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MARCH 14-20, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
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Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Model United Nations
High school team brings
home second place. PAGE 7
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
District
to stay
within
tax cap
By KATHLEEN DUFFY
The Hopewell Sun
The Hopewell Valley Regional
School District will stay within
the 2 percent tax levy cap man-
dated by Gov. Christie for the
state, which will be a plus for
taxpayers, according to school
officials. This is the third year of
the tax cap, said business admin-
istrator Robert Colavita.
While expenditures are up 5
percent, the tax levy increase is
only up 1.3 percent, he said.
A referendum would have
been necessary had the district
gone over the mandatory limit.
Its important to note that the
district has gone to great lengths
to bring budgets below the
mandatory tax levy cap, he said
State aid has increased 24 per-
cent, he said. The budget this
year is just shy of $76 million,
with the largest part of the budg-
et going toward teachers
salaries. Homeowners in
Hopewell Township and
Hopewell Borough can expect a
6-cent tax increase, while Pen-
nington Borough residents can
anticipate a 2-cent rise, per $100
of a homes assessed value.
We have the lowest tax-levy
increase in 26 years, said super-
Children enjoy storytime
KATHLEEN DUFFY/The Sun
please see LARGEST, page 3
Local youngsters
were transfixed by an
exciting tale about
trains during story hour
at 2 p.m. on March 6 at
the Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County
Library System.
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 14-20, 2012
86 East Broad Street
Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100
www.1stconstitution.com
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Mercer County artists on
display at community college
The talents of 76 Mercer Coun-
ty artists will be on display at the
Gallery at Mercer County Com-
munity College in the exhibit,
Mercer County Artists 2012,
which runs now through April 5.
Curator/consultant Jeffrey
Wechsler juried this years exhi-
bition. Most recently,Wechsler
was senior art curator at the Jane
Voorhees Zimmerli Museum at
Rutgers University, New
Brunswick. He has selected 78
works of art 18 of which are
sculptural for this years show.
He also selected the Best in Show,
two Jurors Choice and six Honor-
able Mention awards.
According to MCCC Gallery Di-
rector and Curator Tricia Fagan,
a record-breaking 175 artists en-
tered 288 works of art for consid-
eration, making this one of the
countys most selective shows.
Gallery hours are: Tuesday, 11
a.m. to 3 p.m.; Wednesday, 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.; and
Thursday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and
3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
The exhibition is co-sponsored
by and supported through a grant
from the Mercer County Cultural
and Heritage Commission, with
funding from the New Jersey
State Council of the Arts/Depart-
ment of State, a partner of the
National Endowment for the
Arts.
For more information about
exhibits at the MCCC Gallery,
visit www.mccc.edu/gallery. Direc-
tions to the campus and a campus
map can be found at
www.mccc.edu.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
MARCH 14-20, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
WEIGHT LOSS RESULTS
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800 Bunn Drive, Suite 202, Princeton, NJ 08540
Phone (609) 683-1919 Fax (609) 430-9202
www.princetonweightlosscenter.com
intendent Thomas Smith.
Thats something were happy
about.
The levy goes from $68,085,631
this school year to $68,993,917
next year an increase of just a
little more than $900,000. Pro-
grams within the school district
will not be cut this year.
Were maintaining all levels
of programing, he said. This
will enable us to really keep all
the good things were doing.
Board president Lisa Wolff is
enthusiastic about the amount
of aid the district will get for
2012-12, as compared to prior
years.
Were not cutting any pro-
grams, she said. Thats whats
really impressive. There wont
be any increases in class sizes ei-
ther.
School facilities throughout
the district will be receiving nec-
essary upgrades, said Smith. As
part of the improvement
process, Central High School
and Hopewell Elementary
School will receive roof repairs.
Timberlane Middle School will
get a heating, ventilation and
air-conditioning unit upgrade.
We have a number of old
buildings. Some of them are
about 90 years old, Smith said.
Weve been really working to
increase their efficiency, make
sure theyre adequately main-
tained, and make improvements
where possible to decrease our
carbon footprint.
Improvements within the dis-
trict have already been in the
works. In a message to commu-
nity members posted on the dis-
tricts website on Feb. 17 regard-
ing the budget process, Smith
wrote, This year, we imple-
mented a number of improve-
ments throughout the district.
These include a new high school
schedule, a consistent elemen-
tary schedule, online curricu-
lum tools, common assessments
that all students take and activi-
ties to provide our exceptional
staff with the tools they need to
achieve our goals.
