote The Darkling Thrush? c. What were Hardys views on people and life in general, as expressed in The Mayor of Casterbridge and his other novels?

For more information on critical analyses and how to write them, see Language Arts Handbook 5.1, Critical Thinking Skills, and 4.1, The Writing Process, in your textbook.

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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 7

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

The Mark of the Beast, page 838

MEDIA LITERACY

Create a Public Health Brochure


This lesson supports the Media Literacy assignment on page 849 of your textbook. The protagonist in The Mark of the Beast, by Rudyard Kipling, suffers from leprosy, or Hansens disease. This chronic illness is caused by a bacillus that invades the skin, mucous membranes, and nervous system, producing skin nodules that enlarge and spread. These skin nodules are an identifying characteristic of the disease, and they result in disfigurement that causes both physical and emotional scars for its victims. For this activity, you will research leprosy to create an informative public health brochure.

Build Background
Leprosy has existed for thousands of years: the first known reference to it was found on an Egyptian papyrus from 1550 bce. This illness has affected thousands worldwide and has been, perhaps, the most misunderstood disease known to humankind. Because the disease is mildly contagious and disfiguring, its victimsknown as leperswere shunned by past generations. Frequently, lepers were forced to become beggars, walking the streets in black cowls and ringing bells to signal that they were victims of the disease. Those who came into contact with lepers would utter prayers and cross themselves, believing that leprosy was a curse from the gods; others would stone the lepers out of fear. The most widely accepted practice for handling those affected by leprosy was the establishment of isolated colonies and leprosariums where lepers would be removed from their homes, families, and society to coexist only with other victims. Their rights to live freely were stripped as they were banished and declared dead. Leprosy continues to be a worldwide health concern, but its incidence, according to the World Health Organization, has decreased nearly 20 percent per year in the past five years because of early diagnosis and treatment programs. Today, there are approximately 225,000 known cases, mainly in Africa and Southeast Asia.
Cursed by the Cursed In The Mark of the Beast, Kipling develops an interesting plot twist based on a cultural response to leprosy: a man who has been cursed by the gods in turn curses someone who has offended the gods.

Research and Organize


Use the categories in the outline on the next page to guide you in the research and organization of your data for the brochure.
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Brochure Categories
I. Definition of disease II. Transmission of disease A. Cause B. Risk factors 1. Vulnerable populations (age, family history, nutritional status, medical history) 2. Environmental conditions (geographical location, living conditions, sanitation) III. Incidence A. Geographic distribution B. Affected populations IV. Clinical presentation/progression of disease A. Stages of disease B. Early/advanced signs and symptoms V. Diagnosis A. Signs and symptoms B. Laboratory tests C. Personal history VI. Treatment options/prognosis A. Drug regimens/supportive care B. Recovery VII. Preventive measures VIII. Resources

Write the Content


Using your notes from the graphic organizer, write the information for your brochure. As you are writing the material, keep in mind the tips listed in the margin.
Writing Tips Follow the organization listed in the graphic organizer. Use simple sentences, and break the copy with subheads and lists. Define technical terms, as necessary, for the general public. Include graphics, such as illustrations, tables, and maps. For more information on documenting your research for this brochure, see Language Arts Handbook 5.6, Documenting Sources, in your textbook.

Design the Brochure


Construct a trifold brochure with a total of six panels: one front panel, four interior panels, and one back panel. The front panel should include the subject of your brochure, an attention-getting graphic, and your name. Panels 25 should contain your findings, and the back panel should be reserved for documenting your sources. Creativity in format and design will make your brochure distinct. Experiment with different fonts, type sizes, colors, and other graphic elements. There are several computer software programs available that can help you with your brochure design.

Polish and Present


Read through your brochure to determine the effectiveness of your organization and graphics. Proofread the text for clarity and for errors in spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Share your finished brochure with your classmates.
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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

The Soldier, page 947

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

Compile a Poetry Booklet


This lesson supports the Collaborative Learning assignment on page 951 of your textbook. Poetry plays a large role in times of crisis because it has the power to unite, console, heal, and give voice to thoughts and emotions. This is especially apparent in the poetry written by soldiers serving on the front lines in World War I. For this activity, you and a partner are to use library and Internet sources to compile a booklet of verse about World War I. Some famous poets of the period are listed below.
Richard Aldington Laurence Binyon Edmund Blunden Vera Brittain Rupert Brooke Mary Gabrielle Collins Eleanor Farjeon Robert Graves Julian Grenfell Winifred M. Letts John McCrae Edith Nesbit Robert Nichols Wilfred Owen Isaac Rosenberg Siegfried Sassoon Alan Seeger Edith Sitwell Charles Hamilton Sorley Edward Thomas

