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IT: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMBINED FIRST AND SECOND SEMESTER Code EN04 101 EN04 102 EN04 103A

EN04 104A EN04 105 EN04 106A EN04 107A IT04 108 IT04 109 Subject Engineering Mathematics I Engineering Mathematics II Engineering Physics(A) Engineering Chemistry(A) Humanities Hours/Week Internal Marks 3 3 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 3 3 2 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 550 University Examination 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 900

Engineering Graphics(A) Engineering Mechanics(A) Computer Programming in C Basic Electrical Engineering Civil and IT04 Mechanical 110(P) Workshop Electrical and IT04 Electronics 111(P) Workshop TOTAL

19 1 10

DETAILED SYLLABUS ENO4- 101 : MATHEMATICS I (Common for all B. Tech. Programmes)

3 hours lecture per week Module I: Differential Calculus (15 hours) Indeterminate forms-L' hospital's rule- radius of curvature-centre of curvature - evolute -functions of more than one variable-idea of partial differentiation-Euler's Theorem for homogeneous functionschain rule of partial differentiation-applications in errors and approximations-change of variables-Jacobians-maxima and minima of functions of two -method of Litgrange multipliers. Module II: Infinite series (15 hours) Notion of convergence and divergence of infinite series-ratio test -comparison test-Raabe's test- root test-series of positive and negative terms-absolute convergence-test for alternating seriespower series -interval of convergence-Taylors and Maclaaurins series expansion of functions-Leibnitz formula for the nth derivative of the product of two functions-use of Leibnitz formula in the Taylor and Maclaurin expansions. Module III: Matrices (21 hours) Rank of a matrix- reduction of a matrix to echelon and normal forms- system of linear equations- consistency of linear equationsGauss elimination- homogeneous linear equations-fundamental system of solutions- solution of a system of equations using matrix inversion -Eigen values and eigen vectors - Cayley-Hamilton theorem- Eigen value of Hermitian, skew-hermitian and unitary matrices- Digitalization of matrix using Eigen values and Eigen vectors-quadratic forms-matrix associated with a quadratic form -definite, semidefinite and indefinite forms. Module IV: Fourier series and harmonic analysis (15 hours) Periodic functions-trigonometric series-Fourier series-Euler formulae-even and odd functions-functions having arbitrary period -half page expansions-approximation by trigonometric polynomialsminimum square error- numerical method for determining Fourier Coefficients- harmonic analysis Reference Books

Michael D. Greenberg, Advanced Engineering Mathematics

(second edition),Pearson Education Asia. Wylie C.R. and L.C. Barrent, Advanced Engineering Matematics, McGraw Hill Kreyszig E, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley Eastern Piskunov N, Differential and Integral calculus, MIR Publishers Ayres F, Matrices, Schaum's Outline Series, McGraw Hill Sastry, S.S, Engineering Mathematics -Vol.1 and 2, Prentice Hall of India

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module IV with choice to answer anyone EN04-102 : MATHEMATICS II (Common for all B.Tech. Programmes) 3 hours lecture per week

Module I: Ordinary diferential equations (21 hours) Equations of first order-seperable, homogeneous and linear typesexact equations -orthogonal trajectories-linear second order equations-homogeneous linear equation of the second order with constant coefficients-fundamental system of solutions-Solutions of the general linear equations of second order with constant coefficients- method of variation of parameters-Cauchy's equationsimple applications of differential equations in engineering problems, including problems in mechanical vibrations, electric circuits and bending of beams Module II: Laplace transforms (15 hours) Gamma and Beta functions- definitions and simple propertiesLaplace transform -Inverse transform-Laplace transform-shifting theorems-Transforms of derivatives and Integrals- differentiation and integration of transforms -transforms of unit step function and impulse function-transform of periodic functions -solution of ordinary differential equations using Laplace transforms Module III: Vector differential calculus (15 hours) Vector function of single variable -differentiation of vector functions-scalar and vector fields- gradient of scalar fielddivergence and curl of vector fields-their physical meaningsrelations between the vector differential operators Module IV: Vector integral calculus (15 hours) Double and triple integrals and their evaluation -line, surface and volume integrals-Green's theorem- Gauss divergence theorem -Stocke's theorem (proofs of these theorems not expected)- line integrals independent of the path. Reference Books

Michael D. Greenberg, Advanced Engineering Mathematics (second edition), Pearson Education Asia Wylie C.R. and L.C. Barrent, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, McGraw Hill Kreyszig E, Advanced Engineering Mathematics,Wiley Eastern Piskunov N, Differential and Integral calculus, MIR Publishers

Ayres F, Matrices, Schaum's Outline series, McGraw Hill Sastry, S.S, Engineering Mathematics - Vol 1 and 2, Prentice Hall of India

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module IV with choice to answer anyone EN04-103A : ENGINEERING PHYSICS(A) (Common for AI, CS, EE, EC, IT, IC, BM, BT, PT) 2 hours lecture per week Module I: (11 hours) Semi conductor Physics- Formation of energy bands in solids -Classification of solids on the basis of energy band gap-Intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors -Elemental and compound Semiconductors -Fermi level in intrinsic semiconductor-Electron and hole concentrations in intrinsic semiconductor in thermal equilibrium -law of mass action Eectrical conductivity of intrinsic

semi conductor-Fermi level in n-type and p-type semiconductorsElectrical conductivity of extrinsic semi conductor-Diffusion and total current. Application of semiconductors-Band model of p-n junction- Junction diode and its characteristics - characteristics of a transistor in common emitter configuration -Input, output resistance and current amplification factor -light emitting diode, photo diode, solar cell, photo resistor (LDR) , photo transistor, liquid crystal display (LCD) and zener diode-Avalanche and zener breakdown-Application of zener diode as a voltage regulator. Hall effect in semi conductors - Derivation of Hall coefficientDetremination of Hall coefficient by measuring Hall voltageApplications of Hall effect. Super conductivity -Properties of super conductors (critical magnetic field, Meisnner effect, critical current, flux quantization)Types of super conductors-BCS theory of super conductivity of (Qualitative)- Josephon's effect-Theory of d.c. Josephon's effectSQUID- Applications of super conductivity. Module II: (11 hours) Interference of light- Interference due to division of amplitude Interference from plane parallel thin films-Colours of thin films in reflected and transmitted light-Newton's rings-measurement of Wavelength and refractive index-Thin wedge shaped film-Air wedge -testing of optical planeness of surfaces. Interferometry-Michelson's interferometer-Types of fringes -Visibility of fringes-Application of Michelson's interferometer in determination of wavelength of monochromatic light, resolution of spectral lines and refractive index of gase. Diffraction of light-Introduction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer class of diffraction and their distinction Fresnels diffraction and rectilinear propogation of light - Diffraction pattern due to straight edge and expression for intensity maximum and minimum-Fraunhoffer diffraction- Simple theory of diffraction grating, its construction and working -Rayleigh's criteria. For resolution of spectral linesresolving power and dispersive power of grating. Module III: (11 hours) Poarisation of light-Double refraction-Huygen's explanation of

double refraction in uniaxial crystals-Positive and negative crystalsNicol prism, construction and working -quarter and half wave plates -Theory of circularly and elliptically polarized light, their production and detection -Rotatory polarization -Laurent's half shade (brief expansion)-laurent's half shade polarimeter-Applications of polarized light. Laser physics-Basic concepts and properties of laser-Spontaneous and stimulated emission - Expression for ratio of their coefficients- Absorption, population inversion and optical pumping -Construction and components of a laser -Ruby, Helium and Neon and semiconductor lasers-Application of lasers. Basic principles of holography and its application. Fibre optics-Basic principle-fibre dimensios and construction-Step index single mode and multi mode fibre- Graded index fibreNumerical aperature and acceptance angle- Signal distortion in optical fibres and transmission losses (brief ideas only)-optic fibre communication (block diagram) and it's advantages-Applications of optic fibres. Module IV: (11 hours) Planck's quantum theory -Absorbing power, reflecting power and transmitting power of body or surface- perfect black bodyDistribution energy in the spectrum of a black body -Wein's displacement law- Planck's hypotheses-Derivation of Planck's law of radiation. Quantum mechanics-Distinction between Newtonian and quantum mechanics-Schroedinger wave equation for free particle-Potential in Schrodinger equation-Time dependent and time independent schroedinger equations and their derivations-Expectation valuesApplications-Particles in a box( motion in one dimension) Ultrasonics-Piezo electric effect -Piezo electric crystal -Production of ultrasonics by piezo-electric oscillator-detecton of ultrasonicsgeneral properties and applications of Ultrasonics-Ultrasonic diffractometer and determination of velocity of ultrasonic in a liquid. Text

Sreenivasan International

M.R,

Physics

for

Engineers,

New

Age

Vasudeva A.S, modern Engineering Physics, S.Shand S.O. Pillai, Solid state Physics, New Age International

Reference books

Tyagi, M.S. Introduction to semi conductor materials and devices, John Wiley and sons Mayer, Introduction to classical and modern optics, Arendt John Senior, Fibre optic communication G Aruldhas, Quantum mechanics, Prentice Hall of India Murukesan R, Modern Physics- s.Chand and Co Brijlal and Subrahmanyam N, Text Book of Optics, S.Chand Kale Gokhale; Fundamentalspf Solid State Electronics, Kitab Mahal Guptha S.L. and Kumar, V; Solid State Physics, K. Nath

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions A and B of 15 marks from module IV with choice to answer anyone EN04-103A : ENGINEERING PHYSICS(A)

(Common for AI, CS, EE, EC, IT, IC, BM, BT, PT) 2 hours lecture per week Module I: (11 hours) Semi conductor Physics- Formation of energy bands in solids -Classification of solids on the basis of energy band gap-Intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors -Elemental and compound Semiconductors -Fermi level in intrinsic semiconductor-Electron and hole concentrations in intrinsic semiconductor in thermal equilibrium -law of mass action Eectrical conductivity of intrinsic semi conductor-Fermi level in n-type and p-type semiconductorsElectrical conductivity of extrinsic semi conductor-Diffusion and total current. Application of semiconductors-Band model of p-n junction- Junction diode and its characteristics - characteristics of a transistor in common emitter configuration -Input, output resistance and current amplification factor -light emitting diode, photo diode, solar cell, photo resistor (LDR) , photo transistor, liquid crystal display (LCD) and zener diode-Avalanche and zener breakdown-Application of zener diode as a voltage regulator. Hall effect in semi conductors - Derivation of Hall coefficientDetremination of Hall coefficient by measuring Hall voltageApplications of Hall effect. Super conductivity -Properties of super conductors (critical magnetic field, Meisnner effect, critical current, flux quantization)Types of super conductors-BCS theory of super conductivity of (Qualitative)- Josephon's effect-Theory of d.c. Josephon's effectSQUID- Applications of super conductivity. Module II: (11 hours) Interference of light- Interference due to division of amplitude Interference from plane parallel thin films-Colours of thin films in reflected and transmitted light-Newton's rings-measurement of Wavelength and refractive index-Thin wedge shaped film-Air wedge -testing of optical planeness of surfaces. Interferometry-Michelson's interferometer-Types of fringes -Visibility of fringes-Application of Michelson's interferometer in determination of wavelength of monochromatic light, resolution of

spectral lines and refractive index of gase. Diffraction of light-Introduction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer class of diffraction and their distinction Fresnels diffraction and rectilinear propogation of light - Diffraction pattern due to straight edge and expression for intensity maximum and minimum-Fraunhoffer diffraction- Simple theory of diffraction grating, its construction and working -Rayleigh's criteria. For resolution of spectral linesresolving power and dispersive power of grating. Module III: (11 hours) Poarisation of light-Double refraction-Huygen's explanation of double refraction in uniaxial crystals-Positive and negative crystalsNicol prism, construction and working -quarter and half wave plates -Theory of circularly and elliptically polarized light, their production and detection -Rotatory polarization -Laurent's half shade (brief expansion)-laurent's half shade polarimeter-Applications of polarized light. Laser physics-Basic concepts and properties of laser-Spontaneous and stimulated emission - Expression for ratio of their coefficients- Absorption, population inversion and optical pumping -Construction and components of a laser -Ruby, Helium and Neon and semiconductor lasers-Application of lasers. Basic principles of holography and its application. Fibre optics-Basic principle-fibre dimensios and construction-Step index single mode and multi mode fibre- Graded index fibreNumerical aperature and acceptance angle- Signal distortion in optical fibres and transmission losses (brief ideas only)-optic fibre communication (block diagram) and it's advantages-Applications of optic fibres. Module IV: (11 hours) Planck's quantum theory -Absorbing power, reflecting power and transmitting power of body or surface- perfect black bodyDistribution energy in the spectrum of a black body -Wein's displacement law- Planck's hypotheses-Derivation of Planck's law of radiation. Quantum mechanics-Distinction between Newtonian and quantum mechanics-Schroedinger wave equation for free particle-Potential in Schrodinger equation-Time dependent and time independent

schroedinger equations and their derivations-Expectation valuesApplications-Particles in a box( motion in one dimension) Ultrasonics-Piezo electric effect -Piezo electric crystal -Production of ultrasonics by piezo-electric oscillator-detecton of ultrasonicsgeneral properties and applications of Ultrasonics-Ultrasonic diffractometer and determination of velocity of ultrasonic in a liquid. Text

Sreenivasan M.R, Physics for Engineers, New International Vasudeva A.S, modern Engineering Physics, S.Shand S.O. Pillai, Solid state Physics, New Age International

Age

Reference books

Tyagi, M.S. Introduction to semi conductor materials and devices, John Wiley and sons Mayer, Introduction to classical and modern optics, Arendt John Senior, Fibre optic communication G Aruldhas, Quantum mechanics, Prentice Hall of India Murukesan R, Modern Physics- s.Chand and Co Brijlal and Subrahmanyam N, Text Book of Optics, S.Chand Kale Gokhale; Fundamentalspf Solid State Electronics, Kitab Mahal Guptha S.L. and Kumar, V; Solid State Physics, K. Nath

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to

answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone EN04-103(P) : PHYSICS LAB(A) (Common for AI, EE,EC, IC, BM, BT) 1 hour lab per week or 2 hours lab per alternate weeks

Band gap energy in a semi conductor using a reverse biased p-n junction. Static characteristics of a transistor(p-n-p or n-p-n) in common emitter configuration. Characteristic of a Zener diode Characteristic of a LED and wave length of emitted radiation Characteristic of a Photo diode Characteristics of a photo resistor (LDR) Voltage regulation using Zener diode Wavelength of mercury spectral lines using diffraction grating and spectrometer. Refractive indices of ordinary and extra ordinary rays in calcite or in quarts prisms. Wave length of sodiumlight by Newton's rings method. Diameter of a thin wire or thickness of a thin paper by air wedge method. Specific rotatory power of cane sugar solution using polarimeter Frequency of an electrically maintained tuning fork (transverse and longitudinal mode) Wave length and velocity of ultrasonic waves using ultrasonic difractometer. Divergence of laser beams using He-Ne laser or diode laser Wave length of laser using transmission grating. Resolving and dispersive power of a grating. Wave length of monochromatic light by straight edge using laser beam. Characteristics of a solar cell.

Planck's constant using photo-electric cell or solar cell Hall coefficient by measuring Hall voltage in a semi conductor Measurement of numerical aperature, acceptance angle and attenuation in an optical fibre. Measurement of displacements using optic fibre. Michelson's interferometer-Determination of wavelength of a monochromatic source, resolution of spectral lines and refractive index of gas. (Any 12 experiments should be done)

Reference Books

Practical Physics with viva voice- Dr. S.L. Guptha and Dr. V. Kumar -Publishers- Pragati Prakashan Experiments in Engineering Physics- M.N. Avadhanulu, A.A. Dani and R.M. Pockley-Publishers-S.chand.

Internal work assessment Lab practicals and record = 15 Test/s = 10 Total Marks = 25 EN04-104A: ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY(A) (Common for AI, CS, EE, EC, IT, IC, BM, BT, PT) 2 hours lecture per week SECTION -1 CHEMISTRY OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS Module 1 (13 hours) Solids: Classification of solids with examples-(crystallinePolycrystalline-Amorphous-Partially melted solids-(KCN)-Super cooled liquids-(Glass) - liquid crystals) (1 hour) Crystalline state: Steno's law -Internal structure-Space lattices -Crystallographic axes-law of rational indices -Crystal systems -Elements of symmetry -X-ray study-Bragg's equation (derivation)

single crystal and powder method -(Deybe -Scherrer Camera) Cubic systems-Structure elucidation- d100:d110:d111 ratio (problems to be worked out)-crystal imperfections (point-line-surface-volumeburgers vector- dislocations-edge and screw) Physical properties, bonding characteristics and Structure relation of - (covalent solidsIonic solids-metals)- metallic bonding-stacking of atoms(ABCABC.), (ABAB..)- tetrahedral and octahedral voids -Alloys-Hume Rothery rule -Conductivity-resistivity -(Free electron theory -explanation with Fermi-Dirac statistics ) - Fermi level-Applications of conductors-(transmission lines-OFHS Copper, ACSR, contact materials, Precision resistors- heating elements -Resistance thermometers)- Super Conductors(type I and II examples) (5 hours) Semiconductors- Band theory -(MOT) Valence band-Conduction band-intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors-Fabrication of semiconductor materials - Crystal Growth -ultra pure Silicon production -zone refining -fabricationof Integrated Circuits(IC) (2 hours) Dielectric materials - Polarization - Ferro - Electricity Piezoelectricity-Applications with examples-Introduction to Nano Science -carbon nano tubes and nano wires (1 hour) Non-crystalline state -glass- properties- (applications- conducting glasses-solid supported liquids-(stationary phases in reverse phase chromatography)-Optical fibre (1 hour) Liquid crystals -characterization-Nematic phase Smectic Phase -Cholestric Phases -Columnar Phases-Chemical Propertiesthermotropic-lyotropic-epitaxial-growyh-Freedericksz transitionapplications-Liquid crystal thermometers-LCD displays (3 hours) Reference

J.D. Lee (1996) Concise Inorganic Chemistry, Chapman and Hall Ltd. London, pp-1032 S. Glasstone (1997) Textbook of Physical Chemistry Macmillan, New Delhi, pp-1320 P.W. Atkins (1987) Physical Chemistry Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp-857 P.W. Atkins and J. Depaula (2001) Physical Chemistry W.H. Freeman and Co, pp-1000 V. Raghavan (2000) Material Science and Engineering-A first Course Fourth edition, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.,

New Delhi, pp-485 L.H. Van Vlack (1998) Elements of Materials Science and Engineering Sixth Edition, Addison-Wesley, London pp-598 J.W. Goodby (1997) Chemistry of liquid crystals VCH Publishing, pp-400 K.W. Kolasinski (2002) Surface Science: Foundations of Catalysis and Nano science John-Wiley and Sons, pp-326 K.J. Klaubunde (2001), Nano Scale materials in Chemistry Wiley- interscience, pp-304 J.I. Gersten and F.W. Smith (2001) The Physics and Chemistry of Materials Wiley-Interscience, pp-856

Module 2 (13 hours) High Polymers and Lubricants-Classification of Polymers- (Natural and Synthetic, Organic and Inorganic, Thermoplastic and Thermosetting, plastics, Elastomers, Fibres and liquid resins) Polymerization (Chain polymerization Polythene-PVC-TeflonPolystyrene-Poly-methylmethacrylate) Condensation polymerization (Polyamide and polyesters) Copolymerization(Buna-S, Buna-N, PVC-Co-polyvinyl acetate, PAN- Copolyvinyl chloride), Coordination polymerization (Zeigler -Natta Polymerization) - Electro chemical Polymerization-Metathetical polymerization -Group transfer Polymerization (3 hours) Mechanism of polymerization (Cationic, anionic and free radical). Polymerization techniques ( Bulk polymerization, Solution polymerization, Suspension polymerization, Emulsion polymerization, Melt poly condensation, solution poly condensation, Interfacial condensation, Solid and Gas Phase Polymerization (2 hours) Structure relation to properties (Chemical resistance,Strength,plastic deformation, Extensibility, Crystallinity)Mol.Wt of polymers-Number average Molecular wt. Weight average Mol. Wt- Gel Permeation Chromatography. (1 hour) Thermosetting resins (Bakelite, Urea-Formaldehyde, Silicones), Thermoplastic resins|(Acrylonitrile, PVC, PVA, PS, PMMA,PE)- Fibres (Nylon6, nylon66, 10, Cellulose fibres, dacron, Kevlar) Application of polymers in electronic and electrical industry. Elastomers -Natural rubber-Structure-Vulcanization-Synthetic rubbers (Neoprene, Buna-S, Buna-n, Thiokol, Silicon rubber) (3 hours) Compounding of Plastics (Filters, Plasticizers, lubricants, pigments, antioxidants, Stabilizers) and Fabrication (Calendaring, Die casting,

film casting, Compression, injection, Extrusion and Blow moulding, Thermoforming, Foaming, Reinforcing) (1 hour) Lubricants: Theory of friction-Mechanisms of Lubrication-Fluid film or hydrodynamic, thin film or boundary lubrication, extreme pressure lubrication-Classification of Lubricants-(Liquid (animal and vegetable oils, Petroleum oils), Semi-solid, (Ca-soap grease, Lisoap grease, Al-soap grease, Axle soap grease) Solid lubricants (Dibasic acid esters, Poly glycol ethers, Organo phosphates, Organo silicones). Properties of Lubricants (Viscosity index, Cloud point and pour point, flash point and fire point, Corrosion stability, emulsification, Aniline point). Additives and their functions (Fatty acids, Sulphurised fats, Phenols, Calcium sulphonates, Organometallics, Hexanol, Amine phosphates, Tricresyl phosphates, Silicon polymers) (3 hours) Reference

B.R. Gowariker et al (2002), Polymer Science, New Age International pp-505 B.W. Gonser et al (1964), Modern Materials-advances in development and application Vol 1-7, Academic Press, New York.

Module 3 (9 hours) Electrochemistry: Single Electrode potential (theory-Nernst equation, derivation from thermodynamic principles)-types of electrodes (M|M+|, M|MA|A-, M|A+, A+2, Pt|Cl2|Cl-, Pt|O2|OH- -glass electrode) Electrochemical cells -concentration cells- Salt bridge -Liquid junction potential -emf measurements -Poggendorf's compensation method-digital method -electrochemical series -over voltage -theory - application in corrosion control-Polarogarphystorage cells-lead acid, Ni/Cd- Fuel cells- H2/O2 fuel cells (Bacon cell), Hydrocarbon/air fuel cell -Bio-chemical fuel Cell (5 hours) Acid-Bases- (Lowry-Bronsted and Lewis concepts-examples)concept of pH -pH measurement- (instrumental details recquired)Dissociation constants -Potentiometric titrations - (Neutralization, Oxidation-reduction and Preciptation) Buffer solutions -Henderson's equation for calculation of pH (4 hours) Reference

S. Glasstone (1997) Text book of Physical Chemistry

Macmillan, New Delhi, pp-1320 P.W. Atkins (1987) Physical Chemistry Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp-857 C.A. Hampel (Ed) (1964) encyclopedia of the Electro chemistry, Reinhold Publishing Corportation, Newyork, pp.1206 A.Standen (Ed) (1964) Kirk-Othmr Encyclopaedia of Chemical Technology, Vol. 3, John Wiley and Sons, Inc, New York, pp-925 SECTION-2

CHEMISTRY OF MATERIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE Module -4 (9 hours) Material damages and prevention: Corrosion-theoretical aspects(electrochemical; theory) galvanic seriesPourbiaxdiagram-assessment of corrosion potential of materialsTypes of corrosion-Dry corrosion-direct chemical-Wet CorrosionElectrochemical-differential aeration-Corrosion of Iron in acidic neutral, basic condition (Corrosion in boilers)-Galvanic corrosion(corrosion at contact points in computers-Ag/Au)-Inter granular corrosion (18-8 Steel). Microbial corrosion-factors influencing corrosion. Corrosion protection-Self protecting corrosion products-PillingBedworth rule-Coatings -organic -(paints and polymesr)-Inorganic Coatings-Galvanizing (dip coating, Sherardizing, Wire-gun method)Tinning-Electroplating(Chromium, Nickel), Anodizaion of Aluminium-Passivation of metals by chemical treatment-Protection by Sacrificial Anode-Impressed current. (4 hours) Environmental damages and prevention: Pollution-Definitions-Classification of pollutants(Global, regional, Local; Persistent and Non persistent; Pollutants-Eg: CO2, CO, SOx, NOx, VOC, SPM, CFC, POP, Dissolved metals)-effects on environments -Air pollution-Fossil fuel burning-Automobile exhausts-Photchemical smog-PAN, PBN formation, chemical equations required)-Stratospheric Ozone depletion-CFCsNomenclature CFC's - Chapman cycle of Ozone formation -CFC dissociation and its reaction with Ozone-Alternate refrigerantsMonitoring of pollution -gases (CO, SO2, NOx) and particulate (High volume sampler )- Pollution from thermal power plants-Caol

composition- fly ash-Thermal pollution. Methods of control of Air pollution-Bag filters, cyclones, Scrubbing, ESP, Catalytic converters-composition and action with CO, NOx. Water pollution-pollutant classification- (Organic, Inorganic, Suspended and dissolved-Toxic metal waste-BOD-COD)-Monitoring (analytical methods- brief discussion) and control-waste water treatment- aerobic, Anaerobic- USAB process-industrial waste water treatment- solid pollution-solid waste- radio nuclides-Toxic metals-Monitoring and control -incineration-Dioxins-hazardous waste-deep-well injection (5 hours) Reference

L.L Shreir (Ed) Corrosion Control Vol I and II, NewnesButterworths, London C.A. Hampel (Ed), Encyclopaedia of Electrochemistry Reinhold Publishing corporation, pp-1206 V. raghavan (2000), Material Science and Engineering- A First Course, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, pp485 A.K. De (1996), Environmental Chemistry, New Age International Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, pp-364 C.N. Sawyer and P.L.McCarty (1989), Chemistry for Environmental Engineering McGraw Hill Book company, New Delhi, pp-530 H.S. Peavi, D.R. Rowe and G.Tchobangoglous (1985), Environmental Engineering McGraw hill International, pp720 S.P. Mahajan (1985) Pollution Control in Process Industries Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, pp-273 S.E. Manahan (1975) Environmental Chemistry, Willard Grant Press, Boston, pp-532.

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class.

Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone

EN04-104A (P): CHEMISTRY LAB (A) (Common for AI, EE, EC, IC, BM, BT) 1hour lab per week or 2 hour lab per alternate weeks List of experiments

Estimation of purity of Copper (Iodometric method) Estimation of purity of Aluminium (EDTA method) Crystal growth (melt grouth, solution grouth-CuSO4,KDP,ADP crystals) Phenol formaldehyde-preparation and study of properties Urea formaldehyde-preparation and study of properties Flash and fire point-Martens apparatus Measurements of Single Electrode potential-Poggendorf's method (M|M+ M|MA|A-, Salt bridge preparation, calculation of Junction potential) Corrosion potential measurement of certain metal and alloys in 3.5% salt solution (steel (18-8), AI, CU, Brass, Bronze, Monel metalor alloys of industrial use)- Potentiodynamics and Potentiostatics methods. .pH meter-Caliberation and measurement of pH-preparation of Buffers- Calculation of pH by Henderson's equation and verification.

