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MARCH 21-27, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Debate over ballot
Committee, residents discuss
referendums wording. PAGE 2
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
By KATHLEEN DUFFY
The Hopewell Sun
Hopewell resident Ritch Gaiti
takes his work rather seriously.
The former senior director for
Merrill Lynch spends his time
passionately crafting beauty to be
enjoyed for generations to come.
While seated at Boro Bean in
Hopewell on an unseasonably
warm March afternoon, Gaiti
spoke with The Hopewell Sun
about his infatuation.
For the past 10 years, painting
striking, layered images has
reigned supreme in his mind.
After the Brooklyn native fell
head-over-heels in love with the
West, he picked up his brushes
and created a new perspective.
Im self-taught, he said. I
didnt go to art school, though I
did study with some artists.
He has trained himself to cap-
ture moments.
With more than 500 completed
oil paintings, Gaiti chiefly focuses
on conveying feelings surround-
ing Native American culture,
herds of horses and the great ex-
panse of the western the United
States.
I paint to really communicate
what that subject is feeling at that
moment, he said. Im trying to
communicate the soul of the sub-
ject.
A number of Gaitis horse
paintings are currently on dis-
play at the Straube Center in Pen-
nington as the focus of the show,
Strength, Grace and Freedom.
Horses are universal, he
said.
The exhibit can be viewed from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day now
through May 25 for no cost of ad-
mission.
The title of the show, explains
gallery curator Alisandra Wed-
erich, is taken from the Chinese
zodiac for the horse.
Even better, as the Straube
Center is a lively office complex,
she said, showcased work is sold
without commission.
Were a nonprofit gallery, so
100 percent of the proceeds go to
the artists, she said.
With art rotating on a quarter-
ly basis, office tenants, their
clients and the community at
large all have ample opportunity
to purchase new dcor.
This order of presentation is
based in artistic SoHo in New
York City, Wederich explains.
Youd see this more in the big
city than a little town like Pen-
nington, she said.
As a Big Apple native, Gaitis
work fits right in with the
Straube Centers philosophy of
rotating paintings.
Its my first time exhibiting
there, he said. Its very nice and
very accommodating to artists
and patrons.
His paintings have also been at
exhibits in Santa Fe, N.M., Jack-
son Hole, Wy., and Fort Collins,
Local artist paints the Wild West
KATHLEEN DUFFY/The Hopewell Sun
Artist Ritch Gaiti explains a horse painting on his iPad at Boro Bean
in downtown Hopewell recently. Shown above is Gaitis painting, The
Hard Breeze, which depicts a texturized horse in action.
please see EXHIBIT, page 12
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 21-27, 2012
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By KATHLEEN DUFFY
The Hopewell Sun
The length of an interpretative
statement on the May 8 ballot was
discussed and debated in detail by
township committee members
and area residents at the March
12 council meeting in Hopewell.
The statement in question ref-
erences the $4.1 million referen-
dum for the Ewing Lawrence
Sewerage Authority (ELSA).
The council originally ap-
proved the ordinance on Nov. 28,
but according to administrator
Paul Pogorzelski, area residents
filed a petition within 20 days of
that ordinance taking effect,
which requires a referendum vote
to be approved.
Council members were divided
between choosing a long, explana-
tory style interpretative state-
ment or using more concise lan-
guage.
Township attorney Steven
Goodell said the goal was for the
language to be as simple and di-
rect as possible to let people un-
derstand the results of their vote.
Ray Nichols, a member of the
townships environmental com-
mission and a Hopewell resident,
submitted a sample for the inter-
pretative statement that was
largely debated during the meet-
ing.
As part of his 238-word propo-
sition to the township for perusal,
Nichols wrote, Obtaining
sewage treatment capacity is a
necessary prerequisite to provid-
ing the foundation for sewer serv-
Committee, residents
debate wording for
May ballot statement
please see ORDINANCE, page 6
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BRIEFS
Spring flower sale
is April 6 to 8
The Union Fire Company and
Rescue Squad in Titusville will be
holding its annual spring flower
sale April 6 to 8. The sale opens
each day at 7 a.m. and has a large
variety of flowers, such as hy-
acinths, tulips, daffodils and oth-
ers.
