George Washington’s Constitution

The most important interpretation of the Constitution is not the latest opinion of the U.S. Supreme Court. George Washington re-made the Constitution, just after he was unanimously elected to the Office of President on February 4, 1789, by the simple act of taking the oath to the Office of President of the United States on April 30, 1789. The Constitution that was sent to the States for ratification made provision in Article I for a local government limiting legislation and taxation to a small government District, the Northwest Territory, other territory and property belonging to the United States of America. Article II confirmed the existing executive power in a President of the United States of America under the still viable authority of the Articles of Confederation. That same President of the United States of America would also have authority pursuant to the new Constitution for the United States of America as occupant of the Office of President. Article III established a supreme Court to exercise the judicial power of the Confederacy over the States relating to the powers they had delegated and those described in Section 2. George Washington destroyed the possibility of limited government by his interpretation of the Constitution to permit him to appoint himself to the Office of President of the United States. That interpretation allowed him to act as if he lawfully held all three Offices of President: President, President of the United States and President of the United States of America. That interpretation was no less than the establishment of a Presidential Dictatorship in America. President Elect Washington would have been President of the United States of America under the authority of the Articles of Confederation and the President elected by the presidential Electors under the Constitution, by simply taking the Article VI oath “to support this Constitution.” By taking the oath of Office of President of the United States, he managed a clean sweep of the three Offices of President. As if by magic, George Washington now had the ability to extend legislative power beyond the government District, the Northwest Territory to the States of the Confederacy. Just by taking a well placed oath that stopped short of recognition of the real powers and responsibilities of the Office of President, he would be able to act as if all the legitimate powers of three Offices had been conferred on one man. George Washington had taken dictatorial power, had broken the government and no one noticed. George Washington’s honesty is a myth. He could and did tell many lies. To be President, President of the United States of America and President of the United States he had to deceive all the American people. They had to believe that the oath of Office of President of the United States was the oath of Office of President. Washington knew it wasn’t. He knew the oath was near the middle of the Constitution for the purpose of limiting the oath to what preceded it. He knew he couldn’t take the oath to the Office of President and the oath to the Office of President of the United States, but he didn’t tell anyone what he was doing. He didn’t tell a soul, because the Constitution prohibits the President from taking another Office under the Constitution:

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The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period and other Emolument from the United States, or any of them. Article II Section 1 Clause 7 James Madison, in my opinion, does not deserve the appellation “Father of the Constitution” that distinction should go to George Washington. Without Washington, the Office of President and the Office of President of the United States would, today, be considered to be the two separate Offices they are and we would have limited Libertarian government. Only George Washington had the fame and prestige that would arouse no discernable suspicion, when he took an oath that was nothing like the simple oath required by the Sixth Article “to support this Constitution.” Maybe Madison was the “master builder of the Constitution, but it turned out to be a Trojan Horse George Washington used to claim America for the developing corporate interests. Employing a strict interpretation of the Constitution, the person elected President by the Electoral College would have to, first, take the Article VI oath “to support this Constitution” before he could then appoint the President and Vice President of the United States. Those two Officers would be limited to the duties imposed on them in Article I. George Washington’s accomplices in the House of Representatives and Senate allowed once again the takeover of people recently freed from one tyrant to be handed over to a new one. The American novelty is that it is done for two four-year turns. The two Offices are undeniably separate offices. The “Office of President of the United States” is mentioned twice. First, in Article I Section 3 Clause 5: The Senate shall chuse their other Officers, and also a President pro tempore, in the Absence of the Vice President, or when he shall exercise the Office of President of the United States. Second, in Article II Section 1 Clause 8: “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.” The one time the “Office of President” is mentioned in Article II Section 1 Clause 5 is for the purpose of identifying the qualifications for the Office of President: No person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States The Constitution does not establish qualifications for the Office of President of the United States. A term of four years is established for President of the United States of America and Vice President, but no terms are prescribed for the President and President and Vice President of the United States. The deception of Washington, Madison, Hamilton and practically everyone else involved in the secret Constitutional Convention should be astounding, but those who take the trouble to read the Constitution read it like a

