Fa ?!

*
1

187-

SUFFERINGS

V" .REV.

V

V T.

Gi
AND

CAMPBELL m
AM
1.

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1

S

I

I

Y,

EM

<•&

hs

©

rid

&E^

o

WASHINGTON
I

S'Titni'lllSI

PUBLISHING CoKrANT,
If-::.

LOAN STACK

GIFT

t

PR EFAC E.
Mj' purpose in writing this sketch is to show to ih-j 11 muscle by th '< capital, given to ili-m in brain or t!i I'niv !-•, Ill- )> :] i, n iv -'1 and trample* under fool moneyed aristocrats >f this nation; for while it is em be protected in all proper thai each individual ^li'ml lawful rights of property, yel they should novel ha\ paramounl claim on that ground over any other person. of the South, who licreb} show the feelings of the people nl thsir lot with their Sri!';, upon the theory of para being du; to the States. Ii is claimed by so allegiance -; it their friends thai si ivery being abolish 1. this 'I istrine of Under tli but thai is a great mistake. rights fall with il of local self-government, the) now claim all the) ever i»'. thai and that is the recognition of the rights of prop tie. and of person, which was claim id under the thro the prop srty-h ikl irs of which i- dem nil b) of Sjuth When the troops were withdrawn from the fital Carolina an I/mi-i ma, il was rece.lv :d as a rei ignition of State

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and no matter what in ijh! be tie rights, and property rights moral worth or respectability of a mechanic or ing nun, ivishcs Ills Interests or rights must not stand in the waj of the
;
I:

nt

or prop irt) -li '1 ler. la.'. Therefore, in view of facts as they present themselves. the laboring men an 1 women of this nation, How long will it be Ii ifore you will have no rights th U the capil ilistsorp holder is bound to respect? Ii is tim you began to think Rev. T. G. CAMPB1 about this.
tile c ipitalists
i;
-

THE SITUATION.
Dedic
Lt

sd to

the

Hon. Tunis G-.Campb
to
:

11,

Sl\, jr

A

time-known chair, Within and beyond the honored law, One with record grand and fair.

content, such Placed in the

a.-

men

ne'er

saw

,

The world is coursing the other waj From tho base of wave-worn Plymouth Kock; For "Policy," priests and Levitt" prav. And the creed of the Fathers [hi > jeci and mock

SKETCH OF

TI [K

1

AVI

And now And

To give ti> To magnify

the fate of the hones* man q rebel the upper pdu the ku-klux chin. cringe and bow when foemen meet.
'tis
I t
,

REV. T

.

G

.

CAMPBELL
I

"Oh woe

is the cry from the Southern land, From Dixon's line to Lhe Single Star; Attain theyrule with an iron hand "Who rived the fetters before the war.
!

"

I was born in Middlobrook. Somers t county. .W\\ Jit M\ father, (.Tolm the 1st day of April, in tho year IS i. 1 lisi live — — bell, si.,) was :i blacksmith by tin le.
1
T
i

Csiitij)-

fom- brothers.

I

was the youngc

:

of all, excepl

t«.>

sisters,

And gun and knife, and baying beast,— The cruel hounds, in davs of yore, From stockade sceul the bloody feast,
As
in the

days Long gone before
,

From "

stricken homos the children sigh The orphan and the widow save " The call is vain Peace is the party cry No power now the nation claims to save
!

and they were living near Middlchrook. mien al the age »f 5 years, a gentleman rode up on horseback and spoke I" I was playing with two of my sisters by the roadside. He inquired for my mother. Wc all knew him very well, for h in Middlebrook, He told mj father and mother thai he eoul
;i
I

!

:

get
!

mc

in a

school on

Long

Island, in

the State of .Wu- York.

The freedman, from

the greed and wrath Of those who tore the country's life away Let us have peace! And if tin- gory path Of Southern empire o'er the bondsmen laj

,

,

was subsequently sent to a scl 1 al Babylon, on I.ongTsl was the only colored child in the school. The principal ami were very kind tome. At the age of IS returned home. I would not agree to go to Africa as a missionary, and
I
1

assistants

I

Beneath them
'Ti-*

tomb, Low out of thought and sight bm the coining doom Of those whom God made black
;

lies

an early

from
instead

this

period

I

comm

My father had
•>!

removed

'need as an anti-slavery lecturer. to the city of New Unmswiek.

Xow
i

white

"Peace " is our watchword now, At any, every cost or juice Before it honor, truth and country Low The bluet must turn to while, or die tho
;
; !

last devirn.

Here, in the year 1S32, I formed an anti-coloni* society, and then pledged myself never t<> leave this emmtn until every slave was free on American soil unless 1 w-ni i<> learn something, or to ge.l lielp to secure their liberation. I was
Jersey.
i

brought up

in

(and intend d to b

sunt oul from) the episcopal

6

LIFE

<>F

REV.

T.

G. CAMI'lllUU,

Ml
m
This
)

1.

01 KF-V.
a

T.

G. CAMl'ia.U..

I

Church, bul after leaving school I joined th M itho list'! Uiurch; and except being mobb id in my tim is while lecturing or i>: ing, and nearly killed one?, there was nothing of note occurred, was the first moral reformer and temperance except that lecturer thai entered the Five Points, in the city of New York. After the work was begun, then noble-hearted white in in si epp in and where the "l dens of thieves and pann d-'to'isas stoo 1. a mission hous i. they have rate The mayor of Jersey City was kind enough i<> sen a
i

s,
I

|f."

He gave me
-.

chair,
:i

and

"
said,

Make

out

our."

ill

did at oui

About

month

afti r this a ci

mmittee was
1

I

appointed id Washington to inspect the coniniissury departI the i' ment, anil to report upon tl.e saiiitiirj condit on Staten Island; nr.d 1 was ordered bj Geneial Eaton
i

|

1

rfiiarterinaster,

United States army, to

sit

with

Hum.
the
1 1

I

did so,
i..

