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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) - Topic Overview

What is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Polycystic ovary syndrome (say "pah-lee-SIS-tik OH-vuh-ree SIN-drohm") is a problem in which a womans hormones are out of balance. It can cause problems with your periods and make it difficult to getpregnant. PCOS may also cause unwanted changes in the way you look. If it is not treated, over time it can lead to serious health problems, such as diabetes andheart disease. Polycystic ovary syndrome (or PCOS) is common, affecting as many as 1 out of 15 women. Often the symptoms begin in the teen years. Treatment can help control the symptoms and prevent long-term problems. What are hormones, and what happens in PCOS? Hormones are chemical messengers that trigger many different processes, including growth and energy production. Often, the job of one hormone is to signal the release of another hormone. For reasons that are not well understood, in PCOS the hormones get out of balance. One hormone change triggers another, which changes another. For example: The sex hormones get out of balance. Normally, the ovaries make a tiny amount of male sex hormones (androgens). In PCOS, they start making slightly more androgens. This may cause you to stop ovulating, get acne, and grow extra facial and body hair. The body may have a problem using insulin, called insulin resistance. When the body doesn't use insulin well, blood sugar levels go up. Over time, this increases your chance of getting diabetes. What are the symptoms? Symptoms tend to be mild at first. You may have only a few symptoms or a lot of them. The most common symptoms are: Acne. Weight gain and trouble losing weight. Extra hair on the face and body. Often women get thicker and darker facial hair and more hair on the chest, belly, and back. Thinning hair on the scalp. Irregular periods. Often women with PCOS have fewer than nine periods a year. Some women have no periods. Others have very heavy bleeding. Fertility problems. Many women who have PCOS have trouble getting pregnant (infertility). Depression. Most women with PCOS grow many small cysts on their ovaries. That is why it is called polycystic ovary syndrome. The cysts are not harmful but lead to hormone imbalances. What causes PCOS? The symptoms of PCOS are caused by changes in hormone levels. There may be one or more causes for the hormone level changes. PCOS seems to run in families, so your chance of having it is higher if other women in your family have PCOS, irregular periods, or diabetes. PCOS can be passed down from either your mother's or father's side. How is PCOS diagnosed? To diagnose PCOS, the doctor will: Ask questions about your past health, symptoms, and menstrual cycles.

Do a physical exam to look for signs of PCOS, such as extra body hair and high blood pressure. The doctor will also check your height and weight to see if you have a healthy body mass index (BMI). Do a number of lab tests to check your blood sugar, insulin, and other hormone levels. Hormone tests can help rule out thyroid or other gland problems that could cause similar symptoms.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) - Topic Overview


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You may also have a pelvic ultrasound to look for cysts on your ovaries. Your doctor may be able to tell you that you have PCOS without an ultrasound, but this test will help him or her rule out other problems. How is it treated? Regular exercise, healthy foods, and weight control are key treatments for PCOS. Medicines to balance hormones may also be used. Getting treatment can reduce unpleasant symptoms and help prevent longterm health problems. The first step in managing PCOS is to get regular exercise and eat heart-healthy foods. This can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol and reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease. It can also help you lose weight if you need to. Try to fit in moderate activity and/or vigorous activity on a regular basis. Walking is a great exercise that most people can do. Eat a heart-healthy diet. In general, this diet has lots of vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans, and whole grains. It also limits foods that are high in saturated fat, such as meats, cheeses, and fried foods. If you have blood sugar problems, try to eat about the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal. A registered dietitian can help you make a meal plan. Most women who have PCOS can benefit from losing weight. Even losing 10 lb (4.5 kg) may help get your hormones in balance and regulate your menstrual cycle. PCOS can make it hard to lose weight, so work with your doctor to make a plan that can help you succeed. If you smoke, consider quitting. Women who smoke have higher androgen levels that may contribute to PCOS symptoms.1Smoking also increases the risk for heart disease. A doctor may also prescribe medicines, such as: Birth control pills. They can help your periods be regular and can reduce symptoms such as excess facial hair and acne. An androgen-lowering medicine,spironolactone, may be used with birth control pills to help reduce symptoms even more. These medicines are not used if you are trying to get pregnant. A diabetes medicine called metformin. It can help restore regular menstrual cycles and fertility. Fertility medicines, if you are trying to get pregnant. It is important to see your doctor for follow-up to make sure treatment is working and to adjust it if needed. You may also need regular tests to check for diabetes,high blood pressure, and other possible problems. It may take a while for treatments to help with symptoms such as facial hair or acne. In the meantime: Over-the-counter or prescription acne medicines may help with skin problems. Waxing, tweezing, and shaving are easy ways to get rid of unwanted hair. Electrolysis or laser treatments can permanently remove the hair but are more expensive. Your doctor can also prescribe a skin cream that slows hair growth for as long as you use it regularly.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) - Topic Overview