Potentiometric titration of acid and base-plots of E/V,E/V,2E/V2 plots. electrodepostion- plating of Copper-detection of the thickness or the layer deposited. Anodizing of aluminiumcharacteristics of the coating. Estimation of SO2, NO2, H2S. calculation of concentration in ppm and microgram per M3 and comparison of data with permitted levels. Estimation of Pb, Cd in water-colourimetric method. Estimation of Fluoride(Alizarin dye method),Nitrate in watercolourimetric method Estimation of Dissolved oxygen (Winklers method) Identification tests for certain common plastics(PE, PVC, Nylon, PET, etc) Preparation of some liquid crystals and study of their properties. (At least 12 experiments should be done)

Internal work assessment Lab practical and record = 10+5 (Lab performance to be evaluated by the thoroughness of the procedure practices, results of each experiments and punctuality in the submission of rough and fare records) Test/s = 10 Total marks = 25

EN04-105: HUMANITIES (Common for all B.Tech Programmes) 2 Hours Lecture Per Week Module I: (10 hours) Introduction to english usage and grammar-review of grammaraffixes, prefixes, suffixes, participles and gerunds-transformation of sentences-commonly misspelt words -correction of mistakespunctuation-idioms-style-vocabulary building

Reading comprehension -exposure to a variety of reading materials, articles, essays-graphic representation, journalistic articles, etc. Writing comprehension-skills to express ideas in sentences, paragraphs and essays. Module II: (10 hours) Technical communication and report writing Need, importance and characteristics of technical communication -correspondence on technical mattres-aspects of technical description of machinery, equivalent and processes-giving instructions in an industrial situation-note taking and note makingcorrespondence on technical topics-different types of technical reports Module III: (14 hours) History of science and technology Science and technology in the primitive society-the development of human civilization from primitive to modern society -impact of sciences and technology on societies-cultural and industrial revolutions-the rise and development of early indian sciencecontribution of indian scientist-j c boss, c v raman, visweswarayaramanujan and bhabha-gandhian concepts-recent advances in indian science. Moduel IV: (10 hours) Humanities in a technological age Importance of humanities to technology, education and societyrelation of career interests of engineers to humanities-relevance of a scientific temper-science, society and culkture Reference Books

Huddleston R, English Grammar-An Outline, Cambridge University Press Pennyor, Grammar Practice Activities,Cambridge University Press Murphy, Intermediate English Grammar, Cambridge

University Press Hashemi, Intermediate English Grammar-Supplementary Exercises With Answers, Cambridge University Press Vesilind; Engineering, Ethics And The Environment, Cambridge University Press Larson E; History Of Inventions, Thompson Press India Ltd. Bernal J.D, Science In History, Penguin Books Ltd Dampier W.C, History Of Science, Cambridge University Press Encyclopaedia Britannica, History Of Science, History Of Technology Subrayappa; History Of Science In India, National Academy Of Science, India Brownski J, Science And Human Values, Harper And Row Schrodinger , Nature And Greeks And Science And Humanism, Cambridge University Press Bossel H, Earth At A Crossroads-Paths T A Sustainable Future, Cambridge University Press Mccarthy, English Vocabulary In Use, Cambridge University Press Anna University, English For Engineers Andtechnologists,. Orient Longman Meenakshi Raman Et Al, Technical Communication-Principles And Practice, Oxford University Press

Internal assessment One essay relevant topic One technical report 2 test Total marks 2x15 30 = 50 10 10

University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module i with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module ii with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to

answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module iv with choice to answer anyone EN04-106A : ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (A) (Common for AI, CS, EE, EC, IT, PT, BM, PT) 1 hour lecture and 3 hours drawing Module 0: (8 hours- I drawing exercises) Drawing instruments and their use-different types of lines-lettering and dimensioning-familiarization with current Indian standard code of practice for general engineering drawing. Construction of ellipse, parabola and hyperbola. Construction of cycloid, involute and helix. Introduction to computer aided drafting. (For practice only, not for university examination) Module I: (12 hours- 3 drawing exercises) A) Introduction to orthographic projections -vertical, horizontal and profile palne-principles of first angle and third angle projections. Projections of points in different quadrants. Orthographic projections of straight lines parallel to one plane and inclined to the other plane-straight lines inclined to both the planes and occupied in one quadrants-traces of lines. B) True length and inclination of a line with reference planes. Line occupied in more than one quadrant. Line inclined to the two reference planes but parallel to the profile plane. Line dimensioned in surveyor's unit. Module II: (16 hours- 3 drawing exercises) A) Projections of plane laminae of geometrical shapes parallel to one plane and inclined to other plane- plane laminae inclined to both the planes.auxiliary projections of plane laminae. Projections of laminae inclined to the two reference planes but perpendicular to the profile plane. B) Projections of polyhedra and solids of revolution -frustumsprojections of solids with axis parallel to one plane and inclined to other plane. Projections of solids with the axis inclined to both the

planes. (solids to be drawn: cube, prisms, pyramids, tetrahedron, cone and cylinder). Projections of solids on auxiliary planes. Projection of combinations of solids. (solids to be drawn: prisms, pyramids, tetrahedron, cube, cone, and sphere) Module III: (12 hours- 3 drawing exercises) A) Sections of solids -sections by planes parallel to the horizontal or vertical planes and by planes inclined to the horizontal or vertical planes. True shape of section by projecting on auxiliary plane, (solids to be drawn: cube, prisms, pyramids, tetrahedron, cone and cylinder) B) Development of surfaces of solids -method of parallel line, radial line, triangulation and approximate developments. Development of polyhedra, cylinder, cone and sectioned solids. Developments of solids having hole or cut. Module IV: (12 hours- 3 drawing exercises) A) Introduction to isometric projection-isometric scale-isometric projections of prisms, pyramids,cylinder,cone, spheres,sectioned solids and combinations of them. Principle of oblique projectioncavalier, cabinet and general oblique projections of solids and simple objects B) Introduction to perspective projections-classification of perspective views-parallel, angular and oblique perspectives-visual ray method and vanishing point method of drawing perspective projection-perspective views of prisms, pyramids and circles Module V: (12 hours- 6 drawing exercises) A) Introduction to multiview projection of objects-the principle of the six orthographic views -conversion of pictorial views of simple engineering objects into orthographic views. B) Conventional representation of threaded fasteners. Drawing of nuts, bolts, washers and screws. Locking arrangements of nuts. Bolted and screwed joints. Foundation bolts of eye end type hook end type and split end type. Note: All drawing exercises mentioned above are for class work. Additional exercise where ever necessary may be given as home

assignments. Text Books


John K.C, Engineering Graphics, Jet Publications P.I. Varghese, Engineering Graphics, Vip Publications Bhatt N.D, Elementary Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishing House

Reference Books

Luzadder W.J., Fundamentals Of Engineering Drawing,Prentice Hall Of India Narayana K.L and Kannaiah P, Engineering Graphics, Tata Mcgraw Hill Gill P.S., Geometrical Drawing, Kataria And Sons

Internal work assessment Drawing exercise (best10) 2tests Total marks University examination pattern No question from module 0 QI - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module I with choice to answer anyone QII - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module III with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module IV with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module to answer anyone V with choice 10x3 =30 2x10=20 = 50

EN04-107A : ENGINEERING MECHANICS(A) (Common for AI, CH, CS, EE, EC, IT, IC, BM, BT, PT) 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objectives

To acquaint the student with general method of analyzing engineering problems To illustrate the application of the method to solve the practical engineering problems.

Module I: (17 hours) Principles of static-free body diagrams-Coplanar forces and forces and force system-resultant and equilibrium conditions for concurrent, parallel and general system of forces-solutions of problems by scalar approach. Introduction vector approach (application to simple problems only)- concurrent forces in space resultant-equilibrium of a practical in space -Non-concurrent forces in space-resultant of force of system Module II: (17 hours) Friction-loss of friction-simple contact friction problem-wedge, screw jack and its efficiency. Properties of surfaces-first moment and centroid of curve and area-centroid of composite plane figurestheorems of Pappus-guldinus-second moments of plane figures and composite sections-transfer theorem-polar moments of areasproduct of areas and principal access (Conceptual level treatment only). Moment of inertia of rigid body-M.I of a lamina-M.I of 3 dimensional bodies (cylinder, circular rod, sphere) Module III: (17 hours) Introduction to structural mechanics-different types of support, loads and beams-reactions and support. Shear forces and bending moments diagrams for Cantilever and simply supported beams (only for concentrated and uniformly distributed load cases). Plane trusses-types of trusses (perfect, deficient and redundant, trusses)-Analysis of trusses-Method of joints-Method of sections.

Module IV: (15 hours) Kinetics of rectilinear motion-Newton's second law-D'Alembert's principle- Motion on horizontal and inclined surfaces-Analysis of lift motion- Motion of connected bodies. Curvilinear motion-equation of motion-Tangential and normal acceleration-Centripetal and centrifugal forces-Motion of vehicles of circular path. Work, power and energy-Work done by a force -work of the force gravity and force of spring-Work-energy equation-Transformation and conservation of energy-Applications to problems. Kinematics of rotation-rigid body rotation about a fixed axisrotation under the action of constant moment. Introduction to mechanical vibrations-simple harmonic motion-free vibration-Oscillation of spring-Torsional vibration Text books

Timoshenko and Young, Engineering Mechanics, McGraw Hill Publishers Hibbler, Engineering Mechanics, Vol.I statics, Vol II Dynamics, Pearson Shames. I.H, Engineering Mechanics-Statics and Dynamics, Prentice Hall of India

Reference Books

Beer.F.P and Johnson E.R, Mechanics for Engineers-Statics and Dynamics, McGraw Hill Publishers. Rajasekharan and Sankarsubrahmanian, Engineering Mechanics, VIkas Publishing House

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. (At least one assignment should be computer based using spreadsheet or suitable tools)

10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module (in which, at least 5 questions to be numerical) QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone (QII toV can have subdivisions and at least 80% weightage for numerical problems) Module I: Differential Calculus (15 hours) Indeterminate forms-L' hospital's rule- radius of curvature-centre of curvature - evolute -functions of more than one variable-idea of partial differentiation-Euler's Theorem for homogeneous functionschain rule of partial differentiation-applications in errors and approximations-change of variables-Jacobians-maxima and minima of functions of two -method of Litgrange multipliers. Module II: Infinite series (15 hours) Notion of convergence and divergence of infinite series-ratio test -comparison test-Raabe's test- root test-series of positive and negative terms-absolute convergence-test for alternating seriespower series -interval of convergence-Taylors and Maclaaurins series expansion of functions-Leibnitz formula for the nth derivative of the product of two functions-use of Leibnitz formula in the Taylor and Maclaurin expansions.

Module III: Matrices (21 hours) Rank of a matrix- reduction of a matrix to echelon and normal forms- system of linear equations- consistency of linear equationsGauss elimination- homogeneous linear equations-fundamental system of solutions- solution of a system of equations using matrix inversion -Eigen values and eigen vectors - Cayley-Hamilton theorem- Eigen value of Hermitian, skew-hermitian and unitary matrices- Digitalization of matrix using Eigen values and Eigen vectors-quadratic forms-matrix associated with a quadratic form -definite, semidefinite and indefinite forms. Module IV: Fourier series and harmonic analysis (15 hours) Periodic functions-trigonometric series-Fourier series-Euler formulae-even and odd functions-functions having arbitrary period -half page expansions-approximation by trigonometric polynomialsminimum square error- numerical method for determining Fourier Coefficients- harmonic analysis Reference Books

Michael D. Greenberg, Advanced Engineering Mathematics (second edition),Pearson Education Asia. Wylie C.R. and L.C. Barrent, Advanced Engineering Matematics, McGraw Hill Kreyszig E, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley Eastern Piskunov N, Differential and Integral calculus, MIR Publishers Ayres F, Matrices, Schaum's Outline Series, McGraw Hill Sastry, S.S, Engineering Mathematics -Vol.1 and 2, Prentice Hall of India

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50

University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone EN04-102 : MATHEMATICS II (Common for all B.Tech. Programmes) 3 hours lecture per week Module I: Ordinary diferential equations (21 hours) Equations of first order-seperable, homogeneous and linear typesexact equations -orthogonal trajectories-linear second order equations-homogeneous linear equation of the second order with constant coefficients-fundamental system of solutions-Solutions of the general linear equations of second order with constant coefficients- method of variation of parameters-Cauchy's equationsimple applications of differential equations in engineering problems, including problems in mechanical vibrations, electric circuits and bending of beams Module II: Laplace transforms (15 hours) Gamma and Beta functions- definitions and simple propertiesLaplace transform -Inverse transform-Laplace transform-shifting theorems-Transforms of derivatives and Integrals- differentiation and integration of transforms -transforms of unit step function and impulse function-transform of periodic functions -solution of ordinary differential equations using Laplace transforms

Module III: Vector differential calculus (15 hours) Vector function of single variable -differentiation of vector functions-scalar and vector fields- gradient of scalar fielddivergence and curl of vector fields-their physical meaningsrelations between the vector differential operators Module IV: Vector integral calculus (15 hours) Double and triple integrals and their evaluation -line, surface and volume integrals-Green's theorem- Gauss divergence theorem -Stocke's theorem (proofs of these theorems not expected)- line integrals independent of the path. Reference Books

Michael D. Greenberg, Advanced Engineering Mathematics (second edition), Pearson Education Asia Wylie C.R. and L.C. Barrent, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, McGraw Hill Kreyszig E, Advanced Engineering Mathematics,Wiley Eastern Piskunov N, Differential and Integral calculus, MIR Publishers Ayres F, Matrices, Schaum's Outline series, McGraw Hill Sastry, S.S, Engineering Mathematics - Vol 1 and 2, Prentice Hall of India

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to

answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone EN04-103A : ENGINEERING PHYSICS(A) (Common for AI, CS, EE, EC, IT, IC, BM, BT, PT) 2 hours lecture per week Module I: (11 hours) Semi conductor Physics- Formation of energy bands in solids -Classification of solids on the basis of energy band gap-Intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors -Elemental and compound Semiconductors -Fermi level in intrinsic semiconductor-Electron and hole concentrations in intrinsic semiconductor in thermal equilibrium -law of mass action Eectrical conductivity of intrinsic semi conductor-Fermi level in n-type and p-type semiconductorsElectrical conductivity of extrinsic semi conductor-Diffusion and total current. Application of semiconductors-Band model of p-n junction- Junction diode and its characteristics - characteristics of a transistor in common emitter configuration -Input, output resistance and current amplification factor -light emitting diode, photo diode, solar cell, photo resistor (LDR) , photo transistor, liquid crystal display (LCD) and zener diode-Avalanche and zener breakdown-Application of zener diode as a voltage regulator. Hall effect in semi conductors - Derivation of Hall coefficientDetremination of Hall coefficient by measuring Hall voltageApplications of Hall effect. Super conductivity -Properties of super conductors (critical magnetic field, Meisnner effect, critical current, flux quantization)Types of super conductors-BCS theory of super conductivity of (Qualitative)- Josephon's effect-Theory of d.c. Josephon's effect-

SQUID- Applications of super conductivity. Module II: (11 hours) Interference of light- Interference due to division of amplitude Interference from plane parallel thin films-Colours of thin films in reflected and transmitted light-Newton's rings-measurement of Wavelength and refractive index-Thin wedge shaped film-Air wedge -testing of optical planeness of surfaces. Interferometry-Michelson's interferometer-Types of fringes -Visibility of fringes-Application of Michelson's interferometer in determination of wavelength of monochromatic light, resolution of spectral lines and refractive index of gase. Diffraction of light-Introduction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer class of diffraction and their distinction Fresnels diffraction and rectilinear propogation of light - Diffraction pattern due to straight edge and expression for intensity maximum and minimum-Fraunhoffer diffraction- Simple theory of diffraction grating, its construction and working -Rayleigh's criteria. For resolution of spectral linesresolving power and dispersive power of grating. Module III: (11 hours) Poarisation of light-Double refraction-Huygen's explanation of double refraction in uniaxial crystals-Positive and negative crystalsNicol prism, construction and working -quarter and half wave plates -Theory of circularly and elliptically polarized light, their production and detection -Rotatory polarization -Laurent's half shade (brief expansion)-laurent's half shade polarimeter-Applications of polarized light. Laser physics-Basic concepts and properties of laser-Spontaneous and stimulated emission - Expression for ratio of their coefficients- Absorption, population inversion and optical pumping -Construction and components of a laser -Ruby, Helium and Neon and semiconductor lasers-Application of lasers. Basic principles of holography and its application. Fibre optics-Basic principle-fibre dimensios and construction-Step index single mode and multi mode fibre- Graded index fibreNumerical aperature and acceptance angle- Signal distortion in optical fibres and transmission losses (brief ideas only)-optic fibre communication (block diagram) and it's advantages-Applications of

optic fibres. Module IV: (11 hours) Planck's quantum theory -Absorbing power, reflecting power and transmitting power of body or surface- perfect black bodyDistribution energy in the spectrum of a black body -Wein's displacement law- Planck's hypotheses-Derivation of Planck's law of radiation. Quantum mechanics-Distinction between Newtonian and quantum mechanics-Schroedinger wave equation for free particle-Potential in Schrodinger equation-Time dependent and time independent schroedinger equations and their derivations-Expectation valuesApplications-Particles in a box( motion in one dimension) Ultrasonics-Piezo electric effect -Piezo electric crystal -Production of ultrasonics by piezo-electric oscillator-detecton of ultrasonicsgeneral properties and applications of Ultrasonics-Ultrasonic diffractometer and determination of velocity of ultrasonic in a liquid. Text

Sreenivasan M.R, Physics for Engineers, New International Vasudeva A.S, modern Engineering Physics, S.Shand S.O. Pillai, Solid state Physics, New Age International

Age

Reference books

Tyagi, M.S. Introduction to semi conductor materials and devices, John Wiley and sons Mayer, Introduction to classical and modern optics, Arendt John Senior, Fibre optic communication G Aruldhas, Quantum mechanics, Prentice Hall of India Murukesan R, Modern Physics- s.Chand and Co Brijlal and Subrahmanyam N, Text Book of Optics, S.Chand Kale Gokhale; Fundamentalspf Solid State Electronics, Kitab Mahal Guptha S.L. and Kumar, V; Solid State Physics, K. Nath

Internal work assessment

60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone EN04-103(P) : PHYSICS LAB(A) (Common for AI, EE,EC, IC, BM, BT) 1 hour lab per week or 2 hours lab per alternate weeks

Band gap energy in a semi conductor using a reverse biased p-n junction. Static characteristics of a transistor(p-n-p or n-p-n) in common emitter configuration. Characteristic of a Zener diode Characteristic of a LED and wave length of emitted radiation Characteristic of a Photo diode Characteristics of a photo resistor (LDR) Voltage regulation using Zener diode Wavelength of mercury spectral lines using diffraction grating and spectrometer. Refractive indices of ordinary and extra ordinary rays in calcite or in quarts prisms. Wave length of sodiumlight by Newton's rings method.

Diameter of a thin wire or thickness of a thin paper by air wedge method. Specific rotatory power of cane sugar solution using polarimeter Frequency of an electrically maintained tuning fork (transverse and longitudinal mode) Wave length and velocity of ultrasonic waves using ultrasonic difractometer. Divergence of laser beams using He-Ne laser or diode laser Wave length of laser using transmission grating. Resolving and dispersive power of a grating. Wave length of monochromatic light by straight edge using laser beam. Characteristics of a solar cell. Planck's constant using photo-electric cell or solar cell Hall coefficient by measuring Hall voltage in a semi conductor Measurement of numerical aperature, acceptance angle and attenuation in an optical fibre. Measurement of displacements using optic fibre. Michelson's interferometer-Determination of wavelength of a monochromatic source, resolution of spectral lines and refractive index of gas. (Any 12 experiments should be done)

Reference Books

Practical Physics with viva voice- Dr. S.L. Guptha and Dr. V. Kumar -Publishers- Pragati Prakashan Experiments in Engineering Physics- M.N. Avadhanulu, A.A. Dani and R.M. Pockley-Publishers-S.chand.

Internal work assessment Lab practicals and record = 15 Test/s = 10 Total Marks = 25 EN04-104A: ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY(A) (Common for AI, CS, EE, EC, IT, IC, BM, BT, PT)

2 hours lecture per week SECTION -1 CHEMISTRY OF ENGINEERING MATERIALS Module 1 (13 hours) Solids: Classification of solids with examples-(crystallinePolycrystalline-Amorphous-Partially melted solids-(KCN)-Super cooled liquids-(Glass) - liquid crystals) (1 hour) Crystalline state: Steno's law -Internal structure-Space lattices -Crystallographic axes-law of rational indices -Crystal systems -Elements of symmetry -X-ray study-Bragg's equation (derivation) single crystal and powder method -(Deybe -Scherrer Camera) Cubic systems-Structure elucidation- d100:d110:d111 ratio (problems to be worked out)-crystal imperfections (point-line-surface-volumeburgers vector- dislocations-edge and screw) Physical properties, bonding characteristics and Structure relation of - (covalent solidsIonic solids-metals)- metallic bonding-stacking of atoms(ABCABC.), (ABAB..)- tetrahedral and octahedral voids -Alloys-Hume Rothery rule -Conductivity-resistivity -(Free electron theory -explanation with Fermi-Dirac statistics ) - Fermi level-Applications of conductors-(transmission lines-OFHS Copper, ACSR, contact materials, Precision resistors- heating elements -Resistance thermometers)- Super Conductors(type I and II examples) (5 hours) Semiconductors- Band theory -(MOT) Valence band-Conduction band-intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors-Fabrication of semiconductor materials - Crystal Growth -ultra pure Silicon production -zone refining -fabricationof Integrated Circuits(IC) (2 hours) Dielectric materials -Polarization-Ferro-Electricity -PiezoelectricityApplications with examples-Introduction to Nano Science -carbon nano tubes and nano wires (1 hour) Non-crystalline state -glass- properties- (applications- conducting glasses-solid supported liquids-(stationary phases in reverse phase chromatography)-Optical fibre (1 hour) Liquid crystals -characterization-Nematic phase Smectic Phase -Cholestric Phases -Columnar Phases-Chemical Properties-

thermotropic-lyotropic-epitaxial-growyh-Freedericksz transitionapplications-Liquid crystal thermometers-LCD displays (3 hours) Reference


J.D. Lee (1996) Concise Inorganic Chemistry, Chapman and Hall Ltd. London, pp-1032 S. Glasstone (1997) Textbook of Physical Chemistry Macmillan, New Delhi, pp-1320 P.W. Atkins (1987) Physical Chemistry Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp-857 P.W. Atkins and J. Depaula (2001) Physical Chemistry W.H. Freeman and Co, pp-1000 V. Raghavan (2000) Material Science and Engineering-A first Course Fourth edition, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, pp-485 L.H. Van Vlack (1998) Elements of Materials Science and Engineering Sixth Edition, Addison-Wesley, London pp-598 J.W. Goodby (1997) Chemistry of liquid crystals VCH Publishing, pp-400 K.W. Kolasinski (2002) Surface Science: Foundations of Catalysis and Nano science John-Wiley and Sons, pp-326 K.J. Klaubunde (2001), Nano Scale materials in Chemistry Wiley- interscience, pp-304 J.I. Gersten and F.W. Smith (2001) The Physics and Chemistry of Materials Wiley-Interscience, pp-856

Module 2 (13 hours) High Polymers and Lubricants-Classification of Polymers- (Natural and Synthetic, Organic and Inorganic, Thermoplastic and Thermosetting, plastics, Elastomers, Fibres and liquid resins) Polymerization (Chain polymerization Polythene-PVC-TeflonPolystyrene-Poly-methylmethacrylate) Condensation polymerization (Polyamide and polyesters) Copolymerization(Buna-S, Buna-N, PVC-Co-polyvinyl acetate, PAN- Copolyvinyl chloride), Coordination polymerization (Zeigler -Natta Polymerization) - Electro chemical Polymerization-Metathetical polymerization -Group transfer Polymerization (3 hours) Mechanism of polymerization (Cationic, anionic and free radical). Polymerization techniques ( Bulk polymerization, Solution polymerization, Suspension polymerization, Emulsion polymerization, Melt poly condensation, solution poly condensation, Interfacial condensation, Solid and Gas Phase Polymerization (2

hours) Structure relation to properties (Chemical resistance,Strength,plastic deformation, Extensibility, Crystallinity)Mol.Wt of polymers-Number average Molecular wt. Weight average Mol. Wt- Gel Permeation Chromatography. (1 hour) Thermosetting resins (Bakelite, Urea-Formaldehyde, Silicones), Thermoplastic resins|(Acrylonitrile, PVC, PVA, PS, PMMA,PE)- Fibres (Nylon6, nylon66, 10, Cellulose fibres, dacron, Kevlar) Application of polymers in electronic and electrical industry. Elastomers -Natural rubber-Structure-Vulcanization-Synthetic rubbers (Neoprene, Buna-S, Buna-n, Thiokol, Silicon rubber) (3 hours) Compounding of Plastics (Filters, Plasticizers, lubricants, pigments, antioxidants, Stabilizers) and Fabrication (Calendaring, Die casting, film casting, Compression, injection, Extrusion and Blow moulding, Thermoforming, Foaming, Reinforcing) (1 hour) Lubricants: Theory of friction-Mechanisms of Lubrication-Fluid film or hydrodynamic, thin film or boundary lubrication, extreme pressure lubrication-Classification of Lubricants-(Liquid (animal and vegetable oils, Petroleum oils), Semi-solid, (Ca-soap grease, Lisoap grease, Al-soap grease, Axle soap grease) Solid lubricants (Dibasic acid esters, Poly glycol ethers, Organo phosphates, Organo silicones). Properties of Lubricants (Viscosity index, Cloud point and pour point, flash point and fire point, Corrosion stability, emulsification, Aniline point). Additives and their functions (Fatty acids, Sulphurised fats, Phenols, Calcium sulphonates, Organometallics, Hexanol, Amine phosphates, Tricresyl phosphates, Silicon polymers) (3 hours) Reference

B.R. Gowariker et al (2002), Polymer Science, New Age International pp-505 B.W. Gonser et al (1964), Modern Materials-advances in development and application Vol 1-7, Academic Press, New York.

