T HE N EWSLETTER

OF THE

M C H ENRY C OUNTY C OMPOSITE S QUADRON

M C H ENRY C OUNTY P ATROL
C IVIL A IR P ATROL - US A IR F ORCE A UXILIARY HTTP :// WWW . GROUP 22. NET / MCCS S EPTEMBER 2006

G ALT F LYERS

AND

T IRES
By 1st Kalemis Lt James

The seventh annual Flyers and Tires classic car, motorcycle and air show was held at Galt Airport in August. The show was the largest of its kind in McHenry County. More important than size, said Michael Stanard (airport owner) to the Northwest Herald, was the fact that the show attracted new people who might not otherwise visit the facility. The event hosted hot rods, classic cars and antique cars of all ages. Woodstock HarleyDavidson performed a precision riding demonstration with free demo rides. Helicopter rides will gave attendees a bird's-eye view of the show. And there was a superb air show featuring aeronautical acrobats. Several cadets and senior members volunteered their time on Saturday and Sunday to help with the show. Our duties included color guard, display safety, security, and ticket sellers.

I NFORMATION Deadline for all submissions is the 25th of the preceding month. Email submissions to jkalemis@comcast.net, editor or deliver a hardcopy. All photographs are by 1Lt. James Kalemis unless otherwise noted.

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A DVANCED T ECHNOLOGIES A CADEMY
By C/Major Maria Mangano ATA took place in Oshkosh, WI, from 4-13 Aug. I was privileged to serve as the Cadet Commander for that activity. My unique position allowed me to work with some of the best Senior Members in the nation. Advanced Technologies are emerging technologies that help CAP members complete their missions. We worked with a program that illustrated satellite orbits and allowed the user to find and track specific satellite locations. My favorite system was the ARCHER system. Two high-resolution cameras ride underneath a CAP SAR aircraft (which is manufactured in Australia but is similar to the Cessna 206) and constantly take photos of the ground underneath the plane. Each picture is assigned a number. The number depends on the amount of light that is reflected from the ground. Commercialized areas, such as shopping malls, cars, rivers or houses will reflect more light then fields or trees. The computer system, which is located inside the aircraft, reads the number and marks it for further investigation if the number is higher then the standard. The ARCHER system is useful for detecting plane crashes. A lot of light will reflect from metal so the computer will pick up the reading and alert the operator. At ATA, we also worked with satellite photographs and computer programming. Although the course involved a lot of technology, we had down time for volleyball, soccer, and a trip to the lake. On the last night the cadets were allowed to stay up as late as they wanted, and only two of us made it the entire night. I enjoyed the experience and can’t wait to work with the Activity Director Major Phil Holbrook again next year!

F ROM

THE

C OMMANDER

When I stepped into command, of what was then Galt Composite Squadron, there were 15 members on the roster. About five cadets were actively participating and two to three officers. This past month, with the addition of Cadet Phelan, we have reached a milestone mark of over 50 members! Congratulations to each of you for your contributions of excellence. Officer staff has increased enough that we can now truly function as a composite squadron. We will insure that all staff is in place for smooth running of the cadet program, other officers will be able to participate in officer training designed for professional growth or Emergency Services proficiency. We have created the new MCCS headquarters in Hanger I-6 at Galt Airport. This was no small task. Thanks to Mr. Stanard and Mr. Djurin, the airport owners for their invitation and support, Joe and Dan and Carolyn, Airport Staff; Mr. Bill Lyford, commander, Woodstock VFW; Mr. Steve Fike, Commander, Johnsburg VFW; Mr. John Novak, Retail Director, Home of the Sparrow; CAP members: SM Fred Hyzny III, 1 Lt. James Kalemis, 2Lt Diane Workman, Major Ken Anderson, 2Lt Mike McMahon, 1Lt Nancy Haas, Cadets Tyler Roman, Steven DeCraene, and Maria Mangano; Mike and Nancy Miller; the McHenry County Historical Society; I hope have not forgotten anyone! Looking forward, I see opportunities that we can’t imagine and more growth both within and without as we reach out into the aviation community surrounding us. Our diligence or should that be vigilance is paying off, hats off to each of our volunteer heroes, Your Proud CC,

Rhonda Anderson, Major, CAP

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C HICAGO A IR
By Capt Doris Mangano