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1

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1

and signed (lie n j oil with otlu r mi This was the firsl year of the war.

nibi is of

n.niissk

Myself and other colored

1

men
l,ui

ofl'ered to aid the

Government

in putting

down the

rebellion,

policeman down

me from

to the ferry, every Monday night, to protect th" ferry, and back to the ferry, from th temperance meetings held in that city every Monday night and through Divine Providence kind friends came forward and helped us to

we were premature.
cilj

our services were refused— Sccrctarj Seward replying tha; Iii 1863 I sent a personal petition* to the

;

President, but got no answer.
of

An
if
I

New Ycrk
letter.
I

asked
1

me

old friend of mine had got anj answer

in

the

to

my

raise

our

sch.00]

houses aul churches

in

Jersey City during

I the years 1811, 1S1>, 1S.15 and ISli. also, during the sami time, labored in Brooklyn and WilUamsbirg in the sam way. I now |>:i" to the year 1881. I was a partn irand this tim
i

Washington again, and
to l'ri -id.
i.i

told

l.im

no.

He then
1

said,

"Write
I

will tiy

Lincoln

.-it

i

see

my

friend,

what and and he had
;

did write again 1 can do foi yen." to calli in about a month after this
I

that vc ly dnj received a
I

general agent of the firm of Davies £ Co., untenn inted bread manufacturers, on the corner of Third avenue and Fourteenth We got a contract to supply street, in th" city of Xew York.
the Sickles brigade with bread, at their camp of instructions, on Staten Island; and when 1 went to deliver my bread at the

the Secretin-} of War, upon opening which, sion ordering me to report forthwith to General Saxu.n, at Hilton Head, in South Carolina ; and there 1 remained with General
I 1

package iron found a commis-

commUsary
it

store-house,

was all right; not unload unless they would first sign my papers, showing the weight of each basket and the bread it contained. This difficulty with im prevented the storekeeper from giving out the rations, and brought the offi -r of the d ij to see what was th in itt'e-r^. Til -y toll their ill ones to story; but when he came to me, and ordered in unload, I told him I would not unload until my papers were vouchers for signed, or they weighed ray bread, and gave in
ii
: i

wanted t'i unload it. I would
I

n to

weigh

it.

Th

ly

said

think, t" his Saxt and did \vi ati ver was entrusted lo me, Aflei the fall of Charleston satisfaction. riijucttcd to be sent to the Sea Islands, in Georgia, and had assigned to me Burnsidi An- alu. Sainl Catluirines, Sapelo and Colonel*s Islands, with aits on the Islands orders to organize and establish govi n for tliirty miles back from tin seaprotect freednien and refngi es n these Islands. shore and 1 remained for two goveri
.

;

;

years

I

had three teachers bronglit from

tlic

North

nl

mj own

ex-

pense,

and paid

Hieiu.

Under my

policy-plan (that of Presi-

the weight. The chief quartermaster now eami U| what was the trouble. I at onee told him, and sli ih
pipers.

1

asked

id
1

him

my

He asked m; who

mib

oui

my

pipers.

replied,

in Lincoln sel forth a plan by • The petition which 1 si ni 10 1'n -nl' a educated im !:• in 'i'l' coi i'i 1" rrlievi the Gem ral Govii >- tin- diillri of citizens, ond m-cKiroil 1" it from the t-iinrditiiifl a), whiih, In m> view, lhcv would have to a nn n frem the North, and bad keep over them at a proteclii n against ! nun from the South, who w ould tisi llieni foi ilu n own pur)

which
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ileiu

MI'Iv
i

OF KKV.

T.

G. CAMI'B]

l

l

till.
iii.

OF REV.

T. G. CAMI'liELI,.
I

was removed b} General Tilson, who was then Johnson) placed as head of the Kreedmau's Bureau, and military commander-in-chief of Georgia.

and the other

to sleep in.

found

it

well that

I

did

50, fot

very soon after wc got there a man, who was obnoxious to the while people on account of his having been sherifl' for the Islands

The schools which I had established on the Islands were broken up, and the people driven oil' unless the} work under contractu which were purposely made t<> cheal the frecdmen out of
their labor. Kebels, who before had appeared humble and repentant, now insisted that all colored men and women shook)

during

my

administration there, was arrested during

my
i

ab-

scence, one day, waiting at 1 >oboy Island for my mail, the obj oul being to break up the settlement on Belleville; but m\ wif
not
let

the

man

lie

taken

away

until

I

could

hi-

there to
I

CC

refused, the} would waytelling them that they would have them back w hen the Yankees left the State I went to General Tilson ni the time hi- headquarters were in Augusta, and told him that I could not go on the Islands with showed hiin my certificate as an Elder of the Zion safety. Methodist Episcopal Church in America, with my commission
i

sign these contracts; and lax Iii-iii and beat them,

when they

I

Clinton as missionary for the States if He said, "That isall right; hut J cannot " now returned back to Savannah. ^nc you any protection ! little sent down to village called Thunder Holt and got a sa boat to take to the islands. In it 1 went to see the people,
J.
I I

from Right l.V\. J. Georgia and Florida.
:i

done in his ease. Thisi ncoiuagi d the people. ni ut up to Savannah after the trial to the officer of the Freedtuaii's Bureau, and they sent down an officer to examine into the case, who discharged the man, a- there was no evidence against hini he was lined lief mil- the court in Darien. This was in Under the Reconstruction Act of Congress I was appointed one of the registrars for the Second Senatorial Distrii Georgia—Liberty, Mcintosh and Tatnall counties, and quel illy wa- elected a member of the constitutional convention and upon the submission of the constitution to the people for wa clc ted s mator for the Second District of the i. in ation,
justice
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State of Georgia.