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You may also have a pelvic ultrasound to look for cysts on your ovaries. Your doctor may be able to tell you that you have PCOS without an ultrasound, but this test will help him or her rule out other problems. How is it treated? Regular exercise, healthy foods, and weight control are key treatments for PCOS. Medicines to balance hormones may also be used. Getting treatment can reduce unpleasant symptoms and help prevent longterm health problems. The first step in managing PCOS is to get regular exercise and eat heart-healthy foods. This can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol and reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease. It can also help you lose weight if you need to. Try to fit in moderate activity and/or vigorous activity on a regular basis. Walking is a great exercise that most people can do. Eat a heart-healthy diet. In general, this diet has lots of vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans, and whole grains. It also limits foods that are high in saturated fat, such as meats, cheeses, and fried foods. If you have blood sugar problems, try to eat about the same amount of carbohydrate at each meal. A registered dietitian can help you make a meal plan. Most women who have PCOS can benefit from losing weight. Even losing 10 lb (4.5 kg) may help get your hormones in balance and regulate your menstrual cycle. PCOS can make it hard to lose weight, so work with your doctor to make a plan that can help you succeed. If you smoke, consider quitting. Women who smoke have higher androgen levels that may contribute to PCOS symptoms.1Smoking also increases the risk for heart disease. A doctor may also prescribe medicines, such as: Birth control pills. They can help your periods be regular and can reduce symptoms such as excess facial hair and acne. An androgen-lowering medicine,spironolactone, may be used with birth control pills to help reduce symptoms even more. These medicines are not used if you are trying to get pregnant. A diabetes medicine called metformin. It can help restore regular menstrual cycles and fertility. Fertility medicines, if you are trying to get pregnant. It is important to see your doctor for follow-up to make sure treatment is working and to adjust it if needed. You may also need regular tests to check for diabetes,high blood pressure, and other possible problems. It may take a while for treatments to help with symptoms such as facial hair or acne. In the meantime: Over-the-counter or prescription acne medicines may help with skin problems. Waxing, tweezing, and shaving are easy ways to get rid of unwanted hair. Electrolysis or laser treatments can permanently remove the hair but are more expensive. Your doctor can also prescribe a skin cream that slows hair growth for as long as you use it regularly.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) - Topic Overview


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It can be hard to deal with having PCOS. If you are feeling sad or depressed, it may help to talk to a counselor or to other women who have PCOS. Ask your doctor about local support groups, or look for an online group. It can make a big difference to know that you are not alone. Frequently Asked Questions Learnin What is PCOS? g about What causes PCOS? PCOS: What are the symptoms of PCOS?

What increases my risk for PCOS? Who is affected by PCOS? When do I need to see a doctor? Are there other medical conditions that have symptoms similar to PCOS?

Being How is PCOS diagnosed? diagno What tests will I need? sed: Do I need to see a specialist? Getting What treatment will I need? treatme Do I have different choices for treatment? nt: Will I need to take medicines? Will I need surgery? What treatments are available for excess hair growth? What treatments are available for infertility? Ongoin How will my fertility be affected? g Will I have heart problems from PCOS? concer Will I get diabetes? ns: Living What follow-up will I need? with PCOS:

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) fact sheet



What is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? How many women have PCOS? What causes PCOS? What are the symptoms of PCOS? Why do women with PCOS have trouble with their menstrual cycle and fertility? Does PCOS change at menopause? How do I know if I have PCOS? How is PCOS treated? How does PCOS affect a woman while pregnant? Does PCOS put women at risk for other health problems? I have PCOS. What can I do to prevent complications? How can I cope with the emotional effects of PCOS? More information on polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

What is polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)?

Polycystic (pah-lee-SIS-tik) ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a health problem that can affect a woman's:

Menstrual cycle Ability to have children Hormones Heart Blood vessels Appearance

With PCOS, women typically have:

High levels of androgens (AN-druh-junz). These are sometimes called male hormones, though females also make them. Missed or irregular periods (monthly bleeding) Many small cysts (sists) (fluid-filled sacs) in their ovaries
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How many women have PCOS?


Between 1 in 10 and 1 in 20 women of childbearing age has PCOS. As many as 5 million women in the United States may be affected. It can occur in girls as young as 11 years old.
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What causes PCOS?