AND

W ATER S HOW 2006
When they announced that one of the pilots was from Crystal Lake, I felt so proud, like he was a part of me! I have seen the Blue Angels before, but they still left me breathless. With some confusion, MCCS had been promised a van for the ride back to the train station, but it was sent with another squadron. So we walked to the bus, and many of the cadets had never taken a bus ride before. We had just enough time to grab food and eat on the train on the way home. We were all tired, hot and sweaty, but the card game continued through the ride. Thanks to all the cadets who came, they all worked very hard, and thanks to the SMs Hyzny, without their help the day would not have been so smooth. We’ll find out how much we earned in October. What a great bunch of people we have in MCCS!

I was disappointed when I arrived at the train station and found we had only 13 people to sell down in Chicago - and 2 were my children, not even in CAP! But typically, the day grew exciting as the cadets meshed together, playing cards and talking on the train. When we checked in to the activity, our group was separated based on need, and the few turnout of cadets at this year’s event. All the cadets worked very hard. The day became very humid. No wind even on the beach. The sell was harder this year—gas prices I guess, less people wanted to buy. We continued to sell until the Blue Angels flew over the crowd. The ceiling was low, so their thunder was louder than usual. They seemed to be skimming the lake, they appeared so low.

C HARACTERISTICS
By 1st Lt James Kalemis

OF AN

O FFICER
Col. Henry Horton, USAF, says there are Thirteen Traits of Effective Leaders. Respect, empowerment, accountability, listening, sincerity, reward, discipline, mission, credit, communication, attitude, integrity and courage. All great traits, to be sure, but recently I witnessed a few more traits indicative of a great leader: poise, fast-thinking, and accomplishing the task at hand. During a squadron meeting, C/2d Lt Krystal Freund was inspecting the formations While inspecting a cadet, she leaned a little too much forward and her cover came flying off. In one quick swoop she caught her fleeting cover, placed back on her head and continued the inspection without batting and eye. If you were not looking, you would never see it. But the camera did!

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K ING

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R OCK 2006
like a cadet and must participate in the events without getting damaged. On Saturday the teams line up for formation and start the tasks. Generally the teams are judged on the entry and reporting to the judge, how well the task was carried out, and the reporting out and exit. The other points of judging depend on the individual judge. In the evening the teams are tested again—this time on their culinary skills. Yes, the teams cook fancy dinners on the campground for the cadet staff in hopes of getting the “golden spoon”. Sometimes the dinner can be what determines the place a team gets, so every detail counts. I’ve seen crystal wineglasses, fancy tablecloths, napkins, candles, flowers, and lots of other general accessories one does not normally see in the middle of the woods that were brought by cadets trying to win over the hungry cadet staff. Then comes the sacred tradition of King of the Rock’s capture the flag with glow sticks. Splitting the teams so half with covers are on one side and half without covers on the other side of the camp ground, the teams come up with creative and often humorous ways to get the other team’s flag and escape with it without being caught. That caps the exciting day at King of the Rock. On Sunday we formed up and had a Moral Leadership class to reinforce what we learned. The first, second, and third place teams are recognized in front of the rest of the teams and the first place team gets the trophy (large with a golden eagle poised). King of the Rock is a blast and I hope we have a large number of cadets and seniors participating next year. In this King of the Rock we represented MCCS very well and we need to do so again.

By C/2nd Lt Emily Medina

A weekend were you can experience the meaning of leadership and teamwork while doing bizarre tasks from crawling through the mud under low ropes to constructing a raft out of foam noodles and twine for a person to sit on out on the water. If you like to do leadership games, be out in the woods, love camping, have an adventurous spirit, and don’t mind getting dirty, then King of the Rock is just the activity for you. King of the Rock is one weekend long. Friday when you arrive and set up your tent, you are briefed and introduced to King of the Rock. Your team is presented with its 7th member (in past years the seventh member has been a watermelon, egg or tomato). The 7th member must be treated

W ING C ONFERENCE
By 1st Lt James Kalemis

Illinois Wing Conference
6-7 October 2006 Crowne Plaza Hotel Springfield, Illinois As in a professional conference, throughout the day there will be breakout sessions for you to attend. The sessions include several Aerospace Education topics, Emergency Services, Communications, Cadet Activities, and Chaplains. Attendance at two conferences is a requirement for completion of Level III of the Senior Member Professional Development Program. The Wing Conference is an easy and close

way of getting one of them completed and it's only offered every other year. The cost of the conference and banquet dinner is $75 if registered by 15 September, $85 afterwards for seniors, $47 for cadets. The hotel cost for the overnight stay is only $70. For more information or to register, please visit http:// www.search-rescue.net/286/ILWG06/index.html . We will carpool there Friday afternoon and return Saturday night (late).