A tentative budget was ap-
proved on Feb. 27. Goals outlined
in the tentative budget for the
year include providing accurate
information to the public as
soon as possible, reviewing and
revising the curriculum, and of-
fering opportunities for input
from the community.
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LARGEST
Continued from page 1
Largest part of budget goes
toward teachers salaries
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4 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 14-20, 2012
This spring, Explorations, sen-
ior daytime learning experiences,
welcomes back two favorites, Sue
Ewarts Basic Drawing & Water
Colors, and Larry Mansiers
Enjoying Shakespeare, as well
as introducing two new courses,
Jack Abrams Magic of Word &
Music: Great American Song-
book and Bill Guthries Science
and Religion: Experiencing a Full
Rich Life.
All courses begin the week of
April 16. A cut off date is set for
April 11. Classes are open to all
senior citizens, with preference
given to Hopewell Valley resi-
dents. Fees are $30 for one course;
$20 for each additional course.
Full descriptions and a simpli-
fied registration form are avail-
able online at www.hvseniors.org.
Explorations brings back favorites
Established 1998
MEMBER, AMERICAN MONTESSORI SOCIETY
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Special Events Academic Enrichment
Kindergarten Program Soccer and more!
Montgomery (609) 252-9696 www.NHMontessori.org
Route 518, Skillman - 1/2 mile from Route 206
Minutes from Hopewell, Pennington and Princeton
Retired Bishop John C. Reiss,
who served as the eighth bishop
of the Diocese of Trenton, died
Sunday, March 4, at Morris Hall
in Lawrenceville, at age 89. Reiss
held the distinction of being the
only priest born in the Trenton
Diocese to serve as both an auxil-
iary bishop and then bishop in
his home diocese.
All funeral ceremonies were to
be held at St. Mary of the As-
sumption Cathedral, Trenton.
Reiss was born on May 13, 1922,
in Red Bank, one of 11 children of
Alfred and Sophia Telljohann
Reiss. Of his five brothers and
five sisters, one sister also pur-
sued a vocation to religious life as
a Sister of Mercy.
The future bishop studied two
years for the priesthood in The
Catholic University of America,
Washington, D.C., entering Im-
maculate Conception Seminary,
Darlington, in 1941. His teacher in
dogmatic theology at the univer-
sity was Msgr. George W. Ahr
who, several years later, became
the seventh Bishop of Trenton.
Reiss was ordained a priest
May 31, 1947, in old St. Marys
Cathedral, Trenton, by Bishop
William A. Griffin. The newly or-
dained Reiss first assignment
was as curate in Sacred Heart
Parish, Trenton, where one of his
duties was ministering to in-
mates in Trenton State Prison.
In April 1949, he was trans-
ferred to Holy Spirit Parish,
Perth Amboy, and, later, to St. An-
thony Parish, Trenton.
Reiss returned to Catholic Uni-
versity in 1950 to earn a doctoral
degree in canon law. Three years
later, in 1953, he was appointed
secretary to Bishop George W.
Ahr and master of ceremonies, a
position he held for the next 10
years.
In 1962, Reiss was named ad-
ministrator of St. Francis of As-
sisium Parish, Trenton, before
being named pastor in 1965.
In 1963, Reiss was named Offi-
cialis of the Diocesan Tribunal.
In October of that year, Pope Paul
VI named him a monsignor.
On Oct. 25, 1967, Reiss was ap-
pointed auxiliary bishop of the
Diocese of Trenton by Pope Paul
VI. He was consecrated a bishop
Dec. 12, 1967, in St. Mary of the
Assumption Cathedral by Ahr.
On Feb. 5, 1969, Reiss was trans-
ferred from pastor of St. Francis
Parish, Trenton, to pastor of Sa-
cred Heart Parish, South Plain-
field. At the same time, he was
named episcopal vicar for Mid-
dlesex County and vicar general
of the diocese in charge of spiri-
tual matters and continued as Of-
ficialis of the diocese.
For the next 11 years, Reiss as-
sisted Ahr in Episcopal ceremonies
and by administering with confir-
mation in ceremonies throughout
the eight-county diocese.
In 1980, Pope John Paul II ap-
pointed Reiss the eighth bishop of
Trenton, succeeding Ahr, who
headed the diocese for 30 years.
Reiss was installed as April
22,1980, taking as his motto the
words of his patron, St. John the
Evangelist, found in the apostles
first epistle, Let Us Love One An-
other.
In 1982, Reiss ordained Bishop
Edward U. Kmiec as auxiliary
bishop of Trenton. Ten years
later, he congratulated Kmiec on
his appointment as the bishop of
Nashville, Tenn.