Module 3 (9 hours) Electrochemistry: Single Electrode potential (theory-Nernst equation, derivation from thermodynamic principles)-types of electrodes (M|M+|, M|MA|A-, M|A+, A+2, Pt|Cl2|Cl-, Pt|O2|OH- -glass

electrode) Electrochemical cells -concentration cells- Salt bridge -Liquid junction potential -emf measurements -Poggendorf's compensation method-digital method -electrochemical series -over voltage -theory - application in corrosion control-Polarogarphystorage cells-lead acid, Ni/Cd- Fuel cells- H2/O2 fuel cells (Bacon cell), Hydrocarbon/air fuel cell -Bio-chemical fuel Cell (5 hours) Acid-Bases- (Lowry-Bronsted and Lewis concepts-examples)concept of pH -pH measurement- (instrumental details recquired)Dissociation constants -Potentiometric titrations - (Neutralization, Oxidation-reduction and Preciptation) Buffer solutions -Henderson's equation for calculation of pH (4 hours) Reference

S. Glasstone (1997) Text book of Physical Chemistry Macmillan, New Delhi, pp-1320 P.W. Atkins (1987) Physical Chemistry Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp-857 C.A. Hampel (Ed) (1964) encyclopedia of the Electro chemistry, Reinhold Publishing Corportation, Newyork, pp.1206 A.Standen (Ed) (1964) Kirk-Othmr Encyclopaedia of Chemical Technology, Vol. 3, John Wiley and Sons, Inc, New York, pp-925 SECTION-2

CHEMISTRY OF MATERIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE Module -4 (9 hours) Material damages and prevention: Corrosion-theoretical aspects(electrochemical; theory) galvanic seriesPourbiaxdiagram-assessment of corrosion potential of materialsTypes of corrosion-Dry corrosion-direct chemical-Wet CorrosionElectrochemical-differential aeration-Corrosion of Iron in acidic neutral, basic condition (Corrosion in boilers)-Galvanic corrosion(corrosion at contact points in computers-Ag/Au)-Inter granular corrosion (18-8 Steel). Microbial corrosion-factors influencing corrosion. Corrosion protection-Self protecting corrosion products-PillingBedworth rule-Coatings -organic -(paints and polymesr)-Inorganic Coatings-Galvanizing (dip coating, Sherardizing, Wire-gun method)-

Tinning-Electroplating(Chromium, Nickel), Anodizaion of Aluminium-Passivation of metals by chemical treatment-Protection by Sacrificial Anode-Impressed current. (4 hours) Environmental damages and prevention: Pollution-Definitions-Classification of pollutants(Global, regional, Local; Persistent and Non persistent; Pollutants-Eg: CO2, CO, SOx, NOx, VOC, SPM, CFC, POP, Dissolved metals)-effects on environments -Air pollution-Fossil fuel burning-Automobile exhausts-Photchemical smog-PAN, PBN formation, chemical equations required)-Stratospheric Ozone depletion-CFCsNomenclature CFC's - Chapman cycle of Ozone formation -CFC dissociation and its reaction with Ozone-Alternate refrigerantsMonitoring of pollution -gases (CO, SO2, NOx) and particulate (High volume sampler )- Pollution from thermal power plants-Caol composition- fly ash-Thermal pollution. Methods of control of Air pollution-Bag filters, cyclones, Scrubbing, ESP, Catalytic converters-composition and action with CO, NOx. Water pollution-pollutant classification- (Organic, Inorganic, Suspended and dissolved-Toxic metal waste-BOD-COD)-Monitoring (analytical methods- brief discussion) and control-waste water treatment- aerobic, Anaerobic- USAB process-industrial waste water treatment- solid pollution-solid waste- radio nuclides-Toxic metals-Monitoring and control -incineration-Dioxins-hazardous waste-deep-well injection (5 hours) Reference

L.L Shreir (Ed) Corrosion Control Vol I and II, NewnesButterworths, London C.A. Hampel (Ed), Encyclopaedia of Electrochemistry Reinhold Publishing corporation, pp-1206 V. raghavan (2000), Material Science and Engineering- A First Course, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, pp485 A.K. De (1996), Environmental Chemistry, New Age International Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi, pp-364 C.N. Sawyer and P.L.McCarty (1989), Chemistry for Environmental Engineering McGraw Hill Book company, New Delhi, pp-530 H.S. Peavi, D.R. Rowe and G.Tchobangoglous (1985), Environmental Engineering McGraw hill International, pp720

S.P. Mahajan (1985) Pollution Control in Process Industries Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, pp-273 S.E. Manahan (1975) Environmental Chemistry, Willard Grant Press, Boston, pp-532.

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone

EN04-104A (P): CHEMISTRY LAB (A) (Common for AI, EE, EC, IC, BM, BT) 1hour lab per week or 2 hour lab per alternate weeks List of experiments

Estimation of purity of Copper (Iodometric method) Estimation of purity of Aluminium (EDTA method)

Crystal growth (melt grouth, solution grouth-CuSO4,KDP,ADP crystals) Phenol formaldehyde-preparation and study of properties Urea formaldehyde-preparation and study of properties Flash and fire point-Martens apparatus Measurements of Single Electrode potential-Poggendorf's method (M|M+ M|MA|A-, Salt bridge preparation, calculation of Junction potential) Corrosion potential measurement of certain metal and alloys in 3.5% salt solution (steel (18-8), AI, CU, Brass, Bronze, Monel metalor alloys of industrial use)- Potentiodynamics and Potentiostatics methods. .pH meter-Caliberation and measurement of pH-preparation of Buffers- Calculation of pH by Henderson's equation and verification. Potentiometric titration of acid and base-plots of E/V,E/V,2E/V2 plots. electrodepostion- plating of Copper-detection of the thickness or the layer deposited. Anodizing of aluminiumcharacteristics of the coating. Estimation of SO2, NO2, H2S. calculation of concentration in ppm and microgram per M3 and comparison of data with permitted levels. Estimation of Pb, Cd in water-colourimetric method. Estimation of Fluoride(Alizarin dye method),Nitrate in watercolourimetric method Estimation of Dissolved oxygen (Winklers method) Identification tests for certain common plastics(PE, PVC, Nylon, PET, etc) Preparation of some liquid crystals and study of their properties. (At least 12 experiments should be done)

Internal work assessment Lab practical and record = 10+5 (Lab performance to be evaluated by the thoroughness of the procedure practices, results of each experiments and punctuality in the submission of rough and fare records) Test/s = 10 Total marks = 25

EN04-105: HUMANITIES (Common for all B.Tech Programmes) 2 Hours Lecture Per Week Module I: (10 hours) Introduction to english usage and grammar-review of grammaraffixes, prefixes, suffixes, participles and gerunds-transformation of sentences-commonly misspelt words -correction of mistakespunctuation-idioms-style-vocabulary building Reading comprehension -exposure to a variety of reading materials, articles, essays-graphic representation, journalistic articles, etc. Writing comprehension-skills to express ideas in sentences, paragraphs and essays. Module II: (10 hours) Technical communication and report writing Need, importance and characteristics of technical communication -correspondence on technical mattres-aspects of technical description of machinery, equivalent and processes-giving instructions in an industrial situation-note taking and note makingcorrespondence on technical topics-different types of technical reports Module III: (14 hours) History of science and technology Science and technology in the primitive society-the development of human civilization from primitive to modern society -impact of sciences and technology on societies-cultural and industrial revolutions-the rise and development of early indian sciencecontribution of indian scientist-j c boss, c v raman, visweswarayaramanujan and bhabha-gandhian concepts-recent advances in indian science.

Moduel IV: (10 hours) Humanities in a technological age Importance of humanities to technology, education and societyrelation of career interests of engineers to humanities-relevance of a scientific temper-science, society and culkture Reference Books

Huddleston R, English Grammar-An Outline, Cambridge University Press Pennyor, Grammar Practice Activities,Cambridge University Press Murphy, Intermediate English Grammar, Cambridge University Press Hashemi, Intermediate English Grammar-Supplementary Exercises With Answers, Cambridge University Press Vesilind; Engineering, Ethics And The Environment, Cambridge University Press Larson E; History Of Inventions, Thompson Press India Ltd. Bernal J.D, Science In History, Penguin Books Ltd Dampier W.C, History Of Science, Cambridge University Press Encyclopaedia Britannica, History Of Science, History Of Technology Subrayappa; History Of Science In India, National Academy Of Science, India Brownski J, Science And Human Values, Harper And Row Schrodinger , Nature And Greeks And Science And Humanism, Cambridge University Press Bossel H, Earth At A Crossroads-Paths T A Sustainable Future, Cambridge University Press Mccarthy, English Vocabulary In Use, Cambridge University Press Anna University, English For Engineers Andtechnologists,. Orient Longman Meenakshi Raman Et Al, Technical Communication-Principles And Practice, Oxford University Press

Internal assessment One essay relevant topic 10

One technical report 2 test Total marks 2x15 30

10

= 50

University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module i with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module ii with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module iv with choice to answer anyone EN04-106A : ENGINEERING GRAPHICS (A) (Common for AI, CS, EE, EC, IT, PT, BM, PT) 1 hour lecture and 3 hours drawing Module 0: (8 hours- I drawing exercises) Drawing instruments and their use-different types of lines-lettering and dimensioning-familiarization with current Indian standard code of practice for general engineering drawing. Construction of ellipse, parabola and hyperbola. Construction of cycloid, involute and helix. Introduction to computer aided drafting. (For practice only, not for university examination) Module I: (12 hours- 3 drawing exercises) A) Introduction to orthographic projections -vertical, horizontal and profile palne-principles of first angle and third angle projections. Projections of points in different quadrants. Orthographic projections of straight lines parallel to one plane and inclined to the other plane-straight lines inclined to both the planes and occupied

in one quadrants-traces of lines. B) True length and inclination of a line with reference planes. Line occupied in more than one quadrant. Line inclined to the two reference planes but parallel to the profile plane. Line dimensioned in surveyor's unit. Module II: (16 hours- 3 drawing exercises) A) Projections of plane laminae of geometrical shapes parallel to one plane and inclined to other plane- plane laminae inclined to both the planes.auxiliary projections of plane laminae. Projections of laminae inclined to the two reference planes but perpendicular to the profile plane. B) Projections of polyhedra and solids of revolution -frustumsprojections of solids with axis parallel to one plane and inclined to other plane. Projections of solids with the axis inclined to both the planes. (solids to be drawn: cube, prisms, pyramids, tetrahedron, cone and cylinder). Projections of solids on auxiliary planes. Projection of combinations of solids. (solids to be drawn: prisms, pyramids, tetrahedron, cube, cone, and sphere) Module III: (12 hours- 3 drawing exercises) A) Sections of solids -sections by planes parallel to the horizontal or vertical planes and by planes inclined to the horizontal or vertical planes. True shape of section by projecting on auxiliary plane, (solids to be drawn: cube, prisms, pyramids, tetrahedron, cone and cylinder) B) Development of surfaces of solids -method of parallel line, radial line, triangulation and approximate developments. Development of polyhedra, cylinder, cone and sectioned solids. Developments of solids having hole or cut. Module IV: (12 hours- 3 drawing exercises) A) Introduction to isometric projection-isometric scale-isometric projections of prisms, pyramids,cylinder,cone, spheres,sectioned solids and combinations of them. Principle of oblique projectioncavalier, cabinet and general oblique projections of solids and simple objects B) Introduction to perspective projections-classification of

perspective views-parallel, angular and oblique perspectives-visual ray method and vanishing point method of drawing perspective projection-perspective views of prisms, pyramids and circles Module V: (12 hours- 6 drawing exercises) A) Introduction to multiview projection of objects-the principle of the six orthographic views -conversion of pictorial views of simple engineering objects into orthographic views. B) Conventional representation of threaded fasteners. Drawing of nuts, bolts, washers and screws. Locking arrangements of nuts. Bolted and screwed joints. Foundation bolts of eye end type hook end type and split end type. Note: All drawing exercises mentioned above are for class work. Additional exercise where ever necessary may be given as home assignments. Text Books

John K.C, Engineering Graphics, Jet Publications P.I. Varghese, Engineering Graphics, Vip Publications Bhatt N.D, Elementary Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishing House

Reference Books

Luzadder W.J., Fundamentals Of Engineering Drawing,Prentice Hall Of India Narayana K.L and Kannaiah P, Engineering Graphics, Tata Mcgraw Hill Gill P.S., Geometrical Drawing, Kataria And Sons

Internal work assessment Drawing exercise (best10) 2tests Total marks University examination pattern 10x3 =30 2x10=20 = 50

No question from module 0 QI - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module I with choice to answer anyone QII - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module III with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module IV with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions A and B of 20 marks from module to answer anyone V with choice

EN04-107A : ENGINEERING MECHANICS(A) (Common for AI, CH, CS, EE, EC, IT, IC, BM, BT, PT) 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objectives

To acquaint the student with general method of analyzing engineering problems To illustrate the application of the method to solve the practical engineering problems.

Module I: (17 hours) Principles of static-free body diagrams-Coplanar forces and forces and force system-resultant and equilibrium conditions for concurrent, parallel and general system of forces-solutions of problems by scalar approach. Introduction vector approach (application to simple problems only)- concurrent forces in space resultant-equilibrium of a practical in space -Non-concurrent forces in space-resultant of force of system Module II: (17 hours) Friction-loss of friction-simple contact friction problem-wedge, screw jack and its efficiency. Properties of surfaces-first moment and centroid of curve and area-centroid of composite plane figures-

theorems of Pappus-guldinus-second moments of plane figures and composite sections-transfer theorem-polar moments of areasproduct of areas and principal access (Conceptual level treatment only). Moment of inertia of rigid body-M.I of a lamina-M.I of 3 dimensional bodies (cylinder, circular rod, sphere) Module III: (17 hours) Introduction to structural mechanics-different types of support, loads and beams-reactions and support. Shear forces and bending moments diagrams for Cantilever and simply supported beams (only for concentrated and uniformly distributed load cases). Plane trusses-types of trusses (perfect, deficient and redundant, trusses)-Analysis of trusses-Method of joints-Method of sections. Module IV: (15 hours) Kinetics of rectilinear motion-Newton's second law-D'Alembert's principle- Motion on horizontal and inclined surfaces-Analysis of lift motion- Motion of connected bodies. Curvilinear motion-equation of motion-Tangential and normal acceleration-Centripetal and centrifugal forces-Motion of vehicles of circular path. Work, power and energy-Work done by a force -work of the force gravity and force of spring-Work-energy equation-Transformation and conservation of energy-Applications to problems. Kinematics of rotation-rigid body rotation about a fixed axisrotation under the action of constant moment. Introduction to mechanical vibrations-simple harmonic motion-free vibration-Oscillation of spring-Torsional vibration Text books

Timoshenko and Young, Engineering Mechanics, McGraw Hill Publishers Hibbler, Engineering Mechanics, Vol.I statics, Vol II Dynamics, Pearson Shames. I.H, Engineering Mechanics-Statics and Dynamics, Prentice Hall of India

Reference Books

Beer.F.P and Johnson E.R, Mechanics for Engineers-Statics and Dynamics, McGraw Hill Publishers. Rajasekharan and Sankarsubrahmanian, Engineering Mechanics, VIkas Publishing House

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. (At least one assignment should be computer based using spreadsheet or suitable tools) 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module (in which, at least 5 questions to be numerical) QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone (QII toV can have subdivisions and at least 80% weightage for numerical problems) IT04-108: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING IN C (Common for CS, IT, PT) 2 hours lecture and 1 hour practical per week

Module - I: (15 hours) Programming and problem solving-Functional units of a computer -high level and low level languages-steps involved in computer programming-developing algorithms and flowcharts-efficiency of algorithms -running, debugging and testing of programs-Program design methods-top-down modular programming-measures of program performance -introduction to operating system. Modular - II: (15 hours) Overview of C-Introduction-Basic structure of C programs-Executing a C program-constants, Variables and DataTypes and sizesoperators and Expression-Implicit type conversion, explicit type casting -precedence-syntax notations-managing input and output -formatted I/O-decision making and Branching-break and continueLooping. Module - III: (16 hours) Arrays- one dimensional and multidimensional arrays-handling of character string-Functions- introduction- user defined functionsform of C functions-Return values and their types-Calling a function-Category of functions-handling of non-integer functionsRecursion-Functions- with arrays-Scope and lifetime of variables in functions-Structures and Unions-Pointers-Declaring and initializing pointers-Pointers and arrays-Pointers and functions-Dynamic memory allocation-malloc, calloc, free, ralloc-basic concepts of linked lists-Bit fields. Module - IV: (20 hours) File Management in C- Introduction-Defining and opening a fileClosing a file-Input/output operations on files formatted I/O filesThe unix system interface: File descriptors, Low level I/O-read and write -open, create, close, unlink-Random access-Iseek-I/O error handling-stderr-exit- An implementation of fopen and getcImplementation of sequential access file of records-random access file records. Progarmme development-command line arguments-Scope and linkage in the context of a project-Environmental variables provided by OS-Preprocessing and portability of program to multiple platforms-Standardised C library header files-Programming with standard I/O -Assessing environment from within program-

unix system calls-Handling processes, signals and interrupts as examples-Debugging runtime errors-Diagnostic header file assert.h-introduction to Unix 'make' utility -Introduction to Unix 'version control system' Text books

E. Balaguruswamy; Programming in Ansi C. 2.1 editio; Tata McGraw Hill Brian W Kernighan and Rob Pike, The Unix programming environment, Prentice Hall of India Brian W Kernighan, Dennis M Ritchie; C programming language; 2nd edition; Prentice Hall of India

Reference books

G. Michael Schneider, Steven W Weingart, David M Perlman, An Introduction to programming and Problem solving with Pascal;2nd edition;John Wiley Byron Gottfried, Programming with C; 2nd edition , John Wiley K.R Venugopal, Sudeep R Prasad, Programming with C;Tata McGraw Hill Yashavant Kanektar, Let us C; 3rd edition; BPB Publications. Barret & Wagner; C and Unix:Tolls for Program Design ;John Wiley Deitel H .M & Deitel P. J, C How to Program; Pearson Education Asia

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to

answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04-109: BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (Common for CS, IT, PT) 2 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Module - I: (16 hours) Elementary concepts-Voltage, current, Electric energy and power, Basic Circuit Elements, Independent sources, Modeling, Linear circuits. Resistive Circuits-Resistances in series and parallel, voltage and current division, Star-delta Conversion, Network reduction, source Representation and Conversion, Mesh Analysis, Superposition, Thevenin and Norton Theorems. Reactive Circuits-Inductance and capacitance, RL/RC Circuit Transients, Quiescent Circuit, Duality of Networks, RLC transients, Circuit Analysis, Circuit response to pulse and impulse Excitations. Module - II: (18 hours) AC single phase circuits-Sinusoidal Voltage and current, RMS and average Values, Form factor and Peak factor, phasor representation, Kirchoff's Voltage and current laws, RLC series and parallel circuits, power in steady state, Resonance in series and parallel circuits. Three-phase Circuits-Three phase Voltages and Currents, Phasor diagram, Star & delta connections, Threephase power , Three phase Circuit Analysis, Star- delta conversions ,measurement of three phase Power using single and two wattmeter methods.

Circuit Anlysis by Laplace Transformation-Definition and properties of Laplace and Inverse Laplace Transforms, partial fraction expansion, Circuit analysis, transformed Networks, Circuit Transients using Laplace transforms. Module - III: (16 hours) Magnetism-magnetic Circuits *& Induction-Induced emf, Self and mutual inductance, energy stored in magnetic field, Coupled circuits. Transformers-Construction, Core Types, rating, Induced emf, Ideal Transformers, Magnetizing and Core Loss Current, Equivalent Circuit of a transformer, Voltage Regulation, Efficiency, Autotransformers, Three-phase Transformers (basic idea only) DC machines-Constructional features of various types of DC machines, Circuit model, Communication, Excitation, Magnetization characteristic, shunt generator, other DC generators, characteristics of DC motors, speed control (armature and field control methods), Principle of operation of Series-Shunt and compound motors, Applications. Module - IV: (16 hours) Synchronous machines-Types and constructional features, Principle of Operation, Voltage regulation (using emf and mmf methods), synchronizing to mains, Starting a Synchronous Motor , Damper winding, speed control. Induction Machine-Constructional features, Squirrel-Cage and Slip -Ring motors, Equivalent Circuits, Speed control, Comparisons and applications. Measurement Technique and Instrumentation -Classification and types of instruments, Construction and working of moving coil/moving iron voltmeter and ammeter-Dynamo meter type wattmeter-Induction type energy meter, Bridge Measurement, Electronic Voltmeter and Multimeter, Measurement of electronic Components, Q-meter, Frequency and phase measurement, Digital instruments. Text books

Kothari D P & Nagrath I J, Theory and Problems of Basic

Electrical engineering, Prentice Hall of India William H Hoyt and Jack E Kemmerly, Engineering Circuit Analysis. Tata McGraw hill Sawhny A K, A course in electrical & electronics measurements and instrumentations, Dhanrai.

Reference books

Chakrbarthy A, Circuit theory (Analysis and synthesis), Dhanapat Rai & Co (Pvt) Ltd Smith R J & Dorf R C, Circuits, Devices and systems, John Wiley Cohon H, Fundamentals of electrical Engineering, ELBS Srinivasa Murthy. R. V, Basic Electrical Engineering, Sanguine Technical Publishers. Edminister J.A, Electric Circuits, Schaum's series, McGraw Hill

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone

ITO4-110(P) : CIVIL AND MECHANICAL WORKSHOP (Common for EE, CS, IT, PT) 3 hours practical per week (part a and part B alternate week) Part A : Civil engineering workshop (33 hours)

Chain surveying-study of instruments and chain survey traverse Compass surveying-study of instruments and compass traverse Plain table surveying- study of instruments and plain tabling by intersection and the radiation method Plain table surveying- plain table traverse Levelling-study of instruments, temporary adjustments of dumpy level Fly leveling Theodolite surveying-study of instruments, temporary adjustments Theodolite surveying-measurement of horizontal angles by reiteration method and repetition method Study of electronic distance/level measuring equipments (or total station)

Internal work assessment Surveying and practical and record = 15 Test = 10 Total marks = 25 Part B: Mechanical engineering workshop (33 hours) Machine shop practice (9 hours) Study of different machine tools-lathe, shaper, milling machine, drilling machine, grinding machine-exercises on lathe-models involving straight turning-taper turning, knurling, and thread machining. Fitting practice (6 hours) Study of hand tools and measuring tools used in fitting works-

fabrication exercises in involving cutting, chisley, filling and drillinguse of thread dies and taps Welding practice (6 hours) Study of electric arc welding and gas welding equipmentsaccessories and tools-safety practices-exercises involving preparation of different types of welded joints-lab and butt jointsgas cutting equipments Sheet metal practice (6 hours) Study of shearing and bending and folding machines, press break etc. Used in sheet metal work-hand tools in sheet metal workdevelopments and fabrication of simple sheet metal components like cylindrical dish, funnel, rectangular duct, tray, panel board etc.soldering and brazing joints-die cutting operations Carpentry practice (6 hours) Wood and processing -shop equipment-measuring and marking tools-wood working hand tools - wood working machinerypreparation of joints-lap, butt, dovetail, mortise and tenon and bridal joints-wood turning Internal work assessment Surveying and practical and record = 15 Test = 10 Total marks = 25 EE04-111(P) : ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS WORKSHOP (Common for EE, EC, AI, BT, BM, CS, IT, IC, PT) 2 hours practical per week Part A: Electrical workshop (2 hours per alternate weeks)

Familiarisation of various types of service mains-wiring installations-Accessories and house-hold electrical appliances Methods of earthing measurement of Earth resistanceTesting of electrical installations-Precautions against and

cure from electric shock Practice of making Britannia joints on copper/aluminium bare connectors. Practice making married joints of copper/aluminium conductors Practice of making T joints on copper/aluminium conductors Wiring practice of a circuit to control 2 lamps by 2 SPST switches Wiring practice of a circuit to control 1 lamp by 2 SPDT switches Wiring practices of circuit to control 1 Fluorescent lamp and 1 three-in plug socket Wiring practice of main switch to board consisting of ICDP switch, DB, MCB's, and ELCB's Familiarisation of various parts and assembling of electrical motors and wiring practice of connecting a 3-phase/1-phase motor with starter

Internal work assessment Workshop practicals and record = 15 Test/s = 10 Total marks = 25 Part B: Electronics workshop (2 hours per alternate weeks)

Familiarization of various electronics components such as resistors, AF and RF chokes capacitors, transistors, diodes, IC's, and transformers Assembling and soldering practice of single phase full wave bridge rectifiers circuits with capacitor filter Assembling and soldering practice of common emitter circuit Assembling and soldering practice of common emitter circuit on PCB Assembling and soldering practice of non inverter amplifier circuit using OPAMP on PCB Assembling of a timer circuit IC 555, phase shift oscillator circuit using OPAMP and JK flip-flop using NAND gates on a bread-board Coil winding-silver layer and multi layer- Demonstration Miniature transformer winding-Demonstration PCB layout using software like ORCARD, CIRCUIT MAKER, EDWIN

PCB fabrication-Demonstration

Internal work assessment Workshop practicals and record = 15 Test/s = 10 Total marks = 25 THIRD SEMESTER

Code EN04 301B IT04 302 IT04 303

Subject Engineering Mathematics III Data Structure & Algorithms Discrete Computational Structures Basic Electronics Engineering Switching Theory & Logic Design Technical Argumentation

Hours/Week Internal Marks 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 3 3 6 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 400

University Examination 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 800

IT04 304 IT04 305 IT04 306 IT04 Programming Lab 307(P) IT04 - Digital Electronics 308(P) Lab TOTAL

DETAILED SYLLABUS EN04 - 301B ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS III (Common with CS04 301B) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Module I: Linear Algebra (13 hours) Vector spaces -Linear dependence and independence, and their computation - Bases and dimension - Subspaces - Inner product spaces - Gram-Schmidt orthogonalisation process - Linear transformations - Elementary properties of Linear transformations Matrix of a linear transformation. (Proofs of theorems are not required) Module II: Fourier Integrals and Fourier transforms (13 hours) Fourier integral (proof not required) - Fourier sine and cosine integral representations - Fourier sine and cosine transforms Properties of Fourier transforms - Singularity functions and their Fourier transforms. Module III: Complex Analytic Functions (13 hours) Function of a complex variable - Derivative-Analytic function Canchy-Riemen equations - Laplaces equation - conformal mapping - Exponential function - Trigonometric functions - Hyperbolic functions - Logarithm - Linear fractional transformations. Module IV: Complex Integrals (13 hours) Line integral in the complex plane - Cauchy's integral theorem (Proof of existence of indefinite integral to be omitted) - Cauchy's integral formula - Derivatives of an analytic functions (Proof to be omitted) - Taylor series - Laurent series -Singularities and zeros Residue integration method - Evaluation of real integrals. Text book Module 1: K.B. Datta, Matrix and linear algebra for engineers, Prentice hall of India Module 2: Wylie C.R. and Barret L.C, Advanced Engineering mathematics 6th Edition, McGraw Hill Module 3: Erwin Kreyszig - Advanced Engineering Mathematics 8th Edition, John Wiley & Sons Module 4: Erwin Kreyszig - Advanced Engineering Mathematics 8th Edition, John Wiley & Sons Reference books 1. R.S.L Srivastava, Engineering Mathematics (Volume II) Tata McGraw Hill

2. S.Narayanan, T.K. Manicavachagom Pillai & Dr. Ramanaiah Advanced Mathematics for Engineering students, S. Viswanathan Publishers. 3. R.K. Jain & R.K. Iyengar, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Narosa Publishing house 4. Lipschutz. S, Linear Algebra, Schaum's Outline Series, McGraw Hill Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 302 DATA STRUCTURES & ALGORITHMS (Common with CS04 302) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Module - I: (12 hours) Review of data types - scalar types - primitive types -enumerated types -sub ranges structures types - character strings - arrays -

records - sets - tiles - data abstractions - complexity of algorithms time and space complexity of algorithms using big oh notation recursion: recursive algorithms - analysis of recursive algorithms. Module - II: (12 hours) Linear data structures - stacks - queues -lists - stack and queue implementation using array - linked list - linked list implementation using pointers. Module - III: (12 hours) Non linear structures: graphs - trees - sets - graph and tree implementation using array linked list - set implementation using bit string, linked list. Module - IV: (16 hours) Searching - sequential search -searching arrays and linked lists binary search - searching arrays and binary search trees - hashing introduction to simple hash functions - resolution of collisions sorting: n2 sorts - bubble sort - intension sort - selection sort NlogN sorts - quick sort - heap sort - merge sort - external sort merge files Text book

Aho A.V., Hopcroft.J.E & Ullman J.D., Data Structures and Algorithms, Addision Wesley

Reference book

Sahni S, Data Structures, Algorithms & Application in C++, McGraw Hill Wirth N, Algorithms + Data Structures= Programs, Prentice Hall Cormen T.H., Leiserson C.E.,& Rivest R.L., Introduction to Algorithms, MIT Press, 1990 Adam Drozdek, Data Structures and Algorithms in C++, Thomson Brooks/cole - Vikas Pub. House pvt. Ltd. Deshpande P.S, Kakde O.G, C and Data Structures, Dream -tech India Pvt. Ltd.