The cause of PCOS is unknown. But most experts think that several factors, including genetics, could play a role. Women with PCOS are more likely to have a mother or sister with PCOS. A main underlying problem with PCOS is a hormonal imbalance. In women with PCOS, the ovaries make more androgens than normal. Androgens are male hormones that females also make. High levels of these hormones affect the development and release of eggs during ovulation. Researchers also think insulin may be linked to PCOS. Insulin is a hormone that controls the change of sugar, starches, and other food into energy for the body to use or store. Many

women with PCOS have too much insulin in their bodies because they have problems using it. Excess insulin appears to increase production of androgen. High androgen levels can lead to:

Acne Excessive hair growth Weight gain Problems with ovulation


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What are the symptoms of PCOS?


The symptoms of PCOS can vary from woman to woman. Some of the symptoms of PCOS include:

Infertility (not able to get pregnant) because of not ovulating. In fact, PCOS is the most common cause of female infertility. Infrequent, absent, and/or irregular menstrual periods Hirsutism (HER-suh-tiz-um) increased hair growth on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes Cysts on the ovaries Acne, oily skin, or dandruff Weight gain or obesity, usually with extra weight around the waist Male-pattern baldness or thinning hair Patches of skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs that are thick and dark brown or black Skin tags excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area Pelvic pain Anxiety or depression Sleep apnea when breathing stops for short periods of time while asleep
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Why do women with PCOS have trouble with their menstrual cycle and fertility?

The ovaries, where a womans eggs are produced, have tiny fluid-filled sacs called follicles or cysts. As the egg grows, the follicle builds up fluid. When the egg matures, the follicle breaks open, the egg is released, and the egg travels through the fallopian tube to the uterus (womb) for fertilization. This is called ovulation. In women with PCOS, the ovary doesn't make all of the hormones it needs for an egg to fully mature. The follicles may start to grow and build up fluid but ovulation does not occur. Instead, some follicles may remain as cysts. For these reasons, ovulation does not occur and the hormone progesterone is not made. Without progesterone, a woman's menstrual cycle is irregular or absent. Plus, the ovaries make male hormones, which also prevent ovulation. Normal ovary and polycystic ovary

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Does PCOS change at menopause?


Yes and no. PCOS affects many systems in the body. So, many symptoms may persist even though ovarian function and hormone levels change as a woman nears menopause. For instance, excessive hair growth continues, and male-pattern baldness or thinning hair gets worse after menopause. Also, the risks of complications (health problems) from PCOS, such as heart attack, stroke, and diabetes, increase as a woman gets older.
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How do I know if I have PCOS?


There is no single test to diagnose PCOS. Your doctor will take the following steps to find out

if you have PCOS or if something else is causing your symptoms. Medical history. Your doctor will ask about your menstrual periods, weight changes, and other symptoms. Physical exam. Your doctor will want to measure your blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist size. He or she also will check the areas of increased hair growth. You should try to allow the natural hair to grow for a few days before the visit. Pelvic exam. Your doctor might want to check to see if your ovaries are enlarged or swollen by the increased number of small cysts. Blood tests. Your doctor may check the androgen hormone and glucose (sugar) levels in your blood. Vaginal ultrasound (sonogram). Your doctor may perform a test that uses sound waves to take pictures of the pelvic area. It might be used to examine your ovaries for cysts and check the endometrium (en-do-MEE-tree-uhm) (lining of the womb). This lining may become thicker if your periods are not regular.
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How is PCOS treated?


Because there is no cure for PCOS, it needs to be managed to prevent problems. Treatment goals are based on your symptoms, whether or not you want to become pregnant, and lowering your chances of getting heart disease and diabetes. Many women will need a combination of treatments to meet these goals. Some treatments for PCOS include: Lifestyle modification. Many women with PCOS are overweight or obese, which can cause health problems. You can help manage your PCOS by eating healthy and exercising to keep your weight at a healthy level. Healthy eating tips include:

Limiting processed foods and foods with added sugars Adding more whole-grain products, fruits, vegetables, and lean meats to your diet

This helps to lower blood glucose (sugar) levels, improve the body's use of insulin, and normalize hormone levels in your body. Even a 10 percent loss in body weight can restore a normal period and make your cycle more regular. Birth control pills. For women who don't want to get pregnant, birth control pills can:

Control menstrual cycles

Reduce male hormone levels Help to clear acne

Keep in mind that the menstrual cycle will become abnormal again if the pill is stopped. Women may also think about taking a pill that only has progesterone (proh-JES-tuh-rohn), like Provera, to control the menstrual cycle and reduce the risk of endometrial cancer (See Does PCOS put women at risk for other health problems?). But, progesterone alone does not help reduce acne and hair growth. Diabetes medications. The medicine metformin (Glucophage) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. It has also been found to help with PCOS symptoms, though it isnt approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this use. Metformin affects the way insulin controls blood glucose (sugar) and lowers testosterone production. It slows the growth of abnormal hair and, after a few months of use, may help ovulation to return. Recent research has shown metformin to have other positive effects, such as decreased body mass and improved cholesterol levels. Metformin will not cause a person to become diabetic. Fertility medications. Lack of ovulation is usually the reason for fertility problems in women with PCOS. Several medications that stimulate ovulation can help women with PCOS become pregnant. Even so, other reasons for infertility in both the woman and man should be ruled out before fertility medications are used. Also, some fertility medications increase the risk for multiple births (twins, triplets). Treatment options include:

Clomiphene (KLOHM-uh-feen) (Clomid, Serophene) the first choice therapy to stimulate ovulation for most patients. Metformin taken with clomiphene may be tried if clomiphene alone fails. The combination may help women with PCOS ovulate on lower doses of medication. Gonadotropins (goe-NAD-oh-troe-pins) given as shots, but are more expensive and raise the risk of multiple births compared to clomiphene.

Another option is in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF offers the best chance of becoming pregnant in any given cycle. It also gives doctors better control over the chance of multiple births. But, IVF is very costly. Surgery. "Ovarian drilling" is a surgery that may increase the chance of ovulation. Its sometimes used when a woman does not respond to fertility medicines. The doctor makes a very small cut above or below the navel (belly button) and inserts a small tool that acts like a telescope into the abdomen (stomach). This is called laparoscopy (lap-uh-RAHS-kuh-pee). The doctor then punctures the ovary with a small needle carrying an electric current to destroy a small portion of the ovary. This procedure carries a risk of developing scar tissue on the ovary. This surgery can lower male hormone levels and help with ovulation. But, these effects may only last a few months. This treatment doesn't help with loss of scalp hair or increased hair growth on other parts of the body.

Medicine for increased hair growth or extra male hormones. Medicines called antiandrogens may reduce hair growth and clear acne. Spironolactone (speer-on-oh-LAK-tone) (Aldactone), first used to treat high blood pressure, has been shown to reduce the impact of male hormones on hair growth in women. Finasteride (fin-AST-uhr-yd) (Propecia), a medicine taken by men for hair loss, has the same effect. Anti-androgens are often combined with birth control pills. These medications should not be taken if you are trying to become pregnant. Before taking Aldactone, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Do not breastfeed while taking this medicine. Women who may become pregnant should not handle Propecia. Other options include:

Vaniqa (van-ik-uh) cream to reduce facial hair Laser hair removal or electrolysis to remove hair Hormonal treatment to keep new hair from growing

Other treatments. Some research has shown that bariatric (weight loss) surgery may be effective in resolving PCOS in morbidly obese women. Morbid obesity means having a BMI of more than 40, or a BMI of 35 to 40 with an obesity-related disease. The drug troglitazone (troh-GLIT-uh-zohn) was shown to help women with PCOS. But, it was taken off the market because it caused liver problems. Similar drugs without the same side effect are being tested in small trials. Researchers continue to search for new ways to treat PCOS. To learn more about current PCOS treatment studies, visitClinicalTrials.gov part in a clinical trial might be right for you.
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How does PCOS affect a woman while pregnant?


Women with PCOS appear to have higher rates of:

Miscarriage Gestational diabetes Pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia) Premature delivery

Babies born to women with PCOS have a higher risk of spending time in a neonatal intensive care unit or of dying before, during, or shortly after birth. Most of the time, these problems occur in multiple-birth babies (twins, triplets).

Researchers are studying whether the diabetes medicine metformin can prevent or reduce the chances of having problems while pregnant. Metformin also lowers male hormone levels and limits weight gain in women who are obese when they get pregnant. Metformin is an FDA pregnancy category B drug. It does not appear to cause major birth defects or other problems in pregnant women. But, there have only been a few studies of metformin use in pregnant women to confirm its safety. Talk to your doctor about taking metformin if you are pregnant or are trying to become pregnant. Also, metformin is passed through breastmilk. Talk with your doctor about metformin use if you are a nursing mother.
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Does PCOS put women at risk for other health problems?


Women with PCOS have greater chances of developing several serious health conditions, including life-threatening diseases. Recent studies found that:

More than 50 percent of women with PCOS will have diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance) before the age of 40. The risk of heart attack is 4 to 7 times higher in women with PCOS than women of the same age without PCOS. Women with PCOS are at greater risk of having high blood pressure. Women with PCOS have high levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol and low levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. Women with PCOS can develop sleep apnea. This is when breathing stops for short periods of time during sleep.

