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Lab 3 ABSTRACT This lab work is fullfil by using Matlab software to convert continues signal to discrete signal.

Continuous and discrete signals can be related through the sampling operation in the sense that a discrete signal can be obtained by performing sampling on a continuous time signal with the uniform sampling period.

INTRODUCTION A continuous signal or a continuous-time signal is a varying quantity (a signal) whose domain, which is often time, is a continuum (e.g., a connected interval of the reals). That is, the function's domain is an uncountable set. The function itself need not be continuous. To contrast, a discrete time signal has a countable domain, like the natural numbers. The signal is defined over a domain, which may or may not be finite, and there is a functional mapping from the domain to the value of the signal. The continuity of the time variable, in connection with the law of density of real numbers, means that the signal value can be found at any arbitrary point in time. A discrete signal or discrete-time signal is a time series consisting of a sequence of qualities. In other words, it is a type series that is a function over a domain of discrete integral. Unlike a continuous-time signal, a discrete-time signal is a function of a continuous argument; however, it may have been obtained by sampling from a discrete-time signal, and then each value in the sequence is called a sample. When a discrete-time signal obtained by sampling is a sequence corresponding to uniformly spaced times, it has an associated sampling rate; the sampling rate is not apparent in the data sequence, and so needs to be associated as a separate data item

OBJECTIVES: 1. To know how to convert continuous signal to discrete signal using MATLAB. 2. To know the differentiate between continuous signal and discrete signal.

How to Convert Continues Signal to Discrete Signal % compute continuous signal to discrete signal amp=3; t=0:0.05:0.5; f_Hz=5; f_HzRs= 2*pi*f_Hz; y=amp*sin(f_HzRs*t); stem(t,y); grid

Figure 1 : Show the discrete signal are generated

To separate 2 figure

% compute continuous signal to discrete signal %two figures (sine wave + continuous to discrete signal) amp=3; t=0:0.05:0.5; f_Hz=5; f_HzRs= 2*pi*f_Hz; y=amp*sin(f_HzRs*t); figure(1); plot(t,y); figure(2); stem(t,y); grid

Figures 2 : Show the sine wave and discrete signal

Combine 3 figure (AM) %time interval[0,1] t=0:0.005:0.5; vd=8*cos(2*pi*5*t); vc=0.1*cos(2*pi*15*t); sum=vd+vc; multi=vd.*vc; %plot 3 figures figure(1); plot(t,vd); figure(2); plot(t,vc); figure(3); plot(t,sum); grid

%time interval[0,1] t=0:0.005:0.5; vd=8*cos(2*pi*5*t); vc=0.1*cos(2*pi*15*t); sum=vd+vc; multi=vd.*vc; %plot 3 figures figure(1); plot(t,vd); figure(2); plot(t,vc); figure(3); plot(t,sum); grid xlabel('Time(sec)') ylabel('y(AM)') title('graph of y(AM) vs t(sec)')

Figure 3 : Continuous Signal CONCLUSION In conclusion, we can conclude that a continuous signal is one that is measured over a time axis and has a value defined at every instance. The real world is continuous (ie. analog). A discrete signal is one that is defined at integers, and thus is undefined in between samples (digital is an example of a discrete signal, but discrete does not have to imply digital). Instead of a time axis, a discrete signal is gathered over a sampling axis. Discrete signals are usually denoted by x[k] or x[n], a continuous signal is x(t) for example. Laplace transforms are used for continuous analysis; Z-transforms are used for discrete analysis. Fourier Transform can be used for either.