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Promotion of Employment Through

Training – PETT Project

REPORT ON THE ORGANIZATIONAL
CAPACITY ASSESSMENT OF THE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION PUNTLAND,
IBTVET CENTRES AND LOCAL
IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS

Puntland; April 2006

Report Submitted by:
Acacia Consultants Ltd.
P.O. Box 340, Sarit Centre
00606 Westlands, Nairobi, Kenya
Tel/fax: 3742855 Tel: 3746655 / 3747867
Mobile: 0733 780900 / 0722 203 444
Email: admin@acaciaconsultants.org

This Project is Funded by
the European Union
TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF ANNEXES ................................................................................................................................................... iii

FOREWORD................................................................................................................................ IV

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................................................................. V

LIST OF ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................................vi

1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................vi

2.0 Methodology and Approach ....................................................................................................................................1
2.2 Approach .................................................................................................................................................................1
3.0 Findings..................................................................................................................................................................1

3.1 CAPACITY ASSESSMENT OF MINISTRY OF EDUCATION OF PUNTLAND STATE ..............................1
3.1.1 An Overview of the Education Policy Framework...............................................................................................1
3.1.2 Technical and Vocation Education and Training and the Puntland Policy Paper.................................................4
3.1.3 Interview with key informant - the Minister for Education ..................................................................................5
3.1.4 Recommendations ................................................................................................................................................5
3.1.5 Capacity Assessment of Key Ministry of Education Departments .......................................................................5

3.2 CAPACITY ASSESSMENT OF PUNTLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE (PCC) .....................................10
3.2.1. Introduction .......................................................................................................................................................10
3.2.2 Governance.........................................................................................................................................................10
3.2.3 Resources............................................................................................................................................................11
3.2.4 Management Systems and Procedures................................................................................................................11
3.2.5 Program Performance .........................................................................................................................................12
3.2.6 External Relations...............................................................................................................................................12
3.2.7 Recommendations ..............................................................................................................................................13
3.3 CAPACITY ASSESSMENT OF GALKAYO EDUCATION CENTRE FOR PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT ...14
3.3.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................14
3.3.2 Governance.........................................................................................................................................................14
3.3.3 Resources............................................................................................................................................................15
3.3.4 Management Systems and Procedures................................................................................................................15
3.3.5 Program Performance .........................................................................................................................................16
3.3.6 External Relations...............................................................................................................................................17
3.3.7 Recommendations ..............................................................................................................................................17

3.4 CAPACITY ASSESSMENT OF SOMALI INSTITUTE FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (SIBA) .........18
3.4.1 Introduction: .......................................................................................................................................................18
3.4.2 Governance.........................................................................................................................................................18
3.4.3 Resources............................................................................................................................................................18
3.4.4 Management Systems and Procedures................................................................................................................19
3.4.5 Programme Performance ....................................................................................................................................19
3.4.6 External Relations...............................................................................................................................................19
3.4.7 Recommendations ..............................................................................................................................................19

3.5 CAPACITY ASSESSMENT OF SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES AND SERVICES ....................20
3.5.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................20
3.5.2 Governance.........................................................................................................................................................20
3.5.3 Resources............................................................................................................................................................20

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3.5.4 Management Systems and Procedures................................................................................................................20
3.5.5 Programme Performance ....................................................................................................................................20
3.5.6 External Relations...............................................................................................................................................21
3.5.7 Recommendations ..............................................................................................................................................21

3.6 ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY ASSESSMENT OF GALKAYO VTC ................................................21
3.6.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................21
3.6.2 Governance.........................................................................................................................................................21
3.6.3 Resources............................................................................................................................................................21
3.6.4 Management Systems and Procedures................................................................................................................22
3.6.5 Programme Performance ....................................................................................................................................22
3.6.6 External Relations...............................................................................................................................................22
3.6.7 Recommendations ..............................................................................................................................................22
3.7 Partners’ Training Plan ..........................................................................................................................................23