The Easter Bunny will also be
making an appearance each day.
Fundraiser to benefit
scholarship fund
The Hopewell United
Methodist Church will host a
fundraising dinner to benefit the
Joanne Davison Memorial Schol-
arship Fund on Saturday, April 28
from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Purchase tick-
ets at the door. Adults: $10, chil-
dren 6 to 12: $5, and children
younger than 6 eat free. Three
kinds of pasta will be available:
regular and whole grain spaghet-
ti, fettuccine, baked ziti; three
kinds of sauce, meat, plain and
Alfredo. Meatballs and salad, Ital-
ian bread and homemade
desserts will all be available and
served in an all-you-can-eat, buf-
fet style. Visit www.hopewell-
methodist.org/events or call (609)
466-0471 for more details.
Dinner and line dancing
fundraiser on March 24
To help support and raise
awareness for Christines Hope
for Kids, come out on Saturday,
March 24, at 6 p.m. at the Calvary
Baptist Church, 3 E. Broad St.,
Hopewell, for dinner and a fun
night of line dancing.
The menu will include the Bap-
tists famous barbecued beef
brisket, barbecued chicken,
baked potato, baked beans, cole
slaw, applesauce, cornbread,
desserts and beverages.
Ticket prices: adults $12, sen-
iors $11, children, 6 to 12: $6, and
children 5 and younger are free.
Call the church office at (609)
466-1880 for advance tickets and
additional information.
Narcotics Anonymous
of New Jersey
(800) 992-0401
PSA
Visit us online at
www.hopewellsun.com
MARCH 21-27, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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Mercer County artists on
display at community college
The talents of 76 Mercer Coun-
ty artists will be on display at the
Gallery at Mercer County Com-
munity College in the exhibit,
Mercer County Artists 2012,
which runs now through April 5.
Curator/consultant Jeffrey
Wechsler juried this years exhi-
bition. Most recently, Wechsler
was senior art curator at the Jane
Voorhees Zimmerli Museum at
Rutgers University, New
Brunswick. He has selected 78
works of art 18 of which are
sculptural for this years show.
He also selected the Best in Show,
two Jurors Choice and six Honor-
able Mention awards.
According to MCCC Gallery Di-
rector and Curator Tricia Fagan,
a record-breaking 175 artists en-
tered 288 works of art for consid-
eration, making this one of the
countys most selective shows.
Gallery hours are: Tuesday, 11
a.m. to 3 p.m.; Wednesday, 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m.; and
Thursday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and
3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
The exhibition is co-sponsored
by and supported through a grant
from the Mercer County Cultural
and Heritage Commission, with
funding from the New Jersey
State Council of the Arts/Depart-
ment of State, a partner of the
National Endowment for the
Arts.
For more information about
exhibits at the MCCC Gallery,
visit www.mccc.edu/gallery. Direc-
tions to the campus and a campus
map can be found at
www.mccc.edu.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 21-27, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
KATHLEEN DUFFY
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
W
e could guess that there is
waste in government. Even,
at times, fraud. It kind of
comes with the territory.
But we indeed were shocked to
learn that tens of millions of dollars
have been lost due to abuse of the free
lunch program.
Recently, Gov. Christie announced
the formation of a task force to study
abuse and manipulation of the school
funding formula due to fraud in the
Free and Reduced Price School Lunch
Program. According to the governor,
recent studies and news reports
clearly identify high levels of fraudu-
lent enrollment in the program un-
dercutting the states ability to fairly
and appropriately determine aid lev-
els for schools. A 2011 report by the
State Auditor found that as many as 37
percent of the students in the program
are enrolled fraudulently.
Thirty seven percent? More than
one in three? Thats a shocking num-
ber.