Sessional work assessment

Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 303 DISCRETE COMPUTATIONAL STRUCTURES (Common with CS04 303) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Module - I: (13 hours) Logic - logical connectives and Truth tables - Logical equivalence and laws of logic - logical implication and rules of inference Quantifiers - Proofs of theorems using rules of universal specification and universal generalization. Module - II: (13 hours) Relational Structures - Cartesian products -Relations - Relation matrices -Properties of relations - Composition of relations Equivalence relations and partitions - functions - One-to-one, on to functions - Composition of functions and inverse functions - partial orders - Hasse diagrams

Module - III: (13 hours) Group theory - Definition and elementary properties - Cyclic groups - Homomorphism and Isomorphisms- Subgroups - Cosets and Lagrange's theorem - Elements of coding theory - Hamming metric - Generator matrices - Group codes - Hamming matrices. Module - IV: (13 hours) Rings and Fields -Definitions and examples of rings, integral domains and fields - Elementary properties and substructures Homomorphisms and Isomorphisms - The ring Zn - Polynomial rings - Irreducible polynomials and finite fields. Text book

Ralph P Grimaldi, Discrete and Computational Mathematics: An Applied introduction (Fourth Edition, Pearson Education, 2004

Reference books

Tremblay, J.P. & Manohar , R, Discrete and Mathematical Structures with Applications to Computer Science, McGraw Hill Book Company. Kolman B & Busby R.C., Discrete and Mathematical Structures for Computer Science, Prentice Hall of India. Donald F Stanat & David F Mc Allister, Discrete and Mathematical Structures in Computer Science, Prentice Hall. Truss J K, Discrete Mathematics for Computer Scientists, Pearson Education, 2001 Herstein I.N, Topics in Algebra, Wiley Eastern. Garding, L & Tambour T, Algebra for Computer Science, Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi.

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50

University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 304 : BASIC ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING (Common with CS04 304) 3hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Module - I: (15 hours) Electronic components - concepts of voltage and current sources Energy bands in solids, metals insulators and semiconductors -Intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors - PN junction theory - V-I characteristics - diode resistance - rectifiers - Performance analysis of rectifiers - Filters, Zener, varator and power diodes - LEDs. Transistors - Working and amplifying action - characteristics Comparison between CE, CB and CC configurations - CE Amplifier, construction of transistors - Use of data sheet - Thermal runaway UJT, introduction to FETs. Module - II: (12 hours) Transistor biasting - Selection of operating point - Bias stabilization - Different biasting circuits - PNP biasting - Small signal amplifiers single stage amplifier - Graphical Method - Equivalent circuit method - Amplifier analysis FET amplifier - Multistage amplifiers Gain analysis - RC coupled amplifier - Frequency response - Two stage RC coupled amplifier - Distortation in amplifiers Classification of amplifiers

Module - III: (13 hours) Power amplifiers - Single-ended power amplifier - harmonic distortation - Push-pull amplifier - Tuned voltage amplifier Resonance- Single tuned voltage amplifier - Feedback in amplifiers - Types of feedback - Voltage gain with feedback Negative feedback - Oscillators - Classification - LC oscillators - RC Oscillators - Crystal oscillators - Astable multivibrator Module - IV: (12 hours) Operational amplifiers - Inverting and non- Inverting amplifiers Adder - Voltage follower - Differential amplifier - Integrator and Differentiator - Zero-crossing detector - Precision diode - Peak detector - Logarithmic amplifier - Square and triangle wave generator - Analog computation -Active filters. Text books

Bhargava N.N., Kulshreshta D.C. & Gupta S.C., Basic Electronics &Linear Circuits, Tata McGraw Hill (Modules I, II & III) Nagarath J, Electronics Analog & Digital, Prentice Hall India (Module IV)

Reference books

Millman J. & Halkias C.C., Integrated Electronics: Analog & Digital Circuits & Systems, Tata McGraw Hill Schilling D.L. & Belove C., Electronic Circuits: Discrete & Integrated, McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50 University examination pattern

QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 305 : SWITCHING THEORY & LOGIC DESIGN (Common with CS04 304) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Module - I: (14 hours) Number Systems and codes - Boolean algebra - Postulates and theorems - Constants, Variables and functions - Switching algebra Electronic gates and Mechanical contacts Boolean functions and logical operations - Normal and canonical forms - self-dual functions - Logical operations - Karnaugh map - Prime cubes Minimum sum of products and product of sums - Quine - McClusky algorithm Module - II: (13 hours) Combinational Logic - Analysis and Design of combinational logic circuits - Universal property of the NAND and NOR gates - Adders -Parallel adders and look-ahead adders - Comparators - Decoders and encoders - Code conversion -Multiplexers and demultiplexers Parity generators and checkers - ROMs PLAs Module - III: (10 hours) Fault diagnosis and tolerance - Fault classes and models-Fault diagnosis and testing - Test generation -Fault table method - Path sensitizations method - Boolean difference method - Faulttolerance techniques. Programmable logic arrays - PLA minimization - Essential prime cube theorem - PLA folding - Design

for testability. Module - IV: (15 hours) Counters and shift registers - SR, JK, D and T flip-flops - Excitations tables - Triggering of flip-flops - Flip-flop applications - Latches Ripple counters - Synchronous counters - Up-down counters -Design of sequential circuits - Counter decoding - Counter applications - Shift registers and their applications - Clock mode sequential machine - State tables and diagrams. Text books

Biswas N.N., Logic Design Theory, Prentice Hall of India (Modules I, II & III) Floyd T.L., Digital Fundamentals, Universal Book Stall (Module IV)

Reference books

Kohavi Z., Switching & Finite Automata Theory, Tata McGraw Hill Millman J. & Halkias C.C., Integrated Electronics: Analog & Digital Circuits & Systems, Tata McGraw Hill M.Morris mano, Charles R. Kime, Logic and Computer Design Fundamental, Pearson Education.

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to

answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 306 : TECHNICAL ARGUMENTATION (Common with CS04 304) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: [This topic is concerned with the most fundamental aspects of academic study; abilities to reason with ideas and evidence, to formulate arguments effectively and to appreciate the interplay between ideas and evidence in debate. It introduces a student to the nature of good reasoning and how to test and construct good arguments without assuming any prior knowledge of logic or philosophy. The subject May work as a much-needed guide to thinking critically for oneself.] Module - I: (13 hours) Introduction to argument - choice of topic - defining audience -defining terms - planning argument - avoiding logical fallacies case study of classic arguments of Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr. Module - II: (13 hours) Understanding forms of persuasion - Reading critically - Plagirism documenting sources - guide to research - avoiding selective research - case study involving issue of surfing the web. Module - III: (13 hours) Searching for magazine, journal, newspaper articles - using abstracting services, Internet, books, other library resources - case study involving culture and curriculam

Module - IV: (13 hours) Conducting interviews, surveys, compiling bibliography organizing, writing and preparing researched paper - case study involving gun control and immigration - case study of select classic argument of Plato. Text books

Robert k Miller, The informed Argument, fifth edition, Harcourt Brace College Publishers

References:

John Shand, Arguing Well, Routledge Publishers Peter J Phelan, Peter J Reynolds, Argument and Evidence, Routledge Publishers Tracy Bowell and Garry Kemp, Critical Thinking, Routledge Publishers David Sansford, If P then Q, Routledge Publishers

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to

answer anyone IT04 307(P) : PROGRAMMING LAB 3 hours Practical per week Objective: This Course is to give a strong programming concept so as to introduce the software engineering techniques to the students of computing streams. For adequacy this has to be complemented by exercises appearing in texts and references. Books have been carefully chosen to get examples from diverse computing applications for practice. Set - I: (3 lab sessions) HCF (Euclid's algorithm) and LCM of given numbers - Find mean median and mode of a given set of numbers - Conversion of numbers from binary to decimal, hexadecimal, octal and back Evaluation of functions like ex, Sin x, cos x, etc. for a given numerical precision using Taylor's series - Testing whether a given number is prime. Set - II: (2 lab sessions) String manipulation programs: sub-string search, deletion Lexicographic sorting of a given set of strings - Generation of all permutations of the letters of a given string using recursion. Set - III: ( 2 lab sessions) Matrix operations: Programs to find the product of two matrices Inverse and determinant (using recursion) of given matrix Solution to simultaneous linear equations using Jordan elimination. Set - IV: (2 lab sessions) Files: Text files - use of sequential files for storing records with provision for insertion - deletion, search, sort and update of a record. Implementation of random access files of records. Set - V: (2 lab sessions) Usage of program development & maintenance tools (for example.

make) - Examples of accessing operating system environment from within program, conditional assembly - Exercises involving standard I/O devices, argc, argv functions - Exercises demonstrating a few system calls. Note: Make utility May used extensively to do the programming for this set of experiments. Reference books

Schildt H., C: The Complete Reference, Tata McGraw Hill Tan H.H. & D'Orazio T.B., C programming for engineering & Computer Science, McGraw Hill Cormen T.H. et al, Introduction to Algorithms, Prentice Hall of India. Brian W Kernighan and Rob Pike, The Unix Programming environment, Prentice Hall of India/Pearson Education Asia.

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 IT04 308(P) DIGITAL ELECTRONICS LAB 3hours Practical per week Objective: This course gives hand on experience on digital electronics components and systems; which are fundamental building blocks of the Computer systems. Experiments are structured to cover extensively the characteristic and features of indispensable digital electronic circuits and systems

Verification of truth tables of AND, OR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XOR gates, use for gating digital signals TTL characteristics Verification of the postulates of Boolean algebra and DeMorgan's theorem using logic gates.

Half and full adders, half and full substractors. Digital comparator, parity generator and checker, and code converter. Characteristics and operations of RS, gated RS, D,T and JK master slave flipflops. Multiplexer and demultiplexer using gates Shift register, ring counter, and twisted ring counter. Decade counter and variable modulo asynchronous counter Astable multivibrator and Schmitt trigger using gates, astable and monostable multivibrator and frequency divider using 555

Reference books

Nagarath.J, Electronics Analog & Digital, Prentice Hall India Millman & Halkias, Integrated Electronics, Tata McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Lab practicals & records =25 Regularity in the class =05 2 tests 2x10 =20 Total marks =50 FORTH SEMESTER Code EN04 401B EN04 402 IT04 403 IT04 404 IT04 405 IT04 406 IT04 Subject Engineering Mathematics IV Environmental Studies System Programming Microprocessor Based Design Programming Paradigms Communication Systems Data Structure Lab Hours/Week Internal Marks 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 University Examination 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

407(P) IT04 - Programming 408(P) Environments Lab TOTAL

18

3 6

50 400

3 -

100 800

DETAILED SYLLABUS EN04 401B : ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS IV (Common with CS04 401) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Module I: Probability and Distributions (16 hours) Introduction -Probability distributions continuous random variables -Probability density functions - Mathematical expectation - The Expected value of arandom variable -Moments -Moment generating function- Special probability distributions -Binomial distributionGeometric distributions-Hyper geometric distribution-Poisson distribution-Special probability densities-Uniform density -Gamma and Chi-square distributions-Normal distribution. Module II: Sampling Distributions & Estimation (10 hours) Population and samples-The sampling distribution of the mean- The sampling distribution of the variance Estimation-IntroductionUnbiased estimators-Efficiency-Consistency-Sufficiency-The method of maximum likehood-Interval estimations- the estimation of means-The estimation of Variances. Module III: Testing Hypothesis (10 hours) Tests of hypothesis-Null hypotheses and tests of hypotheses and tests of hypotheses - Hypotheses concerning one mean-Hypotheses concerning two means - hypothesis concerning one variance Hypotheses concerning two variances -chi-square test for goodness of fit. Module IV:Jointly distributed random variables, Markov chains & Poisson process (16 hours) Joint distribution functions-Independent random variablesCovariance and variance of sums of random variables-Joint

probability distribution of functions of random variables- Joint probability distribution of functions of random variables-Stochastic process-Conditional probability and conditional expectations. Markov chains-Champman Kolmogorov equations-Exponential distribution-Properties of exponential distribution-Counting processDefinition of Poisson process-Interval and waiting time distributions. Text books Module 1: John E Freund, Mathematical Statistics 5th Edition, Prentice Hall of India Module 2: Johnson R.A, Miller & Freud's Probability & Statistics for Engineers, 6th Edition Pearson Education Asia John E Freund, Mathematical Statistics, 5th Edition, Prentice Hall of India Module 3: Johnosn R.A, Miller & Freud's Probability & Statistics for engineers, 6th Edition Pearson Education Asia Module 4: Ross S.M, Introduction to Probability Models, 7th Edition, Academic Press Reference books

Erwin Kreyszig- Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 8th Edition, John Wiley & sons R.E. Walpole, R.H Myers, S.L Myers& Keying, Probability and Statistics for Engineers, 7th Edition, Pearson Education Asia Karlin S & Tailor.H, A first course in Stochastic process, Academic Press

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50

University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer any one QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer any one QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer any one QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one EN04 402 : ENVIRONMENAL STUDIES 3 hours lecture & 1 hour Tutorial per week Objective: The importance of environmental science and environmental studies cannot be disputed. Continuing problems of pollution, loss of forest, solid waste disposal, degradation of environment, loss of bio diversity etc have made everyone aware of environmental issues. The objective of this course is to create general awareness among the students regarding these environmental issues. Module I: (12 hours) The Multi disciplinary nature of environmental studies Definition - scope and importance -need for public awareness. Natural Resources Renewable and non-renewable resources: Natural resources and associated problems - forest resources: Use and over exploitation, deforestation, case studies. Timber extraction, mining, dams and their defects on forests and tribal people. - Water resources: Use and over - utilization of surface and ground water, floods, drought, conflicts over water, dams-benefits and problems. -Mineral resources: Use and exploitation,

environmental effects of extracting and using mineral resources, case studies. - Food resources: World food problems, changes caused by agriculture overgrazing, effects of modern agriculture, fertilizer-pesticide problems, water logging, salinity, case studies. Energy resources: Growing energy needs, renewable energy sources, use of alternate energy sources, case studies - Land resources: Land as a resource, land degradation, man induced land slides, soil crosion and desertification - Role of an individual in conservation of natural resources - Equitable use of resources for sustainable lifestyle. Module II: (14 hours) Ecosystems - Concept of an ecosystem -Structure of an ecosystems - Producers, consumers, and decomposers- Energy flow in the ecosystem- Ecological succession - Food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids - Introduction, types, characteristic features. Structure and functions of the following ecosystem: - forest ecosystem - Grassland ecosystem- Desert ecosystem -Aquatic ecosystem (ponds, streams, lakes, rivers, oceans, estuaries) Biodiversity and its conservation Introduction -Definition: genetic, species and ecosystem diversity Biogeographical classification of India - Value of biodiversity: consumptive use, productive use, social, ethical, aesthetic and option values - Biodiversity at global, national and local levelsIndia as a mega-diversity nation - Hot-spots of Biodiversity Threats to biodiversity: habitat loss, poaching of wild life, manwildlife conflicts - Endangered and endemic species of India -Conservation of Biodiversity: In-situ and Ex-situ conservation of biodiversity. Module III: (11 hours) Environmental Pollution Definition - Causes, effects and control measures of: - Air pollution -Water pollution -Soil pollution- Machine pollution- Noise pollutionThermal pollution -Nuclear hazards - Solid waste Management: Cause, effects and control measures of urban and industrial wastes - Role of an individual in prevention of pollution - Pollution case studies - Disaster management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and landslides -Environmental Protection Act - air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act- Water (Prevention and control of Pollution)

Act - wildlife Protection Act - Forest Conservation Act - Issues involved in enforcement of environmental legislation- Public Awareness. Module IV: (10 hours) Social Issues and the Environment From unsustainable to sustainable development -Urban problems related to energy - Water conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed management- Resettlement and rehabilitation of people: its problems and concerns, case studies - environmental Ethics: Issues and possible solutions- Climate change, global, warming, acid rain, ozone layer depletion, nuclear accidents and holocaust. Case studies - Wasteland reclamation - Consumerism and waste products. Human Population and the environment Population growth, variation among nations - Population explosion family welfare programme - Environment and human health Pollution hazards, sanitation and health - Human rights for clean environment-Value Education-HIV/AIDS-social concern-Women and Child Welfare-Role of information Technology in Environmental and human health-case studies. Field Works (5 Hours)

Visit to a local area to documents environment assets river/forests/grassland/hill/ mountain Visit to local polluted site-urban/rural/industrial/agricultural Study of common plants, insects, birds Study of simple ecosystems-pond, river, hill slopes, etc.

Text books:

Clark, R.S. Marine Pollution. Clanderson Press Oxford o Mhaskar A.K, Matter Hazardous. Techno-science Publications o Miller, T.G. Jr. Environmental science, Wadsworth Publishing Co. o Townsend, C, Harper, J. and Michael Begon, Essential of Ecology. Balckwell science o Trivedi . R.K. and Goel. P.K. Introduction to air

pollution. Techno-Science Publications References:


Agarval. K.C. 2001 Environmental biology.Nidhi Publ. Ltd. Bikaner Bharucha Erach, Biodiversity of India, Mapin Publishing Pvt.Ltd, Ahmedabad-380 013, India, E-mail: mapin@icenet.net Brunner, R.C. 1989. Hazardous Waste Incineration. McGraw Hill Inc. 480p Cunningham, W.P, Cooper, T.H Gorhani, E & Hepworth, M.t. 2001 Environmental encyclopedia Jaico publ. House Mumbai 1196p De, A.K. Environmental Chemistry.Wiley Eastern Ltd. Down to Earth, Centre for Science and Environment Gleick, H.P. 1993 Water in crisis. Pacific Institute for Studies in dev., Environment and Security, Stockholm Env. Institute. Oxford Univ.Press. 473p Hawkins, R.E. Encyclopedia of Indian Natural History, Bombay Natural History Society, Bombay Heywood, V.H. & Watson,R.T. 1995. Global Biodiversity Assessment. Cambridge Univ. Press 1140p Jadhav, h & Bhosale, V.M. 1995 Environmental Protection and Laws. Himalaya Pub. House, Delhi Mckinney, M.L. & School, R.M. 1996. Environmental Science system & Solutions, Web enhanced Edition, 639p. Odum, E.P. 1971. Fundamentals of Ecology. W.B. Saunders Co. USA, 574p Rao, M.N & Datta, A.K 1987. Waste Water treatment. Oxford & IBH Publ.Co.Pvt Ltd, 345p Sharma, B.K. 2001 Environmental Chemistry. Goel Publ. House, Meerut. Survey of the Environment, The Hindu (M) Trivedi, R.K. Handbook of Environmental Laws, Rules, Guidelines, Compliances and standards, Vol I and II. Enviro Media Wagner K.D. 1998. Environmental Management. W.B. Saunders Co. Philaldelphia, USA 499pp

(M) Magazine Internal assessment 2 Tests = 20

Field work and Report (Internal Assessment) = 25 Regularity = 5 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 16 Short answer question (4 from each module) of 5 marks each with a choice to answer any 12 (12x5) QII - 2 questions A&B of 10 marks from module I with choice to answer any one QIII - 2 questions A&B of 10 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions A&B of 10 marks from module III with choice to answer any one QV - 2 questions A&B of 10 marks from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 403 SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING (Common with CS04 403) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: [The subject gives the essentials of system software design. System software consists of programs necessary to make the hardware function properly. The objective of the study of this subject is to equip the student with the right kind of tools for computer systems design and development] Module - I: (15 hours) Background - System software machine architecture -the simplified instructional computer - traditional machines -RISC machines -assemblers - bascic assembler functions- machine dependent and machine independent -assembler features- assembler designs assembler design options - implementation examples- AIX

Assembler. Module - II: (13 hours) Loaders and linkers - basic loader functions - machine dependent and machine independent loader features- loader design options and implementation examples- macro processors- basic macro processor functions - machine-independent macro processor features - macro processor design options and implementations examples. Module - III: (15 hours) Introduction to operating systems - basic principles - batch processing - multiprogramming- time sharing systems and realtime systems - parallel and distributed systems - computer system structure - computer system operation -I/O structure - structure -storage hierarchy - hardware protection - general system architecture - operating system structure -system components - OS services - system calls -system structure - virtual machines. Module - IV: (9 hours) General overview of the UNIX operating system - history of UNIX system structure - user perspective -services - hardware assumptions - unix Architecture - system concepts - kernel data structures - system administration process (concepts only) Text books

Beck L.L., System Software - An introduction to systems Programming, Addison Wesley o Bach M.J., The Design of the Unix Operating System, Prentice Hall India

Reference books

Dhamdhere D.M., Systems Programming and Operating Systems, Tata McGraw Hill Godbole S, Operating Systems, Tata McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15

Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions answer anyone A & Bof 15 marks from module I with choice to

QIII - 2 questions A & B of 15 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions A & B of 15 marks from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions A & B of 15 marks from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 404 MICROPROCESSING BASED DESIGN (Common with CS04 404) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: The Course depicts essential features of systems design based on microprocessors. Students get exposure to hardware, interfacing, programming and debugging. The course is also meant to enable students to design hardware systems for optimal performance. Module - I: (13 hours) Historical background of microprocessors - inside the PC motherboard - graphic adapters and monitors - drive controllers floppy and hard disk drives - streams and other drives - parallel interfaces and printers- serial interfaces and modems - network adapters and LANs - CMOS RAM and real clock - keyboard, mouse and other rodents - the power supply - operating system - BIOS and memory organization - 8086/8088 hardware specification: clock generator-bus buffering and latching-bus timing-ready and wait

states- minimum and maximum modes-advanced processorsfeatures of 80386,80486 and Pentium processors Module - II: (14hours) Microprocessors architecture: real mode and protected mode memory addressing-memory paging-addressing modes-data addressing-program memory addressing-stack memory addressingdata movement instructions-arithmetic and logic instructionprogram control instructions-programming the microprocessors: modular programming -using keyboard and display-data conversion- disk file- interrupt hooks Module - III: (13 hours) Memory interface-memory devices- address decoding,8bit (8088),16bit(8086),32bit (80486) and 64 bit(Pentium) memory interfaces-dynamic RAM.I/O interface-port address decodingPPI,8279 interface-8254 timer interface-16550 UART interfaceADC /DAC interface Module - IV: (14 Hours) Interrupts -interrupt processing -hardware interrupts - expanding the interrupt - 8259A programmable interrupt controller -DMA: DMA operation - 8237 DMA controller -shared bus operation- disk memory systems - video displays - bus interface: ISA bus -EISA and VESA buses -PCI bus Text books

Brey B.B, The Intel Microprocessors 8086 to Pentium: Architecture, Programming and Interface, Prentice Hall of India

Reference books

Messmer H.P, The indispensable PC Hardware Book, Addison Wesley Ray K. & Bhurchandi K.M., Advanced Microprocessors & Peripherals, Tata McGraw Hill Hall.D.V., Microprocessors & Interfacing: Programming & Hardware, Tata McGraw Miller K., An Assembly Language Introduction to Computer Architecture using the intel Pentium, Oxford University Press

Bigelow S.J., Troubleshooting, Maintaining & Repairing PCs, Tata McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 405 PROGRAMMING PARADIGMS 3 Hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: Objective of the course is to teach students about different models for programming and to introduce the various constructs and their implementation to support the model on a bare machine. The material is selected to be useful for the computing science stream. It is hoped that students will be familiar with principles of design of programming languages after going through this course. The text given is presenting the ideas using abstract notation; however, the first reference contain good illustrations to the ideas and teachers are requested to include sufficient illustrations from the reference book while presenting ideas in classroom. Paradigms lab will

supplement the learning process. Module - I: (15 hours) Introduction: Role of programming languages - higher level languages - programming paradigms - language implementation on a machine - Language Syntax description -notations for expressions, abstract syntax trees, lexical syntax, context free grammars, variants of grammars- Language Semantic description introduction to synthesized attributes, attributed grammar, natural semantics, denotational semantics. Imperative programming: Introduction structured programming - Constructs for structured control flow - syntactic concerns - handling special cases in loops - Discussion based on C. Role of types -Basic types - compound types like arrays, records, union and variant records, sets - Pointers and dynamic allocation types and error checking -Discussion based on C. Introduction to procedures - parameter passing methods - scope rules -, nested scopes- implementation- discussion based on C. Module - II: (12 hours) Object oriented programming: Introduction - Grouping of data and operations- Constructs for program structuring - Information hiding - Program design with modules - Modules and defined types - Illustration based on C++ on class declaration, dynamic allocation, templates, objects. Definition of object - Object oriented thinking - Inheritance Derived classes and information hiding - Illustration based on C++. Module - III: (12 hours) Functional programming: Introduction - Elements of functional programming - Types: values and operations - Function declaration - approaches to expression evaluation - Lexical scope - Type checking. Functional programming with lists- introduction to schemesStructures of lists - List manipulation - Simplification of expression storage allocation for lists.