LIST OF ANNEXES
ANNEX 1: LIST OF PEOPLE CONSULTED 25
ANNEX 2: OPERATIONAL RATINGS FOR PCC AND GALKAYO VTC 26
ANNEX 3: OPERATIONAL RATINGS FOR GECPD, SPSS AND EPA /SIBA 35

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FOREWORD
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Quality technical and vocational education and training (TVET) helps to develop the individual’s
knowledge of science and technology in a broad occupational area requiring technical and
professional competencies and specific occupational skills. National TVET systems therefore
need to develop the knowledge and skills that will help the workforce become more flexible and
responsive to the needs of local labour markets, while competing in the global economy. Some
countries have introduced TVET reforms that endeavour to integrate work-place-based learning
and training into the vocational education curriculum. TVET systems must also be open and all
inclusive to give even the most underprivileged access to learning and training. The opportunity
for people in urban and rural communities to equip themselves to lead productive and satisfying
lives will undoubtedly be critical to the prosperity and well-being of the community.

In a time of continuous economic, social, and technological change, skills and knowledge
become quickly out dated.. People who have not been able to benefit from formal education and
training must be given an opportunity to acquire new skills and knowledge to enhance their
quality of life. Providing individuals with learning opportunities throughout their lives is an
ambitious but necessary undertaking. An all-inclusive lifelong learning system calls for the
mobilization of increased public and private resources for education and training and for
providing individuals and enterprises with the incentives to invest in meeting their learning and
skills development needs. [A joint message from UNESCO and ILO 2002]

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Save the Children Denmark SCD is leading a consortium consisting of CARE, SCD in
Somaliland, Gothenburg Institute (GI) and Diakonia Sweden (DS) that is implementing the
Promotion of Employment through Training (PETT) Project in Somaliland and in Puntland.
The overall objective of PETT Project is to sustainably improve the livelihood and employment
opportunities of the disadvantaged youth and women in both Somaliland and Puntland. The
project contributes to their vulnerability reduction by providing the Technical and Vocational
Education and Training (TVET).

Specifically, the project uses vocational training centres managed by selected local
implementing partners to provide quality training and opportunities through Institution Based
Technical Vocational Education and Training (IBTEVET) and Enterprise Based Technical
Vocational Education and Training (EBTVET) by attaching trainees to identified potential
enterprises in the main towns of Somaliland and Puntland..The project emphasizes on job
placement services and provision of information on employment and local economic
development (LED) opportunities. Its overall goal is to enhance the capacity of the local
implementing partners through technical assistance and capacity building workshops.

SC Denmark has commissioned an organizational capacity assessment (OCA) to review and
identify capacity gaps in the Ministry of Education, IBTVET centres and local implementing
partners. The assessment was carried out in March and April, 2006 by Acacia Consultants
Limited (ACL). The objective of the assessment was to identify areas of weaknesses in the
IBTVET program, identify capacity gaps and recommend an appropriate capacity building
training for the identified gaps. The assessment approaches included the following; i) review
meetings and consultation fora with PETT project staff of the consortium, ii) interviews with the
Ministry of Education (Minister for Education, Director of Non-formal Education; Chairman of the
Puntland Examinations Board (PEB),); iii) desk reviews of documents related to the project such
as the PETT feasibility study (2004); the Puntland Education Policy Paper ( PEPP Draft 3,
2004), various PETT project reports, organizational profiles; constitutions and other internal
documents of the centres, and iv) site visit to local implementing agencies and the Ministry of
Education in Puntland, IBTVET centres, and partner LNGOs in Garowe, Galkayo, Gardo
Bosaso.

The following were identified as the key players and stakeholders in the provision of TVET: the
ministry of education, the directorate of non-formal education, the Puntland examination board,
Puntland Examination Board and Curriculum Development Department. Other are:; Puntland
Community College (PCC), Vocational Training Centre (VTC), School of Professional Studies
and Series (SPSS), Somali Institute for Business Administration (SIBA) and Galkayo vocational
center.