One of the first major events
for Reiss came a year after his in-
stallation, when he led the cele-
bration of the 100th anniversary
of the establishment of the Dio-
cese of Trenton, followed soon
after, on Nov. 24, 1981, by the divi-
sion of the diocese upon the es-
tablishment of the Diocese of the
Metuchen by Pope John Paul II.
The new diocese would be com-
prised of Middlesex, Somerset,
Hunterdon and Warren counties.
After reaching the mandatory
retirement age of 75, Reiss re-
signed as bishop of Trenton on
June 30, 1997, and was succeeded
by Bishop John M. Smith, who
had been bishop of the Diocese of
Pensacola-Tallahassee, Fla.
MARCH 14-20, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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Now Enrolling for the
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OPEN HOUSE
March 24th

10am-12pm
Blawenburg Village School
424 Route 518 Blawenburg, NJ
(609) 466-6600 blawenburgvillageschool.com
Less than 10 minutes from Hopewell!
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
zaco reiiiicroi rob - reiiiicroi, iJ
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Longtime bishop dies at age 89
letters to the editor
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 14-20, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
KATHLEEN DUFFY
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
F
or a state and nation that have
suffered through devastating
economic times, every scrap of
good news is welcomed. Last week, we
received some good news.
The governors office announced
that, according to data tracked by Site
Selection magazine, the number of
new and expanded corporate facilities
in the state jumped last year. Jumped
quite a bit, in fact.
The data showed that 76 projects
were recorded in 2011, compared to
only 23 in 2010.
On top of that, the governors office
cited Rutgers University economist
Joseph Senecas findings that the state
added about 60,000 new private jobs
over the past two years.
That the news was released from the
governors office means that, of
course, the governor is taking a lot of
credit for these accomplishments. And
maybe he should. Love him or hate
him, Christie has made difficult deci-
sions regarding taxation and spend-
ing. Regardless of whether this boost
in economic activity is a direct result
of those decisions or mere coinci-
dence, theres no denying that the
economy is looking up.
Of particular note are the qualifica-
tions of what a new and expanded
corporate facility actually is. It is a
project that must create at least 50 full-
time regular jobs. It must involve at
least 20,000 new square-feet or involve
at least $1 million for construction,
land and building. And, retail shop-
ping and public-sector institutions do
not count.
So, those 76 projects carry some
weight. Some private-sector weight.
They are creating private-sector jobs
that will be around for awhile.
That leads to greater employment
and increased spending from the pri-
vate sector. Which, of course, spurs
the economy even more.
The state and national economies
are far from being out of the woods.
But this kind of news shows that they
are getting closer.
An improving economy?
This study suggests that indeed there is at least some good news
More jobs for New Jersey
A recent magazine study shows that
New Jersey had a banner year in 2011
when it came to attracting new and
expanded corporate facilities. That
means more jobs and a stronger
economy.
Education Foundation
working to raise iPad funds
Hopewell residents following the budget
referendums of the past several years
know that our school system has been
under significant budgetary pressure. In
these difficult times, it is the non-core as-
pects of our kids education that are typi-
cally the ones hit hardest by budgetary re-
strictions. One of those areas under pres-
sure is technology.
Many of our children are fortunate
enough to live in households where iPads,
iPods, PCs and laptops are readily avail-
able for their school projects, and some of
you probably rely on your children to teach
you how to use your phones and other
gadgets.
But not all of the children have access to
these tools at home.
Even with access at home, there are a
host of applications and uses of iPads as a
teaching tool in the classroom that cannot
be achieved without iPads in the hands of
students in the classroom.
With no room in the budgets for these
purchases, other ways must be found to
plug the gap and ensure that all of
Hopewells students have access to the
technologies that are changing the future.
We are grateful that one organization
has recognized this need and is working to
address it.
The Hopewell Valley Educational Foun-
dation has launched a drive The Power
of 100 with the goal of raising sufficient
funds to purchase a full classroom set of
iPads for each of the six schools in the
Hopewell Valley Regional School District.
To meet this goal, the drive seeks 100
donors (individuals or families) who
can make pledges of $100 or more by
March 31.
Fellow Valley businesses are also en-
couraged to become part of The Power of
100 by making a tax-deductible donation of
$250 or more. Those who can join in The
Power of 100 will have the satisfaction of
knowing that their contribution is putting
technology in the hands of students who
might otherwise be left behind.
While this campaign is seeking gifts of
$100 or more, gifts at any level are welcome
by the HVEF.
We salute the HVEF and those helping
HVEF reach this goal.
Our children will be better for it.