With your partner, investigate the lives of these or other World War I poets. Read several of their works and choose four to six poems to highlight in your booklet. You may also want to locate the books Out in the Dark: Poetry of the First World War and Minds at War: The Poetry and Experience of the First World War, both edited by David Roberts. These include a wealth of information from this period. As you gather information, note common threads between the poets or poems. These notes will help you and your partner choose a chronological or thematic approach for your booklet. For a chronological approach, organize your content by publication date; by early, middle, and late periods of World War I; or by author and then publication date. For a thematic approach, organize your content by similar themes or connections. For ideas, refer to the suggestions below.
People poets who were soldiers or war heroes poets who were war supporters or protesters female poets poets who shared native homelands, such as France Places poems about battlefields in general poems about specific battlefields, such as Verdun poems about specific countries, such as England poems about medical or convalescent facilities

For more information on conducting research, see Language Arts Handbook 5.2, Research Skills, and 5.3, Internet Research, in your textbook.

Ideas poems that reflect patriotism poems about death poems that honor courage poems about postwar trauma poems that mourn wasted youth poems that show comradeship poems that find beauty amid destruction

For each poem, write a brief biography of the poet and an introduction to the work itself. Add meaningful artwork to accompany the poems, and create a booklet cover with the title of your poetry collection, your names, and a powerful illustration.
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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 8

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

The Second Coming / Sailing to Byzantium, page 981

LIFELONG LEARNING

Develop a Rsum
This lesson supports the Lifelong Learning assignment on page 986 of your textbook. For this activity, you will create a rsum for William Butler Yeats to use in applying for a theater director position at the University of Dublin. A rsum is a summary of work experience, education, and skills. Begin the assignment by gathering information on Yeatss life. To focus your research, use the graphic organizer below. Rsum Components
Personal Information. Provide the full name, address, and other contact information for Yeats. Career Objective. Offer a one-sentence statement that describes the type of position Yeats is seekingin this case, theater director. Work Experience. List Yeatss work history. There are two ways to format this section: chronologically or functionally. For a chronological approach, list a reverse work history, beginning with Yeatss current position. Underneath each position, include a bulleted list of job responsibilities. For a functional approach, list three to five broad areas of responsibility and provide a bulleted list of specific tasks for each area. Follow up with a brief reverse chronological work history. Whichever format you choose, include dates, job titles, and business names and locations. Begin each job responsibility or task description with an action verb. Educational Background. Mention Yeatss high school and postsecondary education only. Include dates, courses of study, academic accomplishments, and the names and addresses of the educational institutions. Skills. List any of Yeatss specialized skills that would make him an ideal candidate for the posted position. Honors/Awards. List the titles of relevant honors or awards Yeats has received and the dates these awards were conferred. Publications. List any of Yeatss publications that would be relevant to the posted position. References. List professional references, including names, job titles, and addresses.

For a list of strong action verbs to use in a rsum, go to http://lit/emcp.net/ actionverbs.

Use the notes from your research to write the rsum. Lay out the rsum in an organized and consistent format, and avoid articles (a, an, and the) and personal pronouns (such as I, me, he, him, she, and her). Convey Yeatss positive personal characteristics, such as honesty or a strong work ethic, through your word choice. Review the rsum for conciseness and accuracy, and proofread it for errors. Also check that the format is consistent and that you have used type treatments (such as boldface headings) and text markers (such as spaces, bullets, and tabs) to aid readability. Print your rsum using black ink on white paper.

For guidelines on writing and formatting a rsum, see the Writing Workshop on pages 222223 of your textbook.

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

B. Wordsworth, page 1168

MEDIA LITERACY

Create a Poster
This lesson supports the Media Literacy assignment on page 1174 of your textbook. The story B. Wordsworth, by V. S. Naipaul, is set in Trinidad. In Naipauls story, a man on the street offers to sell the narrator a poem for four cents. The narrator tells the man that peddling poetry is strange that only calypso musicians do that sort of thing. The roots of calypso music go back to the eighteenth century and the West African slaves who worked the island is sugarcane plantations. As they worked in the fields, they began communicating by singing songs. The lyrics were improvised and often commented on daily events, the hardships of labor, and the tyranny of the slave masters. In other words, calypso music began as a type of protest music. Today, calypso musicians play for tips on the street. For this activity, you are to create a poster that advertises a calypso music festival on the island of Trinidad.

Located just off the northeastern coast of Venezuela in the West Indies, Trinidad is the southernmost island in the Caribbean Sea. Known for beautiful whitesand beaches and a tropical bird sanctuary, it is also famous as the birthplace of calypso music.

