Introduction to Marketing Unit 4-Value Creation

Unit Objectives: 1. Students will be able to analyze how the product packaging or brand impacts the consumer by determining how new products and services can attribute to a consumers choice. 2. Students will evaluate how competitive products and other brands impact choices that company by hypothesizing which methods work best. 3. Students will create a marketing mix plan to devise how to develop new products to enter the market and how branding and service aspects will impact the products acceptance, growth, and maturity into the market place.

Unit Goals:  Have students understand the introduction of a new product in the market  Students know product life cycle and BCG matrix and how the apply to marketing  Students evaluate how services differ from products and what impact this makes on the consumer  Students know and can apply the Gaps model  Students can determine how different aspects of the product can change and how this affects the product image  Students know how branding can affect a product Rationale: A marketer’s job is to create value for the product. This unit provides a variety of ways that will help students to gain understanding of what aspects go into creating this value for the customer. Through the creation of the product, to branding, packaging, and looking at what value services have, this unit helps students become proficient marketers by learning how to create value of a product.

Lessons Outline (Lessons Attached): 1. 2. 3. 4. Diffusion, innovation, and development of new products The Product Life Cycle and the BCG matrix Service Marketing: Intangible, Inseparable, Perishable, and Variable The Gaps model

5. Product Assortment, Line Decisions, and Packaging 6. Branding Materials and Supplies      Elmo Class Journals Daily Worksheets (listed on lesson plans) Products with primary and secondary packaging Pictures of different brands/examples of different brands

Diversification: This unit would be set up for everyone to succeed. I do not give quizzes throughout my unit; instead I have much informal assessment. The reflections allow the teacher to see where are my students are struggling, especially my students on IEPs. Depending on their reflections and what the journal on their warm-up’s and exit slips, the teacher would be able to see where or if they need more help. Also, when the unit test is given, students on IEPs would be given extra time or be allowed to take this is a separate classroom. The unit also uses many worksheets. When going over them on the Elmo, the student with a low vision problem would be given his own answer key so that he is able to see better. In addition, I would place him near the front of the class so that if there is writing on the board, he is able to see it. Lastly, the teacher should work with the gifted and talented students to create their own project throughout this lesson. By working closely together, the teacher can find a particular angle of the unit the student finds interesting and help them discover more on this area and go in depth to gain greater understanding. Assessment of the Unit:  The unit test will be the largest overall assessment for the unit. This wraps up the unit and allows the teacher to see where they need to adjust their teacher for the next time they teach this unit. Warm-ups and exit slips will be the other main grading for the unit. Everyday they will be assigned a grade on how well students reflect or work on the assignments. These are very valuable to the teacher because it allows them to see where the students are at and what needs to be adjusted in the teaching. The lessons are mainly discussion based. This provides are great foundation for informally assessing the students. By reflecting continuously on what students say, their responses to questions, the teacher is able to monitor

them informally easily. Also, when students are working in pairs or groups, it is imperative that the teacher walks around and talks to the students. This allows the teacher to assess students as well and on a more individual basis. By talking to only a couple students at a time, the teacher is able to gain a better grasp at where students are at in their understanding of the lesson. Grading: The unit test will be worth 60 points towards to total for the unit. Each warm-up and exit-slip will be worth five points, over six lessons, giving a total of 60 points. Therefore, overall the unit will be worth 120 points. Resources:  
Effective Methods of Teaching Business Education Marketing: Grewal and Levy

Introduction to Marketing-Chapter 11-Developing New Products, J. Hendricks Lesson Topic: Diffusion, Innovation, and Development of New Products Two-day Lesson Plan Lesson 1 Lesson Objectives: The student will 1. Know the stages of diffusion 2. Understand how innovation is important to a product 3. Know the stages of the product development Process and how they apply Curriculum Standards Alignment: NBEA Marketing VI-The marketing plan Prerequisites: None Materials and Equipment:     Elmo Class Journals Diffusion of Innovation organizer Product Development organizer