The assessment reviewed different aspects of capacity including governance, resources use
and management, management systems, programme performance, and other external factors
affecting the project.. Based on the self-rating and interviews, both formal and informal, and
observations by the consultant; recommendations have been made on the capacity building
required for each stakeholder. The findings, conclusions and recommendation include areas of
capacity building and training for consideration by SCD in order to address the capacity gaps of
the PETT project-implementing partners.

The assessment has found that Putland has no standardized curriculum or syllabi for TVET..
There is also no standardized system for TVET assessment, examination and certification that

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has been or is being developed by the Ministry of Education (MoE) as proposed by PEPP. The
only standardized curriculum available but not being used in most of the TVET centres visited
during the OCA is the UNESCO PEER. It is therefore imperative the development partners, the
consortium, urgently put in place a program to harmonize the existing curricula if the intended
benefits from TVET program has to be realized. There is also a need for PEET Project to focus
on provision of human and financial resources to support local institutions to run training
programs efficiently and cost effectively.

Overall, TVET Program in Puntland is found to be appropriate and relevant alternative to formal
education in the face of the prevailing socio-economic and political realities. However
consortium must address the question of sustainability either directly or indirectly by putting in
place management structure that provides for continuity and stable management. Some of the
critical components of this sustainability would include the training of adequate human resource
and initiation of a cost recovery program that would guarantee financial stability among the
providers of TVET program, particularly the institutions that offer the various TVET programs
activities. Section 3.7 of the report makes recommendations on the areas of training for
implementing partners

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LIST OF ACRONYMS
BoD Board of Directors
CBOs Community Based Organizations
CD-ROM Read Only Memory- Compact Disc
CEDAW Convention on Elimination of all forms of Discrimination against Women
CIDA Canadian International Development Agency
CSOs Civil Society Organizations
DANIDA Danish International Development Agency
DFID Department for International Development
DRDD Directorate of Reintegration, De-mining and Demobilization
DS Diakonia Sweden
EBTVET Education based technical education and training
EMIS Educational Management Information System
EPA Ecological Preservation Association
GECPD Galkago Education Centre for Peace Development
GI Gotenborg Initiative
GSM Garone School of Management
HR Human Resource
IBTVET Institution based Technical Vocational Education and Training
IGA Income Generating Activity
IGAs Income Generating Activists
ILO International Labour Organization
LED Local Economic Development
LNGOs Local Non Governmental Organizations
M&E Monitoring and Evaluation
MoE Ministry of education
MOU Memorandum of Understanding
NFE Non- Formal Education
NGOs Non Governmental Organizations
NSA Non-State Actors
OCA Organizational capacity Assessment
PCC Puntland Community College
PEB Puntland Examinations Board
PEPP Puntland Education Policy Paper
PETT Promotion of Employment through Training
PHRN Peace and Human Rights Network
PREC Puntland Regional Examinations Council
RMSN Rescue Management Somali Network
SCD Save children Denmark
SIBA Somali Institute for Business Administration
SIHA Strategic Initiatives for Horn of Africa
SPSS School of Professional Studies and Series
TOT Trainer of Trainers
TVE Technical and Vocational Education
TVET Technical Vocational Education and Training
UN United Nations
UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
UNICEF United Nations Children Education Fund
USIU United States International University
VTCs Vocational Training Centre
1.0 Introduction

Save the Children Denmark SCD, in Somalia is currently conducting Promotion of
Employment through Training (PETT) Project as a lead agency of a consortium consisting
of CARE, SCD in Somaliland, Gothenburg Institute (GI) and Diakonia Sweden (DS) in
Puntland.

The overall objective of PETT Project is to sustainably improve the livelihood and
employment opportunities of the disadvantaged youth and women in both Somaliland and
Puntland thus contributing to reduce their vulnerability through provision of Technical and
Vocational Education and Training (TVET). Specifically, the project uses vocational
training centres of selected local implementing partners to provide access to quality
training and opportunities through Institution Based Technical Vocational Education and
Training (IBTEVET) and Enterprise Based Technical Vocational Education and Training
(EBTVET) by attaching trainees to identified potential enterprises in the main towns of
Somaliland and Puntland.