Hopewell Elementary School PTO
Presidents Anne Bancroft, Nancy Barich,
Donna Costanzo, Ned Fletcher, Judy Karp,
Nancy King, JoAnn Markiewicz, Janet Neal,
Jennifer Norton, Shannon Schafer and
Claire Shevlin
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
The following items can be
found on file with the Hopewell
Township Police Department:
Officer James Rosso responded
to Route 546 and Route 579 for the
report of a tractor-trailer striking
a traffic light post on Feb. 28. The
tractor-trailer drove away from
the intersection and was later
stopped on I-95 just into Pennsyl-
vania. Rosso spoke with the driv-
er, who stated that he didnt real-
ize his trailer struck the light post
while making a right turn on to
Route 546 from Route 579.
The light post shifted, but was
still functional.
The driver received a motor-ve-
hicle summons for careless driv-
ing. He also received a motor-ve-
hicle summons for a weight limit
violation since Route 579 has a 4-
ton weight limit.
These charges will be heard in
municipal court.
Detective Kevin Zorn charged
an Old Bridge man with burglary
and theft on Feb. 23 for a residen-
tial burglary which occurred on
Wilfred Avenue on Jan. 4. The
man is currently lodged at the
Hunterdon County Jail on
charges from other jurisdictions.
This case will be forwarded to the
Mercer County Prosecutors Of-
fice for review.
On Feb. 26, Officer Gerard In-
fantino stopped a car along Route
31 after a computer check re-
vealed that the registered owner
had a suspended drivers license
and two outstanding traffic war-
rants for his arrest. Officer Infan-
tino spoke with the driver and
confirmed he was the registered
owner of the vehicle. The driver
was placed under arrest and
transported to police headquar-
ters for processing. He was
charged with driving while sus-
pended and failure to inspect,
which will be heard in municipal
court.
He was released on his own re-
cognizance on the outstanding
warrants out of Greenwich and
Clinton townships.
Officer Christopher Vaccarino
investigated a car parked in the
Lukoil parking lot on Feb. 27. Vac-
carino says he observed the front
door of a car open, the headlights
dimming, an open beer can on the
dashboard and a person slumped
over the front seat of the car. Vac-
carino woke the cars occupant,
who whom he says had the odor
of alcohol on his breath. After
performing field-sobriety tests,
the Hopewell resident was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing.
He was charged with drunken
driving, refusal to submit to a
breath test, possession of an open
container of alcohol, reckless
driving and failure to produce
credentials.
He was later released to a rela-
tive, and this case will be heard in
municipal court.
Officer William Gaskill investi-
gated a car parked in front of the
Circle Cleaners on March 3.
Gaskill says he spoke with the
driver, who had the odor of alco-
hol on his breath. After perform-
ing field-sobriety tests, the Delran
resident was placed under arrest
and transported to police head-
quarters for processing. He was
charged with drunken driving
and reckless driving, and was
later released to a relative. The
case will be heard in municipal
court.
Officer Gerard Infantino
stopped a car along Route 31 after
observing it traveling at 61 mph
in a 45 mph zone on March 3. Fur-
ther investigation found the driv-
er of the car in possession of a
metal pipe containing marijuana.
A passenger was also found in
possession of a glass pipe con-
taining marijuana.
Also found in the car were bot-
tles of beer and two jugs contain-
ing orange juice and vodka.
Three men were subsequently
placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters for
processing.
One was charged with the pos-
session of marijuana (under 50
grams), possession of drug para-
phernalia, underage possession
of alcohol, speeding, open con-
tainer and possession of CDS in a
motor vehicle.
Another was charged with the
possession of marijuana (under
50 grams), possession of drug
paraphernalia, underage posses-
sion of alcohol and open contain-
er.
And a third man was charged
with the underage possession of
alcohol and open container. All
three men were later released and
their cases will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
MARCH 14-20, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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WEDNESDAY
March 14
FOR CHILDREN
St. Patricks Day Story Time: Ages
2 to 5; siblings welcome. 11 to 11:45
a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the Mer-
cer County Library System. Wear
something green! Stories, songs and
crafts. Follow the rainbow clues to
find something gold.
THURSDAY
March 15
FOR CHILDREN
St. Patricks Day Story Time: Ages
2 to 5; siblings welcome. 11 to 11:45
a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the Mer-
cer County Library System. Wear
something green! Stories, songs and
crafts. Follow the rainbow clues to
find something gold.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Singing, dancing ad rhymes.
Play with musical instruments, pup-
pets, parachutes and more.