Johnsburg Parade Noon

Sunday, 10 September

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P ROMOTIONS

W ELCOME
Fred Hyzny Freddy Hyzny David Hyzny Kyle Major Patrick Phelan

NEW

M EMBERS

Dr. Mackie Snebold Kev Stebbins Corey Stohlquist

Cadet Maria Mangano
Major

A EROSPACE E DUCATION
By 1st Lt James Kalemis Title 36 of the United States Code, Section 40302, states that among CAP's purposes are "To provide an organization to encourage and aid citizens of the United States in contributing their efforts, services, and resources in developing aviation and in maintaining air supremacy" and "To provide aviation education and training especially to its senior and cadet members." CAP's Aerospace Education program fulfills this objective of the CAP corporation. In the squadron we do many AE activities including the Model Rocketry program, building airplane models, windtunnels, paper models and gliders, all conducted with the objective of teaching AE. Cadets can not promote unless they pass an AE test with their Leadership test. But over the past year we have been fortunate to take our AE program "on the road". C/Major Mangano and I, plus recently C/Hendler and C/B Freund, have been doing rocketry presentations at the local libraries. Our program consists of making the Fizzy Flyer, CD Hovercraft, launching the Estes air rocket outdoors, plus various crosswords and connect-the-dots. The most recent presentation was at Huntley Library where we had the largest audience yet. Over twenty children participated. We also provide information and recruiting materials about CAP to anyone interested. And most importantly, it's a fun time for all. Hopefully next year we will get to do a round of the libraries again.

Waukegan Air Show Saturday, 9 September 8:00 to 17:00 Waukegan Regional Airport

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C HAIN

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C OMMAND
son holding the position above them on the chain. For example, Cadet Element Members contact Element Leaders, the Element Leaders contact Flight Sergeant. No cadets should be contacting the Cadet Commander directly except Flight Commanders. No cadets should be contacting the Squadron commander except the Cadet Commander. One common question that we receive concerns the consequences of "jumping" the CAP Chain of Command. "Jumping" the Chain of Command is a buzz phrase; the precise language is "insubordination." One is denying one's subordinate position when one goes over the boss' head. CAPR 35-3, Membership Termination, provides the possible consequences of insubordination or "failure to obey rules, regulations, and orders of higher authority" (CAPR 35-3, 4.b.) It is imperative that cadets follow the proper chain of command. By following the chain of command no individual officer or cadet is overloaded with questions and requests. Even more importantly, cadets are selected to positions to further their leadership training. To jump chain of command is to deny them this training and that is unfair to the cadet. In a recently instituted policy at MCCS if you jump chain of command in e-mail, you will receive a return e-mail with the simple message "follow your chain of command". But if you do not get the help or information you need proceed up the chain until you have resolution. It goes without saying, in a matter of cadet safety – always contact the commander, deputy commander or nearest officer directly and immediately.

By C/1st Lt Steven Decraene Cadet staff and officers often receive questions about the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) "Chain of Command" from cadets and adults interested in volunteer service with CAP. There is a difference between CAP’s organizational structure and CAP’s Chain of Command. For information on organizational structure refer to CAPR 20-1, Organization of Civil Air Patrol, which describes the organizational structure of CAP. The CAP Chain of Command is National Commander, Region Commander, Wing Commander, Group Commander, Squadron Commander CAP cadets are involved in practical leadership training as part of their progression in the cadet program. Cadets follow a cadet Chain of Command structure under the authority of the Squadron Commander (see CAPR 20-1 for details about the cadet to senior member relationship). MCCS Cadet Chain of Squadron Commander Dep Commander Cadets Cadet Commander Cadet Flight Commander Command Structure, in order: Maj. Rhonda Anderson 1 Lt Esther L. Medina C/1st Lt Steven DeCraene Bravo Flight: C/2d Lt. Freund Echo Flight: C/MSgt Freund Cadet Flight Sergeant Bravo Flight: C/2d Lt. Medina Echo Flight C/SMSgt Hendler Element Leaders, Element Members To follow the chain of command one simply contacts the per-