Upon

tin-

question of clegibility to

off!

e

I

them that if they would come over on the main land would try to get a plantation called Belleville, which was ti gentleman of the name of Hopkins, in Mcintosh ooiuin There was 1,250 acres of laud in this plantation, and he would not sell it for less than S14.50 per acre. Icing at the
to tell
J

owned by
.

to stand alone tor eight days on the llooi of the Senate, con ten din;', for the rights of the colored members to hold could their scats; and at different times when I was speaking sec Democratic members, with their hands on the butts of their w ilh their teeth shut hard together, and using threatenpistols,

was compelled

I

1

pitiful
I

condition of the people,

advanced 81,000. could only take in with rain and storm, when we got to Belleville, it was almost worthless—for everything was burned up during the war on
the place. As the people dare not stay there without me, I therefore moved my own family into a camp made of old boards on the
side

on which agreed to give As the people had to move with what they small boats, I got one flat-boat; but what
1
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ing gestures al me. On the ninth day 1 gave way. seeingnohopc called the for us in he Georgia legislature and at 1 o'clock, expelled members together, and told them our only chance wai to prevent the Senators from Georgia taking their seats in the United Stales Senate. My son, T. G. Campbell, jr., who was
I

1

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and ends, and

a

Palmetto roof— for

I

had

to have

one to

cooli

of the house, and myself were elected n a coi ittee go to Washington to protest against the Hon. Joshua Hill M. A'. Miller taking their seat-, until the colored m inner.- of the General Assembly of the Suite of Georgia were reWe went on to the city of Wasliington and -aw the seated.
a

member

to

anil 11.

10

I.I

IK OF REV.

T. V.

CAMPBELL.
January, 1S70.
inelcgiblc

like or rev.
.As
it

t.

r,.

cami-iu.i.i..

Congressional Committee, and conferred with tliem personally, by request of their chairman, Hon. E. 1). Morgan, of the State
of

Now

York, (who

knew me

personally,) and Hon. Charles

Sum-

ner, of Massachusetts, with whom we had a long conference. told him and other members of the committee thai wo did nol come only to complain of dune ns in and wrongs

We

that many who v had taken the oath prescribed byCongress.it was deemed necessary under this hill for some mem!, in branch of the General Assembly to read a proti : linst all
i ,
.

was well known

that

were

ineligible,

who should attempt

to take

the oath
>nt

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I

Georgia,

get Congress to reseat us, but that a law which would protect all

we wanted Congress

to pass

before the day came there was such an ex< item difficult to get any one to take the protest. Ia of the State,

that
pj

it

wa>

don

persons in their rights, without regard to race, color, or previous condition of servitude. Mr. Stunner at once said, "That is true. We must amend the

fundamental law.

We

must have

a

fifteenth

amendment

to

the Constitution of the United States, and I will bring that measure before the Senate, or get some one to do it, at the next session." then called his attention, as we also did the attention of other members of the committee, to the particular reason why the Senator.- from Georgia should not be admitted at that time ; for if they won- seated, the State would be admitted, and then Congress could not act ou our cases no more than in the case of any member or members of any legislature of any other State— as of New York or Massachusetts. Suffice it to we

We

committee of three to seek for and employ counsel in behalf and I found, ou suiting them, that no member could be prevented from taking his seat by any civil tribunal. for they could give any bond, no matter what was its ,,;,-. ment, to answer at the proper time, and wall in and take their 1 went to the Governor and made this fact known to seats. him, and suggested to him that General Terry had betl point a board of officers to examine all those who' should be
,-,.
.

rj

our mission- the Georgia Senators were not was, by the Georgia State central committee, appointed with Hon. Foster Blodgett, to go to Washington and look after reconstruction in Georgia. We went on- although threatened by many rebel sympathizers that if /
in
1

were successful
in I860.

say,

seated

went

to

Washington again I should not live in Georgia. We met Governor Bullock and quite a number of prominent Republicans from Georgia. I felt it my duty to go and see the Republican members of the House and Senate, and urge them to vote foi the bill to promote reconstruction in Georgia. I stayed until the bill was passed, in a modified form, and then went direct I" Atlanta, as it was not thought safe for me to try to reach home. I wont to Atlanta by rail, and arrived there on the 25th day of December, 18CD. The General Assembly met on the 10th of

protested. The governor said that he did nol know v General Terry would take this responsibility. 1 replied. "Wi cannot organize without lie will do that."' On the 10th. in the morning, I was s.-nl for by the chairman of our committee of He told me that the protests wire all ready, bul three. would sign them as a protectant, to appear on !••!:. If of the 1 Cover out. at one- signed my name for the put the protests in my pocket, and went into my seat in tinSenate chamber. 1 was informed by Senators of the reaso why they would not read or sign these prote ts. They said thai there was eighl men stationed on the front and side of the
i

gallery, above the Republican members, to shoot down member who should read, or attempl to read, a protosl

mj
:

an

I

in the galleries and see how crowded the\ " You had hotter not read were; and said, them, for you will be cut ill two by revolver- !" I looked at the clock and saw it told
to look

me

up

wanted ten minutes
plied
:

to the

''I

will

read
seal.

them!"

away from

my

There was only one Senator

hour of meeting, and of course reAll the Senators then moved to he .worn

12
iii

LIFE OF REV.
before me.
I

T.

(I.

CAMPBELL.
had
in left

J.

in: OF r.EV. T. G.