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recipe from a cookbook substituting the Office of President with the Office of President of the United States with reckless abandon. Washington was able to combine the two Offices by simply taking the oath of Office of President of the United States, instead of the Article VI oath “to support this Constitution.” Throughout the Constitution a distinction is made between “this Constitution” as a written document and the Constitution of the United States as the territory to be governed by the new Congress of the United States and President and Vice President of the United States. The confusion of Presidents created by Madison’s writing of the Constitution let George Washington take the Office of President without taking the proper oath that would create a limited government. Washington and his cronies, the socalled Founding Fathers managed to take over the federal government without firing a shot. Madison may be credited with a major part of the writing of the Constitution, however, it was George Washington who presided over the Constitutional Convention and it was his interpretation of the Constitution that has prevailed over all others. He avoided the constitutional prohibition against holding more than one Office by simply asking that he be addressed as Mr. President. George Washington single handedly changed the Constitution that provided for a government for the Northwest Territory and similar territory within the original thirteen states consisting of a Congress of the United States and a President and Vice President of the United States into the continually failing representative democracy of today. How did Washington take the sovereignty of the people in the states and hand it over to the politicians in Congress and the future Presidents of the United States? He read the Constitution exactly as James Madison and others had written it and determined that he was not qualified for the Office of President, because he had not been a Resident within the United States for the required 14 years. Counting from July 4, 1776, Washington calculated that the Office of President couldn’t be filled until July 4, 1790, so he appointed himself President of the United States and the Senate confirmed him by not objecting to what he had done. Once in the Office of President of the United States, Washington and the Congress of the United States could begin to create a government for the federal territory by statute laws, which was called the United States and continues to be called the United States. Today, those laws are found in a United States Code of 50 Titles. Because George Washington took the oath of Office of President of the United States, he had no obligation or responsibility “to support this Constitution,” according to the oath in Article VI. Is there a real Constitution limiting government, or is it just a piece of paper? Without an oath to recognize the entire Constitution, the Constitution for the United States of America remains just a piece of paper. George Washington never took an oath “to support this Constitution,” and the precedent he set has continued without a break. No

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person elected by the Electoral College has ever taken any oath other than the one that appears in the middle of the Constitution. Did George Washington permanently change the Constitution? Washington did not change anything in the Constitution. He caused everyone to believe that person who was elected President by the Electoral College was also President of the United States as well as President of the United States of America under the Articles of Confederation. Washington proved that an elected President could appoint himself to be President of the United States and was President of the United States of America by virtue of his election to President, but that was his limit. No one can hold two Offices under any part of the Constitution. When Washington took the Office of President of the United States, the Office of President under the Constitution became vacant regularly and continually vacant. Washington refused to accept the compensation paid to person holding the Office of President, so that acceptance of the benefits of that Office would not bind him to the oath of that Office. All Presidents since George Washington have held the statutory office of president found in Title 3 of the United States Code. That Presidential statutory authority is represented by the official residence of the President—The White House. The legislative branch has created an “executive mansion” for its legislative/chief executive and President of the United States of America under the Articles of Confederation. The United States Supreme Court, as a statutory creation, does not establish nor can it represent an independent third branch of government. Since Washington, all “judicial” appointments are made by a President of the United States, who is also President of the United States of America under the Articles of Confederation, pursuant primarily to the statutory authority of the Judiciary Act of 1789. On the date of enactment, September 24th, Section 2 of the Judiciary Act divided the United States into thirteen districts. The division of the United States into thirteen districts, when only eleven States had ratified the Constitution, confirms that the United States consists of the federal territory within the states. Eleven of the districts were named for the States that had ratified and the remaining two were named for Kentucky and Maine. On September 24, 1789, the territorial jurisdiction of the United States district courts for the districts of Kentucky and Maine could only be federal territory. The territorial jurisdiction of those two courts would not change when Kentucky was admitted into the Union on June 1, 1792 and when Maine was admitted on March 15, 1820. The “one supreme Court” of Article III of the Constitution is ordained and established by the ratification of the Constitution, which provides that the holder of the Office of President shall appoint the Judges of the supreme Court. The perpetual vacancy in the Office of President caused by George Washington’s precedent setting refusal “to support this Constitution,” by taking the proper oath of Office, has prevented the establishment of a real judicial court system. The courts established pursuant to the Judiciary Act of 1789 can only be legislative courts exercising legislative power. They cannot be independent judicial courts exercising the judicial power of the United States of America, because the power of appointment of the Judges of the supreme Court was granted to an Office of

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President that has remained vacant for almost 220 years. The President of the United States it should be noted appoints Justices not Judges to the supreme Court. What are the possibilities of error in my analysis of the constitutional provisions presented here? My investigation can be easily confirmed by any computer word processing program. When one searches for the Office of President of the United States of America, the computer will not find the Office of President as a match and neither should the student. Similarly, the computer will not lie and tell you that a Justice is a Judge. That finding should eliminate all opinions of the federal courts. Purely legislative creations, all the federal courts including the U.S. Supreme Court are without judicial authority. The Constitution is the fourth Organic Law for the United States of America. The three Organic Laws that predate the Constitution for the United States of America confirm that the Constitutional Convention was bound by that Organic Law, so it had no choice but to create limited government. Only by deception could the Constitutional Convention create the constitutional vehicle by which the first President could rob Americans of their freedom. That freedom can be easily reclaimed simply by demanding that the person elected by the Electoral College take the oath “to support this Constitution.”

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