Rationale: Understanding how a product is developed and accepted in the market is vital to being able to market a new product. Students would be expected to know the different stages and how innovation and diffusion play a part in a product life cycle. Procedure: 1. Warm-up- Journal how does a product get value? What are important steps for a product to gain value? (5 minutes) 2. Discuss diffusion of innovation. What are the different levels that purchasers fall into? What stages do all the students fall into? Put up the definition on the Elmo and have them copy onto worksheet. Have students give examples

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

of what stage they fall into and why. Students should copy this onto the worksheet so they can have concrete examples. (20 minutes) Have students talk in groups determine a new product they would want to see in the market place. Have whole class narrow it down to one product. Relate this to the first stage of the development of new product, idea generation.(7 minutes) Go through each stage of the product development process. Have students create graphic organizer of the base given to students. Create own organizer on the Elmo as you explain to students. Do not pre-fill organizer, make sure to let students write first so they can put it in their own words then add to it if necessary. (20 minutes) Have students work in groups to determine why each stage of the product development process is important. Have them write down a small summary of what they came up with. (11 Minutes) In class discussion on what groups talked about. Have each student write down on their organizer a few points of what was said in the discussion. (12 minutes) Exit-slip-What are two things you learned today? What are two things you are still confused about? (5 minutes)

Evaluation: 1. Unit Test 2. End of class discussion/worksheets

Diffusion of Innovation Worksheet
Directions: Copy the definition from the board. Also, record the different examples given from classmates for each stage. Innovators

Early Adopters

Early Majority

Late Majority

Laggards

Key
Directions: Copy the definition from the board. Also, record the different examples given from classmates for each stage. Innovators-Those buyers who want to be the first on the block to have the new product or service

Early Adopters-Second subgroup that begins to use a product or service. Generally do not like to take as much risk as innovator but wait to purchase the product after careful review.

Early Majority-Crucial because the product cannot be profitable until this group buys them. Do not take as much risk as two earlier groups and therefore wait to purchase until all the kinks are out of the product.

Late Majority-The last groups of buyers to enter a new product market. When the enter, the product has reached its full market potential.

Laggards-Like to avoid change and rely on traditional products until they are no longer available.

The Product Development Process Directions: Complete graphic organizer for the product life cycle while we talk in class

Introduction to Marketing-Chapter 11-Developing New Products, J. Hendricks Lesson Topic: The Product Life Cycle and the BCG Matrix Lesson 2 Lesson Objectives: The student will 1. 2. 3. 4. Know the stages of the product lifecycle Be able to determine where products are in the lifecycle Identify and label a BCB matrix Place products in the BCG matrix

Curriculum Standards Alignment: NBEA Marketing VI-The marketing plan

Prerequisites: None

Materials and Equipment:     Elmo Journals Product lifecycle graph and product papers BCG matrix

Rationale: Students would be expected to know the product life-cycle and the BCG matrix if part of the business community. By knowing these tools, students begin to see how different products fit into the marketing world and how marketing tools differ for every product.

Procedure: 1. Warm-up: Students should brain storm products that are new to the market, have been in the market a long time and are still prominent, and products that are leaving the market (5 minutes) 2. Write the stages of the product life-cycle on the board and briefly explain what the product life-cycle is. Have students write down all the stages and at least 3 products that fit into each category. Students can use the products they thought of in the warm-up to guide them in labeling products. (7 minutes) 3. Discuss each stage of the product life cycle and have students give examples of each stage. Question students as to why each product fits into that stage. See what products were mislabeled and determine why there were originally put into the wrong categories.(8 minutes) 4. Have students complete the first activity in pairs. Given a graph with the product life-cycle on it and 4 products, have students put each product on the graph in the correct place. (5 minutes) 5. Explain the BCG matrix and have students help give examples of each stage (5 minutes) 6. Have students place previous examples in BCG matrix in pairs (5 minutes) 7. Draw connections between product life-cycle and BCG matrix (5 minutes) 8. Exit-slip: Journal what the BCG matrix and the product life cycle have in common