CAMPBELL.
I

13

was from the Second District. After being sworn, I took Hie protests and layed them in order, and as each came to be sworn I began to read, and the Democratic
bodj to object, and would not obey Willi permission from tinany president, (pro tempore,) I continued to read, raising my voice above their clamor ami did read all, except one, when the Governor si nt forme and told me not to read anj more, as the house had to
calls

Atlanta on the Saturday previous, by reqtu top the city of Rome on the Sabbath. My son started al
of the

for the city of

members arose almost
to order.

in a

me
left

Washington. My wife sent a telegram informing communication received, and the nature of what was

;

Burgham amendment to the Georgia hill. I at once Atlanta; found two other members of the General Assembly, (colored,) and took them with inc. This is what was
called the
for

called the Georgia delegation,

(all

colored.)

adjourn without doing anything. As no protests could be read then, I returned to my scat the member whose name I had a protest against did not

;

but

members and two private citizens. Bingham amendment was defeated.

We

composed of tin were successful the

present

himself. Immediately after adjournment 1 called on the Governor, anil at his request called on General Terry, to In to get him to appoint a hoard of officers to into the

We all saw tin danger beiug admitted without and tin- was brought by myself some additional restricti before the convention of colored men held in the city of Atlanta
of the State

inquire

on February

3,

1871.

1

was by

that

convention

electi

1

a

elegibility of

the

members

against

gotten ready, whether they had allow any member to take his seat unless he was clearly entitled it under tie- Reconstruction T Acts. did ..ill on General Terry, and he said he would consider my request, and also see the Governor. This was on the 10th. On the 13th, general orders Xo. 3, of the military district of Georgia, were "issued, detailing Brevet Major General T. H. Euger, United States Army; Brevet Major General T.J.Haines, and Maim
to

protests had been been read or not, and not I"

whom

to pass delegate at large to go to Washington and urge Congress a law to protect loyal citizens in the Southern States. I arrived

there in .March, and found Con but, through the providence of

n

-

just

read}

to

adjourn;
test

God, the President

message

to thai bod) the consideration of the condition of loyal citizens in the Southern States, and the pa-age of some law looking to their protection. 1 had
to Congress,

recommending

Henry

Goodfellow, judge advocate, United States Army, as

a

board to

the honor of calling on the President at that time, am! had assurance of his sanction to any bill passed bj ongress for that purpose. The Kn-Klux Bill was passed, and of course my
<

inquire into the elegibility of those members. U* now became the common talk that the old Xegro Senator of the Second was and that

destroying Georgia,

would be unruly unless he was put out
This session

the Xegros

of the

way.

the 10th day of January, 1870, and closed on the 6th day of December, 1S70. There we're recesses taken during that time; in on,- of ivhicli recesses I was sent for by Governor Bullock to come on to the

commenced on

mission was accomplished. Now the rebels became more enraged at me than ever. My friends informed me in Washington of plots laved to murder me on my way home, and advised me to stay in the North for a while; but without answering them, I came home before thej

thought
possible,

I

had

left

Washington, and went

to

wank

to find out,

if

ington,
patch,

and bring a delegation. and informed my sou— he

city of

Washdis1

My

wife

received the
in

how they intended to kill me. The plan was this: men w ere to come up from the country and watch for me going to or coming from the church at night, and kill me
Certain
:

being with her

Atlanta.

then lake

my body

a

short distance in the woo,'.,

and leave

M

LIFE OF REV.
it

T. O.

CAMPBELL.

to make it appeartli.it colored men from tlie something by country had done it. I pursued my inquiries until the statements made were fully corroborated bj incidents that occurred at my own house and near the church. Tin- parties were well known and when they found that I was aware of their intentions, they had me arrested and taken to Savannah under the Ku-Klux Bill, before the United Stales Commissioner. It was
;

another pari of

tin-

programme
county

to
to

compel me
in jail,

to leave the

keep me Keep out
1

in

of jail

lawsuits, so as to or if 1 wa;

HISTORY OF THE CASE.
My
This
case charged false imprisonment of a

put jail at night and kill me in it. In any event, my life was to be taken. I was compelled, on going up to the legislature last November, to leave my house at dusk, ami go by laud, to meet my son, who was waiting in Savannah for me. On my return, the cap-

then break the

man named

Rafe.

man was

families lived, of these families.

charged with breaking into a house in which two and threatening to kill tie: two men—-both heads

Upon

the affidavits of said parties

I

issued a

Darien coming and going to Savannah) refii ed to take mo and another who wa- with me, ami had my trunk put on the gentleman dock. After first taking our fare, he then came and gave back to us, and ordered us on shore. All tin- was to get up a
(a

tain

of

the steamer

"Hardy"

boat

that stop-

at

it

Savannah; hut being aware of theil object, I at my thin:,- to be taken directly off the wharf, and crossed the country in a -wagon, which took one day longer to get home. The only security that 1 now had for my life or -was this; Tie- rebel- knew that property they would he held
once ordered
responsible by the loyal people of (hi- country, both colored and white, for any injury that might he done to me.

difficulty in

warrant for his arrest, and upon a healing, he wa- ordered to nthbond of $10 in eaeh ease to keep the pea e for sis as toward- these families, and to pay the costs of court, which he agreed to do. lie went to get bondsmen; but came back and said he woidd not give bonds; upon which, I ordered him to be locked up; hut he went, and made an affidavit that he had given bonds, and then ran away.
give a
I was indicted without having a notice to appear before the grand jury, ami that charges had been preferred against me. Whcii'lho regular term of court came it wa- adjourned, and no time was set. I had business in Washington, and went there. Upon my return home I found my dwelling-house had been burned, and the grocery and dry-goods store of my wife and son was also burned. That day the court met, and I was arf the rested the next day. There was a called sessi superior I was not allowed to go two blocks to get my court court.

T. G.

CAMPBELL,

Sit.

records.

My

again asked
I

for fifteen

counsel asked for one hour, hut being refused, he minute-, and was again refused by

Judge Tompkins.

upon the

led plead not guilty to the indictment, and tie' CISC pr affidavit of Kate, who had rim away, and the testimony of the sheriff, who said that be was told not to lock him

lr;

LIFE OK KEV.
>

T.