Module - IV: (13 hours) Logic programming: Introduction - Computing with relations - Introduction to Prolog Data structures - Programming techniques - controlling prolog Cuts. Concurrent programming: Parallelism in hardware - Implicit Synchronization - Interleaving Liveness properties - Safe access to shared data - Synchronized access to shared variables. Text books

Ravi Sethi; Programming languages Constructs; Pearson Education Asia

Concepts

and

Reference books

Sayed H. Roosta; Foundations of programming languages Designs and Implementation; Vikas Publishing House, New Delhi Scott M.L; Programming Language Pragmatics; Harcourt Asia (Morgan Kaufman) Tennent R.D; Principles of Programming Languages; Prentice Hall International Appleby. D & Vandekopple.J.J; Programming Languages: Paradigms & Practice; Tata McGraw Hill

Internal work assessment 30 - Test papers (minimum 2) 15 - Open book tests/Assignments/any other mode decided by the teacher. 5 - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern

QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions A & B of 15 marks from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions A & B of 15 marks from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions A & B of 15 marks from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions A & B of 15 marks from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 406 : COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: Objective of these course is to give idea about the various transmission technology available for digital communication. This together with paper of digital data communication will give sound knowledge in designing custom communication network for an IT application. This course is touching more on the theory on how is each working. This is a pre-requisite for the computer network course also. Module - I: (14 hours) Noise in communication systems - Classification - SNR - CNR - Noise figure -Relationship between noise figures - Voice signal digitization - PAM - pTM - PWM - PCM - Delta modulation - PCM & DM voice signal comparison - TDM of PCM signals - CCITT - Digital radio Block diagram - ASK - FSK -PSK - QAM - Digital demodulation - QAM demodulation.

Module - II: (12 hours) Line of sight microwave links - Analog line of sight microwave links - Digital line of sight microwave links - Communication satellite Classification - Communication satellite systems - Orbits - Planetary mechanics - Launching -Stabilization -Subsystems and repeaters -

Satellite Earth station - antenna subsystems Receiver. Module - III: (13 Hours)

Transmitter -

Fibre optic communications - nature of light - Optical Laws - Optical fibres - Optical sources - Photo detections - Optical communication system - System parameters - Analog optical fibre links - Digital optical fibre systems. Module - IV: (13 hours) Satellite access - FDM access -TDM access - Satellite links - Satellite link analysis and design - Digital satellite link design - System measurements - Fourier series - The Z - transform Modulator/demodulator sensitivity measurements - digital microwave link measurements and performance evaluation - high definition TV - System specifications. Text book 1. Kolimbiris H., Education, Asia Reference books

Digital

Communication

Systems,

Pearson

Freeman R.N., Telecommunication Transmission Hand Book, Wiley Panther P.F., Communication System Design, McGraw Hill Ramaswami R & Sivarajan K.N., Optical Networks, Harcourt Asia Gagliardi R.M., Satellite Communication, CBS Publishers Gowar, Optical Communication, PHI

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 =15 Tests 2x15 =30 Regularity =05 Total marks =50

University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 407(P) DATA STRUCTURES LAB 3 hours Practical per week

Stack Queue: Implementation using arrays and linked lists Searching methods: Binary search and hashing Sorting: Recursive implementation of quick sort and merge sort Binary Search Tree: Implementation with insertion, deletion, traversal Infix expression evaluation: Using expressions tree. Graphs search Algorithms: DFS & BFS on a connected directed graph. Minimal Spanning Tree: Implementations of Kruskal's and Prim's Algorithms Shortest path Algorithms: Dijkstra and Floyd Warshall algorithms Disjoint set operations: Union and find using rank and path compression Applications of Heap: Priority queue and heap sort

Reference book

Cormen T.H., lieserson C.E.& Rivest R.L., introduction to Algorithms, Prentice Hall of India Sahni S., Data structures, Algorithms, and Application in C+ +, McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Lab practicals & record = 25 2 tests 2x10 = 20 Regularity = 5 Total marks = 50

IT04 408 (P) PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENTS LAB 3 hours practical per week

Familiarization with features of an editor ( for example Vi, Emacs) Shell programming, usage of tools like grep, awk etc Usage of Program development & maintenance tools (for example make) Usage of debugging tools (for example gdb) Familiarization with scripting languages (for example Perl, Tcl/Tk) Usage of lexical processing tools (for example Lex) Introduction to document formats (for example HTML, PDF). Scripting and generation of dynamic pages. Scripting languages and interaction Introduction to the tools providing GUI based human computer interaction (for example Qt.). Automatic generation of code for interaction using visual programming (for example Qt Designer) Introduction to tools for preparing documents (for example Word/Latex)

Sessional work assessment Lab practicals & record = 25 2 tests 2x10 = 20 Regularity = 5 Total marks = 50

FIFTH SEMESTER Code IT04 501 IT04 502 IT04 503 IT04 504 IT04 505 IT04 506 IT04 507(P) IT04 508(P) Subject Software Engineering Digital Data Communication Operating Systems Information Theory & Coding Graph Theory & Combinatorics Data Modeling & Design Programming Paradigms Lab Hardware Lab TOTAL Hours/Week Internal Marks 3 3 3 3 3 3 18 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 3 3 6 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 400 University Examination 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 800

DETAILED SYLLABUS IT04 501: SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (Common with CS04 501) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: Objective of the course is to quickly introduce the software engineering techniques and background information in a single paper useful for the computing sciences stream. Note that software engineering has grown to the level of becoming a course by itself; since we are covering material in a single paper because of lack of slots, the thrust of this course is on teaching existing practice. For adequacy this has to be complemented by exercises appearing in texts and references. Books have been carefully chosen to get examples from diverse computing application for

practice along with theory. Those interested can find additional training materials downloadable from sites associated with each book. One suggestion is to consider using techniques learned here while doing mini project. Module - I: (11 hours) Introduction: Definition - History - Software life cycle - Software Engineering & other areas of computer science - Nature of a software product - Representative qualities - Quality requirements in different application areas - Idea of quality assurance. Software Engineering principles - Illustrative case studies. Module - II: (14 hours) Design: Relation of software engineering principles to design Design activity & its objectives - Modularization techniques module structure and its representation, interface and information hiding, categories, specific techniques to accommodate change, stepwise refinement, top-down and bottom-up design - Handling anomalies. Concurrent software - methods to keep consistency - Real time software - Distributed software - issues in building modules, module integration - Object oriented design. Architecture: Standard - Components - Architecture for component integration -Architecture for distributed systems. Specification: The different contexts - Typical uses - Different styles - Verification of specification. Operational specification notations - Definition with example for DFD, UML, Finite state machines - Descriptive specification notations - Definition with example of E-R diagrams, logic specification, algebraic specification - Building & using specifications in practice. Module - III: (15 hours) Verification: Goals and requirements of verification - Approaches to verification.

Testing - Goals for testing - Theoretical foundations - Empirical testing principle - White box testing, black box testing - Top-down & bottom-up integration - Testing object oriented programs Separate concerns in testing activity - Testing concurrent & real time systems. Analysis - Informal techniques - Basic concepts of correctness proof - Using correctness proof in practice - Symbolic execution - Basic concepts - Model checking. Verifying other software properties - Metrics for verifying qualities. Production Process: Software Process Model - Importance - Main activities in software production - feasibility study, specifying requirements, detailed design, testing, system testing, delivery & maintenance, other related activities. Process models - Waterfall model, Evolutionary model, Transformational model, Spiral model - An assessment of process models - Dealing with Legacy software - Case study: A telephone switching system - Case study: Synchronize & stabilize process Case Study: Open source approach. Configuration management - Software standards. Module - IV: (12 hours) Management: Functions - Project planning - Software productivity Productivity metrics - Factors affecting productivity - Cost estimation - Predictive models - COCOMO & COCOMO II - Project control - Work breakdown structures, Gantt charts, PERT charts Dealing with deviations - Team organization - centralized, decentralized, mixed - An assessment of team organizations - Risk management - Capability maturity model. Tools & Environments: Evolution - Dimensions for comparing tools Representative tools - Tools for software testing - Static analyzers GUI tools - Configuration management tools - Tracking tools Reverse and re-engineering tools - Management tools - Tool integration - Evolution of tools. Future - Role of the software engineer - Ethics and social

responsibility. Text books

Carlo Ghezzi, Mehdi Jazayeri, Dino Mandrioli; Fundamentals of Software Engineering; 2nd edition; Pearson Education Asia

Reference books

Pressman R.S.; Software engineering - A practitioner's approach; 5th edition; McGraw Hill Higher education series. Mall R.; Fundamentals of Software Engineering; Prentice Hall of India Behferooz A. & Gydsib F.J.; Software Engineering fundamentals; Oxford University Press. Jalote P.; An Integrated approach to Software Engineering; Narosa Ian Sommervillie; Software Engineering, Pearson Education Asia

Internal work assessment 60% - Test papers (minimum 2) 30% - Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher. 10% - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total Marks=50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to

answer anyone IT04 502 : DIGITAL DATA COMMUNICATION (common with CS04 502) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course is useful for the students in understanding the fundamental theory associated with Data Communication, which is the basis for all forms of Computer networks. This syllabus focuses on essential principles of digital transmission and the reliable transfer of data between Computers located at various places.] Module - I: (13 hours) Data communication networks - standards - ISO reference model internal architecture - protocol implementation issues transmission media - attenuation and distortion - limited bandwidth - signal types -propagation delay - public carrier circuits modulation - multiplexing - physical layer interfacing standards Module - II: (14 hours) Data transmission basics - transmission modes - asynchronous and synchronous transmission - bit - character and frame synchronization - coding - error detection methods - parity - block sum check - cyclic redundancy check - data compression - Huffman coding - dynamic Huffman coding - facsimile compression transmission control circuits - communication control devices Module - III: (12 hours) Protocol basics - error control - stop-and-wait & sliding window protocol - link utilization - selective repeat and go-back-N - link management Module - IV: (13 hours) Data link control protocols - character-oriented protocols - halfduplex protocols - duplex protocols - bit- oriented protocols - high level data link control (HDLC) - LAPB - LAPD - logical link control -

protocol operation Text book 1. Halsall F., Data Communication, Computer Networks and Open Systems, Addison Wesley Reference books

Forouzan B., Introduction to Data Communication and Networking, Tata McGraw Hill William Stallings, Data and Computer Communications, PHI Prakash C Gupta, Data Communications, PHI

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 503 : OPERATING SYSTEMS (Common with CS04 503)

3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course is to impart the students the need and requirement of an interface between Man and Machine; to enable them to identify the difference between the system software and the application software and their design requirements. The syllabus includes the features of operating systems and the fundamental theory associated with process, memory and file managements components of operating systems.] Module - I: (12 hours) Review of operating system strategies - resources - processes threads - objects - operating system organization - design factors functions and implementation considerations - devices characteristics - controllers - drivers - device management approaches - buffering - device drivers - typical scenarios such as serial communications - storage devices etc Module - II: (12 hours) Process management - system view - process address space process and resource abstraction - process hierarchy - scheduling mechanisms - various strategies - synchronization - interacting & coordinating processes - semaphores - deadlock - prevention avoidance - detection and recovery Module - III: (12 hours) Memory management - issues - memory allocation - dynamic relocation - various management strategies - virtual memory paging - issues and algorithms - segmentation - typical implementations of paging & segmentation systems Module - IV: (16 hours) File management - files - implementations - storage abstractions memory mapped files - directories and their implementation protection and security - policy and mechanism - authentication authorization - case study of unix kernel and microsoft windows NT (concepts only)

Text book

Nutt G.J., Operating Systems - A Modern Perspective, Pearson Education Asia

Reference books

Silberschatz & Galvin, Operating System Concepts, Pearson Education Asia Crowley C., Operating Systems-A Design Oriented Approach, Tata McGraw Hill Tanenbaum A.S., Modern Operating Systems, Prentice Hall of India / Pearson Education

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 504 : INFORMATION THEORY & CODING 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objective: The subject deals with the fundamentals of information quality, error control in communication process and various systems of coding information for reliable communications. Built on a sound mathematical basis, the methods developed in this field of study are essential in a study of communication systems, information Technology and computing. A background in algebraic structures would prove helpful while learning this subject. Module - I: (14 hours) Information theory - information and entropy - properties of entropy of a binary memory less source - extension of a discrete memory less source - source coding theorem - Shannon-Fano coding - Huffman coding - Lempel Ziv coding - discrete memory less source - binary symmetric channel - mutual information properties - channel capacity - channel coding theorem information capacity theorem Module - II: (14 hours) Coding - linear block codes - generator matrices - parity check matrices - encoder - syndrome and error detection - minimum distance - error correction and error detection capabilities - cyclic codes - coding and decoding Module - III: (14 hours) Introduction to algebra - groups - fields - binary field arithmetic construction of galois field - basic properties - computations vector spaces - matrices - BCH codes - description - decoding - reed solomon codes Module - IV: (10 hours) Coding - convolutional codes - encoder - generator matrix transform domain representation - state diagram - distance properties - maximum likelihood decoding - Viterbi decoding sequential decoding - interleaved convolutional codes Text books

Simon Haykin, Communication Systems, John Wiley Shu Lin & Costello D.J., Error Control Coding - Fundamentals

and Applications, Prentice Hall Inc. Englewood Cliffs Reference books


Das J., Malik S.K. & Chatterje P.K., Principles of Digital Communication, New Age International Limited Sam Shanmugham, Digital and Analog Communications, John Wiley Simon Haykin, Digital Communications, John Taub & Shilling, Principles of Communication Systems, Tata McGraw Hill.

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 505 : GRAPH THEORY & COMBINATORICS 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course comprehends the graphs as a modeling and analysis tool in computer science & Engineering. It introduces the structures

such as graphs & trees and techniques of counting and combinations, which are needed in number theory based computing and network security studies in Computer Science. Module - I: (13 hours) Introduction to graphs - definitions - subgraphs - paths and cycles matrix representation of graphs - euler tours - chinese postman problem - planar graphs - Euler's formula - platonic bodies applications of Kuratowski's theorem - hamiltonian graphs - graph colouring and chromatic polynomials - map colouring Module - II: (14 hours) Trees - definitions and properties - rooted trees - trees and sorting weighted trees and prefix codes - biconnected components and articulation points - Kruskal's and Prim's algorithms for minimal spanning trees - Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm - bellman-ford algorithm - all-pairs shortest paths - Floyed-Warshall algorithm - the max-flow min-cut theorem - maximum bipartite matching Module - III: (11 hours) Fundamental principles of counting - permutations and combinations - binomial theorem - combinations with repetition combinatorial numbers - principle of inclusion and exclusion derangements - arrangements with forbidden positions Module - IV: (14 hours) Generating functions - partitions of integers - the exponential generating function - the summation operator - recurrence relations - first order and second order - nonhomogeneous recurrence relations - method of generating functions Text book

Grimaldi R.P., Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics: An Applied Introduction, Addison Wesley

Reference books

Clark J. & Holton D.A., A First Look at Graph Theory, Allied Publishers (World Scientific) Corman T.H., Leiserson C.E. & Rivest R.L., Introduction to

Algorithms, Prentice Hall India Mott J.L., Kandel A. & Baker T.P., Discrete Mathematics for Computer Scientists and Mathematicians, Prentice Hall of India Liu C.L., Elements of Discrete Mathematics, McGraw Hill Rosen K.H., Discrete Mathematics And Its Applications, McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 506 : DATA MODELLING & DESIGN 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objectives: Notations introduced in Object Oriented design are powerful enough to be used as a notation for expressing a software design. The Unified Modeling Language is a combination of several earlier notations and is being promoted as a universal standard for objectoriented design. Continuing from the course on paradigms of programming this course tries to give specialized knowledge about

UML. UML notations were introduced in Software Engineering course and hence this paper tries to provide detailed knowledge about UML and its implications. Module - I: (10 hours) Overview of object oriented systems - objects - attributes encapsulation - class hierarchy - polymorphism - inheritance messages - history of object orientation Module - II: (14 hours) UML - classes - attributes - and operations - class diagrams generalizations and association constructs - composition and aggregation - collaboration diagrams - sequence diagrams asynchronous messages and concurrent execution - state diagrams - nested states - concurrent states and synchronization - transient states - architecture and interface diagrams packages deployment diagrams for hardware artifacts and software constructs - window-layout and window- navigation diagrams Module - III: (14 hours) Encapsulation structure - connascence - domains of object classes encumbrance - class cohesion - state spaces and behaviour of classes and subclasses - class invariants - preconditions and post conditions - class versus type - principle of type conformance principle of closed behaviour - case studies Module - IV: (14 hours) Abuses of inheritance - danger of polymorphism - mix-in classes rings of operations - class cohesion and support of states and behaviour - components and objects - design of a component lightweight and heavy weight components - advantages and disadvantages of using components - case studies Text book 1. Page Jones M., Fundamentals of Object- Oriented Design in UML, Addison Wesley Reference books

Booch G., Rumbaugh J. & Jacobsons I., The Unified Modeling

Language User Guide, Addison Wesley Bahrami A., Object Oriented System Development, McGraw Hill Rumbaugh J., Jacobson I. & Booch G., The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual, Addison Wesley Larman C., Applying UML & Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis & Design, Addison Wesley Pooley R. & Stevens P., Using UML: Software Engineering With Objects & Components, Addison Wesley

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x10 = 20 Tests 2x15 = 30 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 507(P) : PROGRAMMING PARADIGMS LAB 3 hours practical per week This laboratory is intended to supplement the theory on paradigms of programming. This additionally serves as introduction to various programming languages representative of each paradigm. It is assumed that students will take extra hours to learn on their own the languages of their choice. The syllabus is prepared in a free format so that an institute offering this course can suitably adapt this with type of platforms / facilities available with them. The

thrust is in teaching the paradigms; not the platforms. However, adequate knowledge about platform is a need for successful experimentation. It is hoped that students get enough information in selecting a particular paradigm suitable to the problem in hand. Lab -1 : (object-oriented programming in - Java /C+ +) - Programs to bring out concepts of classes and objects - for example the abstract data type binary tree Lab - 2 : (object oriented programming) Programs to demonstrate inheritance and class hierarchy - for example define a base class shape and derived classes for rectangle, square, ellipse, circle with proper class hierarchy Lab - 3 : (object oriented programming) - Programs to demonstrate polymorphism, virtual functions - for example define base class for vectors and use inheritance to define complex and real vector with standard operations Lab - 4 : (functional programming - in Lisp / scheme / Haskell) Program to demonstrate functional specification for a solution - for example implementation of quick sort Lab - 5 : (functional programming) - Program to demonstrate implementation of conventional data structures - for example implementation of binary search tree with insertion, deletion, and search operations Lab -6 : (functional programming) - Program to demonstrate use of available data structures in functional programming languages - for example implementation of set with membership, union, and intersection operations Lab - 7 : (logic programming - in prolog / VisiCalc) - Program to demonstrate ready implementation of propositional logic statements - for example implementation of logic program to find the gcd of two given integers Lab - 8 : (logic programming) - Program to demonstrate language specific features - for example implement a logic program to check whether a given NFA accepts the given string Lab - 9 : (concurrent programming - Java / Ada) Demonstration of concurrency support - for example program to find the

least common ancestor of two given nodes in a binary tree may be implemented. Lab 10 : (concurrent programming) - Demonstration of synchronized concurrency - for example program for the readers and writers problem may be implemented.

Reference books

Sethi R., Programming Languages: Concepts And Constructs, Pearson Education Asia Appleby D. & Vandekopple J.J., Programming Languages: Paradigm And Practice, Tata McGraw Hill Luger & Stubblefield, Artificial Intelligence, Pearson Education Asia Samuel A. Rebelsky, Experiments in Java, Pearson Education Asia

Sessional work assessment Lab practicals & record = 25 2 tests 2x10 = 20 Regularity = 5 Total marks = 50

IT04 508(P) : HARDWARE LAB 3 hours practical per week Objective: This course is to understand the relevance and characteristics of hardware and operating system components of a digital computer system through various laboratory experiments. It also gives the students the ability to interface devices to computer systems through various interfacing techniques. Lab - 1 : Identification of components/cards and PC assembling from components

Lab - 2 : Assembly language program for implementing arithmetic operations Lab - 3,4 : Implementation of a file manager using DOS/BIOS interrupts Lab - 5 : TSR (Terminate and Stay Resident) Programming Lab - 6 : ADC interface Lab - 7 : Stepper Motor interface using DAC Lab - 8,9 : Parallel Interface: Printer and HEX keyboard. Lab - 10 : Serial Interface: PC to PC serial interface using MODEM. Reference books

Messmer H.P., The Indispensable PC Hardware Book, Pearson Education Asia Hall D.V., Microprocessors and Interfacing, Tata McGraw Hill Norton P., Dos Internals

Sessional work assessment Lab practicals & record = 25 2 tests 2x10 = 20 Regularity = 5 Total marks = 50

SIXTH SEMESTER Code IT04 601 IT04 602 Subject Embedded systems Database Management Hours/Week Internal Marks 3 3 1 1 50 50 University Examination 3 3 100 100

IT04 603 IT04 604 IT04 605 IT04 606 IT04 Systems lab 607(P) IT04 Mini Project 608(P) TOTAL

Systems Computer Networks Computer Architecture Human Computer Interaction Information Retrieval

3 3 3 3 18

1 1 1 1 6

3 3 6

50 50 50 50 50 50 400

3 3 3 3 3 3 -

100 100 100 100 100 700

DETAILED SYLLABUS IT04 601: Embedded Systems

(Common with CS04 601) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: Objective of the course is to teach students about architecture, h/w and s/w elements, programming models and practice and tools on embedded system design and implementation, common to computing streams. Note that there is an annoying duplication of computer organization and software engineering, which can't be avoided as it, appears in a different context here; time may be spent more on untaught aspects after revision of ideas. Thrust is on the available hardware and real time operating systems for the embedded systems design. Project works in the concerned field will supplement the learning process. Module - I: (10 hours) Introduction: Definition - Classification - Processors in the system - Other h/w units. Software components Typical applications Embedded

systems on a chip(SoC) and use of VLSI circuits. Module - II: (12 hours) Hardware organization: Structured units of a processor - Processor selection factors. Common memory devices - Memory selection - Memory map Internal devices & I/O devices map - Direct memory access Interfacing the above. Types of I/O devices - Serial devices - Parallel port devices Sophisticated features - Timer and Counting devices - Advanced serial bus & I/O - High speed Buses - Common types - Advanced Buses. Module - III: (15 hours) Programming: Compiling, cross-compiling - Optimized use of memory - Use of DFG for program analysis - Control Data Flow graph - Use of finite state machines model - Use of Petrinet models - Use of Petri table for Real time programming - Issues in multiprocessor systems. Real time programming issues during software development process - Distinction between functions, ISR and tasks Problems of sharing data in RTOS - Interprocess communication in RTOS. Device drivers - Parallel port driver - Driver for internal programmable timing devices - Interrupt servicing mechanism Context and periods for context switching - Deadline and Interrupt latency. Module - IV: (15 hours) Real Time Operating Systems: Typical OS structure - RTOS structure - The context of its use Schedule management for multiple tasks - Scheduling in real time - Interrupt routines in RTOS environment - RTOS task scheduling models - List of basic actions in pre-emptive

scheduler and expected time taken - Strategy for synchronization - Discussion using Linux - OS securities issues Mobile OS. Case study of RTOS using MUCOS. Case study for RTOS based programming - Coding for Automatic Chocolate vending machine using MUCOS. Text books 1. Raj Kamal; Embedded systems - architecture, programming and design; Tata McGraw-Hill. Reference books

J.B. Peatman; Design with Microcontrollers and Microcomputers; McGraw-hill David E. Simon; An embedded software primer; Pearson Education Asia Daniel W. Lewis; Fundamentals of Embedded Software where C and assembly meet; Pearson Education Asia

Internal work assessment 30 - Test papers (minimum 2) 15 - Open book tests/Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher 5 - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total marks = 50

University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to

answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 602 : DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (Common with CS04 602) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: To introduce basic concepts of data bases connected with software engineering techniques and background information useful for the management of data bases. The syllabus includes the file organization, database design and transaction processing techniques. Module - I: (12 hours) Introduction: characteristics of database approach - advantages of using DBMS - database concept and architecture - data models schemes - instances - data independence - database languages and interfaces - database modeling using entity - relationship (ER) entity sets attributes and keys - relationships - type role and structural constraints - weak entity types - enhanced entityrelationship (EER) and object modeling - sub classes - super classes and inheritance - specialization and generalization - modeling of union types Module - II: (10 hours) File organization and storage: secondary storage devices - RAID technology - operations in files - heap files and sorted files hashing techniques - types of single level ordered index, multi-level indexes - B - trees and B + trees - indexes on multiple keys - other types of indexes Module - III: (14 hours) Database design: functional dependencies - normal forms - general

definition of second and third normal forms - Boyce-Codd normal form - multi valued dependencies and fourth normal form - join dependencies and fifth normal form - inclusion dependencies practical database design tuning - database design process relational model concepts - relational algebra operations - queries in SQL - insert - delete and update statements in SQL views in SQL Module - IV: (16 hours) Transaction processing: desirable properties of transactions, schedules and recoverability - serializability of schedules concurrency control - locking techniques - time stamp ordering multi version concurrency control - granularity of data items database recovery techniques based on deferred up data and immediate updating - shadow pages - ARIES recovery algorithm database security and authorization - security issue access control based on granting/revoking of privileges introduction to statistical database security Text book 1. Elmasri & Navathe, "Fundamentals of Database Systems", Addison Wesley Reference books

Ramakrishnan R. & Gehrke J., "Database Management Systems", McGraw Hill O'neil P. & O'neil E., "Database Principles, Programming, And Performance", Harcourt Asia, Morgan Kaufman Silberschatz A., Korth H.F. & Sudarshan S., "Database System Concepts", Tata McGraw Hill Ullman J.D., Principles of Database Systems, Galgotia Publications Date C.J., An Introduction to Database Systems , Addison Wesley

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05

Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 603: COMPUTER NETWORKS (Common with CS04 603) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course is beneficial for the students to understand the mode of operation of different types of Computer networks that are used to interconnect a distributed community of computers and various interfacing standards and protocols. This course includes the essential theory and different techniques associated with Local Area Network (LAN), Wide area Network (WAN) and Inter network. Module - I: (13 hours) Local Area Networks - Project 802 - Ethernet - Token Bus - Token ring - FDDI, Wireless LANs, Wireless media, Transmission schemes, Medium access control, Switching - circuit switching packet switching (Data gram & Virtual circuit) - Message switching, Connection oriented & Connectionless services. Module - II: (14 hours) ISDN - services - history - subscriber access - ISDN layers, Broadband ISDN, X.25 - layers - PLP packets - Information packet -

Control Packet, Frame relay - layers - operation - implementation, ATM - design goals - topology - protocol architecture, SONET/SDH layers - frames - multiplexing STS frames. Module - III: (13 hours) Networking devices - Bridges - Routers - Gateways, Routing algorithms - distance vector - link state, Transport layer - duties connection - OSI transport protocol, Upper OSI layers - session layer - presentation layer - application layer. Module - IV: (14 hours) Overview of TCP/IP, Network layer - IP - ARP - RARP - ICMP - IGMP, Transport layer - UDP - TCP, Application layer - DNS - TELNET - FTP - Electronic Mail - SNMP - HTTP, World Wide Web - URL - browser architecture - WWW documents. Text books 1. Behrouz Forouzan, Introduction to data communication and networking, Tata McGraw- Hill Publishing Company Ltd. Reference books 1. Halsall F., Data Communication, Computer Networks and Open Systems, Addison Wesley 2. 3. Peterson L.L. &Davie B.S., Computer Networks, A systems approach, Harcourt Asia Keshav S., An Engineering Approach to Computer Networking, AWL

4. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, PHI 5. Leon-Garcia A. & Widjaja I., Communication Networks, Tata McGraw Hill

6. Bertsekas & Gallagar, Data Networks, PHI Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15

Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 604 : COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This paper is aimed to introduce a single concentrated course on parallel computing based computer architectures with a quantitative approach. The students will be able to understand new design paradigms to achieve parallelism, memory hierarchy design and interconnection networks. Module - I: (15 hours) Fundamentals: task of a computer designer - trends in technology usage and cost - performance measurement - quantitative principles of computer design - instruction set architectures classification - addressing and operations - encoding an instruction set - role of compilers - case study: the DLX architecture pipelining - pipeline for DLX - pipeline hazards - data and control hazards - implementation difficulties - pipelining with multicycle operations

Module - II: (12 hours) Instruction level parallelism: concepts and challenges scheduling - dynamic hardware prediction - multiple instructions - compiler and hardware support for ILP processing - vector architecture - vector length and compiler vectorization - enhancing vector performance Module - III: (13 hours) Memory hierarchy design - reducing cache misses and miss penalty, reducing hit time - main memory - virtual memory and its protection - case study - protection in the intel pentium crosscutting issues - I/O systems - performance measures reliability and availability - designing an I/O system - case study unix file system performance Module - IV: (12 hours) Interconnection networks - simple networks - connecting more than two computers - practical issues - multiprocessors - introduction application domains - centralised-shared memory and distributedshared memory architectures - synchronization - models of memory consistency Text book 1. Hennesy J.L. & Pattersen D.A., Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Harcourt Asia Pte Ltd. (Morgan Kaufman) Reference books

dynamic issue of - vector stride -

Pattersen D.A. & Hennesy J.L., Computer Organization And Design: The Hardware/ Software Interface, Harcourt Asia Pte Ltd (Morgan Kaufman) Hwang K., Advanced Computer Architecture: Parallelism, Scalability And Programmability, McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30

Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 605 : Human Computer Interaction

3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week The problem of how to take into account the human and contextual part of a system with anything like the rigor with which other parts of the system are understood and designed is important in creating popular applications. Over the years, understanding the right interaction and implementing it has led to meddling with fields like applied psychology, industrial engineering, ergonomics. Human computer Interaction is the latest of these, more complex in some ways because of the breadth of user populations and application, the reach into cognitive and social constraints, and the emphasis on the interaction. Objective of the course is to introduce the well developed models in this emerging area with a thrust to plan interaction for a new IT application. Note that ubiquitous computing and rich sensor-filled environment are finding their way out of the laboratory, not just into films and fictions, but also into our workplaces and homes. Module - I: (14 hours) Foundations: Introduction to model human processor - Input-output channel -

Human memory - Thinking - Emotion - Difference between individuals - Psychology and the design of interactive systems. Typical Computer - Text entry devices - Positioning, pointing and drawing - Display devices - Devices for virtual reality & 3D interaction - Physical controls, sensors & special devices Printing & scanning - Memory - Processing & networks. Introduction to interaction - Model - Frameworks & HCI Ergonomics - Interactive styles - Elements of WIMP interface Interaction & its context - Experience and engagement Paradigms for interaction. Module - II: (15 hours) Design Process: Introduction to interaction design - Process of design - User focus - Scenarios - Navigational design - Screen design & layout - Prototyping. HCI software process - Usability engineering - Software prototyping & techniques - Principles to support usability Standards - Golden rules sample - Rule learning from HCI patterns - Implementation - Elements of windowing systems Programming - Using toolkits - User interface management systems. Evaluation - Expert analysis - Evaluate participation - Choosing an evaluation method. through user

Universal design principles - Multi-modal interaction - Design for diversity - Approaches to user support - Adaptive help systems. Module - III: (12 hours) Models & theories: Cognitive models - Linguistic model - Physical & device model Socio-organizational issues - Communication and collaboration model - Uses of task analysis. Dialog notation & design - Diagrammatic notation - Textual dialog notation - Dialog analysis and design.

Module - IV: (11 hours) GroupWare systems - Computer mediated communication Meeting & discussion support systems - Shared applications and artifacts - Framework for GroupWare. Ubiquitous computing & realities - Ubiquitous computing applications research - Virtual and augmented reality Information and data visualization. Text books

Alan Dix, Janet Finlay, Gregory D. Abowd, Russell Beale; Human - Computer Interaction, 3rd edition; Pearson Education Asia

Reference books

John M. Carroll; Human computer interaction in the New Millennium; Pearson Education Asia Ben Shneiderman; Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction, 3rd edition; Pearson Education Asia

Internal work assessment 30 - Test papers (minimum 2) 15 - Open book tests/Assignments/Term project/any other mode decided by the teacher 5 - Other measures like Regularity and Participation in Class. Total marks = 50

University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to

answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 606 : INFORMATION RETRIEVAL 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: In the current scenario of information explosion, tools and techniques for deriving the right information at the right time will give a competitive edge to an organization. This paper examines this aspect in detail in the context of the World Wide Web. It covers many forms of information, such as text, image, audio and video formats, and presents several research issues related to different IR tasks. Module - I: (10 hours) Introduction: Information versus Data Retrieval, IR: Past, present, and future. Basic concepts: The retrieval process, logical view of documents. Modeling: A Taxonomy of IR models, ad-hoc retrieval and filtering. Classic IR models: Set theoretic, algebraic, probabilistic IR models, models for browsing. Module - II: (12 hours) Retrieval evaluation: Performance evaluation of IR: Recall and Precision, other measures, Reference Collections, such as TREC, CACM, and ISI data sets. Query Languages: keyword based queries, single word queries, context queries, Boolean Queries, Query protocols, query operations. Module - III: (12 hours) Text and Multimedia Languages and properties, Metadata, Text formats, Markup languages, Multimedia data formats, Text Operations. Indexing and searching: Inverted files, Suffix trees, Suffix arrays, signature files, sequential searching, Pattern

matching. Module - IV: (16 hours) Multimedia IR: Spatial access methods, Generic multimedia Indexing approach, Distance functions, feature extraction, Image features and distance functions. Searching the Web: Characterizing and measuring the Web. Search Engines: Centralized and Distributed architectures, user Interfaces, Ranking, Crawling the Web, Web directories, Dynamic search and Software Agents.

Text book 1. R. Baeza-Yates and B. R. Neto: Modern Information Retrieval:, Pearson Education, 2004. Reference books 1. C.J. van Rijsbergen: Information Retrieval, Butterworths, 1979. 2. C.D. Manning and H. Schutze: Foundations of Statistical natural Language Processing (Chapters 13, 14, and 15 only), The MIT Press, Cambridge, London.2001. 3. David Hand, Heikki Mannila, Padhraic Smyth, Data Mining, Prentice hall of India Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module

QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 607(P) : SYSTEMS LAB 3 hours practical per week Objective: This course is useful to understand the operating system (OS) structures and the implementation aspects of various OS functions and schedulers. The data base problems are incorporated to familiarize problems connected with Data Base designs. Operating systems

Implementation of dining philosophers problem by multiprogramming using threads, semaphores and shared memory Implement ls/dir command of Unix/Dos to display contents of a given floppy disk Program to generate disk usage status report for a given Unix/Dos formatted floppy disk giving details like free space availability etc Implement banker's algorithm Inter-process communication using mailboxes and pipes

Database management systems


Conversion of a given relational scheme to 3NF and BCNF Implementation of B tree and B+ tree Implement a database stored in an RDBMS accessible through a web browser Program to convert SQL subset into relational algebra (tools

like YACC may be used.)

Implement optimistic concurrency control algorithm

Reference books

Nutt G.J., "Operating Systems - A Modern Perspective", Addison Wesley Bach M.J., "The Design of the Unix Operating System", Prentice Hall India Elmasri & Navathe, "Fundamentals of Database Systems", Addison Wesley Ramakrishnan R. & Gehrke J., "Database Management Systems", McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Lab practicals & record = 25 2 tests 2x10 = 20 Regularity = 5 Total marks = 50

IT04 608(P) : MINI PROJECT 3 hours per week Guidelines for Project Formulation Objectives The mini project is aimed at improving the professional competency by touching the areas which otherwise is not covered in theory classes or laboratories - There is a greater realization of importance of the application of ideas to build a solution in complementing the learning process - Result of this exercise may be a completely deployable product with documentation made by following practice in Software Engineering - It is recommended to have connection between mini project and final year project - A report is to be submitted and students will be evaluated in groups and individually.

Type of project Students may be given an introduction to problems related to industry and level of current research. They may be given idea about the state of technology in India and abroad and about typical killer applications to understand the implications of a product(computing solution). Then each student is assigned to a project. Two approaches are possible

To ask the students to select their work from already prepared list of works (prepared by a competitive person and revised from time to time) To ask the students to select a relevant work which is approved by an approving authority.

In any case, the work selected may include the use of as many as possible from the following list. OS platforms: Relevant to the current state, with support for networked environment, for distributed computing, for development of multi-platform applications. For example latest GNU Linux with supporting packages. Internet technologies : XML, Scripting languages like Perl / Python, Middleware(Component) technologies, Architectural concepts like RMI / CORBA Front end / GUI: Code development (XWINDOWS in GNU Linux) or development based on tools(Qt designer, Jbuilder etc) RDBMS/Back end: Relevant to current state, with database connectivity to different platforms. For example MySQL or PostgreSQL Languages: Qt, Glade or any similar 4GLs, scripting languages and C & C++ in GNU Linux (under GNU gcc) Universal n/w applications development platforms: JAVA, GNU .NET or any similar platform Unix internals : Device drivers, RPC, Threads, Socket programming Embedded systems: RTOS, Embedded hardware with software for an application, Code optimization, security etc The project may be related to one of the following application areas: Financial / Manufacturing / Multimedia / Instructional design / DBMS

/ Networking or communication software development / Internetintranet applications / TCP-IP programming / Protocol study / Operating systems / Distributed systems Projects like development of payroll, inventory, library system or any similar system and use of old packages like dbase III plus should not be entertained. Development based on Office suite is also not recommended; for example, use of Visual Basic front end and MS-Access backend for development should not be entertained. Format of report A format may be designed and enforced at each institution formats must be available in all current OS platforms and students must be asked to use a specific document preparation systems recommended by each institution - they may be asked to provide the report in electronic form also - this electronic form, made available in CD, will contain the entire project document besides multi-media illustration material prepared using any presentation software. Guidelines for conduct and evaluation:

A committee may be constituted for conduct and coordination of mini project related activities. The committee is responsible for developing schedules for various activities and keeping them. The functioning of a committee is over only after the final evaluation of the project. Project may be allotted to a student or groups of size at the most four. Each student may be asked to select a guide and then finalize a topic following the guidelines given above. After finalizing the topic, students should submit a Project proposal to the guide. The project work can start only after the approval of the report by guide. The institution has to offer infrastructure recommended by guide till the completion of the project work. In case of non-approval, the suggestions for reformulating the project will be communicated to the students. The revised proposal may be submitted again to guide in a different time slot. Sufficient number of chances may be given; the guide may device a time schedule to accommodate this revision process looking into the available time frame for the project. The project may be an in-house project or an external project. In any case, the student is associated with a guide.

The guide must be competent in terms of academic qualifications and experience in the selected area. A list of guides available for a term may be published by the committee mentioned above. The project proposal should be prepared in consultation with guide. It states clearly the project objective and the environment of the proposed project to be undertaken. The following details may be included in it: Title of the project Objective of the project Project category. Information pertaining to analysis and design Tools / Platforms, Hardware and software requirement specification.

Students are supposed to go through initial software engineering activities related to the selected problem and may convince the guide about the genuineness of attempt. The proposal need be formed only after this. The proposal may be at the most ten pages in size.

The committee mentioned above should do an assessment of the project work at the end of the semester. The students, with the approval of guide, must submit a project report on the work done. Besides, they will make a presentation followed by demonstration before the committee for the evaluation purpose. The assessment is made individually and in groups. The pattern for awarding marks will be as follows: Attendance : 5 marks Work in design and way of presentation evaluated by committee : 30 marks Report and individual assessment by guide : 15 marks Total = 50 marks

For external projects, the attendance may be evaluated based on proof for attendance provided by a competent authority of the external agency. In addition, the technical report may contain a certificate from competent authority of the external agency as proof for originality of work done by the student at their premise. SEVENTH SEMESTER

Code IT04 701 IT04 702 IT04 703 IT04 704 IT04 705 IT04 706(P) IT04 707(P) IT04 708(P)

Subject Distributed Systems Cryptography & Network security Management Information Systems Computer Graphics & Multimedia Elective I Networks lab Seminar Project Work TOTAL ELECTIVE-I

Hours/Week Internal Marks 3 3 3 3 3 1 18 1 1 1 1 1 6 3 3 3 6 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 400

University Examination 3 3 3 3 3 3 100 100 100 100 100 100 700

A Digital Signal Processing Advanced Topics in Database B systems C Theory of computation D Parallel architectures & algorithms E Professional Ethics F Critical Perspective of Technology DETAILED SYLLABUS IT04 701 : DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS (Common with CS04 701) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: The development of distributed systems followed the emergence of high-speed local area networks, the availability of high performance PCs, workstations and servers has resulted in a recent

shift towards distributed systems, and away from centralized, multi user systems. This trend has been accelerated by the development of distributed system software designed to support the development of distributed applications. This course is to impart basic knowledge of the issues concerning distributed systems, from both software and hardware viewpoints. Module - I: (10 hours) Operating system fundamentals - distributed system concepts and architectures - major design issues - distributed computing environments (DCE) Module - II: (13 hours) Concurrent processes and programming - threads and processes client server model - time services language mechanisms for synchronization - concurrent programming languages Module - III: (13 hours) Interprocess communication and coordination - message passing communication - request/reply communication - transaction communication - name and directory services - distributed mutual exclusion - leader election Module - IV: (16 hours) Distributed process scheduling - static process scheduling, dynamic load sharing and balancing - distributed process implementation real-time scheduling - concepts of distributed file systems distributed shared memory - distributed computer security Text book 1. Chow R & Johnson T., "Distributed Operating Systems and Algorithms", Addison Wesley Reference books

Sinha P.K., "Distributed Operating Systems Concepts and Design", PHI Tanenbaum S., "Distributed Operating Systems", Prentice Hall Inc. Coulouris G., Dollimore J. & Kindberg T., "Distributed

Systems Concepts And Design", Addison Wesley Singhal M. & Shivaratri, "Advanced Concepts In Operating Systems, Distributed Databases and Multiprocessor Operating Systems", McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 702 : CRYPTOGRAPHY & NETWORK SECURITY (Common with CS04 702) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course introduces the principles and practice of cryptography and network security. It includes the issues to be addressed by network security capability and practical applications that have been implemented and are in use to provide network security. Module - I: (14 hours)

Congruence equations : properties - complete and reduced residue systems - Fermat's theorem - Euler function. Indeterminate equations - linear and second degree diophantine equations - congruences in one unknown - congruences of higher degree with prime and composite modulo - Wilson's theorem quadratic residues. Introduction to cryptography - attacks - services and mechanisms security attacks - security services Conventional encryption - classical techniques steganography - classical encryption techniques model -

Modern techniques - DES - cryptanalysis - block cipher principles and design - Algorithms - triple DES - IDEA - blowfish Confidentiality - placement of encryption function - traffic confidentiality - key distribution - random number generation. Module - II: (14 hours) Public key encryption - RSA algorithm - key management and exchange. RSA Design and implementation- Chinese Remainder theorem, Garner's formula, RSA Model definition, Digital signatures and public Exponents, Public Key, RSA Key generating functions, Pitfalls in using RSA ,RSA encryption function, Signature functions. Key NegotiationProtocol- Key setting, Authentication convention, Views of the protocol, Attacker's view, Key compromise, complexity and optimization. Implementation issuescomputations and RSA Large integer issues, checking DH

encryption, faster multiplication, Elliptic curve cryptography message authentication requirements - functions and codes - hash functions - security of hash functions and MACs algorithms - MD5 message digest algorithm , Secure Hash (SHA-1 ) algorithm

Module - III: (14 hours) Digital signature algorithm - DSA Decription -DSA prime generationSecurity of DSA-GOST Digital Signature Algorithm-ONG-SchnorrShamir, ESIGN, - Identification schemes- Feige- Fiat-Shamir and its simplified form ,enhancements - Guillou-Quisquater schemes, - Schnorr schemes - Key-exchange Algorithms, DiffieHellman scheme and modifications- Encrypted Key exchange(EKE),Conference Key Distribution and secret Broadcasting - Multiple-Key Public-Key cryptography, SecretSharing Algorithms, Subliminal Channel ,Undeniable Digital Signatures-Computing with encrypted data, Fair Coin Flips- Fair and Failsafe Cryptosystems ,Blind SignaturesProbabilistic EncryptionQuantum Cryptography Module- IV: (10 hours) Kerberos- Model, working principle, key servers, Sesame- Common Cryptographic Architecture(CCA),ISO Authentication framework, Privacy-Enhanced Mail(PEM), Pretty Good Privacy(PGP), Public-Key Cryptography Standards(PKCS). IP Security - Architecture, Authentication Header, Encapsulating security payload, Combining security associations Internet Protocol security ,Key-management,ISAKMP-

WEB Security-Socket layer and Transport layer security, Secure Electronic transaction , password selection strategies ,Intrusion detection. Text book 1. Stallings W., Cryptography and Network Security Principles and Practice, Pearson Education Asia. 2. Schneier B., Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms, and

Source Code in C, John Wiley 3. Schneier B, Ferguson N. , Practical Cryptography, Wiley-Dream tech India Pvt.Ltd. Reference books 1. Wenbo Mao , Modern cryptography - Theory and Practice, Pearson Education Asia 2. Niven & Zuckerman H.S., An Introduction to The Theory of Numbers, John Wiley 3. Pfleeger C.P., Pfleeger S.L., Security in Computing ,, Pearson Education (Singapore) Pte.Ltd. 4. Michel E. Whiteman, Herbert J.Mattord, Principles of Information Security, Thomson, Vikas Publishing House Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern Q I - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one

IT04 703 : MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course will introduce the methods and the influence of the information systems in management milieu and use MIS as an effective tool in management and decision making. Module - I: (12 hours) Information systems - functions of management - levels of management - framework for information systems - systems approach - systems concepts - systems and their environment effects of system approach in information systems design - using systems approach in problem solving - strategic uses of information technology Module - II: (10 hours) An overview of computer hardware and software components - file and database management systems - introduction to network components - topologies and types - remote access - the reasons for managers to implement networks - distributed systems - the internet and office communications Module - III: (14 hours) Application of information systems to functional - tactical and strategic areas of management, decision support systems and expert systems Module - IV: (16 hours) Information systems planning - critical success factor - business system planning - ends/means analysis - organizing the information systems plan - systems analysis and design - alternative application development approaches - organization of data processing - security and ethical issues of information systems Text book 1. Robert Schultheis & Mary Sumner, Management Information Systems-The Manager's View, Tata McGraw Hill Reference books

Laudon K.C. & Laudon J.P., Management Information Systems - Organization and Technology, Prentice Hall of India / Pearson Education Asia Sadagopan S., Management Information Systems, Prentice Hall of India Basandra S.K., Management Information Systems, Wheeler Publishing Alter S., Information Systems: A Management Perspective, Addison Wesley Effy Oz., Management Information Systems, Thomson, Vikas Publishing House

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 704 : COMPUTER GRAPHICS & MULTIMEDIA 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objectives: The objective of the course is to introduce fundamental principles

of computer graphics design in software engineering and background information useful for the students of computing sciences stream. For adequacy this has to be complemented by exercises appearing in texts and references. Module - I: (14 hours) Introduction to computer graphics - basic raster graphics algorithms for drawing 2D primitives - scan converting lines circles - generating characters - geometrical transformations - 2D transformations homogeneous coordinates and matrix representation of transformations window-to-viewport transformation - input devices and interactive techniques interaction hardware - basic interaction tasks - 3D graphics viewing in 3D - projections - basics of solid modeling - 3D transformations Module - II: (12 hours) Introduction to multimedia - media and data streams - properties of a multimedia system - data stream characteristics - information units - multimedia hardware - platforms - memory and storage devices - input and output devices - communication devices multimedia software - multimedia software tools - multimedia authoring tools Module - III: (13 hours) Multimedia building blocks - audio - basic sound concepts - music speech - MIDI versus digital audio - audio file formats - sound for the web - images and graphics - basic concepts - computer image processing - video and animation - basic concepts - animation techniques - animation for the web - multimedia building blocks audio - basic sound concepts - music - speech - MIDI versus digital audio - audio file formats - sound for the web - images and graphics - basic concepts - computer image processing - video and animation - basic concepts - animation techniques - animation for the web Module - IV: (13 hours) Data compression - storage space and coding requirements classification of coding/compression techniques basic compression techniques like JPEG, H.261, MPEG and DVI multimedia database systems - characteristics of multimedia

database management system - data analysis - data structure operations on data - integration in a database model Text books

Foley J.D., Van Dam A., Feiner S.K., & Hughes J.F., Computer Graphics Principles And Practice, Addison Wesley Ralf Steinmetz & Klara Nahrstedt, Multimedia: Computing, Communications And Applications, Pearson Education

Reference books

Newmann W. & Sproull R.F., Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics, McGraw Hill Rogers D.F., Procedural Elements for Computer Graphics, McGraw Hill Hearn D. & Baker P.M., Computer Graphics, Prentice Hall India Koegel Buford J.F., Multimedia System, Addison Wesley Vaughan T., Multimedia: Making It Work, Tata McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to

answer any one IT04 705A : DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING (Common with CS04 705A) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: Current communication technology is based on digital signal processing. Here the fundamental principles of various transforms and the tools used in analysis and design of discrete-time systems for signal processing are introduced. Module - I: (12 hours) Discrete time signals and systems - discrete signal sequences linear shift invariant systems - discrete signals - stability and casualty - difference equations - frequency domain representations - fourier transform and its properties - relationship between system representations, review of Z-transforms Module - II: (15 hours) Discrete fourier transform - representation of discrete fourier series - properties of discrete fourier series - periodic convolution - DFT properties of DFT - computation of DFT - circular convolution linear convolution using DFT - FFTs - DIT-FFT and DIF-FFT - FFT algorithm for composite N Module - III: (13 hours) Design of digital filters - IIR and FIR filters - low pass analog filter design - Butterworth and Chebyshev filters - design examples bilinear transformation and impulse invariant techniques - FIR filter design - linear phase characteristics - window method Module - IV: (12 hours) Realization of digital filters - discrete form I and II - cascade and parallel form - finite word length effects in digital filters - quantizer characteristics - saturation overflow - quantization in implementing systems - zero input limit cycles - introduction to DSP processors

Reference books

Proakis & Manolalus, Digital Signal Processing, Principles, Algorithm & Applications, Prentice Hall Oppenheim & Schafer, Discrete Time Signal Processing, Prentice Hall Ludeman L.C., Fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing, Harper & Row Publishers Van Valkenburg M.E., Analog Filter Design, Holt Saunders Terrel T.J. & Shark L.K., Digital Signal Processing, Macmillan Sanjit K. Mitra, Digital Signal Processing- A Computer- Based Approach, Tata McGraw-Hill.

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 705B : ADVANCED TOPICS IN DATABASE SYSTEMS (Common with CS04 705B) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week

Objective: The course is intended to impart knowledge on the latest advancements in implementations of database management systems. This imparts sound idea on the latest methodologies such as object oriented, distributed and deductive database systems along with comparisons supported by some case studies. By the end of the course, it enables the student to analyze, design and implement modern database systems, especially for a distributed environment. Module - I: (11 hours) Overview of relational database concept - object oriented database - overview of object oriented concepts - object definition language object query languages - object database conceptional design overview of CORBA standard for distributed objects Module - II: (13 hours) Distributed database concepts - data fragmentation replication and allocation - types of distributed database system - query process concurrency control for distributed database - overview of client server architecture and its relationship to distributed database Module - III: (13 hours) Deductive database - introduction to deduction database prolog/datalog notation - interpretation of rules - basic inference mechanism for logic programs - datalog programs and their evaluation - deduction database systems - data Warehousing and data mining - database on World Wide Web - multimedia database mobile database - geographic information system - digital libraries Module - IV: (15 hours) Oracle and Microsoft access - basic structure of the oracle system m database structures and its manipulation in oracle - storage organization programming oracle applications - oracle tools - an overview of Microsoft access features and functionality of access distributed databases in oracle Text book

Elmasri & Navathe, Fundamentals of Database Systems,

Addison Wesley Reference books


Ramakrishnan R. & Gehrke J., Database Management Systems, McGraw Hill O'neil P. & O'neil E., Database Principles, Programming, And Performance, Harcourt Asia (Morgan Kaufman) Silberschatz, Korth H.F. & Sudarshan S., Database System Concepts, Tata McGraw Hill Theory T.J., Database Modelling And Design, Harcourt Asia (Morgan Kaufman)

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 705C : Theory of Computation

3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective:

Being a fundamental course on computational models and computability, the emphasis is on teaching the fundamentals regarding the theory. Beginning with introductory concepts of languages and their classification, the course proceeds through treatment of their recognizers and automata. The learners of this course are expected to have sound knowledge of set theory and relations as well as various proof techniques. The course concludes with a treatment on the ways and means of classifying algorithm into the various computability classes and proofs of some standard algorithms. The course teaches fundamental computability theory which can be later on used to lay the foundation for parsing theory and algorithms. Module - I: (13 hours) Introduction to formal proof - Inductive proofs - Concepts of automata theory - Deterministic finite automata - Nondeterministic finite Automata - equivalence of deterministic and nondeterministic finite automata - Nondeterministic Finite automata with a transitions - Regular expressions - Finite automata and regular expressions - Algebraic laws for Regular expressions - Pumping lemma for regular languages - closure properties of regular languages - Decision properties of regular languages - Equivalence and minimization of automata. Module - II: (13 hours) Context free Grammars - Derivations - sentential forms - The language of grammar - Parse trees - Ambiguity in grammar and languages - Inherently ambiguous languages - Pushdown automata - Formal definition - Graphical notation - The language of a PDA Acceptance by PDA - Empty stack - Final state - PDAs to grammars - Deterministic PDAs and CFLs - Non deterministic PDAs - Chomsky Normal Form - Greibach Normal Form - Pumping lemma for CFLs Closure properties of CFLs - Decision properties of CFLs - CYK algorithm Module - III: (14 hours) Turing Machines - Notation - Instantaneous Description - Transition Diagram - The language of a Turing Machine - Halting of TMs Programming techniques for Turing Machines - Extension to basic TMs - Nondeterministic TMs - Restricted TMs - Recursive and Recursively Enumerable Languages - Halting problem of TMs Undecidable problem about TMs - Rice's Theorem - Post's

Correspondence problem - Undecidablity of PCP - Undecidable problems on Languages Module - IV: (12 hours) Intractable problems - The classes P and NP - Polynomial time reducibility - NP-Complete problems - The Satisfiability problem NP-Completeness of the satisfiability problem - NP-Completeness of CSAT - NP-Completeness of 3SAT - Node cover problem - Directed Hamiltonian circuit problem - The class of languages Co-NP Problems solvable in polynomial space. Text books

Hopcroft J.E, Motwani R & Ullman J. D., Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages and Computation, Pearson Education.