Evaluation: 1. Unit Test 2. Warm-ups and exit-slips 3. Informal discussion of discussion

Dr. Pepper 10 IPad 2 Silly Bandz Coke-Cola

Introduction to Marketing-Chapter 12-Developing New Products, J. Hendricks Lesson Topic: Service Marketing-Intangible, Inseparable, Perishable, and Variable Lesson 3

Lesson Objectives: The student will 1. 2. 3. 4. Determine why products and services are inseparable Know the difference between products and services Show why services are variable Know why services are perishable and how this impacts them

Curriculum Standards Alignment: NBEA Marketing VI-The marketing plan

Prerequisites: None

Materials and Equipment:    Elmo Services Graphic Organizer Journals

Rationale: Services are a huge part of the business community. Students would be expected to know how to market a service industry as well as a product industry if entering the business market. Knowing how and why services are different than products are vital for determining the different ways to market. Procedure:

1. Warm-up: Talk in partners about some industries that are based on services. What makes them different than markets that are based on products? What are some markets that combine both products and services? Are there different ways to market services than products? (5 minutes) 2. In class discussion-What makes a service different than a product? Lead students to discovering inseparable, intangible, perishable, and variable.(10 minutes) 3. Have students work in groups to fill out graphic organizer given about services. Students should have why the factors making services different than products are important, definitions of what they are, and what difference this may make in marketing. (10 minutes) 4. Full class discussion wrapping up what students had been talking about. Cover key points that students need to have written down about each difference. (10 minutes) 5. Exit Slip-Students should hand draw the product life-cycle and label each section, put a product in each cycle, and tell why it is in that stage. This serves a check of yesterday’s lesson and shows what needs to be retaught or what students do not understand. Make sure students know this is not a quiz, it is for feedback only. (5 minutes) Evaluation: 1. Unit Test 2. Full class discussion 3. Warm-up and exit-slips

Core Differences between Services and Goods
Fill out the graphic organizer below with the key difference between services and products and tell why they are important, the definition, and what difference they make in marketing.

Introduction to Marketing-Chapter 12-Developing New Products, J. Hendricks Lesson Topic: The Gaps Model Two Day Lesson Plan Lesson 4

Lesson Objectives: The student will 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Understand the different levels of the Gaps model Determine why each level is important when developing a marketing plan Know the building blocks of service quality Know the methods to reduce delivery gaps Understand ways for service recovery

Curriculum Standards Alignment: NBEA Marketing VI-The marketing plan

Prerequisites: None

Materials and Equipment:     Elmo Journals Gaps Model Worksheet Building blocks and reducing delivery gaps worksheet

Rationale: Marketers would be expected to know ways to provide great service for customers. The Gaps model was created to help make service excellent and show companies where they are coming up short. It is important for service companies to give great service because the service they give is, in a way, marketing for the company. By

knowing the Gaps model and procedures for service recovery, companies can be the best possible. Procedure: 1. Warm-up: Have student’s journal the four major differences between services and products and why these are important to know as marketers. (5 minutes) 2. Present the gaps model stages to students on board. In groups have student’s brain storm how and why these gaps occur. (10 minutes) 3. Hand out worksheet to students to fill in with the gaps model as it is filled out on Elmo. (5 minutes) 4. In class discussion about how what the students came up with is similar or different from the gaps model is. Why did these differences occur? (12 minutes) 5. Describe the building blocks of service quality. Have students look up definitions in book and discuss what each ones means for service industries. Fill in top half of worksheet for the building blocks of service quality. (15 minutes) 6. Have students discuss what could reduce delivery gaps. Put ideas on board. Tell students the three main methods to reduce delivery gaps. Talk about the reason these three are important. Have students fill in second half of worksheet. ( 13 minutes) 7. Full class discussion, how does this all tie together? Why is the gaps model important for marketers? What role as a marketer would you have in filling these gaps? (15 minutes) 8. Exit Slip: What do you still have questions about to concerning services and marketing? (5 minutes) Evaluation: 1. Unit Test 2. Exit slips 3. Discussion, informal

Gaps model for Improving Service Directions: Fill out the model with the Gaps model for improving service

Building Blocks of Service Quality
Fill out the graph with the building blocks of service quality from the book. Make sure to give a short description of what each one means.