(I.

C.Ull'lli:!,!,.

l.ll I.

01'

REV.

T.

G. f'AMl'l

i

i .

17

<

I

by the lawyer.

The lawyer was
."

also a witness, he having
: i

down, and we missed the

train, so

we

did not get

t" Sai

i

written the affidavit, ami swore that J f had given bonds. My counsel, in open court, said it was impossible for him to get testimony, or do anything in inj case, on account of intimidation,
i

until Monday morning. My wife and son employed eoun Savannah, and presented my case under the motion w Inch h t\ to hear made in Mcintosh argument in thirty daj
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i

but the judge said he saw no intimidation, and the ease should He then ordered the clerk to get the jury-box, which proceed. lie unlocked, and thou took out two or three tickets; but the clerk whispered to him, and lie pul those back and look out two

at

he a them oil', and issued a special order to the guard to take me away, which they did at night. I was released from the Atlanta on a writ of habeas corpus, and put in jail. N'ow, the
|
1 1

packages of
out

tickets,

when he
lie
1

tore

one package open and counted

judge refused, after hearing argument, to grant ami also refused to sign a bill of exceptions ; and
could not get for a writ of
lOllbl
it.

a

nci
I;

inj

twenty-four.

had counted out
looking.

ten,
lie

then tore open the other, and when he told my counsel to look. He said he was

counted oul the other package, the clerk. the count, said there was forty-eight. This li-t was given to the sheriff, who Killed their nam :s and as the sheriff called, every one answered. We of emir.-' challenged

When

to

make application to the Sup Cour! mandamus. The judge then came up to Atlanta, lie OUl of mj lawyers' way.
so as to to

who was keeping

M\ son then telegraphed

my counsel,

and they bro
i

;

me
a

out for a hearing the daj the judge arrived, ami had that afternoon, and the court adluces te cum subpee

the array, but were overruled by the court as to our ground of were entitled to take from the first pauuel, and ehallange.

We

if

that

was exhausted,
in

to

have

tal

-

juroi

-

The jury

my

case

was out

all night,

and

also prejudice. at 10 o'clock the

journed until the next day, at 10 a.m. The judge at first refused to come, bul the solicitor went for him. He admitted nted to him in mj case, that a bill of excel ion had b en pn We then got papers ready while one of m\ counsel wat
it

next day the foreman informed the judge that the} could not agree. In reply the judge said, "You go back to your room, and if you don't agree by 11 o'clock, 1 will have yon locked up

and adjourn
have food or

this court until
fire

until

Thursday next, and you shall not then." They then went out, and (by my

speaking to move before Judge Hopkins, of the Atlanta Superior Court and to do hi-, we had to dismiss it from before As soon as we dismi the Court of Ordinary. it, irons wi re was then dragged to a covered wagon, and put upon me.
t

;

1

1

watch) returned in fifteen minutes with a verdict of guilty, but with a recommendation to the mercy of the court.

taken out of town, through hy-roads, to a wood-, when the} made mc get oul and walk. Of course I took my time. When

we

gol within D mile of a

prison camp,

two nun came up
I

Oil

upon which we were entitled 1. any would not take $300,000 bonds, but agreed to hear argument at Savannah any time within thirty days, and ordered me to be sent to State prison at once. I was taken on Sunday, at 10 o'clock" a. lh., with two other prisoners, across the country, to the Atlantic and Gulf Railroad. They hurried the horses so that they broke
then
for a
trial,

We

moved

new

to give bond, but the judge said he would not take when we insisted upon our right-. He then said he

1

horseback and served papers upon the guard, ordering him to was bring me hack; but they not being officers, he refused. put in iron- there, and that afternoon put to work, and tinnext day, until 2 o'clock,
to
I

worked, when

I

fell

— being unable

work any longer.

was raining. After they had breakfast was taken by two men up to the guard tent, or headquarters, when they took oil' my chains. The captain of the guard
it
I

The next morning

IS

1

ll

>:

OF REV.

J

.

O. CAMl'ltKLIj,

,,,!

|

OF Kl

V.

T.

<:.

CAMITIXI..

19

showed me the order of court forbidding chains being put upon me, and ordering mj return back to Atlanta. After had read ii, he asked Die when I expected m\ friends would send forme. " back, "Why," J replied, you are ordered bj this to scud therefore they "ill not come." He then ordered a to be brought, and ordered me put in, to be se'ntj>ack to the was carried to the jail Atlanta jail, in charge of a guard.
1
I

ceptions
o-ive

and that we had also given notice of n bill of exthirty days; were entitled to to the Supreme Court, and therefore
said, honds after hearing their argument, Judge Hopki !• rein =et no doubt counsel believes the stati ments up cannot believe that anj ju forth to be true, but of God's sun shines, would refu whom the
\
| -

Z

lilvc

!

1

i

i

1

1

light

I

l>\

two men.

When
"lie

the
I

men

said,

will

they laid soon 'lit, for he

me down upon
is

the cell-floor,

under such a state of facts. will remand him back to
I

I

cannot release the prison*

jail,

and give you time

to

.

asked one of the men to get about two hours he brought it.

me

a

little

scarcely alive now." In rice and milk.