The PETT project also emphasizes on job placement services and availability of
information on employment and local economic development (LED) opportunities in
conjunction with TVET activities. Its aims enhancing the capacity of the local implementing
partners by providing technical assistance and capacity building workshops.

ACL consultancy carried out the assessment of project activities, identified capacity gaps
in the Ministry of Education, IBTVET centres and local implementing partners and
provided recommendations on the way forward .

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2.0 Methodology and Approach

2.1 Objectives of the Capacity Assessment
The main task, as stated by the implementing agency, was to carry out a capacity
assessment of the IBTVET centres and their implementing agencies, and the Ministry of
Education in Puntland State of Somalia. The objective of the assessment was to identify
areas of weaknesses in the IBTVET program, identify capacity gaps and recommend an
appropriate capacity building training program.

The information gathered from the assessment was to be used by the contracting
agency to:
ƒ Assist the ministry of education in Puntland in reviewing TVET policy guidelines
ƒ Support the development and implementation of an effective cost recovery,
finance and management program for TVET centres
ƒ Develop capacity building training for LNGOs that run the TVET centres.

2.2 Approach

The approaches utilized in assessing the capacity included:
ƒ Consultation with PETT project staff in Save the Children Denmark (the Lead
Agency of the Consortium); Diakonia –Sweden and Gotenborg Initiative, both of
which are the Consortium implementing agencies in Puntland.
ƒ Interviews with the Minister for Education, Director of Non-formal Education,
Chairman of the Puntland Examinations Board (PEB) to generate information on
the capacity and related gaps of the MoE and its key departments especially in
TVET.
ƒ Desk review of documents related to the project such as the PETT feasibility
study (2004), the Puntland Education Policy Paper ( PEPP Draft 3, 2004),
various PETT project reports, Organizational profiles, Constitutions and other
internal documents of the centres and local implementing agencies relevant to
aspects of OCA.
ƒ Visits to the Ministry of Education in Puntland, IBTVET centres, and partner
LNGOs in Garowe, Galkayo, Gardo Bosaso to carry out the organization capacity
assessment (OCA) relevant to the areas mentioned in the problem statement. A
standard OCA tool was administered to each of the centres in Puntland. Details
on the ratings are annexed.
ƒ Based on the self-rating and interviews, both formal and informal, and
observations by the consultant; recommendations were made on the capacity
building for each of the stakeholders. The recommended areas of capacity
building include the training that SCD may consider developing to address the
capacity gaps of the PETT project implementing partners.

3.0 Findings

3.1 Capacity Assessment of Ministry of Education of Puntland State

3.1.1 An Overview of the Education Policy Framework

The Puntland Education Policy Paper (PEPP) ‘recognizes non-formal and technical and
vocational education as integral parts of the Puntland Education System.’ TVET falls
under Non-formal Education which the PEPP defines as A broad set of learning

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opportunities that are offered to young persons and adults. These include vocational
skills training, adult literacy, community health education and agricultural extension
activities. Technical/Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in the Puntland State of
Somalia. It is designed to contribute to occupational proficiency through the inculcation
of appropriate skills and training in the development and application of indigenous
technology. The PEP program also responds to the basic occupational needs of its
recipients.

a) Structure of Technical/Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

It is envisaged that Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in the
Puntland State will be offered for both the primary and secondary school graduates.

b) The Objectives of TVET

There are three interrelated objectives of TVET, namely:
• To provide training opportunities for school leavers to enable them to become self
supporting and useful citizens.
• To provide a technical/vocational education and training that is relevant to the
industrial, commercial and economic needs of Puntland.
• To reduce disparities through increased training opportunities for women, the
handicapped and learners from disadvantaged communities.

c) Policy direction

The PEPP identifies the key areas of priority as enhancement of access of and Equity in
technical vocational education and Training and sets two time-bound targets to achieve
this:
▬ To improve the participation of primary and secondary school leavers in technical
and vocational institutions to at least 30% of the total post-secondary enrolment by
2014.
▬ To improve the participation of female school leavers to at least 50% of the total
TVET enrolment by 2014.