Methods to Reduce Delivery Gaps
Fill out the organizer with the methods to reduce delivery gaps. Give an example of why each one is important.

Introduction to Marketing-Chapter 10-Product, Branding, and Packaging Decisions, J. Hendricks Lesson Topic: Product Assortment, Line Decisions, and Packaging Lesson 5

Lesson Objectives: The student will: 1. Know key definitions 2. Understand how to change product mix breadth, product assortment depth, and product line decisions for services 3. Know the difference between primary and secondary packaging and how they affect the product marketing 4. Gain knowledge on product labeling

Curriculum Standards Alignment: NBEA Marketing VI-The marketing plan

Prerequisites: None

Materials and Equipment:    Class Journals Definition worksheet Products with primary and secondary packaging

Rationale: Product assortment, line decisions, and packaging are all big parts of how a product markets itself in the store. Marketers are required to have knowledge how these affect the products sales.

Procedure: 1. Warm-up: Discussion about exit slips from previous day concerning what students are not understanding about services (5 minutes) 2. Hand out students outlines for definitions. Have students work in pairs to find the definition from the book. (10 minutes) 3. In class discussion about how to change product mix breadth, product assortment depth, and product line decisions. Have students take notes on the back of their definition sheet. (10 minutes) 4. Bring in different products with various primary and secondary packaging. Go through and talk about how the packaging affects the products. Talk about how the labels on the packaging affect the product. The products serve as a visual for the students so they can make connections to the definitions and actual packaging. (15 minutes) 5. Exit Slip: Students should write down 5 identifiable brands that they know and why these are the first that come to mind (5 minutes) Evaluation: 1. Unit Test 2. Students Discussions 3. Participation in activity

Definitions Chapter 10 Fill out the definitions from the book Product Assortment-

Product lines-

Product Category-

Brands-

Depth-

Stock-Keeping Units-

Category Depth-

Primary Package-

Secondary Package-

Key Definitions Chapter 10 Fill out the definitions from the book Product Assortment-The complete set of all products offered by a firm.Also called product mix. Product lines- Groups of associated items that a consumer uses together or thinks of as part of a group. Product Category-An assortment of items that the customer sees as a reasonable substitute for one another Brands- Names, terms, designs, symbols, or any other features that identify one sellers good or service from another. Breadth- the number of product lines offered by the firm

Depth-the number of categories within a product line

Stock-Keeping Units- the smallest unit available for inventory control

Category Depth- the number of SKUs within a category

Primary Package- The packaging the consumer uses

Secondary Package- the wrapper or exterior carton that contains the primary package and provides the UPC label used by retail scanners

Introduction to Marketing-Chapter 10-Branding, J. Hendricks Lesson Topic: Branding Two Day Lesson Plan Lesson 6 Lesson Objectives: The student will: 1. Understand the value of branding 2. Know the importance of brand equity and what role it plays 3. Learn the variety of different branding strategies and how they work Curriculum Standards Alignment: NBEA Marketing VI-The marketing plan

Prerequisites: None

Materials and Equipment:    Class Journals Pictures of different brands Definitions of key terms

Rationale: As marketers, it will be important to know how the brand factors into the marketing scheme. Being able to identify why branding is important and different branding strategies is a key function of a marketer. Procedure: 1. Warm-up: Have student’s journal what questions they still have about the value creation unit. This will serve as a guide for a review before the test. (5 minutes)