Women with PCOS may also develop anxiety and depression. It is important to talk to your doctor about treatment for these mental health conditions. Women with PCOS are also at risk for endometrial cancer. Irregular menstrual periods and the lack of ovulation cause women to produce the hormone estrogen, but not the hormone progesterone. Progesterone causes the endometrium (lining of the womb) to shed each month as a menstrual period. Without progesterone, the endometrium becomes thick, which can cause heavy or irregular bleeding. Over time, this can lead to endometrial hyperplasia, when the lining grows too much, and cancer.
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I have PCOS. What can I do to prevent complications?

If you have PCOS, get your symptoms under control at an earlier age to help reduce your chances of having complications like diabetes and heart disease. Talk to your doctor about treating all your symptoms, rather than focusing on just one aspect of your PCOS, such as problems getting pregnant. Also, talk to your doctor about getting tested for diabetes regularly. Other steps you can take to lower your chances of health problems include:

Eating right Exercising Not smoking


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How can I cope with the emotional effects of PCOS?


Having PCOS can be difficult. You may feel:

Embarrassed by your appearance Worried about being able to get pregnant Depressed

Getting treatment for PCOS can help with these concerns and help boost your self-esteem. You may also want to look for support groups in your area or online to help you deal with the emotional effects of PCOS. You are not alone and there are resources available for women with PCOS.

Reverse PCOS - Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome


infertility weight gain skin problems sleep apnea fatigue excess facial or body hair hormone imbalance

If you are suffering from any of these PCOS symptoms or conditions we want you to know we are here to help you. There is a solution.

Take These Steps to PCOS Health

The staff at Insulite Laboratories is all too aware of the devastating effects Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome can have on your life and your moods. We know firsthand the frustration of being misdiagnosed and the disappointment of not being able to find the right answers. You will find the answers and solution you seek here - from the leader in providing comprehensive systems and support to reverse PCOS.

The 4 colored links above are a "fast track" view of PCOS and how our system works to reverse this devastating condition. If you're not sure if you have PCOS, please click the link to "Take the Test," or you can go directly to "How the System Works for You." For a more detailed description about PCOS, please continue to read below on this page. Here's what other women have discovered about transforming their health.

Real Women, Real Stories


"I didn't think I could ever conceive on my own. We are delighted to be having our third child and I am overjoyed that I know exactly how to get healthy through your system, diet and exercise!" -- Stacie, Florida

"In doing research I came upon the Insulite systems - that's when my entire life changed. I have lost weight, fewer moods swings. I now have a regular period. I almost held a party when I started having a regular period. I really feel great. It took me ten (10) years to get the help I needed . Thanks to Insulite Labs and the encouraging stories. A special thanks to Dr. Heather DeLuca." - - NG, Trinidad & Tobago

"I have energy, I am not moody, I feel great...My facial hair has slowed down in growth. That alone is something to celebrate. I also suffer from male pattern baldness, I can see fine hairs in only one week. With a face full of tears, thank you and everyone who works hard every day at Insulite Labs." -- Cathiya Roberts, Brooklyn, NY More Stories

We built this website and all its features for women like us. First: We want you to have all the knowledge necessary to understand the underlying causes of your PCOS. At Insulite laboratories we believe "knowledge is power". It has been shown the more you know about your Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and the effects it is having on your body and emotions the better equipped you will be to heal your condition. Second: In response to the demand for effective PCOS solutions Insulite Labs has developed what experts say is the most effective and complete system designed to reverse the underlying cause of PCOS, Insulin Resistance. Below and at testimonials please see what women like you, are saying about how this extraordinary system helped them transform their health.

Perhaps you have already been diagnosed with PCOS? Polycystic ovarian syndrome - also called polycystic ovarian disease and polycystic ovary disease - has many and varying symptoms. Do you believe you may have this condition? Whether you've been diagnosed with PCOS, or you aren't sure, we're so glad you've found us. We are here to help. If you're not sure, please click here to take the test. Insulite Laboratories understands the physical and psychological discomfort caused by polycystic ovaries. Our web site is dedicated to helping you better understand your condition and the specific steps needed to better manage your condition, to prevent it becoming worse and even reverse your symptoms entirely. We recommend you read the whole of this page to gain a better understanding of your condition. But we know people lead busy lives which make enormous demands on their time. So if you would like to quickly learn about how the Insulite PCOS System could help you feel better, please click here now.