d) Strategies

To enhance access and equity in general and to meet the set targets the Government
has planned to:
• Encourage increased enrolments in existing vocational centres and training
institutions.
• Upgrade and expand some of the existing TVET training institutes to offer courses for
crafts, technicians and technologists.
• Develop a framework that will attract and support the participation of the private sector
in the provision of TVET programmes.

e) Gender Specific Strategies

Gender balance in TVET program in the Puntland State has received adequate attention
in the policy framework. Planned strategies and activities include:
• Provision of better facilities for the teaching and learning of science subjects and
mathematics in primary and secondary schools.

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• Provision of adequate opportunities for girls to identify with women who are role
models in science, mathematics and technology-based careers.
• Provision of sponsorships for needy girls in science, mathematics and technology
careers.
• Encouragement of girls to develop interest in science and mathematics while in
school.
• Encouraging women entering TVET institutions to take up courses outside the
stereotypically feminine courses such as art and business/commerce based courses.
• Application of affirmative action policies for enrolment in TVET institutions for female
students.
• Provision of bridging courses in mathematics and science subjects for secondary
and primary school leavers to enable women with a weak academic background to
catch up with the more educated students.
• Encouraging employers to introduce attractive terms and conditions of service for
TVET graduates as one way of promoting and sustaining the gains of expanded
access in TVET.
• Establishment of programme of sponsorships/bursaries for TVET trainees, especially
women and learners from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, will also be
embarked upon.
• Establishment of gender responsive guidance and counselling units in TVET
institutions to promote retention of learners.

f) Sub-sectoral Plans

There are several positive policy intentions for TVET in Puntland. The challenge is
obviously the actualization of the ambitious policy pronouncements including:

• The development and constant review of TVET curriculum to improve TVET quality
and relevance.
• Putting in place measures for the establishment of standards and performance
evaluation mechanisms for TVET graduates by the MoE.
• Ensuring that TVET institutions are adequately staffed with qualified instructors.
• The development of a strategic plan for TVET teacher education and development.
• Establishment of a technical teacher training college
• Putting in place attractive pay packages and related terms and conditions of service
for TVET instructors.
• Establishment of instructional resource centres to overcome the problem of lack of
professional commitment in TVET institutions occasioned by the scarcity of
teaching/learning materials and equipment.
• The production of low cost appropriate technology learning/teaching materials as
well as gender sensitive technical teaching and learning materials that take into
account both women’s and men’s indigenous knowledge and expertise.
• Streamlining and standardization TVET institutions
• Establishment of a TVET unit within the MoE to deal with issues related to
standardization, quality assurance, assessment, evaluation, equivalence and
certification.
• Establishment of an Education Management Information System (EMIS) to generate
gender analytical information and sex desegregated data related to student
enrolment, staffing, course offerings, status of facilities and linkages within the labour
market.

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• Development of evaluation models that will incorporate testing of skills related to the
world of work.
• Establishment of measures for assessment and certification of learning for all levels
of technical education.
• The construction and equipping of vocational training centres in key locations and
towns with a view to increasing the quality, relevance and functionality of their
offerings.

3.1.2 Technical and Vocation Education and Training and the Puntland Policy
Paper

a) The Concepts

a) The Concepts
According to UNESCO’s Convention on Technical and Vocational Education, TVET
"... refers to all forms and levels of the education process involving, in addition to general
knowledge, the study of technologies and related sciences and the acquisition of
practical skills, know-how, attitudes and understanding relating to occupations in the
various sectors of economic and social life".
It can be provided "... in educational institutions or through co-operative programmes
organised jointly by educational institutions, on the one hand, and industrial, agricultural,
commercial or any other undertaking related to the world of work, on the other"

In the revised UNESCO recommendation on technical and vocational education, TVET
is understood to be:
a) An integral part of general education;
b) (b) A means of preparing for occupational fields and for effective participation in
the world of work;
c) (c) An aspect of lifelong learning and a preparation for responsible citizenship;
(d) An instrument for promoting environmentally sound sustainable development
d) A method of facilitating poverty alleviation (UNESCO, 2001).