P LUTO

A

P LANET N O L ONGER

By 1st Lt James Kalemis After years of debate, astronomers decided on 24 August to demote Pluto from being called a planet. We all learned that there are nine planets in our solar system. Findings over the last decade proved that we either have eight planets or twelve - but not nine. The International Astronomical Union downgraded the ninth rock from the sun in a historic new planetary definition. Pluto, a planet since 1930, got the boot because it didn't meet the new rules, which say a planet not only must orbit the sun and be large enough to assume a nearly round shape, but must "clear the neighborhood around its orbit." That disqualifies Pluto, whose oblong orbit overlaps Neptune's. From the IAU website: "This means that the Solar System consists of eight planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. A new distinct class of objects called "dwarf planets" was also decided. It was agreed that planets and dwarf planets are two distinct classes of objects. The first members of the dwarf planet category are Ceres, Pluto and 2003 UB313 (temporary name for an object beyond Pluto's orbit). To the memory of Pluto as a planet, I will be removing the Pluto ES patch off my BDUs.

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S ENIOR S TAFF
Commander …………………... Major Rhonda Anderson Deputy Commander Seniors …………. 1Lt James Kalemis Deputy Commander Cadets ………….. 1Lt Esther Medina Leadership Officer /Advisor to CC..…Major Ken Anderson Medical Officer……………..………..Dr. Mackie Snebold Nurse Officer ……………………... Capt Doris Mangano Safety ………………….…………... 2Lt Mike McMahon Historian ……………………………...SM Freddy Hyzny Administration/Personnel………….... 1Lt Sharon Freund Aerospace Education ………...……… 1Lt James Kalemis Cadet Programs ……………………... 1Lt Esther Medina 2Lt Paul Ebanks 2Lt Diane Workman SM Fred Hyzny SM Freddy Hyzny Communications……………….……..SM John Peterman Finance …………...……….……… Capt Doris Mangano Logistics …………………………..….. SM Kev Stebbins Public Affairs & Marketing …..…..… Capt Doris Mangano 1Lt James Kalemis Emergency Services ………………..... 1Lt James Kalemis Capt Corey Stohlquist Professional Development …….…. Capt Corey Stohlquist Moral Leadership Officer ……………. 2Lt Mike McMahon SM Larry Kokkelenberg Transportation Officer …….………..…….SM Fred Hyzny Capt Corey Stohlquist
CAP-USAF CAP-RAP TSgt Kenneth Roth (847) 688-5810 email: k.roth1@sbcglobal.net W EBSITES McHenry County Composite Squadron http://www.group22.net/mccs Illinois Wing News Blog http://ilcapnews.blogs.com Group 22 CAP http://www.group22.net Illinois Wing CAP http://www.ilcap.org Great Lakes Region CAP http://glr.cap.gov/files/index.html National Headquarters CAP http://www.cap.gov

C ADET S TAFF
Cadet Commander ………….……. 1st Lt Steven DeCraene Executive Officer ………………….... SMSgt Jared Hendler First Sergeant …………….…………. TSgt Ethan Peterman Flight Commander ……………...…... 2d Lt Krystal Freund Flight Commander ……………...…... CMSgt Emily Medina Flight Sergeant ……………………...… MSgt Brian Freund Flight Sergeant ………………..…..… SMSgt Scott Hendler Aerospace Education Officer ………. Major Maria Mangano Emergency Services ………….…… 1st Lt Steven DeCraene Communication Officer ……………… 2d Lt Krystal Freund Training Officer ………………….... Major Maria Mangano Recruiting/PT Officer ……...……..... CMSgt Jared Hendler Supply Officer …………………….. SSgt Shelby McMahon Color Guard Commander ……....…… CMSgt Emily Medina

Events Calendar
www.kalemis.com/events.doc

C ONTACT I NFORMATION
3806 Spy Glass Ridge Road Crystal Lake, IL 60012 (815) 788 0737

M EETING I NFORMATION
Tuesday’s 6:45pm—9:15pm Galt Airport 5112 Greenwood Road, I-6 Greenwood, IL 60097

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