How to Receive Free Health Consultations About Your PCOS As part of our pledge to do all we can to improve your health, we offer free consultations with our Consulting and Advisory teams about any issues you might have concerning your condition. You can take advantage of a free consultation without committing to start the multi-level Insulite System. But if you do begin the system, you will enjoy the reassurance of knowing you can continue to contact our experts for free health advice. The information on this site is not about fad diets, magic pills or fantasy claims to transform the way you look and feel overnight. It is about accurate scientific information that can help you to effectively change the way your body responds to food and reverse an underlying cause of PCOS, namely a condition called Insulin Resistance.

Learn about a system designed to reverse PCOS

Discover More About Your Condition Would you like to learn definitively why and how you can finally achieve your goals of restoring your health by better managing or reversing PCOS via weight loss? Overweight women are prone to Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome but they do not have a monopoly of this distressing condition. Females of normal weight can develop Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and so, too, can lean women. Insulite Laboratories firmly believes that information is power when it comes to better managing or reversing your condition. Please understand why we are different. Insulite Laboratories is a caring organization that puts its clients first, ahead of profit. We care deeply about you and we are committed to helping you restore your health. To learn about a system that is specifically designed to help you either better manage your PCOS to prevent it becoming worse or reverse your disorder by making your polycystic ovaries a thing of the past. Click Here.

INSULIN RESISTANCE IS A ROOT CAUSE OF PCOS


Are you one of the millions of women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome who, no matter what they've tried, has failed to better manage or reverse the symptoms of this condition? It may not be due to lack of willpower. Instead, you could be Insulin Resistant, a root cause of PCOS. Scientists at the National Institutes of Health, Stanford University and other research centers have clearly identified the existence and effects of Insulin Resistance, a biochemical condition that can cause excessive weight gain and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. If you are among the 65% of the overweight population with Insulin Resistance, your ability to better manage or reverse your PCOS and lose weight may not have been within your control - until now. This breakthrough in understanding the body's biochemistry remains relatively unknown, even though Insulin Resistance has reached epidemic proportions. Your doctor may not have explained the crucial link between Insulin Resistance, weight gain and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. You need to understand this link in order to better manage or reverse your condition. The Insulite PCOS System is the first scientifically-designed method that can help you do this by reversing Insulin Resistance.

PCOS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE


Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is a hormonal imbalance linked to the way the body processes insulin after it has been produced by the pancreas to regulate blood sugar (glucose). Insulin Resistance, an underlying cause of PCOS, has many factors that contribute to its presence in the body. In essence, our environment and lifestyles have evolved too rapidly for our bodies to keep pace. We are still genetically "wired" to thrive on the entrenched habits of our ancestors, who

consumed different, nutrient-rich foods and a diet low in carbohydrates and who sustained greater levels of movement and exercise. Some people may also have a genetic predisposition to Insulin Resistance, while others develop the condition through high stress and unhealthy lifestyles. Over time, the above factors have damaged the complex ability of the body's cells to properly utilize insulin to convert glucose to energy. This process creates Insulin Resistance.

Insulin Resistance vastly reduces the insulin sensitivity of cells, which impairs the processing of glucose through the cell wall for conversion to energy. As a result, glucose remains in the blood stream, causing elevated levels of blood sugar, which are sent to the liver. Once there, the sugar is converted into fat and stored via the blood stream throughout the body. This process can lead to weight gain and obesity, key factors in creating PCOS, which is also referred to as Polycystic Ovarian Disease or PCOD. Insulin Resistance can also cause PCOS is by raising insulin levels in the blood stream. Unhealthy lifestyles and genetic conditions can lead to the pancreas overproducing insulin. This excess insulin stimulates the ovaries to produce large amounts of the male hormone testosterone, which may prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg each month, thus causing infertility. High levels of insulin also increase the conversion of androgens (male hormones) to estrogens (female hormones), upsetting a delicate balance between the two and having a direct effect on weight gain and the formation of cystic follicles or ovarian cysts. To learn about a system that can help restore your health, Click Here.