Research

Research the role of calypso music in the history and culture of Trinidad. Go online or to the library to find materials. As you conduct your research, take notes in the following categories: Origin of the term calypso Traditional melodies and lyrics of History and evolution of calypso music calypso music Past and current instruments of Popular calypso musicians calypso music Cultural significance of calypso music

For more information on conducting research, see Language Arts Handbook 5.2, Research Skills, and 5.3, Internet Research, in your textbook.

Plan, Create, and Share


Determine the information that must appear on the poster: the name of the event; the date, time, and location; and any costs. Then, using the information from your research, answer the following questions. 1. What is the purpose of your poster? Who is your intended audience? 2. What would entice locals and visitors to attend the festival? 3. What kinds of activities could you offer during the festival that would appeal to a variety of age groups? Choose lettering (fonts and type sizes) and graphics (borders, illustrations, photographs, and so on) that will enhance the posters content. For high impact, use minimal copy and bold graphics. Hang all the finished posters in the classroom, and note any similarities and differences. Decide as a class which poster elements best capture the essence of a calypso music festival.
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BRITISH TRADITION, UNIT 9

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Name: ____________________________________________________ Date: __________________

Telephone Conversation / from Midsummer XXIII, page 1175

LIFELONG LEARNING

Present an Oral Report


This lesson supports the Lifelong Learning assignment on page 1180 of your textbook. The poems Telephone Conversation, by Wole Soyinka, and Midsummer XXIII, by Derek Walcott, deal with the related topics of prejudice and discrimination. In the excerpt from Midsummer XXIII reproduced in your textbook, the poet compares midsummer leaves to the Brixton riots. In 1981, the area of south London known as Brixton was the scene of a devastating confrontation. Racial tension between Brixtons predominantly black citizens and the predominantly white London Metropolitan Police was reaching a breaking point, and clashes between the two groups were on the rise. To tighten security in this region, the police launched Operation Swamp, in which approximately one hundred plainclothes officers stopped and searched more than one thousand youths in the neighborhood over a six-day period. The sus law (short for suspicion law) allowed police to perform these searches without any proof of wrongdoing. More than one hundred people were arrested. The community of Brixton was outraged and declared the operation to be nothing more than racial profiling. The climax of the situation came on April 10. Police spotted a black youth in the street who had suffered stab wounds to his back. According to their reports, police were attempting to give first aid to the victim when they were surrounded by fifty black youths who believed the victim was being harassed and arrested by the police. The victim and the other youths broke free, and the victim was taken to the hospital by the youths. On April 11, another black youth was arrested following a run-in with undercover officers. The outrage over these two incidents led to a riot in the streets of Brixton. Protesters armed with bricks, bottles, and petrol bombs (Molotov cocktails) ran through the streets. Police officers formed a ring around Brixton to control the outbreak of physical violence, looting, and burning of police vehicles. By April 12, the London Metropolitan Police reported that nearly three hundred police officers and sixty-five civilians were injured; more than one hundred vehicles were damaged or destroyed; nearly 150 properties were damaged or looted; and eighty-two people were arrested. For this activity, you are to conduct online and library research on the causes and effects of the Brixton riot in 1981. You will then use your findings to prepare and present an oral report on the topic.

For more information on conducting research, see Language Arts Handbook 5.2, Research Skills, and 5.3, Internet Research, in your textbook.

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Research
To help guide you in your research, copy the graphic organizer below. Take notes for each of the categories listed under the main headings. These categories will help you discover the contributing factors and underlying causes of the Brixton riot of 1981.
Citizens of Brixton Demographics Lifestyle/attitudes Socioeconomic issues Criminal activity London Metropolitan Police Demographics Job performance/attitudes Policing initiatives/laws

Brixton Citizens vs. London Metropolitan Police Mounting tensions (time line of events) Rumors/breakdown in communication

Brixton Riot of 1981

Scarman Report of 1981 Changes in Black British Community Changes in Police Community Changes in Englands Legislation

Prepare and Present


Using your notes from the graphic organizer, prepare an oral report to present to the class. Follow the outline below to set up your report: I. Introduction Paragraph 1. Create an attention-getting opener by using an anecdote, a surprising fact or statistic, or a compelling quotation that you found in your research. II. Body Paragraph 2. Outline and describe the causes of the riot. Present a fair and balanced account from the perspective of the citizens as well as the police. Paragraph 3. Discuss the immediate and long-term effects of the riot and the results of the Scarman investigation. Paragraph 4. Focus on one of the long-term effects and how it led to change. III. Conclusion Paragraph 5. Discuss how London has tried to heal the scars from this incident. When you have finished writing, read through your report to verify that your ideas are clearly presented and that they follow a cause-andeffect sequence. If you wish, add a visual element to your presentation by including charts, photographs, or illustrations. Practice your delivery before giving your presentation to your classmates.
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For more information on presenting an oral report, see Language Arts Handbook 7.6, Public Speaking, in your textbook.