FRIDAY
March 16
FOR CHILDREN
Pat McKinleys Toddler Tunes:
Ages newborn to 5. 10:30 to 11 a.m.
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Sing and
dance to classic childrens songs
played on live guitar. Parental super-
vision recommended.
Open Play: All ages welcome; adult
supervision required. 11 a.m. to noon
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Come to the
childrens activity room for open
play time. Toys and coloring supplies
will be available. No registration
required.
SATURDAY
March 17
FOR CHILDREN
St. Patricks Day Story Time: Ages
2 to 5; siblings welcome. 10:30 to
11:15 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System. Chil-
dren can come wearing something
green! Stories, songs and crafts.
Afterward, children can follow the
rainbow of clues to find something
gold.
MONDAY
March 19
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Recreation
Advisory Committee meeting: 7
p.m. at the Hopewell Municipal Build-
ing, 201 Washington Crossing-Pen-
nington Road. Open to the public.
Visit www.hopewelltwp.org to con-
firm time or for more information.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat or
large towel. Registration required;
call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn this
ancient art to promote good health
and relaxation.
FOR CHILDREN
Kids Open Craft: All ages. 4 to 5:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the Mer-
cer County Library System. Staff
member will assist kids with the
craft of the week. Parent supervi-
sion required.
TUESDAY
March 20
FOR ALL
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Participants should
bring a yoga mat or a large towel.
Registration required. To register,
call (609) 737-2610.
Hopewell Township Environmental
Commission meeting: 7:30 or 8
p.m. at the Hopewell Township
Municipal Building, 201 Washington
Crossing-Pennington Road the third
Tuesday of every month. Verify time
find more information at
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Historic Preservation Commission
meeting: 7:30 p.m. in the Hopewell
Township Main Administration
Building the third Tuesday of the
month. For more information and to
verify meeting time, visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
FOR CHILDREN
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System. A
great way to introduce your child to
library story times and reading. Age-
appropriate books will be shared.
Songs, nursery rhymes, puppets and
felt board figures create a rich
audio-visual and social experience
for participants. Adult supervision
required. No registration is need-
ed.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Stories, songs and
crafts.
calendar PAGE 8 MARCH 14-20, 2012
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D E S I G N S
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
Church
collecting
for sale
Calvary Baptist Church,
Hopewell, will again be holding
its renowned rummage sale May
31 to June 2.
At this point, the church is
only collecting large items such
as furniture.
If you have such items to do-
nate and need them picked up,
please call or email the church at
(609) 466-1880 or email hcbco@ver
izon.net. The church will let
everyone know when it will begin
to accept other donations.
Poison Control Center
(800) 222-1222
PSA
Hopewell Valley Central High
Schools Model United Nations
team took second place overall at
the Philadelphia Model United
Nations 2012 last month.
The team of 26 CHS students
got the Outstanding Large Dele-
gation award at the event, which
put them in second place overall
at the competition. It was their
best showing in the six years
since teacher Paul Tkacs began
advising the club.
Every student on this team
had a positive impact in their
committees, said Tkacs, who
teaches world history and Ad-
vanced Placement government. I
am extremely proud of their ef-
forts and dedication to raising
global awareness.
At the competition, which
drew 17 schools from around the
region, CHS large group broke
into two-person teams who then
represented one of two nations
Liberia and Rwanda and argued
a point of view representing
those countries on various UN
committees.
The presentations combined
research, analysis and public
speaking skills at the students
sought to accurately and persua-
sively present their countries
views in solving world problems.
In addition to the overall
award, eight two-person teams
from CHS took special honors.
They included:
Seniors Nicole Gifford and
Scott Morrison-Melmon (Liberia)
Best position paper on the Com-
mittee on Crime Prevention and
Criminal Justice.
Senior Sarah Mitrano and
sophomore Haley Morin (Rwan-
da) Best Delegation in the UN
Development Programme Com-
mittee.
Senior Steve Millner and jun-
ior Nick Lewis (Liberia) Best
Delegation in the World Health
Organization Committee.
Juniors Erich Heinzel and Dan
Shaikh (Rwanda) Distinguished
Delegation in the Department for
Peacekeeping Operations.
The Philadelphia competition
was sponsored by the Institute for
Domestic and International Af-
fairs, which is based at Rutgers
University. In May, the Model UN
Club hopes to host its own such
competition at Central High
School.
High schools Model United Nations
team takes second place
MARCH 14-20, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Special to The Sun
Shown are members of the Hopewell Valley Central High Schools
Model United Nations team, which took second place at the Philadel-
phia Model United Nations 2012 last month.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
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CLEANING
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
MARCH 14-20, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
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