2. In class discussion on why branding is important. What difference does it make for the customer? For the marketer? (15 minutes) 3. Have students start to create branding chart? Put all the different ways brands create value. (10 minutes) 4. Define Brand Equity. Have students add to their chart the different ways we evaluate brand equity. In threes, talk about the ways these different things help us to evaluate brands. (20 minutes) 5. Talk about different branding strategies. Add to branding chart students are creating. Students should talk about the ways these strategies are important to marketers. (20 minutes) 6. Bring up pictures of different major brands. Have students give ideas of the branding strategies these brands use. How are they successful or unsuccessful? (15 minutes) 7. Exit-slip: What are two things you learned today? What are two things you still have questions on? Evaluation:    Unit Test Exit-slip In class discussion

Comments: This is the only lesson in the unit that does not give the students a graphic organizer or note guide. As the students went through the unit, they saw different ways to set up note taking. Since this is the last lesson in the unit, I want students to work towards becoming proficient in being able to take their own notes and be responsible for their learning. Since they were previously guided through the note taking, by not providing a guide for this lesson, students can discover a way that works for themselves to take notes.

Unit 4 Test: Value Creation 60 points Name: __________________________________

Multiple Choice: Choose the best answer for the following questions. Each question is 2 points. 1. What is the difference between product depth and product breadth? a) Depth is the amount of product lines from a company, while breadth is the number of categories in a product line. b) Breadth is the amount of product lines from a company, while depth is the number of categories in a product line. c) Depth is the amount of different products offered by a company, while breadth is the variety of categories offered. d) Breadth is the amount of different products offered by a company, while depth is the variety of categories offered. 2. What are the five building blocks of service quality? a) b) c) d) Performance, willingness, caring, knowledge, and appearance Performance, responsiveness, assurance, caring, and knowledge Reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy, and tangibles Reliability, willingness, tangibles, appearance, and empathy

3. Name the four stages of the product life cycle. a) b) c) d) Introduction, growth, maturity, decline Start, increase, peak, end Introduction, increase, peak, decline Start, growth, maturity, end

4. Which category of purchasers in vital in the adoption of a product because a product can normally not be successful until this group buys them? a) b) c) d) Early adopters Early Majority Late Majority Laggards

5. What is the difference between primary and secondary packaging? a) b) c) d) Primary is the one you see and you don’t see secondary Primary is the one consumers use while secondary packaging is never used Primary is the outside carton and secondary is the inside carton Primary is the one consumers use and secondary is the wrapper that contains the UPC label

6. What is brand extension? a) Making a new product for a different market using the same brand b) Making a new product for the same market with the same brand c) Using an old product and targeting towards a different market using the same brand d) Using a new product with the same brand and targeting a different market 7. What are the methods to reduce delivery gaps? a) b) c) d) Delegating, using technology, and encouraging employees Empowering, delegating, and encouraging employees Empowering, provide support and incentives, and using technology Provide support and incentives, encouraging, and delegating

8. What are the four elements of the GAP Model? a) b) c) d) Knowledge, standards, delivery, and communication Knowledge, standards, expectations, and promises Expectations, promises, delivery, and communication Knowledge, standards, promises, and communication

9. What is a way to get service recovery? a) b) c) d) Talk at them Take a long time Ignore them Listen to them

10. What does is mean for a service to be perishable? a) b) c) d) They cannot be stored for future use They expire They go away We have to throw them away

True False: Answer true of false for each question. 2 points each ___11. One of the core differences between services and goods is that services cannot be marketed. ___12. Innovators are normally the first ones to buy a product. ___13. Yogurt is currently in the growth stage of the product life cycle. ___14. The knowledge gap is the difference between the actual service provided and the firms service standards. ___15. Finding a fair solution is one way to gain service recovery. ___16. The BCG matrix consists of question marks, stars, cash cows, and dogs.

Fill in the blank: Fill in the blank with the best option. 2 points each. 17. Core difference between services and goods are they are inseparable, intangible, ______________, and _______________. 18. In the decline stage of the product life cycle sales and profits are ______________. 19. Laggards like to __________ change. 20. BCG stands for ________________ _________________ ___________________. 21. In the introduction phase sales and profits are ______________.

Essay: Write and explain each stage of the product development process. 18 points

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