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ANSWER KEY
Unit 1 from Beowulf
Collaborative Learning: Compare Cultures, page 1
Students should work together in small groups to define the word boast and complete Compare-and-Contrast Charts for boasting in Beowulf and in contemporary culture. They should also prepare a clear summary statement that addresses the similarities and differences between boasting in the time of Beowulf and boasting today and explains how the concept has changed over time. A spokesperson from each group should present his or her groups statement to the class, and all students should participate in combining the classs statements into one consensus statement that represents their findings.

from Le Morte dArthur


Critical Literacy: Create a Map of Arthurs Britain, page 6
Students should read through the selection and note important historic places and people in the graphic organizer. They should then use the Internet or library to find an outline of England from this time period and an atlas. Students should use the atlas to find the places they found in the selection and mark them in the correct locations in their outlines of England. While they may not be able to locate all the places from the story, they should be able to find some. Students should then combine their maps into a larger class map and create a key. When the map is complete, they should discuss what they learned while creating it and how it affects their understanding of the story.

Unit 3 Speech to the Troops at Tilbury


Media Literacy: Compare Speeches, page 7
Students should conduct online research to locate and read other inspirational speeches. Students should then choose one speech that appeals to them and that provides an interesting counterpoint to Queen Elizabeth Is speech. Students should examine the two speeches, using the list of questions to guide them in their analysis. Students should then write a compare-and-contrast essay based on their findings.

The Seafarer / The Wifes Lament


Media Literacy: Analyze Film Portrayals, page 3
Students should brainstorm a list of stereotypical characteristics for sailors and fishers. They should then select and watch a film about people who live or work on the sea and take notes about the characters. Students should use their notes to fill out a Compareand-Contrast Chart for Film Characters, analyzing which portrayals of the films protagonist and antagonist are fresh and which are stereotypical. They should then write a short summary of their findings, using the questions provided to guide their writing.

Unit 2 Bonny Barbara Allan / Lord Randall


Lifelong Learning: Conduct an Interview, page 4
Students should work in groups of two to discuss and note their initial ideas regarding the role of mothers in medieval ballads. They should then use the library or Internet to conduct further research and fill out the graphic organizer. Students should use the information they find in their research to create the questions for their interviews. The questions and responses should reveal factual information about the roles of mothers in medieval times, and the presentations should be creative, interesting, and engaging for the audience. Students should also remember to leave time for questions at the end of their interview presentations and should answer them clearly and thoughtfully.

Song (Go and catch a falling star) / Meditation 17 (Perchance he for whom this bell tolls) / from Devotions upon Emergent Occasions
Collaborative Learning: Ask the Author, page 8
Students should familiarize themselves with biographical material on John Donne by reading background information in the textbook and by conducting research online or in the library. Students should use the category topics listed in the table as reference points in their analysis of Donnes life and writings. Students should then formulate clear, open ended, and comprehensive interview questions based on their findings in these categories.

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Unit 4 The Tragedy of Macbeth, Act II


Lifelong Learning: Research the Effects of an Assassination, page 9
Students should choose a prominent individual from the national or world community who has been assassinated. Students should then investigate the circumstances of the assassination as well as profile the victim and the assassin. Students should consider the historical, political, social, legal, and emotional effects of the assassination and use the information that they have gathered to predict the immediate and long-term effects of the assassination of King Duncan on Scotland and its citizens.

from Gullivers Travels / A Modest Proposal


Lifelong Learning: Write a Problem/Solution Essay, page 12
Students should choose a school issue that is interesting and important to them. Students should then conduct research on their topics to provide them with background knowledge on all facets of their chosen issue. Students should use the guiding questions provided in the graphic organizer to help them focus their research and create the content of their essays. Students should organize their essays according to the format provided and should make any necessary revisions based on their proofreading. Finally, students should submit their essays to school or local newspapers.

from The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus


Critical Literacy: Compare Soul-Selling Themes, page 10
Students should choose a literary or musical composition that has a soul-selling theme similar to the one found in the excerpt from The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus. Students can choose one of the recommended compositions or select one of their own (with teacher approval). Students should compare and contrast their chosen compositions with the textbook excerpt by using the questions to guide them in their analysis. Students should then draw Venn diagrams that show the similarities and differences between the two compositions and share their comparative analyses with their classmates.