Technical and Vocational Education should be designed that it:
(a) Is an integral part of everyone’s basic general education in the form of initiation to technology, the world of work,
and human values and standards for responsible citizenship;
(b) May be freely and positively chosen as the means by which people develop talents, interests and skills leading to an
occupation in various sectors or to further education;
(c) Allows access to other aspects and areas of education at all levels, including institutions of higher learning, by being
grounded in a solid general education and, as a result of the integration mentioned in paragraph 6(a), containing a general
education component through all stages of specialization;
(d) Allows transfers from one field to another within technical and vocational education;
(e) Is readily available to all and for all appropriate types of specialization, within and outside formal education systems,
and in conjunction or in parallel with training in order to permit educational, career and job mobility at the minimum age
at which the general basic education is considered to have been acquired, according to the education system in force in
each country;
(f) Is available on the above terms and on a basis of equality to women as well as men, and where the learning and
working environment is made suitable for the participation of girls and women by removing overt and covert bias and
discrimination and seeking strategies for motivating girls and women to take an interest in vocational and technical
education;
(g) Is available to people with disabilities and to socially and economically disadvantaged groups such as immigrants,
refugees, minorities (including indigenous peoples), demobilized soldiers in post-conflict situations, and underprivileged
and marginalized youth in special forms adapted to their needs in order to integrate them more easily into society
nd
(UNESCO,2 . November 2001)

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3.1.3 Interview with key informant - the Minister for Education

The facilitator held a discussion with, Mr. Ahmed Saed NOOR, the Minister of Education
of the Puntland State of Somalia on 26th March. The Minister raised the following
concerns:
• The flow of information on the implementation PETT project and the Ministry is
inadequate
• The disharmony between the priorities of the donor agencies and those of the
MoE. The Ministry’s priority was to have functional government TVET centres
and provide long term support as opposed to short term interventions.
• The cost of running technical institutes is beyond what the Ministry is able to
provide and therefore unsustainable in the long run..
• There is no approved curriculum despite the implementation of that the PETT
IBTVET..
• The PETT project implementation is behind schedule.
• The consortium agencies are ignoring institutional capacity building need for MoE
The lack of support to the Ministry will have an implication on the future
performance and sustainability of PETT programs.

3.1.4 Recommendations

The Minister of Education recommends the following:

• Priority be given to fast tracking the design and syllabi development for TVET
• Provide institutional capacity to MoE to enhance capacity to coordinate NFE and
avoid overlapping and duplication by NGOs and other private service providers.
• Harmonization and standardization of NFE curriculum and programmes to scale up
their impact and effectiveness.
• Assist the MoE to develop a policy and strategy for NFE, including TVET.
• Rationalize PETT project activities and budget to what can reasonably be achieved
• Delegate the implementation and responsibility to the implementing partners
• The Program Manager should visit Puntland.

3.1.5 Capacity Assessment of Key Ministry of Education Departments

In this subsection we present an organizational capacity assessment of the Directorate
of Non-formal Education and the Puntland Examination Board (PEB). The capacity
assessment was based on interviews held with the relevant Government officials and an
observation of the physical infrastructure of the MoE.

a) The Director General’s Office

i) Capacity

The Director General’s Office is largely limited in capacity to steer the Ministry of
Education effectively, especially in the area of TVET.