Reference books

Hopcroft J. E. & Ullman J. D., Introduction to AutomataTheory, Languages and Computation, Narosa Linz: P., An Introduction to Formal Languages & Automata, Narosa Martin J. C., Introduction to Languages & the Theory of Computation, Tata McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to

answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 705D : PARALLEL ARCHITECTURES & ALGORITHMS 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This is a continuation of the Computer Architecture course and is trying to throw more light on issues of programmability, performance and scalability of parallel architectures. Module - I: (11 hours) Trends in parallel architectures - convergence of parallel architectures - fundamental design issues - parallel application case studies - the parallelization process - examples Module - II: (14 hours) Programming for performance - partitioning - data access and communications - orchestration for performance - performance factors - case studies - implications for programming models workload-driven evaluation - scaling workloads and machines evaluating a real machine - evaluating an architectural idea illustrating workload characterization Module - III: (15 hours) Cache coherence - memory consistency design space for snooping protocols - assessing protocol design trade-offs - synchronization snoop-based multiprocessor design - correctness requirements single-level caches with an atomic bus - multilevel cache hierarchies - split-transaction bus - case studies - extending cache coherence Module - IV: (12 hours) Scalable multiprocessors - scalability - realizing programming

models - physical DMA - user-level access - dedicated message processing - shared physical address space - clusters and networks of workstations - implications of parallel software - synchronization - directory-based cache coherence - scalable cache coherence directory-based approaches - assessing directory protocols and tradeoffs - design challengers for directory protocols - memorybased directory protocols - cache-based directory protocols performance parameters - synchronization - hardware / software tradeoffs Text book

Culler D.E., Singh J.P. & Gupta A., Parallel Computer Architecture: A hardware/ Software Approach, Harcourt Asia, Morgan Kaufman

Reference books

Sima D., Fountain T. & Kacsuk P., Advanced Computer Architectures, Addison Wesley Hwang K., Advanced Computer Architecture, McGraw Hill Quinn M.J., Parallel Computing Theory and Practice, McGraw Hill

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to

answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 705E: Professional Ethics 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: The course introduces student to important philosophical inputs of professional ethics. The course introduces widely accepted theories in ethics as well as their applications in areas of human service. Understanding of these principles would lead to a student to take sound decisions and justify those, while confronting with dilemmas. Module - I: (12 hours) Ethical concepts and theories - autonomy - rights and right action utilitarian theories - deontological theories - justification Module - II: (12 hours) Ethics and health care - issues : abortion, euthanasia, mental retardedness - justice and health care Module - III: (12 hours) Business ethics - issues : corporatism, employer-employee relations - products and the consumers - social and ecological responsibilities Module - IV: (12 hours) Ethics in technology development and use - information technology - genetic engineering - appropriate technology Text book 1. David Appellbam, Sarah Veroni Lawton, Ethics and Professions, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 1980 2. John H Piet and Ayodhya Prasad, An Introduction to Applied

Ethics, Cosmo Publications, India 2000 Reference books/articles


William Frankena, Ethics, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., Prentice Hall, 1963 Alan Goldman, The Moral Foundations of Professional Ethics, Totowa NJ, Rowman and Littlefield, 1980 Alan R White, Rights, Claraedon Press, Oxford, 1984 Tom L Beauchamp, Le Roy Walters, Contemporary issues in Bio-Ethics, Dickenson Publishing Co Inc Encino, California, 1978 Benjamin Freedman, A moral theory of consent, Hastings Center Report, Vol 5, Oct 1975 Sissela Bok, ed, Lies to the sick and dying, Lying : Moral choice in public and private life, ed. Sissela, Pantheon books, New York, 1978 Marc Lappe, Moral obligations and the fallacies of genetic control, Theological studies, 33 No 3, September 1972 Le Roy Walters, Human in vitro fertilization : A review of the ethical literature, Hastings Center Report, 9, Aug 1979 Phillipa Foot, Euthanasia, Philosophy and Public Affairs, 6 No 2 Winter 1997 Patricia M Wald, Basic Personal and Civil Rights in the Mentally retarded citizen and the law, ed., Michael Kindred, The Free Press, New York, 1976 John R Kramer, The Right not to be mentally retarded, in the Mentally retarded Citizen and the Law ed., Micael Kindred, The Free Press, New York Dan E Beauchamp, Public Health as Social Justice, Inquiry, 13, March 1976 Elizabeth Telter, Justice, Welfare and Health Care, Journal of Medical Ethics, 2, September 1976 Marc D Basson, Choosing among candidates for scarce medical resources, Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 4, September 1979 Rashi Fein, On achieving access and equity in health care, Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly / Health and Society 50, October 1972 Tom L Beauchamp, The Justification of reverse discrimination in hiring, Social justice and preferential treatment, ed. Blackstone and Heslep, University of Georgia Press, Athens, 1977 NA Ashford, Worker Health and Safety : An area of conflicts, Monthly Labour Review, Vol 98, Sep 1995

Mitchell Fein, The Myth of Job Enrichment, The Humanist, Sep-Oct 1973 Sissela Bok, Whistle blowing and professional responsibilities, New York University Education Quarterly, Vol II 4 1987 Robert L Arrington, Advertising and Behavioural Control, Journal of Business Ethics, 1 No 1 Feb 1982 George A Steiner, New Patterns in Government Regulation of Business, MSU Business Topics, Autumn 1978 Wilfred Beckerman, The care for economic growth, Public Utilities Fortnightly, Sep 26, 1972 Peter A French, Corporate Moral Agency in Business Ethics : Reading and cases in corporate morality, ed, W Michael Hoffman and Jennifer Mills Moore, McGraw Hill, New York, 1984 Goodpaste Kenneth E and John B Mathews Jr, Can a corporation have a conscience? Harward Business Review, Jan-Feb 1982 Rob Kling, Computers and Social Power, Computers and Society, 5, 1973 Terrell Ward Bynum, ed, Computers and Ethics, Special issue of metaphilosophy, Vol 16, No, 4, Oct 1984 Donn B Parker, Rules of Ethics in Information Processing, Communications of the ACM, 11, 1968 James Moore, Are there decision computers should never make?, Nature and Systems, 1 1979 Arsenio Talingdon, Implications of Computer use in politics, Technology and Society, 12, Sep 1980 C Valbonia, J Johnson and S Beggs, Moral and legal implications of physicians responsibility in a computerized health system, Man and Computer 1974

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 705f : Critical Perspectives of Technology

3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: The course introduces student to various concepts of information society, knowledge society, techniques of production of knowledge in a society, along with the various forms of risks associated during application of such concepts in a society. The course enables critical thinking on part of student as an academic exercise. Module - I: (13 hours) The concept of knowledge-society - knowledge society and information society - knowledge and power - power of knowledge knowledge in modern societies Module - II: (13 hours) Modernity - techno structures - postmodernity - expertise and designing the lifeworld - knowledge and expertise - production and function of expertise Module - III: (13 hours) Concept of risk society - modernization and risks - risks and human existence - advanced technological risks and traditional risks Module - IV: (13 hours)

Knowledge and economy - human capital - knowledge production risks and expertise - knowledge society as risk producing society expertise - rationality Reference books

Nicostehr and Richard V Ericson, The culture and power of knowledge in modern society, Walter de Gruyber, New York, 1992 Wiio, OA, The information society, is it really like this?, Intermedia 13:12-14, 1985 Barnes, Barr, Power listens to Science, Social Studies of Science, 17:555-564 Fritz Machlup, Knowledge and knowledge production : Princeton University Press, Princeton 1981 Bohme, Gernot and Nico Stehr, The growing impact of scientific knowledge on social relations in The knowledge society, Sociology of the sciences year book 1987, D Reidel, Dordrecht Leiss William, The domination of nature, Braziller, New York, 1972 Under technologies thumb, McGill-Queen's University Press, Montreal 1980 Ellul, Jacques, The power of technique and ethics of nonpower in Kathleen Woodward ed The myths of Information Technology and post industrial culture, Coda Press, Madison Seardigli, Victor, Francois Plesserd & Pierre - Alain Mercier, Information Society and Daily Life, pp 37, 54 in Lian Bannon et al eds., Information Technology Impact on the Daily Life, EEC Conference on the Information Society held in Dublin 1820, Nov 1980. Tywoly, Inter Publishing Dublin, 1980 Zygmunt Bauman, Life-world and expertise : Social production of dependency in Nico Stehr ed Nico Stehr, Experts, Counsellors and Advisers, in Nico Stehr (Ed) above Dennet, Daniel C, Information Technology and Virtues of Ignorance, Daedalus 115:135-153 Birnbaum, Norman, Is there a knowledge elite? Pp 416-446 in Birnbaum, Towar a critical sociology OUP, New York Habermas J, Knowledge and Human Interests, Beacon Press, Boston, 1971 Haskell, Thomas L ed, The authority of experts, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 1984 Lapp, Ralph E, The New Priesthood : The scientific elite and uses of power, Harper and Row, New York Leiberman TK, The tyranny of experts : how professionals

are closing the open society, Walker, New York, 1970 Marcuse, Herbert, One dimensional man, Studies in the ideology of advanced industrial society, Beacon Press, Boston, 1964 Merton, Robert K, Role of Intellectual in Public Bureaucracy in Merton, Social Theory and Social Structure, Free Press, New York, 1957 Pacey, Arnold, The culture of technology, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1983 Rouse, Joseph, Knowledge and Power : Toward a political philosophy of science, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 1987

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 706(P) : NETWORKS LAB 3 hours practical per week Objective: This practical course includes experiments in computer networking using basic network components and systems there by allowing the

students to gain an intuitive feel for network protocols. This course is very much significant both from research perspective and from application perspective. Lab - 1 : Implementation of PC to PC file transfer using serial port and MODEM. Lab - 2, 3 : Software simulation of IEEE 802.3, 802.4 and 802.5 protocols. Lab - 4, 5 : Software simulation of medium access control protocols 1) Go back N 2) Selective repeat and 3) Sliding window. Lab - 6 : Implementation of a subset of simple mail transfer protocol using UDP Lab - 7, 8 : Implementation of a subset of file transfer protocol using TCP/IP Lab - 9 : Implementation of finger utility using remote procedure call (RPC) Lab - 10 : Generation and processing of HTML forms using CGI. Reference books

Richard S.W., Unix Network Programming, PHI Comer D.E., Internetworking With TCP/IP, Vol.1, 2 & 3, PHI Campione et. al M., The Java Tutorial Continued, Addison Wesley

Sessional work assessment Lab practicals & record = 25 2 tests 2x10 = 20 Regularity = 5

Total marks = 50

IT04 707(P): SEMINAR 3 +1 hours per week Objective Each student is expected to present a seminar on a topic of current relevance in Information Technology - they are expected to refer papers from standard journals like ACM, IEEE, JPDC, IEE, or RFCs (from www.ietf.org) etc - at least three cross references must be used - the seminar report must not be the reproduction of the original paper. Conduct and evaluation An evaluation committee must be formed to determine the schedule of activities and subsequently conduct evaluation. The members of the committee must be competent in academic qualification and experience. Students are supposed to select a topic in consultation with any of the members of committee. The committee may publish guidelines to complete this process easily. After this, an abstract may be submitted along with title of the seminar. A formal approval of the committee is necessary for the seminar presentation. In case of non-approval, the suggestions for reformulating it will be communicated to the students. The revised proposal may be submitted again to the committee in a different time slot. Sufficient number of chances may be given; the committee may device a time schedule to accommodate this revision process looking into the available time frame for seminar. A seminar report need to be submitted in a format insisted by the institution well in advance to the presentation. Marks may be awarded according to the following pattern: Sessional work assessment Presentation & discussion = 25 Regularity = 5

Report = 10 Relevance = 10 Total marks = 50 IT04 708(P) : PROJECT 3 hours per week Guidelines for Project Formulation Objectives The project is aimed at improving the professional competency by touching the areas which otherwise is not covered in theory classes or laboratory classes - There is a greater realization of importance of the application of ideas to build a solution in complementing the learning process. The work practice here will help student develop ability to apply theoretical and practical tools/techniques to solve real life problems related to industry and current research. It is recommended to have connection between mini project and final year project. However, there is clear distinction in terms of time frame for project and mini project and hence problems must be selected carefully. Problems related to mini project domain should never be allowed here. Type of project Students may be given an introduction to problems related to industry and level of current research. They may be given idea about the state of technology in India and abroad and what an employer expect from them. They may be given idea about the venues for higher studies in India and abroad and what such institution expects from them. They may be given idea about opportunities of making use of technology and what capacities an entrepreneur should have for successfully running an enterprise. Then each student is assigned to a project. Two approaches are possible

To ask the students to select their work from already prepared list of works (prepared by a competitive person and revised from time to time) To ask the students to select a relevant work which is

approved by an approving authority In any case, the work selected may include the use of as many as possible from the following list. OS platforms: Relevant to the current state, with support for networked environment, for distributed computing, for development of multi-platform applications. For example latest GNU Linux with supporting packages. Internet technologies : XML, Scripting languages like Perl / Python, Middleware(Component) technologies, Architectural concepts like RMI / CORBA Front end / GUI: Code development (XWINDOWS in GNU Linux) or development based on tools(Qt designer, Jbuilder etc) RDBMS/Back end: Relevant to current state, with database connectivity to different platforms. For example MySQL or PostgreSQL Languages: Qt, Glade or any similar 4GLs, scripting languages and C & C++ in GNU Linux (under GNU gcc) Universal n/w applications development platforms: JAVA, GNU .NET or any similar platform Unix internals : Device drivers, RPC, Threads, Socket programming Embedded systems : RTOS, Embedded hardware with software for an application, Code optimization, security etc The project may be related to one of the following application areas: Financial / Manufacturing / Multimedia / Instructional design / DBMS / Networking or communication software development / Internetintranet applications / TCP-IP programming / Protocol study / Operating systems / Distributed systems Projects should not be developed using the packages like Dbase III plus, Foxpro, Visual Foxpro and MS-Access. Projects should not be developed using the combination of Visual Basic as the front end and MS-Access as the back end. Students can also develop applications using tools / languages / software not listed above, if they are part of latest technologies. Existing open source projects

may also be used, but the contribution of the group to the project should be clearly demarcated, distinguished and visible. Project work should compulsorily involve hardware and/or software development work; developing installation instructions, developing configuring instructions for LAN / WAN etc are examples for works not involving any such development and hence are strictly not allowed. Format of report A format may be designed and enforced at each institution Formats must be available in all current OS platforms and students must be asked to use a specific document preparation systems recommended by each institution - An interim report is to be submitted. Besides they may be asked to do a multi-media presentation using any presentation software; the formats and tools may again be standardized by each institution. Guidelines for conduct and evaluation:

A committee may be constituted for conduct and coordination of project related activities. The committee is responsible for developing schedules for various activities and keeping them. The functioning of a committee is over only after the final evaluation of the project. Project may be allotted to a student or groups of size at the most four. Each student may be asked to finalize a topic following the guidelines given above. After finalizing the topic and selection of guide, students should submit a Project proposal with approval of the guide. The project work can start only after the approval of the committee constituted. The institution has to offer infrastructure recommended by this committee till the completion of the project work. In case of non-approval, the suggestions for reformulating the project will be communicated to the students. The revised proposal may be submitted again to the committee in a different time slot. Sufficient number of chances may be given; the committee may device a time schedule to accommodate this revision process looking into the available time frame for the project. The project may be an in-house project or an external project. In any case, the student is associated with a guide. The guide must be competent in terms of academic qualifications and experience in the selected area. A list of guides available for a term may be published by the

committee mentioned above. The project proposal should be prepared in consultation with guide. It states clearly the project objective and the environment of the proposed project to be undertaken. The following details may be included in it: Title of the project Objective of the project Project category. Information pertaining to analysis and design Tools / Platforms, Hardware and software requirement specification.

Students are supposed to go through initial software engineering activities related to the selected problem and may convince the guide about the genuineness of attempt. The proposal need be formed and forwarded for approval only after this. The proposal may be at the most ten pages in size. An assessment of the project work should be done at the end of the semester by the committee mentioned above. An interim report of at the most 20 pages on the work done must be submitted by the students with the approval of guide. Besides, they will make a presentation before the committee for the evaluation purpose. The assessment is made individually and in groups. The pattern for awarding marks will be as follows:

Attendance : 5 marks Work in design and way of presentation evaluated by committee : 30 marks Report and individual assessment by guide : 15 marks

Total = 50 marks For external projects, the attendance may be evaluated based on proof for attendance provided by a competent authority of the external agency. EIGHTH SEMESTER Code IT04 801 Subject Industrial Management & Hours/Week Internal Marks 3 1 50 University Examination 3 100

IT04 802 IT04 803 IT04 804 IT04 805 IT04 806(P) IT04 807(P) IT04 808(P)

Economics Mobile Communication Systems Internet Technologies Elective II Elective III Graphics & Multimedia Lab Project Work Viva voce TOTAL ELECTIVE-II

3 3 3 3 -

1 1 1 1 -

3 7 -

50 50 50 50 50 100 400

3 3 3 3 3 -

100 100 100 100 100 100 700

15 5 10

A B C D E F

Artificial Intelligence Image Processing Compiler Design Industrial Psychology Simulation & modeling Quantum Computing ELECTIVE-III

A Neural networks & Fuzzy logic B Pattern recognition Design and Analysis of algorithms

D Entrepreneurship

E Stochastic Processes F Concrete Mathematics DETAILED SYLLABUS IT04 801 : INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT AND ECONOMICS (Common with CS04 801) 3 hours lecture & 1 hour tutorial per week PART A : ENGINEERING ECONOMICS Objective: a brief exposure of engineering graduate. Module - I: (13 Hours) 1. Introductory Background - Nature and scope of Economics, Science, Engineering and Technology, their relationship with economic development. 2. Basic Economic Concepts - Wants and utility, Demand and supply, Elasticity of demand and supply, concept of cost and revenue, concept of equilibrium and margin, wealth and capital. 3. Money and Banking - Functions of money - Functions of banks Commercial and Central Banks, Monetary policy of the Reserve Bank of India. Module - II: (13 Hours) 4. Industrialization and Economic Planning in India - Need for industrialization, Development of Indian Industry since independence, Role of public sector in India, Industrial Policy of the Government of India, A brief study of Five Year Plans of India. 5. Agriculture - Role of Agriculture in Indian Economy - Problems of Indian Agriculture - Green Revolution in Indian Features and Engineering Economics necessary for

effects. 6. Foreign exchange and International Trade - Determination of rate of exchange - Balance of payments and Trade - India's Foreign Trade Policy - A short note on International Monetary Fund (I.M.F.). PART B: PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT Objective An elementary level exposure of management principles relevant for industrial sector. Module - III: (13 hours) Need for management - principles of management - management functions - span of control - delegation - directing - leadership and motivation (basic concepts only) Theories of scientific management (an overview only expected) - Fredric Taylor's theory - Frank Gilbreth's theory - Henry Foyal's theory - present concepts of management. Financial management - objectives and functions - time value of money (numerical examples included) - basics of financial accounting (problem solving not required) - profit and loss account - balance sheet (only introduction) - sources of industrial financeshares - debentures - public deposits - bank loans - financial institutions. Module - IV: (13 hours) Marketing management -concept of market and marketing marketing mix - market research - advertising and sales promotion, Scope and objective of Human Resource Management - manpower recruitment analysisrecruitment and training - job analysis - job evaluation - wages and incentives. Decision making - Introduction and definition - techniques of decision making - decision making process - under certainty - uncertainty and risk (problems not included), Network analysis - CPM and PERT

(analysis of simple networks). Text books 1. Mazda F, Engineering management, Low priced edition, Addison Wesley. 2. O.P.Khanna, Industrial Management. 3. Kotler. P, Marketing Management: Analysis, Implementation and Control, Prentice Hall. Planning,

4. Venkata Ratnam C.S & Srivastva B.K, Personnel Management and Human Resources, Tata McGraw Hill. 5. Prasanna Chandra, Financial Management: Theory and Practice, Tata McGraw Hill. 6. K.K.Dewett, Modern Economic Theory 7. Ishwar.C.Dhingra, The Indian Economy (Resources Planning development and Problem)

Reference books 1. Koontz H, O'Donnel C & Weihrich H, Essentials of management, McGraw Hill. 2. Satya Raju R & Parthasarathy A, Management: Text & Cases, Prentice Hall. 3. Ramaswamy V.S & Namakumari S, Marketing Management : Planning, Implementation and Control, MacMillan. Assignments: 1. Economics: Assignment should be able to help students appreciate necessity of economics in engineering. 2. Management: Individual documentation of best management practices by various organizations. Sessional work assessment

Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT2K 802 : MOBILE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course is an introduction to the field of mobile communications and focuses on the aspects of digital data transfer in wireless and mobile environments. The students require a basic understanding of communication and a rough knowledge of the Internet or networking in general.] Module - I: (12 hours) Introduction - applications - history of wireless communications reference model wireless transmission - frequencies for radio transmission - signals - antennas - signal propagation - multiplexing - modulation - spread sprectrum - cellular systems - medium access control - specialized MAC - SDMA - FDMA - TDMA - aloha - CSMA collision avoidance - polling - CDMA - comparison of S/T/F/CDMA

Module - II: (12 hours) Telecommunication systems - GSM - mobile services - system architecture - radio interface - protocols - localization and calling handover - security - new data services - DECT - TETRA - UMTS and IMT-2000 - satellite systems - history - applications - basics rooting - localization - handover - examples - broadcast systems overview - cyclic repetition of data - digital audio broadcasting digital video broadcasting Module - III: (12 hours) Wireless LAN - infrared Vs radio transmissions - infrastructure and adhoc networks - IEEE 802.11 - HIPERLAN - bluetooth - wireless ATM - motivation for WATM working group - WATM services reference model - functions - radio access layer - handover location management - addressing - mobile quality of service access point control protocol Module - IV: (16 hours) Mobile network layer - mobile IP - packet delivery - registration tunneling and encapsulation - optimizations - reverse tunneling dynamic host configuration protocol - adhoc networks - routing algorithms - metrics - mobile transport layer - TCP - indirect TCP snooping TCP - mobile TCP - retransmission - recovery - transaction oriented TACP - support for mobility - file systems - WWW - WAP architecture - datagram protocol - transport security - transaction protocol - session protocol - application - environment - WML - WML script - wireless telephony application - example stacks with WAP Text book 1. Schiller J., Mobile Communications, Addison Wesley Reference books

Singhal et.al S., The Wireless Application Protocol, Addison Wesley Wesel E., Wireless Multimedia Communications: Networking Video, Voice, and Data, Addison Wesley Gordman D., Wireless Personal Communications Comer D.E., Computer Networks and Internets, Addison Wesley Lee W.C., Mobile Collection Tele Communications, McGraw

Hill Tero Ojawpera & Ranjee Prasad, Wide Band CDMA for Third Generation Mobile Communication, AH

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 803 : INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course introduces the algorithms and protocols implemented to have human interaction with internet with an emphasis on application layer and multimedia networking. It also introduces the techniques and methods of E-Commerce. Module - I: (14 hours) Network Applications-Client-Server Interaction-Socket InterfaceConnection Oriented Service-Simple Client and Server exampleDomain Name System-Electronic Mail - Representation and

Transfer-VoIP-File Transfer and Remote File Access-RPC and Middleware-Initialization Module - II: (12 hours) Multimedia networking-applications-streaming stored audio and video - internet telephony - RTP - scheduling and policing mechanisms - integrated services - RSVP differentiated services - network management - the internet network management framework - network security - integrity, Access control attacks & control measures Module - III: (13 hours) E-commerce-Difference between E-commerce and E-Business, Unique features, types - Portals - E-distributor. Emerging Ecommerce areas. Technology infrastructure - Internet and web features (case study not required). Building an E-commerce website- choosing server software- choosing hardware- Ecommerce site tools. Security needs in E-commerce environment. Module - IV: (13 hours) E-commerce payment systems - credit cards, E-commerce transactions - digital payments in B2C arena - B2B payment systems, B2B E-commerce and Supply Chain Management - Evolution - Procurement process & Supply Chain Management - Trends in Supply Chain Management and collaborative commerce, Net Marketers - characteristics, types, edistributors, e-procurement. Text books 1. Douglas E. Comer, Computer Networks and Internets with Internet Applications - Pearson Education 2. Kurose J.F. & Ross K.W, Computer Networking: A Top -Down Approach Featuring the Internet- Pearson Education 3. Kenneth C. Laudon, Carol Guercio Traver, E-Commerce-Business, Technology, Society - Pearson Education

Reference books 1. Nalin K. Sharda, Multimedia Information Networking - Prentice Hall of India. 2. Stallings, Computer Networking with Internet Protocols - Pearson Education Asia. 3. Greenlaw R. & Hepp E.,In-line / On-line: Fundamentals of the Internet and the World Wide Web- Tata McGraw Hill 4. Goncalves M., Firewalls: A Complete Guide - Tata McGraw Hill 5. Kalakota R. & Whinston A.B., Frontiers of Electronic Commerce Addison Wesley 6. Schneider G.P. & Perry J.T. Electronic Commerce, Course Technology

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one

IT04 804A : ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (Common with CS04 804A) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: The course intends to introduce students to elementary and informational aspects of artificial intelligence. Various perspectives of the subject are analysed from different viewpoints. The course is expected to enable the student to gain a deeper understanding of the philosophy of the AI. Module - I: (12 hours) Introduction to philosophy of AI, Algorithms and Turing machines, Church-Turing thesis - computational theories of mind. Module - II: (12 hours) Classical version of AI - symbolic representation - rules and representation - classical AI's consequences for technological and psychological AI - rationality Module - III: (12 hours) Problem in classical model of AI - commonsense reasoning - nonmonotonic logic - Eliza effect - Chinese Room argument - semantics of AI - Language model - Limits of informational semantics Module - IV: (13 hours) Neural networks - connectionism - subsymbolic micro-freatures and context sensitivity of interpretation - parallel distributed processing - PDP and brain situated robotics - connectionism and representation - dielectic representation - dynamic system approach Reference articles and books

Boden, MA AI and Natural Man, MIT Press, London 1987 Boden, MA, Computer models of mind : Computational approaches in theoretical psychology, CUP, Cambridge, 1985 Boden , MA, The Philosophy of AI, OUP, Oxford, 1990

Boden, MA, The Philosophy of AI, OUP, Oxford, 1994 Churchland, PM, A Neuro-computational perspective : The nature of mind and the structure of science, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1980 Clark, AJ, Micro cognition : Philosophy, Cognitive Science and Parallel Distributed Processing, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1989 Clark AJ, Associative Engines : Connectionism, concepts and representational changes, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1993 Cliff D, Harvey I, Husbands P, Exploration in Evolutionary Robotics' Adaptive Behaviour 2:73-110, 1993 Dreyfus, HL, What computers can't do : The limits of Artificial Intelligence, Harper and Row, New York, 1979 Feigenbaum, EA, and Feldman J, Computers and Thought, McGraw Hill, New york 1963 Gelder, T Van, What is cognition, if not computation?, Journal of Philosophy, 91, 1995 (A defense of dynamic systems) Holl & JM, Holy Oak KJ, Nisbet RE and Thagard PR, Induction : Processes of Inference, Learnings and Discovery, MIT Press, Cambridge 1980 (Algorithms)

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one

IT04 804b : IMAGE PROCESSING (Common with CS04 804B) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Module - I: (20 hours) Introduction - digital image representation - fundamental steps in image processing - elements of digital image processing systems digital image fundamentals - elements of visual perception - a simple image model - sampling and quantization - basic relationship between pixels - image geometry - image transforms introduction to Fourier transform - discrete Fourier transform some properties of 2-fourier transform (DFT) - the FFT - other separable image transforms - hotelling transform Module -II: (12 hours) Image enhancement - point processing - spatial filtering frequency domain - color image processing - image restoration degradation model - diagonalization of circulant and block circulant matrices - inverse filtering - least mean square filter Module - III: (10 hours) Image compression - image compression models - elements of information theory - error-free compression - lossy compression image compression standards Module - IV: (10 hours) Image reconstruction from projections - basics of projection parallel beam and fan beam projection - method of generating projections - Fourier slice theorem - filtered back projection algorithms - testing back projection algorithms Text book 1. Rafael C., Gonzalez & Woods R.E., Digital Image Processing, Addison Wesley Reference books

Rosenfeld A. & Kak A.C., Digital Picture Processing, Academic

Press Jain A.K & Englewood Cliffs N.J., Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing, Prentice Hall Schalkoff R.J., Digital Image Processing And Computer Vision, John Wiley Pratt W.K., Digital Image Processing, John Wiley

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 804C : COMPILER DESIGN 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: Objective of the course is to introduce the software engineering techniques and background information in a single paper useful for the students of computing sciences stream. For adequacy this has to be complemented by exercises appearing in texts and references. Books have been carefully chosen to get examples from diverse computing application for practice along with theory.