Unit 6 London
Media Literacy: Compile an Anthology, page 14
Students should research Romantic poetry or prose that is set in London. Students should apply their background knowledge of the hallmarks of Romanticism as well as the historical context of this period to their reading and understanding of the poems. Students should compile and organize their anthologies by following the stated guidelines.

Ozymandias / Ode to the West Wind / To a Skylark


Critical Literacy: Analyze Themes, page 15
Students should be familiar with theme and understand that, quite often, selections have more than one theme. Many times these themes must be inferred. Students should use the guidelines in the lesson to help them take notes on the background information of the literary movement and author as well as any textual evidence that may point toward a particular theme. Students should establish the unique, shared, and Romantic themes of Shelleys three poems. Finally, students should evaluate their theme analysis by answering the questions provided.

Unit 5 from The Pilgrims Progress


Collaborative Learning: Create a Board Game, page 11
Students should work within small groups to design and create board games based on The Pilgrims Progress. Students should consider the type of game they would like to create, their intended audience, and the objects of their games. Students should analyze the settings, characters, plot, and symbolism of the tale and determine how they will use these literary elements in their board game designs. Students should determine the types and number of playing pieces that will be needed for their games and create these pieces. They should also write clear, precise directions for their games and test each others games by playing them.

Unit 7 The Darkling Thrush


Critical Literacy: Conduct Literary Criticism, page 17
Students should apply biographical-historical criticism to the selection by conducting research to find the answers to the questions provided. They should

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conclude that Hardy had a depressed, hopeless attitude toward the events of the last century, which he expresses by personifying the century as a dead person. Events that may have led him to feel this way include the Crimean War in 1854, problems caused by the British occupation of Asia, the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883, Bloody Sunday riots in London in 1887, and murders by Jack the Ripper in 1888. Students should also discuss Hardys strong connection to religion, his doubts regarding his faith, and the fact that he was estranged from his first wife. They should note that his view on life in general was that it was largely ruled by fate and was rife with social injustices.

The Second Coming / Sailing to Byzantium


Lifelong Learning: Develop a Rsum, page 21
Students should develop a rsum for William Butler Yeats in response to an open theater director position at the University of Dublin. Using the rsum components listed in the graphic organizer as a guide, students should conduct research on Yeatss life and take notes on their findings. Finally, students should follow the writing and editing guidelines for producing an effective rsum.

The Mark of the Beast


Media Literacy: Create a Public Health Brochure, page 18
Students should create public health brochures on leprosy that reflect their knowledge of this chronic disease. Students should use the categories listed in the graphic organizer to focus their research and to gather the required information. Students should use their research notes to help them write the content of their brochures in an organized and clear format. Students should understand the overall design of a brochure and should use a variety of textual and graphic elements in their designs. Finally, students should review their brochures for effectiveness and to spot and correct any spelling or mechanical errors and then share their brochures with the class.

Unit 9 B. Wordsworth
Media Literacy: Create a Poster, page 22
Students should research the origin, history, and evolution of calypso music. They should become familiar with the traditional melodies and lyrics of this type of music, as well as the instruments that commonly make up a calypso band. They should also understand that calypso music typically contains social commentary and can have nonsense lyrics (bracket) or serious lyrics (ballode). After completing their research on calypso music, students should determine the content of their music festival posters. Their posters should offer several different activities related to calypso music; for example, students may advertise a picong contest, a showing of the film Calypso, or steel drum lessons. After students have determined the content of their posters, they should create their designs by capturing the flavor of the calypso music festival in lettering and graphics.

Unit 8 The Soldier


Collaborative Learning: Compile a Poetry Booklet, page 20
Students should work with partners to compile booklets of verse about World War I. Students should conduct online and library research to find the poets and poems of this historical period that interest them. Based on their research findings, students should choose either chronological or thematic formats for their collections. Students should then compile their chosen poems and write introductory text (brief author biographies and poem introductions) for all poems in their collections. Finally, students should assemble their booklets by arranging the materials, adding artwork, and designing front covers.

Telephone Conversation / from Midsummer XXIII


Lifelong Learning: Present an Oral Report, page 23
Students should read through the background material presented on the Brixton riot of 1981 and should conduct research to find the causes and immediate and long-term effects of this incident. Students should discover that there were many underlying causes that served as catalysts, including Brixtons poor socioeconomic structure, high crime rate, and the idleness and frustration of its citizens due to a high unemployment rate. Students should also discover a policing initiative whose intent to curb crime had the opposite effect on the citizens of Brixton. Students should prepare oral reports of their findings and present them to their classmates.

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Exceeding the Standards: Extension Activities

BRITISH TRADITION

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