• The Directorate has an acute shortage of staff;
• None of the directors has a technical or vocational academic background making it
difficult for the office to give the necessary expert mentoring and policy direction
• There is an acute shortage of basic materials and equipment
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• There is enormous good will for TVET that can be exploited in putting in place
systems.
• The human, financial and physical resource capacity of the directorate are
inadequate.

i) Recommendations
• Extension of the project duration to make MoE develop capacity to start and run the
TVET programmes and to enhance sustainability. A longer project time frame can
give room for more realistic planning in the Directorate given that the TVET structure
is currently non-existent in the Directorate.
• Support the institutional and technical capacity of the MoE in Puntland. The support
should be extended to the development of the policy frameworks, structures and staff
to implement the same..
• Support the MoE to establish am school by rehabilitating and equipping one
government technical institute in the regional towns. The six technical schools,
which were built by the IDB in Garowe, Qardo, Bossaso, Galkayo, Burtinle and
Abudwak, are potential candidates for consideration.
• The three vocational training centres (in Bossaso, Galkayo and Garowe) which were
equipped and reportedly operated briefly with Kuwait government funding before
closing and in which the Puntland State authorities have expressed interest in
developing for the provision of TVET to promote employment, should be made use of
in piloting the re-establishment of government VTCs.
• Support the MoE to develop a curriculum for Technical and Professional Training.
The existing UNESCO PEER curriculum could serve as a guide in technical skill
upgrading. The curriculum should cater for craft and technician level training as
visualized under PEPP.
• Support the provision and distribution of teaching/learning materials in all the skill
areas.

b) The Non – Formal Education Department

“We have no curriculum, no examination, and no certification in place. Though there is a
curriculum developed by UNESCO nobody is using it!” (Safia Sugulle, Director NFE
Puntland, Personal Interview 26th March 2006)

i) Structure and Functions

The Non-Formal Education department is one of the five departments under the MoE of
the Puntland State of Somalia. The other four are Formal Education, Administration,
Planning and Statistics and Examinations, Certification and Curriculum development.
The NFE department has two sections, NFE Section (that deals with basic literacy, and
promotion of adult education) and TVET section (with IBTVET and EBTVET as the
components). The department has 12 stated responsibilities out of which two focus on
TVE. These are:
• Establishing and strengthening TVET
• Encouraging girls who dropout of school to participate in TVET sectors (IBTVET
and EBTVET).
It is evident that the department recognizes its role to include TVET but this has not
been clearly conceptualized. The departmental operational plan, First Year Operational
Plan, 2005-2006, did not have any specific activities targeting TVET.

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ii) NFE (TVET) Policy

The PEPP has a section that details the TVET policy direction, objectives, targets on
access and equity, measures and strategies for improving female access and
participation in TVET. The policy was however not yet implemented by the department
due to its limited capacity.

iii) TVET Curriculum

Presently there is no standardized and agreed curriculum or syllabus for TVET in
Puntland. There is also no standardized system for TVET assessment, examination and
certification that has been or is being developed by the MoE as proposed by PEPP.

The only standardized curriculum available but was not being used is UNESCO PEER..
Syllabus developed for basic level training in 12 subjects or courses including:
• Garment making,
• Masonry,
• Carpentry and joinery,
• Metal fabrication,
• Electrical installation,
• Entrepreneurship (as part of all first five syllabi)
• Agriculture,
• Plumbing,
• Hospitality services,
• Computer studies,
• Secretarial studies
• Accounting

iv) Constraints

The NFE department indicated that the following were the constraints facing it:
• Lack of furniture and equipment
• Inability to meet office running costs
• Lack of adequate and professionally qualified human resource for the sections of
the department. Currently the department has only one professional staff who is
also the director.
• Lack of NFE Staff in the regions and districts.
• Lack of data and information on NFE activities in the regions and districts

v) Recommendations

• Urgent support is needed in building the capacity of NFE department to establish
a TVET unit under a deputy director. The person in charge of the unit should
have the relevant academic and professional background in TVET. Development
partners could consider extending this technical assistance by supporting the
Government in meeting the costs of such an office for such a period of time that
the unit will be fully functional.
• To determine the current TVE needs and status in the various regions of
Puntland, the NFE department should carry out a countrywide community needs
assessment. Such a need assessment will ensure that the TVE programmes are
relevant and responsive to the current developmental priorities in the State.