With

difficult!

late

it,

for

I

had not eaten anything for two days. The food given to prisoners was corn meal, mixed with water, without salt, made into an oval shape, and baked hard on the outside- but, as a

1 was th papers to make the necessary showing." f weeks. back to jail bj four men. 1 remained in jail about Mcintosh county, and with great difficulty go! Jly wife "went to

arrieil

-

and a piece of fat bacon, that general thing quite raw inside would find raw. In going about they would eight persons to one u ed pick up pieces of old-iron pots and kettles, and these were Then they woidd break open the corn for frying meat upon.
upon more palatable but could not eat it. burn it sii had mj In the jail at Atlanta the food was better; but meals brought from the hotel. As a genera] thing they kept
il

and had my case copy of the records of the court, The a motion for a new trial, before Judge Tompkins. then presented a bill of said motion being refused, she found the records incomplete. with my lawyers, ceptions, and. She was compelled to travel back on dismal, dark nights, when the m< who drove the wagon had to get out and lead the
.

a

on

-

i

ll

bread, and

lay the pieces as to make ii

the coals and rook
;

— or
1

hm
in

i

-.

and pick

their

way

as best

they coidd

in

darknes

f

rathci

f

the winter, although there is no -now to lay upon the ground, she was compelled I" cross. vet in the three counties which
I

them out

in

the office until finite cold.

1

could nevei see the

man who
their

who had brought them. There were white prisoners meals sent to them from some hotel, and the man would

andM after leaving Chatham, namely, Bryan, Liberty For cold rain- and sleet were things of constant oCcurret weeks she was kept going up and down—from Savannah three unt of on a to Darien, and from Daricn back to Savannah— malicious omissions, or errors, made by the clerk, lint with an
.

being brought back—J do not rememberthe day. for was very sick—my lawyers brought me a hearing before Judge Hopkins. I was carried out a"ain for in a My counsel, on the writ of habeas corpus,

carry them in their cells. Two or three day.- after
I

my

up

carriage.

on herwearj and dangerous jourc age she kept sufficient to meet my case, and act as a ncying, until the papers When 1 was released from jail, supersedeas, was made out. and on my wav home, the rebels again arrested mi' in Savannah. then said that it my wife was again found in Mcintosh

unshaken

They

the -round of my having applied for a alleged illegality, on new trial, and there being no refusal; and, upon my affidavit.,

county she would be

ai'rested.

One

of

my

had agr to they showed to the court that Judge Tompkins hear argument in this case, bj inj counsel, ai Savannah, within
I

a record of

Campbell (my

counsel came i" Savannah, hut was no; able to get my case in time from the clerk of the court. Mi-. wife) would not trust any person, but -tart, d

LM

LIFE OF REV.

T.

G.

CAMPBELL.
187"),
il

LIFE OF REV.
letter

T. O.

CAMPBELL.

21

was cold and raiuj In the morning train of the Atlantic and Gulf railroad, and stopped at station No. 3, and there a friend of ours (Eev. Joseph \\ illiam tool; her in his buggy on to u neighbor's. (Cain Jeeins,) when he was to take her to Mi-. John Mclvers', when he was to take her to'Darien altogetiier a distance of forty miles. She had to travel across the country, over roads which, with the exc iption of bridgi acr :ertain rivers, had never been repaired since the war, and in rainy weather almost impassable on account of suck-holes and miry place over which poles had been layed, forming wlml is called a corduroy road. But these poles had become rotten, and had dangerous lioli - in tin in. in which wagon wheels or horse legs were in danger of being broki n even in the daj time. Thirty mill s of this road had to be traveled at night, so as to In- in Darii n soon
)
.

from Savannah herself about the llth of January,

from him, and he says you will be safe, will you go!'*' ' \n will never consent t" go and be killed for any said, one." lie then said, " do not think that Judge Krskeii entertain your ease." I asked, " Upon what ground can he He said, "Well, publi object? fori run cover tin statute." prejudice is so strong that he will not dan to act '." lie came again !•> sec me, ami -aid that ".Mr-. Canii'belJ wanted him to attend to my ease, and I havi promised to do il for $50; so would like to have some of yoiu friend- pay me
I
;

I

I

i

I

the

for tell you it is a very heavy thine to stand up, as have to do, against public sentiment a -you well know." ' said. "Well, whatever mj wife has agreed to do will i" nil He went away, and then came back right when [gel out."

money,

I

we
I

will

and

told

me

that
-

it

was
I

besl
th.it

to g.. before

Tompkins,

for the

case was so clear!

illegal

to see the clerk in his office in time to get the work \\ hen she got there the clerk kept out of her way, and would not come to the office. She then got sonic of our friends to watch for him, and they found hi-; a place of concealment store. He would go in the front door and out of the back, and down a bank, and get around to his own house. The} then set a watch front and rear, and by thai means got a pari of the When she got back'to Savannah told Colonel Thomas papers.

enough
done.

getting inj discharge.
I

there would be no difficulty in " -aid. Judge Tompkins will not disI

charge me, and you ought to know thai." lie replied. "You will get you discharged." The uexl daj are mi-taken. was taken before Judge Tompkins, who peremptorily refused
to discharge or evi n consider my case, brought before him. out of Mcintosh county.

and

-aid

it

could noi be

lh then

remanded
to

me hack
I

to. jail,

notifying

me

that

I

would have

appear

1

before him in Mcintosh county.

to have

my case at once brought before the United States Court, lie promised to come up in an hour or two, but did not come.
I

then sent word to him by an
lie

officer.

He came

up, and
1

lid

it

would

best for

me

to

go

to

Mcintosh county.

"
said,

Von

know

that they will pretend that 1 am frying to escape, and will shoot me; that is well known!" He said, •'There is no

wrote a letter to mj wife, who was in Atlanta. She had been compelled to get out of th'- way. I'm there was a warrant out against her, alleging thai she was a dangerous character. and ought not to he al large aiming the people. They had two indictments agaiu-t m\ sou. on trumped-iip

danger
sel

;

and
1

if

you employ couusi

1,
I

you must do
think
a

as

your coun-

directs."

I replied,

better than

do; but

"I will, who would

if

my

counsel

be such

fool as to
"i

knew they would be killed !" He then said, " and think a great deal of Colonel A. T. Akerman.
they

knows go, when ou know
J

me together, charges, and said they would chain him and Bui we got my take us both to the State prison at onetime. state of Massa(J. son jr..) and hi- v*ifc oft" to the
(T.