SYMPTOMS OF PCOS
The symptoms of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome vary widely from woman to woman. In addition to

polycystic ovaries, they can also include: irregular or completely absent periods, Hirsutism (excessive facial or body hair), Alopecia (male pattern hair loss), obesity, acne, skin tags (raisinlike growths on the skin), Acanthosis Nigricans (brown skin patches), exhaustion or lack of mental alertness and decreased sex drive. Because the symptoms vary so widely and not all women display all the symptoms, doctors very often misdiagnose PCOS. This became an issue of critical concern after a study in 2000 found that women suffering from PCOS have a higher risk of coronary heart disease. Researchers discovered a link between Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and other metabolic conditions such as obesity, high blood pressure and high levels of LDL "bad" cholesterol, all of which are risk factors for coronary heart disease. Studies have also shown an increased link between PCOS and atherosclerosis, which occurs when fatty deposits called plaque cling to the interior walls of the arteries, leading to blockages that can cause heart attacks or stroke. Not only do PCOS sufferers have higher rates of plaque buildup but those over 45 have thicker deposits of plaque. Another report indicated that up to 40% of women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome have either impaired glucose tolerance or Type 2 Diabetes by the age of 40. All these findings substantially raise the bar on the seriousness of PCOS, making it even more important that doctors correctly diagnose the condition and instruct their patients about Insulin Resistance. Even the removal of the ovaries will not completely eliminate this disorder. A complete, multi-level system is needed to reverse Insulin Resistance and PCOS. THE INSULITE PCOS SYSTEM The Insulite PCOS System is the first scientifically-formulated, multi-layered plan to address the underlying cause of PCOS in order to better manage or even reverse symptoms such as polycystic ovaries. The Insulite System increases your body's capacity to allow glucose to enter your cells, reducing overall insulin load - a major contributing factor to Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. This comprehensive system supports your body's ability to balance glucose and insulin levels, thus helping you lose weight. The Insulite System also helps to better manage or reverse the symptoms of PCOS by decreasing estrogen and androgen hormones and stimulating SHBG (sex hormone-binding

globulin) to regulate ovulation which is essential if you wish to become pregnant. Your condition requires a wide range of nutrients in sufficient quantities to affect the level of health improvements you seek. Every ingredient in each of Insulite's four PCOS formulas is there as a result of our research to determine the most effective vitamins and minerals to reverse insulin resistance and the symptoms of PCOS. Insulite's nutraceutical formulas are the finest available in the marketplace and we encourage you to compare the types and volumes of nutrients competitors claim to be effective. We believe that any company representing that they can accomplish substantial physical changes in your condition with one or two pills is misleading at best. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that affects how a womans ovaries work. PCOS affects millions of women in the UK. There are three features which lead to a woman beingdiagnosed with PCOS. Even if only two of them are present, this is enough to confirm the diagnosis. The features of PCOS include: a number of cysts that develop around the edge of the ovaries (polycystic ovaries) a failure in the release of eggs from the ovaries (ovulation) a higher level of male hormones than normal, or male hormones that are more active than normal These can lead to the following symptoms: excessive body hair (hirsutism) irregular or light periods problems getting pregnant (infertility) weight gain acne hair loss from the head

Read more about the symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome.

What are polycystic ovaries?


Polycystic ovaries contain a large number of harmless cysts that are no bigger than 8mm each. Normal ovaries have only about half this number of cysts. The cysts are under-developed follicles which contain eggs that haven't developed properly. Often in PCOS, these follicles are unable to release an egg, meaning ovulation doesn't take place. Many women have polycystic ovaries without having the syndrome (without the symptoms). Some women have the syndrome, but have normal-looking ovaries on ultrasound.

Causes of polycystic ovary syndrome

The exact cause of PCOS is unknown, but it often runs in families. Women who are overweight are more at risk of developing PCOS. Many women with PCOS have a family history of diabetes and high cholesterol. It's also believed that insulin may play a role. Insulin is a hormone that controls sugar levels in the body. Many women with PCOS have too much insulin in their body, which contributes to the increased production and activity of male hormones. Being overweight increases the amount of insulin that your body produces. Read more about the causes of polycystic ovary syndrome.

Treating polycystic ovary syndrome


There's no cure for PCOS, but the symptoms can be treated. Specific types of contraceptive pill may be prescribed to help regulate the menstrual cycle and improve hair growth. Lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, may help to control some of the symptoms. Polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with an increased risk of problems in later life, such as type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol levels. There are treatment options for infertility caused by PCOS. There's also medication to increase ovulation and, in some cases, surgery. Many women with fertility problems due to PCOS can still have a baby. Read more about treating polycystic ovary syndrome.

Symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome


The symptoms of PCOS usually become apparent in your late teens or early twenties. In many women, the only symptoms are menstrual problems or a failure to conceive. Not all women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have all of the symptoms. Each symptom can vary from mild to severe. The classic symptoms of PCOS are: irregular periods or no periods at all problems getting pregnant (because of irregular ovulation or failure to ovulate) excessive hair growth (hirsutism) weight gain thinning hair and hair loss oily skin or acne

Fertility problems
Polycystic ovary syndrome is one of the most common causes of female infertility. Many women discover they have PCOS when they're trying to get pregnant and are unsuccessful.