If its true, heck, if its anywhere
close to being true, then, yes, someone
needs to clean house.
The task force will consist of seven
members from both inside and outside
of government.
Now, were usually not big on task
forces or blue-ribbon committees or
whatever other study groups might be
formed. Too often they spend time and
tax money looking at something, pon-
dering various scenarios and then
writing a report that results in no ac-
tion whatsoever.
This time, we have to hope that the
task force figures out where the prob-
lems are and how to fix them. And
then, the state fixes them.
Its no secret that N.J. taxpayers are
overburdened especially when it
comes to property taxes. There can be
zero tolerance for mismanagement,
waste, abuse, fraud, whatever you
want to call it.
This applies across the board when
it comes to spending tax dollars even
when it comes to free lunches.
Free lunch fraud
Seriously? Someone is scamming the schools free-lunch program?
A hunger for reform
The governor says tens of millions of
dollars have been lost due to fraud in
the free lunch program at schools.
Lets hope his task force gets to the
bottom of the problem and remedies
are forthcoming.
ices in certain areas of the township.
This purpose is not considered a cur-
rent expense but rather, one which the
township may lawfully undertake as a gen-
eral improvement, and therefore, pay for,
over an extended period of time, through
the issuance of bonds.
In adopting this ordinance, the town-
ship explicitly reserved the right at some
time in the future to determine that it (ob-
taining sewage treatment capacity) spe-
cially benefits certain properties, in which
case it could be determined that all or
some of the cost will be specially assessed
against such properties.
Committeewoman Kimberly Johnson
approved of his suggestion.
I feel its an unbiased view of the town-
ships position, she said at the meeting.
Committeeman Allen Cannon believed
Nichols submission was too long and
would reduce readership in the communi-
ty.
We need something concise, he said.
The more concise it is, the better.
Johnson rebutted that residents can
read the sample ballot prior to voting so as
to not feel rushed in making a decision on
the issue, but she believed an explanation
on why the ordinance was passed in the
first place was needed.
Public input needs to be acknowl-
edged, Committeewoman Vanessa San-
dom said. I think its great that people are
participating.
Sandom said its necessary to educate
voters prior to an actual vote, to and keep
the shorter statement based on past years.
Over the years, she said, theyve always
been very short.
Deputy Mayor James Burd wants to
keep any bias out of the statement, and
Mayor Michael Markulec agreed, calling
the issue both a hot potato and later a
lava rock.
Go into the booth, read the statement
and make a decision, he said. I really
want it to be unbiased.
In other business:
It was decided at the meeting the town-
ship would move forward with the possibil-
ity of adding a referendum vote to the No-
vember election to preserve 1 cent of the
Open Space Tax from sunsetting on Dec.
31.
Presently, there is a 3-cent open space
tax. The sunsetting 1 cent is used for all
purposes, one half cent is used for all pur-
pose but recreation and maintenance, and
one and a half cents are for all purposes
and recreation.
Existing total open space debt in the
township is $15,174,747.
There would be no increase in taxes for
Hopewell residents in relation to the open
space tax-- it would stay the same.
Markulec wants the townships boards
and commissions to discuss the topic be-
fore moving forward with a possible refer-
endum. If approved, it would appear on the
November ballot for voters.
Police officers Mandy Grey and Kevin
Koveloski were honored at the meeting for
saving lives.
On Feb. 11, the pair responded to a call
about an unconscious person. They were
quick to the scene and administered CPR
and breathing until the victims heart
began beating again.
What a wonderful job you do, said
Markulec, referring to the variety of situa-
tions to which the police department re-
sponds.
The township committee is hopeful that
the 2012 budget will be introduced at the
next public council meeting, which will be
held on March 26.
Ordinance originally approved in November
ORDINANCE
Continued from page 2
MARCH 21-27, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Where everyone is welcome!