/

Campbell,

If

get a

chusetts, (he had been a member of tin legislature fot foui and of course, as he could not be bought, he mu-t go oi In tore was arrested the last time ; therefore there w.t- no
\

I

LIFE OF REV.

T.
i

<
I

CAMl'B
v."!

'

Ml

I

of

ki:v. T.

C4.

C

\MI'l:l

I

I

my
.•all

family here now lmf her— Catharine Amelia

ii-ifc
i-

he

old in

Ih'' spring of ,1*77. They wife employ. .1 Colonel G. S. Thomas, assistant I'nited States cast' into the attorney for the State of Georgia, to bring my She gave her to pay liim S-'iO. United States Court, and

ind daughter Cassey. as wo name. She was 1-1 years were both in Atlanta. My

f,„-

,,,,..

About tlm- da\
1

-

aft.'

a

renin

iiiation*

from
wife,
;

the Attorney General.

also received a letter

from

my

informing me
the
j.

of her
I

same afternoon

having written received a cot

to President

Granl inieation from tit

and

D

allium! of Justice,

informing me

thai

my

wife (Mrs. Harriet

agreed

o-old

watch
in

as security for the

payment.
it

Colonel
"if1

Thomas was

down
it

Savannah on

business.

and son scut My was then brought out again, now went down <> I. before Judge Hopkins, and gavel 5 o'clock Savannah, on my way home. I got to Savannah al The tn-Nt day, at 2 o'clock p. in., T was in the afternoon.
Willi great difficulty lie got up to my counsel at Atlanta.

and from Campbell) had written a letter to the President; statements made therehrf— said letter having been referred to be made in m\ him—that an immediate investigation should was ordered Just when I case. through reading tiiis letter
I

signed.
1

down

I

got found the assi taut attorney the office, and there Ih said Colonel G. Thorn G gin general for the State of eived al Ail mta, ordering them to 1" en n that a dispatch had
to
1
. <

I

arrested upon an old

suit,

which was no( only out

of date, bin

had been decided
jail at

in

my favor

by

the

Supreme Court.
I

In this
tin:

case the judge refused to take bonds.

was

then, put in

He had an afti take my case into the United States Court. told tome. drawn "up, already forme to sign. He read e before th c.i there was tin otii him that was all right but of Georgia, which ought al o Supr, me Court of the State
it 1
i

;

Savannah, which had been condemned 1>\ the grand jury I was kept there for eight, ,,n account of it- unhealthiness. months and ten day-. The first month 1 was kept in a cell -half feet wide. nine feel long and four and down stairs, The prisoners were let out to walk in a hall six feet wide once Mr. Russell, after I had been there about four in two weeks. weeks, ordered me to go up stairs, and every day after thai my cell was unlocked, and 1 was allowed to walk aboul the hall all
a friend of ours to day. My wife also made arrangement with send mi' something to eat every day. She also sent me medifor her knowledge of the medicinal qualities of roots and, cines,

Mil CAlil HI

I

"'

JrSTICK,
J.i.

W.1-1U

UTO

l>

'

L57J.

Tests G. Cami-bki.l, Chatham C(
tn m roui "-"'I i" deeply United Suites attorn, s foi In
I

t} Jail, ,S;.\ :uiii:ili

' I

uiSni

The President hn
i

ref.
I

rred

me

your
i

let

f

the 13th ii

nddr.
,

-"I tohii

pi;

coiifbn
ia,

i.

nl in
'",'

Savannah
t)

i

>-oui

»Ki
.

and have
i

Gcorj
lit
J

cxpm
;>.
I

to ca

him
;
i

n

i

,1,

.„,.

i,,.

.,,

iivo anil in rsisti
li I.

sell

hcvi
tin

fro

Ii

,.

will

do

can w-ltatt-vi full) be done for yon rirtt Very respectfully,
i

thruus.

on that

must

in

and
I

tam

l.,v,

ABU
I

..„.,.,,,,.,,
j

till

I

II:

mi \
1'

i

OF JUSI Ml,
16, ISTj.

Was
ill,-

'

"

C„ Noi ember
have

lhi:i:i

i

i

'o'i'iii

i

'
.

Atlanta, Gsi
Hi.

herbs was very extensive. I was attacked with a severe cough, and a swelling in my a liniment and body, but was relieved of them by rubbing with made by her. taking three doses a daj of a> syrup which was I had been three or I wrote a letter to President Giant, after
four months in
jail,

;,„,! asking of him relief, has been dressed a lettei to Mr Farrow, the attorn, letti r to him, Gi'i.i t. referrinc a com of youl be done 'f anythina can ""1 i" ',, ,„;, -i, 'to mil s-oui husband to be r. lievctl from hi imj
i
i

Mu".M*

Yourlettei of

nil.

instant, addressed to the

Pre
l.«.
1

referred to

me

1

bun,
I

•'

>i

youi relief, and to
to deliM-r

,

,

rnfli i .,ur husband
l

1

to

do vhateve.

i

i

ih.

Government
"',,

pont informed

me

and, in answer, Attorney General Plervcthat he did not see how he could do anything

Very

from theditiieulty uudei respectfully,

\

i'"

'!:'.'

M

.,,,.,.,., ,,.,

k

™Z?g\*

^.'t'lViud Suue.,

>{

1

.11

I.

nl

REV.

T.

Ci.

CUIl'Iill,!,.

brought
hul
.

into

tin:

United States Court.

He

said,

"Tli.it

is

so;

LIFE OF REV.

T.

C4.

CAM I'M
to

I

1

.