During each menstrual cycle the ovaries release an egg (ovum) into the uterus. This process is called ovulation and usually occurs once a month. Women with PCOS often fail to ovulate or they ovulate infrequently.

Risks in later life


Cardiovascular disease Having PCOS can lead to an increased risk of: diabetes high blood pressure (hypertension) high blood cholesterol levels

These conditions can cause stroke or heart disease later in life. This increased risk is associated with resistance to insulin (a substance released by the pancreas to control blood sugar levels), obesity and hormone imbalances. Read more about the causes of polycystic ovary syndrome. Endometrial cancer Women who have had absent or irregular periods for many years have a higher-than-average risk of developing cancer of the womb lining (endometrial cancer). However, the chance of getting endometrial cancer is still very rare. This risk can be minimised by certain treatments to regulate periods, such as the contraceptive pill or intrauterine system (IUS).

Causes of polycystic ovary syndrome


The exact cause of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is unknown, but the following factors often lead to its development.

Resistance to insulin
Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas to control the amount of sugar in the blood. It helps to move glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it is broken down to produce energy. Insulin resistance means that the body's tissues are resistant to the effects of insulin. The body therefore has to produce extra insulin to compensate. High levels of insulin cause the ovaries to produce too much testosterone (see below), which interferes with the development of the follicles and prevents normal ovulation.

Weight gain
Insulin resistance often makes it more difficult to lose weight, as raised insulin levels can lead to weight gain. Being overweight or obese makes the symptoms of PCOS more pronounced because excess fat causes the body to produce more insulin.

Hormone imbalance
Many women with PCOS are found to have an imbalance in certain hormones: Raised levels of testosterone and other male sex hormones results in many of the symptoms of PCOS (all women produce testosterone, but normally in much lower levels than men). Low levels of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), which means that testosterone levels are more active. Raised levels of luteinising hormone (LH), which is created in the pituitary gland to stimulate ovulation and hormone production in the ovaries. This excess is thought to have an abnormal effect on the ovaries. Raised levels of prolactin (only in some women with PCOS). This hormone usually stimulates the breast glands to produce milk in pregnancy. The exact reason how and why this happens is not known. It's been suggested that the problem may start in the ovary itself, in the pituitary gland and part of the brain that controls it. Or it may be caused by the resistance to insulin.

Genetics
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can sometimes run in families. If any of your relatives, such as your mother, sister or aunt, have PCOS then the risk of you developing it is often increased.

Diagnosing polycystic ovary syndrome


If you have any of the typical symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) see your GP. Your GP will ask you about your symptoms to try and rule out other causes and check your blood pressure. Your GP or specialist may then request an ultrasound scan, which can show if you have polycystic ovaries (a chain of cysts is often seen, and the ovaries are enlarged). However, the diagnosis can often be confirmed without a scan. You may also need a blood test to determine levels of: hormones, such as luteinising hormone (LH), oestradiol, prolactin and testosterone glucose and cholesterol, depending on which other features are present

Referral to a specialist
If you are diagnosed with PCOS, you're likely to be referred to a specialist either a gynaecologist (specialist in treating conditions of the female reproductive system) or an endocrinologist (specialist in treating hormone problems). Your specialist will discuss with you the best way to manage your symptoms. They will advise you on any lifestyle changes to make, and start you on any necessary medication.

Follow-up
If you have PCOS, you should request annual blood pressure checks checks to detect the possible longterm effects of the condition. If you are resistant to insulin you may also consider having your glucose levels checked annually.

Diagnosing polycystic ovary syndrome


If you have any of the typical symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) see your GP. Your GP will ask you about your symptoms to try and rule out other causes and check your blood pressure. Your GP or specialist may then request an ultrasound scan, which can show if you have polycystic ovaries (a chain of cysts is often seen, and the ovaries are enlarged). However, the diagnosis can often be confirmed without a scan. You may also need a blood test to determine levels of: hormones, such as luteinising hormone (LH), oestradiol, prolactin and testosterone glucose and cholesterol, depending on which other features are present

Referral to a specialist
If you are diagnosed with PCOS, you're likely to be referred to a specialist either a gynaecologist (specialist in treating conditions of the female reproductive system) or an endocrinologist (specialist in treating hormone problems). Your specialist will discuss with you the best way to manage your symptoms. They will advise you on any lifestyle changes to make, and start you on any necessary medication.

Follow-up
If you have PCOS, you should request annual blood pressure checks checks to detect the possible longterm effects of the condition. If you are resistant to insulin you may also consider having your glucose levels checked annually.