Worship Services: Sundays 8 & 10am
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This spring, Explorations, sen-
ior daytime learning experiences,
welcomes back two favorites, Sue
Ewarts Basic Drawing & Water
Colors, and Larry Mansiers
Enjoying Shakespeare, as well
as introducing two new courses,
Jack Abrams Magic of Word &
Music: Great American Song-
book and Bill Guthries Science
and Religion: Experiencing a Full
Rich Life.
All courses begin the week of
April 16. A cut off date is set for
April 11. Classes are open to all
senior citizens, with preference
given to Hopewell Valley resi-
dents. Fees are $30 for one course;
$20 for each additional course.
Full descriptions and a simpli-
fied registration form are avail-
able online at www.hvseniors.org.
Explorations brings back favorites
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distributing them to kids at vari-
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Cards2Kids has a new East
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children in need in the area. Con-
tributions can be dropped off at
CG Sports, 15 North Main St.,
Pennington.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
WEDNESDAY
March 21
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Senior Adviso-
ry Board meeting: 2 p.m. at the sen-
ior center, 395 Reading St., Penning-
ton. For more information visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities.
Parental supervision required.
THURSDAY
March 22
FOR ALL
Hopewell Valley Municipal Alliance
Executive Committee meeting:
7:45 a.m. For more information visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Hopewell Township Fire District
No. 1 Union Fire Company and
Rescue Squad meeting: 7 p.m. at
the Hopewell Township Municipal
Services Building. For more informa-
tion visit www.hopewelltwp.org.
Hopewell Township Planning
Board meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the Munic-
ipal Auditorium. For more informa-
tion visit hopewelltwp.org.
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities. Age-
appropriate craft follows story time.
Parental supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Singing, dancing ad rhymes.
Play with musical instruments, pup-
pets, parachutes and more.
FRIDAY
March 23
FOR CHILDREN
Open Play: All ages welcome; adult
supervision required. 11 a.m. to noon
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Come to the
childrens activity room for open
play time. Toys and coloring supplies
will be available.
MONDAY
March 26
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Committee
meeting: 7 p.m. at the Municipal
Building. For more information visit
www.hopewelltwp.org.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat or
large towel. Registration required;
call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn this
ancient art to promote good health
and relaxation. No registration
required.
FOR CHILDREN
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and pre-
schoolers. Stories, songs and finger-
plays. Registration is not required.
Kids Open Craft: All ages. 4 to 5:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the Mer-
cer County Library System. Staff
member will assist kids with the
craft of the week. Parent supervi-
sion required.
TUESDAY
March 27
FOR ALL
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library. This
group welcomes knitters of all lev-
els. Join for a cozy evening of stitch-
ing and conversation.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat or
large towel. Registration required;
call (609) 737-2610.
New Jersey Writers Society Sup-
port Group: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. All welcome
to attend and enjoy challenges of
becoming better writers, defeating
writers block and perfecting the
craft. No registration necessary.
FOR CHIDREN
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System. A
great way to introduce your child to
library story times and reading. Age-
appropriate books shared. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience. Adult
supervision required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Action rhymes,
songs and felt board activities. Age-
appropriate craft follows story time.
Parental supervision required.
calendar PAGE 8 MARCH 21-27, 2012
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Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
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Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
Church collecting for sale
Calvary Baptist Church,
Hopewell, will again be holding
its renowned rummage sale May
31 to June 2.
At this point, the church is
only collecting large items such
as furniture.
If you have such items to do-
nate and need them picked up,
please call or email the church at
(609) 466-1880 or email hcbco@ver
izon.net. The church will let
everyone know when it will begin
to accept other donations.
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All major and minor brands.
Members of the First Presbyte-
rian Church of Titusville part-
nered with the West Trenton
Community Center for a day of
community service on March 10.
The independent, non-profit
WTCC, located at 510 Stuyvesant
Ave. in Trenton, serves the sur-
rounding community by provid-
ing a monthly food pantry, weekly
after school tutoring, a childrens
summer enrichment series, a
Thanksgiving turkey give-a-way
and a free community Christmas
dinner.
