You are on page 1of 1

REMARKS 

COL BENITO T DE LEON INF (GSC) PA, Commander, 104th INF BDE, 1ID, PA 
at CSO‐Media Fellowship Night 
with the Theme: The Role of Media  
in the Attainment of Lasting Peace in Mindanao 
24 October 2008 
Maria Cristina Hotel, Iligan City 
 

I am a journalist by heart, but not necessarily my occupation. I say this having finished a 
journalism course. Some of my writings have found their way to print, but many have to be 
withheld due its sensitivity and considering my profession. As such, I understand the role of 
the media in upholding democracy, justice, and the interest of the people. I recognize its 
responsibility of serving as the “watchdog of society” living by the words “truth” and 
“impartiality.” I am also well aware of its power of influencing opinion and in shaping 
perceptions. This great power can rouse emotions and move people to action. Hence, media 
will always play a crucial role in attaining peace not only in Mindanao but in other conflict 
areas. 

Media’s presentations will always result into two sides: those who will be happy and those 
who will be irritated by it. To illustrate this point, a glass half‐filled with water can be 
described to be either “half‐full” or “half‐empty.” While both descriptions are correct, the 
former is viewed to be optimistic and the latter to be pessimistic. Further, an individual 
getting bald may be described as one who is either “losing hair” or “gaining face.” In the 
choice of words alone, media has the capacity to swing perceptions or evoke emotions. This 
when taken to extreme is exaggeration or sensationalism—understandably, as it is what the 
people want. 

With such capacity to shape perceptions, will you then promote hope or bring despair; 
encourage cooperation or cause divisiveness; be driven by service or be profit‐oriented; 
aspire for balance or give way to bias; expose the truth or cover deceit; bring stability or 
cause insecurity; foster harmony or create discord; cultivate peace or fuel conflict. This is 
the extent of the power of the media. However, “with this great power comes great 
responsibility” in taking caution on its use from the movie “Spiderman.” 

Hence, as you spin your web of stories, you should take heed of your conscience with 
civility. The Journalist’s Code of Ethics where decency is the watchword should always be 
your guide. And keep in mind the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines’covenant 
which declares for press freedom along with its concept that journalists must serve the 
national interest and the people. 

Perhaps, the final test of your work should be: “Will it be for the better good to the society 
we all serve and to which we all have a stake in its future.” And that I leave to your 
judgment.