25

yon Imd butter lol us gel tliis ease first." lie then went awa\ and came back the. next day, and said, " Colonel II. P. Farrow requested me to say thai he had been slow to move; but now lie would move, and should be righted. Thai must gel S50 ready, and as soon as they saw whal action would be taken by Judge Tompkins, thej would go to work on my case.
I I

was Before this-in 1SGG-I wa
This offer of $35,000

first

made

me
a

i,000

myself

and the direction of white land owners to locate on the Island wherever I cl
belt or

the year 1 year to preach under a hou e built to suit
In
in

the black

I then said, "Jly papers are not properly before the Supreme Conn, and that I wanted them brought before the United States Court and properly prepared." He replied "You are all

me bj letter of an order having been sent partmenl of Justice, to Colonels Farrow and Thomas, to have all mj cases brought into the United States Court. There was only two cases now against me; for when was last in Darien, before the court, I drew a plea myself in d against support of a motion to dismiss five indictments f
from the

I

right." Mi wife informed

prison a. m., and handcuffed .about 7 o'clock the State prison ca me along me and, with a chaiu about twelve feel long, dragged Central railroad, and tlv the streets of Savannah to the Savannah, to a p me one hundred and forty miles from Jack Smith's, in Washington camp on the plantation of Colonel The weather was ret county, State of Georgia. when we go there, took me up in a wagon. I was helpless

for mc when they came anj more 1 told the jailor not to send I had made up my mind to die to set me out by bargains, as from On or about the 12th of January, 187G, the guard

main land.

m

they

me at the previous term. showed il to a Democratic lawyer, who was very anxious for me to employ him. agreed to give liim $30 if he was successful. He went to the judge, and after
I 1

at 1 o'clock in the

a short

conversation
I

he

made

granted the o
to not i,c

not

r. It was done I was well satisfied that the other two cases would it. amount to anytliing, unless 1 failed to defend them. About three weeks after this a letter came from my wife,

the motion, when the judge so quickly that no one appeared

chai night-my hands being I tried of the wagon. had a very had fall in getting out ink and paper and pen and ink, and fmallj did get pen, hey much from my fall. 1 suffered very a letter to my wife. brush. It - imposand ordered me to
1

Wcre

clearing land, sible to describe the

pile

way

to which prisoners
tl

were worked.

They

wcre taken out mer-and kepi

as

informing

me

of

my

case having been dismissed by the

Supreme

Conn

of Georgia. My counsel failed to file the brief of evidence with the bill of exceptions. Upon a proper showing, case

my

coidd have been brought de novo even then. But I saw nrysclf betrayed, and resolved to suffer or die! There were certain
persons, (Democrats,) out of pretended pity, wanted me nowas they said Republicans had deserted mc to accept of offers
that
to

with one hour to work as long as it was light, If to They had breakfast before daj light. for dinner. with the as most cxperl men to be cut the strongest and with hmi otli r man had to keep stroke made leaders, and evi ., n failed to do so, thej wen b at all daylong; and ifthej and
i

yo

ild

se<

both winter and sum-

or unmercifully with a leather strop,

a

bugg)

trace,

given

had teen mad'/ to mi namely, $35,000 and keep ijiiirt, and preach as the white ministers directed, or leave the Stair.

from
die

fifty to I

am

one hundred strokes, until they well satisfied that four men in the

camp where

would keep up or I was

was considered one oi the were whipped to death— ami this These beatings made men reckless, best ramps in the State. like wild men, to get the and they would rush here and there, I must say that the guards were alow favor of the guard.

20

LIFE OF REV.

T.

(.'.

CAMPBELL.

LIFE OF

I'.r.v.

1. a.

CAMP].:
i

!

I

.

•-'.

and brutal set of men, as a general thing. .Yon could hear them all the time calling out to the men, "I don't hear those .ins Go in with those axs! Go in with those axs!" If a man could not stand the work, Hun lie was reported, and of course beaten. Women were treated in the same manner. I was in this cam]) eleven months and twenty-one days. Two women one a prisoner and the other a hired woman (both colored]—had white babies—which shows the stale of morals there. I preached in this camp. I was for three' Sundays in chains bul the Monday morning after the third Sunday my chains were taken off, and I was put as overseer of the wheelwright and blacksmith shops. The keys of the store bouses and cribs were given to me, as also the books for all acMr. counts, of work done on the place, or for out neighbors. and Mrs. Smith always, from thai time, treated me very kindly.
!

; a woman <! remarksay that Mrs. Campbell (my wife) able good judgment, guided by firm Christian prin Cod for h .,, no Ian, uage to express my thankful

mu
I

l

I

I

i

both wife and

I

hill.

-

During the whole
or parlies "f men persons that they

of this time

I

was
jails
v.

in

dread

i

I

the

1

it-khix,


;

who broke open
wanted out

and pri?on cam]

to get

of the

cam.- from their table. My wife sent me every month a box of nourishments and medicines—clothing, soda-crackers, pound-cake, strawberry and other preserves, found that pickled eggs. &C. Since 1 have been oul of prison

My meals

sugar-cakes,

I

Tim

ENT>.

wife went to the principle keeper and stated my case to him, and through her .statements he was induced to have my chains taken ofl. Yet I feel under many obligations to Colonel J. T. Smith and lady for their kindness to me. My wife and daughter were, dining mj confinement, in the to city of Atlanta; and every dollar thai she had been able collect from her customers was used up in trying to help me.

my

in the winter to sell and in the summer, went into the woods around Atlanta and picked blackand from the berries, and brought them to the city to sell About three fields brought strawberries in, ami sold them. weeks before I got home January G, 1S77—my little girl went
; ;

She also made up medicine

out to work, so as to keep a room, that

1

might have

a place to

come once more, and

lie

sent to President Grant

with them. She wrote all the letters by her mother. In this connection, I

__ARI£S

I

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