The partnership between the
church and WTCC allowed for the
center's building, where many of
the programs are offered, to be re-
freshed through cleaning, paint-
ing, ceiling tile replacement, win-
dow pane replacement and food
pantry improvements.
The WTCC's next food pantry
will be Saturday, March 24.
Donations of non-perishable
food for the pantry may be left in
the church's narthex at 48 River
Drive in Titusville.
Call the church at (609) 737-1385
for more information.
Church members, community center
work together on day of service
Special to The Sun
Members of the First Presbyterian Church of Titusville volunteered
at the West Trenton Community Center on March 10.
NJ AIDS/STD Hotline
(800) 624-2377
PSA
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 21-27, 2012
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
Mercer County Community
College's Holocaust-Genocide Re-
source Center will host two up-
coming events that are open to
the public, Echoes and Reflec-
tions on Wednesday, March 28,
and War Horse on Wednesday,
April 4. Both events will be held
at 4:30 p.m. on the West Windsor
Campus.
Echoes and Reflections is
open to teachers and academic su-
pervisors for grades 6 to 12. A
powerful 21st century resource, it
was created by ADL to connect
Holocaust education to current
curriculum and academic stan-
dards using interactive web-
based technology. Participants
will receive an underwritten copy
of this award-winning curricu-
lum, developed by the Anti-
Defamation League, the USC
Shoah Foundation Institute, and
Yad Vashem.
The event is free and can count
toward three professional devel-
opment credits. Space is limited
for this event, and those interest-
ed in attending need to register
via email at mcholgen@gmail.com.
On Wednesday, April 4, a dis-
cussion entitled, War Horse:
How One Novel (or play, or movie)
Can Teach Peace, will be held at
the Resource Center.
The discussion stems from the
2011 English war epic motion pic-
ture directed by Steven Spielberg,
which was based on a childrens
novel by British author Michael
Morpurgo.
Both the novel and film detail
the remarkable bond between a
man named Albert and his loyal
horse, Joey.
The story follows Joey on an in-
credible journey across the Eng-
lish countryside after the pair are
forcibly separated during World
War I.
Both events are free of charge,
and refreshments will be provid-
ed.
The Holocaust-Genocide Re-
source Center is located on Mer-
cer County Community Colleges
West Windsor Campus, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, on the second floor
of the Library building.
For more information on this
and other events, visit
www.mccc.edu/holocaust or email
mcholgen@gmail.com.
MCCC hosting discussions
Elauwit, publisher of The Sun
newspapers, has announced new
leadership.
Barry Rubens will become
chief executive of Elauwit on
April 1.
This is an exciting moment
for Elauwit, Chairman of the
Board Russell Cann said of
Rubens promotion from his cur-
rent role as chief financial officer.
Barry has brought a wealth of
experience and wisdom to
Elauwit, and we are all excited to
see him use that knowledge to
lead our company.
Rubens succeeds Dan McDo-
nough, Jr., who steps down as
chief executive March 31. McDo-
nough has run the company for
the past three years and will con-
tinue to serve on Elauwits board
of directors and on its executive
committee.
Barry has been a trusted
teammate, a mentor and a friend
for the last three years, McDo-
nough said. He is perfectly suit-
ed to take Elauwit to the next
level and I am excited to support
his efforts to do just that.
In addition to serving as chief
financial officer, Rubens, 51, has
served on the board of directors
of Elauwit. Prior to joining
Elauwits board in 2009, Rubens
served as the senior vice presi-
dent and chief financial officer of
CT Communications, Inc. (NAS-
DAQ: CTCI), where he helped
grow revenues from $40 million to
$160 million.
Alan Bauer has been named
vice chairman of the Elauwit
Media board of directors. He has
served as general manager and
editor of the company since its
formation in 2004. He is responsi-
ble for the daily operations of the
company, overseeing news and
production.