Students are expected to find additional training materials downloadable from sites associated with each book. It is expected that the techniques learned here would be useful in doing project. Module - I: (10 hours) Introduction - analysis of the source program - phases of a compiler - compiler construction tools - lexical analysis - role of the lexical analyser - specification of tokens - recognition of tokens - lexical analyzer generators Module - II: (15 hours) Syntax analysis: role of the parser - context-free grammars - topdown parsing - bottom-up parsing - operator precedence parsing LR parsers (SLR, canonical LR, LALR) - parser generators Module - III: (13 hours) Syntax-directed translation - syntax-directed definitions - Satributed definitions - L-attributed definitions - bottom-up and topdown translation - type checking - type systems - specification of a type checker - run-time environments - source language issues storage organization - storage allocation strategies - access to nonlocal names - parameter passing - symbol tables Module - IV: (14 hours) Intermediate code generation - intermediate languages declarations - assignment statements - Boolean expressions procedure calls - introduction to code optimization - sources of optimization - introduction to data-flow analysis - introduction to code generation - issues in the design of a code generator - the target machine - a simple code generator Text book 1. Aho A.V., Sethi R. & Ullman J.D. Compilers: Principles, Techniques and Tools, Addison Wesley Reference books

Aho A.V. & Ullman J.D. Principles of Compiler Design, Narosa Muchnick S.S., Advanced Compiler Design Implementation, Harcourt Asia (Morgan Kaufman)

Holub A.I., Compiler Design in C, Prentice Hall India Appel A.W., Modern Compiler Implementation in C, Cambridge University Press Kenneth C Lauden, Compiler Construction - Principles and practice , Thomson Brooks/Cole - Vikas Publishing House Dick Grune, Henri E Bal, Ceriel J.H Jacobs & Koen G Langendoen, Modern Compiler design, Dreamtech

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone

IT04 804D : INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial Objective: The course is expected to expose to the student various techniques in analyzing and improving relationships, that are expected by

people employed in industries while conducting within an organization. It looks at various psychological issues and attempts to solve them. Module - I: (13 hours) Introduction - psychology as a science - areas of applications study of individual - individual differences - study of behavior stimulus - response behavior - heredity and environment - human mind - cognition - character - thinking - attention - memoryemotion - traits - attitude - personality Module - II: (13 hours) Organizational behavior - definition - development - fundamental concept - nature of people - nature of organization - an organizational behavior system - models - autocratic model - hybrid model - understanding a social - system social culture - managing communication - downward, upward and other forms of communication Module - III: (13 hours) Motivation - motivation driver - human needs - behavior modification - goal setting - expectancy model - comparison models - interpreting motivational models - leadership - path goal model style - contingency approach Module - IV: (13 hours) Special topics in industrial psychology - managing group in organization - group and inter group dynamics -managing change and organizational development - nature planned change resistance - characteristic of OD - OD process Reference books

Davis K. & Newstrom J.W., "Human Behavior At Work", McGraw Hill International Schermerhorn J.R. Jr., Hunt J.G. & Osborn R.N., "Managing Organizational Behavior", John Willy Luthans, "Organizational Behavior", McGraw Hill International Morgan C.T., King R.A., Rweisz J. & Schoples J., "Introduction to Psychology", McGraw Hill

Blum M.L. & Naylor J.C., "Industrial Psychology", CBS Publisher, Horper & Row

Sessional work assessment 2 Tests 2 x 15 = 30 2 Assignments 2 x 10 = 20 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions A and B of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions A and B of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions A and B of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions A and B of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 804E : SIMULATION & MODELLING 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: In simulation scientists try to reproduce real-world events or process under controlled laboratory conditions, using mainly mathematical models. Some of the most important scientific discoveries stem from the use of computers to simulate the complex natural phenomena. Hence, both from research perspective and from application perspective, study of the course is inevitable. Module - I: (10 hours) Introduction - systems and models - computer simulation and its applications - continuous system simulation - modelling continuous systems - simulation of continuous systems - discrete system

simulation - methodology - event scheduling and process interaction approaches - random number generation - testing of randomness - generation of stochastic variates - random samples from continuous distributions - uniform distribution - exponential distribution m-Erlang distribution - gamma distribution - normal distribution - beta distribution - random samples from discrete distributions - Bernoulli - discrete uniform - binomial - geometric and poisson Module - II: (12 hours) Evaluation of simulation experiments - verification and validation of simulation experiments - statistical reliability in evaluating simulation experiments - confidence intervals for terminating simulation runs - simulation languages - programming considerations - general features of GPSS - SIM SCRIPT and SIMULA Module - III: (15 hours) Simulation of queueing systems - parameters of queue formulation of queueing problems - generation of arrival pattern generation of service patterns - Simulation of single server queues - simulation of multiserver queues - simulation of tandom queues Module - IV: (15 hours) Simulation of stochastic network - simulation of PERT network definition of network diagrams - forward pass computation simulation of forward pass - backward pass computations simulation of backward pass - determination of float and slack times determination of critical path - simulation of complete network - merits of simulation of stochastic networks Note to the question paper setter - programming questions must be based on `C` language or specified simulation languages in the syllabus. Reference books

Deo N., System Simulation and Digital Computer, Prentice Hall of India. Gordan G., System Simulation, Prentice Hall of India. Law A.M. & Ketton W.D., Simulation Modelling And Analysis, McGraw Hill.

Sessional work assessment Assignments* 2x7.5 = 15 2 Tests** 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 5 Total marks = 50 * One assignment must be computer based. (practical)

** One sessional test must be computer based.(practical) University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 804F : QUANTUM COMPUTING 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: The developments in fabrication technology will eventually reach a point where logic gates are so small that they are made out of only a handful of atoms. On the atomic scale matter obeys the rules of quantum mechanics, which are quite different from the classical rules that determine the properties of conventional logic gates. So if computers are to become smaller in the future, new, quantum technology must replace or supplement what we have now. The point is, however, that quantum technology can offer much more than cramming more and more bits to silicon and multiplying the

clock-speed of microprocessors. It can support entirely new kind of computation with qualitatively new algorithms based on quantum principles. This course is meant to be an introduction to this field. Module - I: (13 hours) Foundations of quantum theory - states - observable measurement - dynamics quantum measurement - quantum entanglement - bell's theorems Module - II: (13 hours) Classical information theory - entropy - quantum information theory - quantification of entanglement - communication complexity quantum cryptography Module - III: (13 hours) Turing machines - reversible computation - universal logic gates and circuits - quantum computers and circuits - quantum algorithms - search - FFT - prime factorisation Module - IV: (13 hours) Quantum simulations - quantum error correction and codes - fault tolerant quantum computation - physical implementations - ion traps - quantum dots - cavity QED - NMR Reference books

Preskill J., Lecture Notes For The Course On Quantum Computation, bttp://www.theory.caltech.edu/people.preskill/ph229. Berman G.P., Dooten G.D., Mainieri. R. & Tsifrinovich V., Introduction to Quantum Computers, World Scientific Lo H.K., Popescu S. & Spiller T., Introduction to Quantum Computation and Information, World Scientific Press A., Quantum Theory: Concepts And Methods, Kluwer Academic

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15

Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 805A : NEURAL NETWORKS & FUZZY LOGIC (Common with CS04 805A) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This course is intended to introduce some of the methods and techniques by means of which it is possible to incorporate human like performance in machine. At the end of this course students will be able to design and develop such systems using neural networks and fuzzy logic. Module - I: (13 hours) Introduction to artificial neural networks - biological neurons Mc Culloch and Pitts modals of neuron - types of activation function - network architectures - knowledge representation - learning process - error-correction learning - supervised learning unsupervised learning - single unit mappings and the perceptron perceptron convergence theorem (with out proof) - method of steepest descent least mean square algorithms -

adaline/medaline units - multilayer perceptrons - derivation of the back-propagation algorithm Module - II: (13 hours) Radial basis and recurrent neural networks - RBF network structure - covers theorem and the separability of patterns - RBF learning strategies - K-means and LMS algorithms - comparison of RBF and MLP networks - recurrent networks - Hopfield networks energy function - spurious states - error performance - simulated annealing - the Boltzman machine - Boltzman learning rule - the mean field theory machine - MFT learning algorithm - applications of neural network - the XOR problem - traveling salesman problem image compression using MLPs - character retrieval using Hopfield networks Module - III: (13 hours) Fuzzy logic - fuzzy sets - properties - operations on fuzzy sets fuzzy relations - operations on fuzzy relations - the extension principle - fuzzy measures - membership functions - fuzzification and defuzzification methods - fuzzy controllers - Mamdani and Sugeno types - design parameters - choice of membership functions - fuzzification and defuzzification methods - applications Module - IV: (13 hours) Introduction to genetic algorithm and hybrid systems genetic algorithms - natural evolution - properties - classification GA features - coding - selection - reproduction - cross over and mutation operators basic GA and structure Introduction to Hybrid systems - concept of neuro-fuzzy and neuro-genetic systems Reference books

Simon Haykins, Neural Network A - Comprehensive Foundation, Macmillan College, Proc, Con, Inc Zurada J.M., Introduction to Artificial Neural Systems, Jaico publishers Driankov D., Hellendoorn H. & Reinfrank M., An Introduction to Fuzzy Control, Narosa Ross T.J., Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications, McGraw Hill

Bart Kosko. Neural Network and Fuzzy Systems, Prentice Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs Goldberg D.E., Genetic Algorithms in Search Optimisation and Machine Learning, Addison Wesley Suran Goonatilake & Sukhdev Khebbal (Eds.), Intelligent Hybrid Systems, John Wiley

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 805b : PATTERN RECOGNITION (Common with CS04 805B) 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: The course will impart a basic knowledge on pattern recognition and will give a sound idea on the topics of parameter estimation and supervised learning, linear discriminant functions and syntactic approach to PR. It will provide the strong foundation to students to

understand and design pattern recognition systems. Module - I: (12 hours) Introduction - introduction to statistical - syntactic and descriptive approaches - features and feature extraction - learning - Bayes Decision theory - introduction - continuous case - 2-category classification - minimum error rate classification - classifiers discriminant functions - and decision surfaces - error probabilities and integrals - normal density - discriminant functions for normal density Module - II: (12 hours) Parameter estimation and supervised learning - maximum likelihood estimation - the Bayes classifier - learning the mean of a normal density - general bayesian learning - nonparametric technic - density estimation - parzen windows - k-nearest neighbour estimation - estimation of posterior probabilities - nearest neighbour rule - k-nearest neighbour rule Module - III: (12 hours) Linear discriminant functions - linear discriminant functions and decision surfaces - generalised linear discriminant functions - 2category linearly separable case - non-separable behaviour - linear programming procedures - clustering - data description and clustering - similarity measures - criterion functions for clustering Module - IV: (16 hours) Syntactic approach to PR - introduction to pattern grammars and languages - higher dimensional grammars - tree, graph, web, plex, and shape grammars - stochastic grammars - attribute grammars parsing techniques - grammatical inference Text books

Duda & Hart P.E, Pattern Classification And Scene Analysis, John Wiley Gonzalez R.C. & Thomson M.G., Syntactic Pattern Recognition - An Introduction, Addison Wesley

Reference book

1. Fu K.S., Eaglewood Cliffs N.J., Syntactic Pattern Recognition And Applications, Prentice Hall Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 805C : DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective of the course is to provide a sound basis of algorithm design and analysis techniques. A background of data structures and programming languages is assumed. After completing the course, one is expected to be able to design efficient algorithms, compare different algorithms for efficiency and also to have an idea about what is computable by a machine. Module - I: (13 hours) Analysis: RAM model - cost estimation based on key operations big Oh - big omega - little Oh - little omega and theta notations recurrence analysis - master's theorem - solution to recurrence

relations with full history probabilistic analysis - linearity of expectations - worst and average case analysis of quick-sort merge-sort - heap-sort - binary search - hashing algorithms - lower bound proofs for the above problems - amortized analysis aggregate - accounting and potential methods - analysis of KnuthMorris-Pratt algorithm - amortized weight balanced trees Module - II: (13 hours) Design: divide and conquer - Strassen's algorithm, o(n) median finding algorithm - dynamic programming - matrix chain multiplication - optimal polygon triangulation - optimal binary search trees - Floyd-Warshall algorithm - CYK algorithm - greedy Huffman coding - Knapsack, Kruskal's and Prim's algorithms for mst - backtracking - branch and bound - travelling salesman problem matroids and theoretical foundations of greedy algorithms Module - III: (13 hours) Complexity: complexity classes - P, NP, Co-NP, NP-Hard and NPcomplete problems - cook's theorem (proof not expected) - NPcompleteness reductions for clique - vertex cover - subset sum hamiltonian cycle - TSP - integer programming - approximation algorithms - vertex cover - TSP - set covering and subset sum Module - IV: (13 hours) Probabilistic algorithms: pseudo random number generation methods - Monte Carlo algorithms probabilistic counting - verifying matrix multiplication primality testing - miller rabin test - integer factorization - Pollard's rho heuristic - amplification of stochastic advantage - applications to cryptography interactive proof systems - les vegas algorithms randomized selection and sorting - randomized solution for eight queen problem - universal hashing - Dixon's integer factorization algorithm Text books

Corman T.H., Lieserson C.E. & Rivest R.L., Introduction to Algorithms, Prentice Hall India, Modules I, II and III Motwani R. & Raghavan P., Randomized Algorithms, Cambridge University Press, Module IV

Reference books

Basse S., Computer Algorithms: Introduction to Design And Analysis, Addison Wesley Manber U., Introduction to Algorithms: A Creative Approach, Addison Wesley Aho V., Hopcraft J.E. & Ullman J.D., The Design And Analysis of Computer Algorithms, Addison Wesley Kenneth A Berman, Jerome L Paul, Fundamentals of sequential and parallel algorithms, Vidya Vikas Publications

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks, 2 from each module QII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module I with choice to answer anyone QIII - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module II with choice to answer anyone QIV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module III with choice to answer anyone QV - 2 questions of 15 marks each from module IV with choice to answer anyone IT04 805D : ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: The course intends to help strengthen the entrepreneurial capabilities of a student while preparing to graduate as a

professional. These capabilities include identification of opportunities, studying project feasibility, and implementing business ventures. The course also exposes the intricacies of economic fundamentals of a business venture, needed for commissioning one. Module - I: (20 hours) Entrepreneurial perspectives - understanding of entrepreneurship process - entrepreneurial decision process - entrepreneurship and economic development - characteristics of entrepreneur entrepreneurial competencies - managerial functions for enterprise Module - II: (10 hours) Process of business opportunity identification and evaluation industrial policy - environment - market survey and market assessment - project report preparation - study of feasibility and viability of a project - assessment of risk in the industry Module - III: (12 hours) Process and strategies for starting a venture - stages of small business growth - entrepreneurship in international environment entrepreneurship - achievement motivation - time management creativity and innovation structure of the enterprise - planning, implementation and growth Module - IV: (10 hours) Technology acquisition for small units - formalities to be completed for setting up a small scale unit - forms of organizations for small scale units - financing of project and working capital - venture capital and other equity assistance available - break even analysis and economic ratios technology transfer and business incubation Reference books

Koontz H. & Weihrich H., Essentials of Management, McGraw Hill International Hirich R.D. & Peters Irwin M.P., Entrepreneurship, McGraw Hill Rao T.V. & Deshpande M.V., Prayag Metha, Nadakarni M.S., Developing Entrepreneurship A Hand Book, Learning Systems Kurado D. & Hodgelts R.M., Entrepreneurship A

Contemporary Approach, The Dryden Press Dr Patel V.G., Seven Business Crisis, Tata McGraw Hill Jeffry A Timmons, New Venture Creation - Entrepreneurship for 21st Century, McGraw Hill International Patel J.B., Noid S.S., A Manual On Business Opportunity Identification, Selections, EDII Rao C.R., Finance for Small Scale Industries Pandey G.W., A Complete Guide to Successful Entrepreneurship, Vikas Publishing

Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 805E : STOCHASTIC PROCESSES 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: Dynamic indeterminism is to be analyzed in any field of Science and Technology with reference to time, which is in other words defined as random processes. Students are introduced to various methods to model and analyze such systems.

Module - I: (13 hours) Markov chains and poisson processes (a brief revision) - continuous time Markov chains - definition -transition probability function Chapman - Kolmogorov equations - rate matrix - Kolmogorov forward and backward equations - computing the transition probabilities - limiting probabilities - pure birth process - birth and death process - M/ M/ 1 queue Module - II: (13 hours) Renewal theory and its applications - the renewal process N(t) distribution of N(t) - renewal function - renewal equation - limit theorems and their applications - elementary renewal theorem (without proof ) - applications of renewal theorem - central limit theorem of renewal processes (without proof) - renewal reward processes - regenerative processes - delayed renewal processes alternating renewal processes Module - III: (13 hours) Queueing theory I - introduction - preliminaries - cost equations Little's formula - steady state probability - exponential models single server exponential queueing system - single server exponential - system having finite capacity - a queueing system with bulk service - network of queues - open systems - closed systems - the system M/G/1 - preliminaries - work and cost identity - applications of work to M/G/1 - busy periods - discussion of M/D/1 model and M/Ek/1 model Module - IV: (13 hours) Queueing theory II: variations on the M/G/1 - the M/G/1 with random sized batch arrivals - priority queues - the model G/M/1 the G/M/1 busy and idle periods - multi server queues - erlang loss system - the M/M/k queue -the G/M/k queue - the M/G/k queue M/G/ queue Text book

Ross S.M., Introduction to Probability Models, Sixth edition, Harcourt Asia Pvt. Ltd. & Academic Press, Chapter 6sections6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 6.4, 6.5, 6.8; Chapter 7 - sections 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5; Chapter 8 - Sections 8.1 to 8.5 for module 3

and the remaining for module 4 Reference book 1. Medhi J., Stochastic Processes, Wiley Eastern Ltd. Sessional work assessment Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 805F : CONCRETE MATHEMATICS 3 hours lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week Objective: This is an introduction to the mathematics that support advanced programming and analysis of algorithms. By its very nature it illustrate how computer science benefited from mathematics and how mathematics benefited from computer science. As such this is the continuation of number theory taught as part of the cryptography course earlier. Including examples of core applications based on the theory presented here will increase the

acceptance of the material. Module - I: (10 hours) Recurrent problems - tower of Hanoi - lines in the plane - the Josephus problem - sums - notation - sums and recurrences manipulation of sums - multiple sums - general methods - finite and infinite calculus - infinite sums Module - II: (18 hours) Integer functions - floors and ceilings - applications - floor / ceiling recurrences - mod - the binary operation - floor / ceiling sums number theory - divisibility - primes - prime examples - factorial factors - relative primality - mod - the congruence relation independent residues - additional applications - phi and mu Module - III: (12 hours) Binomial coefficients - basic identities - basic practice - tricks of the trade - generating functions - hypergeometric - functions hypergeometric transformations - partial hypergeometric sums mechanical summations Module - IV: (12 hours) Special numbers - Stirling numbers - Eulerian numbers - harmonic numbers - harmonic summation - Bernoulli numbers - Fibonacci numbers - continuants Text book 1. Graham R.L., Knuth D.E. & Patashnik O., Concrete Mathematics, Addison Wesley Reference books

Melzak Z.A., Mathematical Techniques for Various Applications, Wiley Melzak Z.A., Mathematical Ideas, Modelling and Applications, Wiley

Sessional work assessment

Assignments 2x7.5 = 15 Tests 2x15 = 30 Regularity = 05 Total marks = 50 University examination pattern QI - 8 short type questions of 5 marks each, 2 from each module

Q II - 2 questions of 15marks each from module I with choice to answer any one Q III - 2 questions of 15marks each from module II with choice to answer any one Q IV - 2 questions of 15marks each from module III with choice to answer any one Q V - 2 questions of 15marks each from module IV with choice to answer any one IT04 806(P) : GRAPHICS & MULTIMEDIA LAB 3 hours practical per week Lab 1 : Basic raster drawing algorithms implementations (lines, circle, ellipse, polygons etc.) Lab 2 : mplementation of algorithms for 2D/3D object generation, transformations Lab 3 : Generate a 3D object, say a cube, and try to implement the following using any standard graphic library set (for example OpenGL library) on a selected OS 1. Viewing transformations 2. Modeling transformations 3. Projection transformations 4. Drawing a scene (2D picture of 3D space or a shot by

camera) involving object Lab 4 : Generate a 3D object, say a sphere, based on surfaces or polygonal faces or wireframe approach and render it defining a material, light source and lighting model properties using any standard graphic library set (for example OpenGL library) on a selected OS Lab 5 : Model a scene containing several 3D objects, say table top having several objects - each object may be modelled as given in above experiment - also render the scene with hidden surfaces in mind - rendering considering a light source may also be practiced - this again is using standard graphic library set on a selected OS Lab 6 : Use source code of any freely available sound recording, encoding / decoding software - encoding / decoding portions may be removed before actual experimentation - study any three audio formats to learn about (a) file size (b) popularity (c) quality of audio reproduced. Do the following in a chosen OS 1. Record sound for 10 secs 2. Convert from one format to other 3. Playback both the formats and analyze the results Lab 7 : Study any 5 popular still image formats (JPEG, BMP included) - do the following in a chosen OS 1. Take a snap of face of a person using digital camera or a webcam 2. Use any photo editing tools (say, Adobe Photoshop) to get desired size, desired resolution photo(both color and black and white may be generated). Paint touching may also be practiced 3. Create the image of a decorated greeting card or an identity card using image creation tools and insert the photo and print it. Verify for color matching and size of the image Lab8 : Use a MPEG decoder source code freely available from

internet and do the following in a chosen OS 1. Play MPEG video 2. Modify the source code so that play can be done frame by frame Lab 9 : Use any web animation authoring tool, say macromedia flash, on a chosen OS to create simple animations Lab 10 : Learn to use server and client software for streaming media - pick any freely available software on a chosen OS - create a web page with multimedia content and providing interaction in some form to a user Reference books

Foley J.D., Dam A.V., Feiner S.K. & Hughes J., Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, Addison Wesley Stevens R.T., Graphics Programming In C, BPB Publications Stevens R.T. & Watkins C.D., Advanced Graphics Programming in C & C++, BPB Publications OpenGL Architecture Review Board, OpenGL Programming Guide, Pearson Education Asia OpenGL Architecture Review Board, OpenGL Reference Manual, Pearson Education Asia Addele Droblas Greenberg & Seith Greenberg, Fundamental Photoshop, McGraw Hill Linda Richards, Web Graphics for Dummies, IDG Books

Sessional work assessment Laboratory practicals and record = 15 Tests = 30 Regularity = 5 Total marks = 50 IT04 807(P) : PROJECT WORK 7 hours per week

Guidelines for completion of project The project work started in seventh semester is to be continued here. In the rare special case of a student joining in eighth semester(due to year out or shortage of attendance), the design part mentioned in 708(P) Project has to be repeated following the guidelines there. However, the duration of the project need to be limited to a semester. Format of report A format may be designed and enforced at each institution formats must be available in all current OS platforms and students must be asked to use a specific document preparation systems recommended by each institution - they may be asked to provide the report in electronic form also - this electronic form, made available in CD, will contain the entire project document besides multi-media illustration material prepared using any presentation software - Each student has to submit a technical report about work done and a detailed report of work done; these may also be provide in the CD. Guidelines for conduct and evaluation:

The committee constituted in the seventh semester will continue with the remaining activities. The committee is responsible for developing schedules for various activities remaining and keeping them. The functioning of a committee is over only after the final evaluation of the project. The committee mentioned above should do an assessment of the project work at the end of the eighth semester. The project must be submitted in a technical paper format with a maximum of eight pages in single line spacing of 12 point Times New Roman Font. A detailed report may be submitted to the guide for his assessment. Besides, they will make a presentation and demonstration of work done by them before the committee mentioned above for their assessment.

The assessment is thus done in individual and in groups. The pattern for awarding marks will be as follows:

Attendance: 10 marks Technical report, work done and presentation evaluated by committee : 60 marks

Work record and individual assessment by guide : 30 marks

Total = 100 marks For external projects, evaluation of attendance may be done on the basis of proof of attendance provided by a competent authority of the external agency. In addition, the technical report may contain a certificate from competent authority of the external agency as proof for originality of work done by the student at their premise. IT04 808(P) : VIVA VOCE Each student is required to appear for the viva-voce examination on the project work and seminar, and also on the various subjects prescribed for the course - the project and seminar reports are to be produced for the viva-vice examination - the examiners will ask questions from subjects studied for the B.Tech course, mini project, project and seminar reports of the student . There is only University examination for Viva-voce. University will appoint examiners to conduct this. The mark distribution should be as follows: Mark distribution for Viva-voce Subjects : 40

Mini project : 20 Project Seminar : 30 : 10

Total marks : 100