Also, Steve Miller has been
named publisher of all Elauwit
Media publications. In his new
role, Miller will be responsible for
working with community and
business leaders and promoting
the Elauwit Media brand
throughout South and Central
Jersey. Miller has served Elauwit
Media as vice president of sales
and most recently as executive
vice president.
Elauwit is the parent company
of Elauwit Media and Elauwit
Networks.
Elauwit Media publishes 15
weekly newspapers in South and
Central Jersey. Its 16th paper, The
Princeton Sun, will launch next
week, March 28. It has offices in
Haddonfield and Princeton.
Elauwit Networks is a national
leader in providing Internet ac-
cess, telephone service, high defi-
nition video and security services
to multi-unit housing develop-
ments, such as student housing,
apartments, condominiums, hos-
pitals and senior living complex-
es. The company currently serves
properties in more than 20 states
across the nation.
MARCH 21-27, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
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12 THE HOPEWELL SUN MARCH 21-27, 2012
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The International Museum of
the Horse, the American Quarter
Horse Museum, the Great Plains
Museum and the Gilcrease Muse-
um have all exhibited his work
over the years.
The area public is seeing his
paintings for the first time in six
or seven years, he said. His work
has never been on display in
Hopewell, but it was last seen in
the surrounding area in Trenton
and New Hope, Pa.
Ive been showing out West,
he said. I thought itd be good to
do something locally again. Its
been awhile.
His paintings range in price
from $1,300 to $8,000.
Gaiti will do work for commis-
sion, but specifically states he
will not paint a clients living,
breathing pet horse since his
work is interpretative rather than
physically precise.
Im looking to evoke some
kind of feeling of the subject, he
said. I dont really paint to be
anatomically correct.
Like many artists, Gaiti says
hes a perfectionist.
I never let a painting go until
Im really satisfied that its fin-
ished, he said. There are paint-
ings Ive done that Ive done in a
month. Others take me five, six
months.
It depends on how the cosmos
align.
Most of his paintings are
formed with warm colors.
He also takes advantage of lay-
ers.
Most of them, not all of them,
are heavily texturized, he said.
I like texture. It brings out lay-
ers.
When Gaiti is not looking at a
canvas, he is writing.
And, generally, about horses.
As a three-time published au-
thor, Gaiti has been on The
Today Show. His latest book,
Dutching the Book, was recently
released.
According to the novels Ama-
zon.com description, Dutching
the Book is an American epic
about the tests of friendship and
family over several decades and a
one man's quest to be the best
horseplayer in the game.
Im a pretty eclectic writer,
he said.
His next book will be about Na-
tive American culture.
Although hard-working be-
tween writing and painting, Gaiti
hopes to begin painting lessons
for eager adults in a small class
setting interested to become im-
mersed in a fresh creative outlet.
Its an outlet that takes him
away from lifes hectic demands.
When I paint, I am in a differ-
ent world. Im somewhere else,
he said. I couldnt tell you what
part of the solar system Im in.
The end result of his labor is
never clear.
I will never know where its
going to wind up, he said. Ill al-
ways have a game plan in mind,
but that game plan can change as
soon as I lift my paintbrush.
The magic takes over.
His life completely changed
when he decided to follow a more
creative path.
This is my second career. I
managed a large organization for
many years, he said. I spent
most of my life in my left brain,
now Im in my right brains sand-
box writing and painting.
For more information about
the Straube Center exhibit, visit
www.straubecenter.com or call
(609) 737-3322.
Learn more about Gaitis art-
work on his website,
www.gaiti.com, email him at
Ritch.Gaiti@verizon.net with in-
quries, or call (609) 466-5888.
EXHIBIT
Continued from page 1
Exhibit on display
through end of May
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
Addiction Hotline
of New Jersey
(800) 238-2333
PSA
Alcoholics Anonymous
of South Jersey
(856) 486-4444
PSA
Please recycle this newspaper.
20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
MARCH 21-27, 2012 PAGE 15
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
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20per week
B US I NE S S
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