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• There is need for exchange visits to other communities and countries to make
the local opinion leaders and stakeholders in TVE generally learn and share
experiences in this area.
• There is an urgent need to have standardised and agreed curricula/syllabi,
assessment, and examination system for TVET.
• There is an acute shortage of TVE instructors. Training programmes should be
mounted in all skill areas. There is also a need to retrain existing instructors since
their skills may have become obsolete due to the fast changing technological
advances or dis-use due to long period of time most of them have been out of
practice or practicing in less challenging training environments.
• Granted, most instructors are elderly, here is a general generation gap that
needs to be urgently bridged for continuity in TVET in Puntland.
• New instructors should be recruited
• The NFE department needs to be equipped adequately. It lacks adequate office
space and equipment like computers, printers and even furniture.
• The policy on TVE needs to be reviewed and entrenched within other efforts
targeting the strengthening of the education sector in Puntland. For instance
whereas innovative programmes are in place to teacher training like the
DIAKONIA Sweden programme in Garowe (GTEC), the TVET teacher training is
not included.
• For long term sustainability of the TVE programme and even to give it the
necessary ideological and credibility status, the Government must be actively
involved in the provision of TVE. Support should be given to the Government to
revive the closed technical schools and VTCs.
• The NFE department should actively tap the potential financial, material and
technical resources in Diaspora to develop TVE programs in Puntland
• The education sector as a whole and NFE department in particular should be
supported to establish a database and put in place systems for collecting periodic
data on learners, teachers and teaching-learning infrastructure for effective
planning and programme implementation. An Education Management
Information System (EMIS) is therefore a sector-wide priority.
• Education officers at the Ministry Headquarters and regional level lack the
required management and supervisory skills. Capacity building programmes in
these aspects is essential for effective implementation of TVE in Puntland.
• The NFE director expressed desire to be trained in office management, record
keeping, financial management, management of TVE institutions, Monitoring and
Evaluation of education programmes and resource mobilization.
.
c) Puntland Examination Board and Curriculum Development Department

The Puntland Education Policy Paper provides for the establishment of a council,
Puntland Regional Examinations Council (PREC), that will take the lead in assessing
and monitoring educational achievement at the state, regional/district and school levels.

The key functions of PREC is to:
• Design and conduct valid and reliable state examinations for certification,
selection and placement purposes.
• Provide appropriate professional advice on all matters related to both internal
institutional and external assessment and examinations;
• Lead in overall monitoring of educational standards through research and
evaluation studies.

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• Provide overall leadership with regard to the establishment and management of
a qualification framework that will coordinate accreditation of institutions and
certificates offered outside the Puntland education system.

i) Capacity Gaps

Examinations and curriculum issues are currently under the Puntland Examination Board
and Curriculum Development Department.
• The department is relatively young and not fully functional due to resource
constraints
• The department is seriously understaffed and the technical and management
capacity of the Board is low. There is a general lack of skilled staff in critical
areas as setting, moderation, marking, processing and grading of examinations.
The current staff has only undergone short training of up to 3 months. The staff
had very limited information technology competencies.
• The centre is also poorly equipped- the only computer that the centre owns had
broken down; the storage facilities are inappropriate for sensitive matters such as
examinations and certificates.
• None of the Board members had an academic or professional background in
TVE leaving the ability of the board to handle the assessment, examination and
certification of TVET highly unlikely.

ii) Recommendations

• Review and implementation of the PEPP is the touchstone of a successful TVET
subsector in Puntland. Supporting the government to finalize and implement PEPP
should therefore be given high priority department..
• There is an urgent need to develop a TVET curriculum that will serve the needs of
Puntlanders. The UNESCO syllabi currently in existence could serve as a guide
though there is need to review them to enhance their relevance. The syllabi
developed should be comprehensive to cater for craft, technician and diploma levels.
New TVET trades such electronic/electrical installation, refrigeration; computer
maintenance/assembly etc should also be incorporated in the TVET curriculum..
The feasibility study and the EPS local survey information have an array of new skill
areas that are a priority for the community.
• Support MoE staff training, especially in upgrading of skills in curriculum design and
development, implementation, innovation and evaluation. The training should cover
all the fields of curriculum i.e. Formal Education and Non-formal education
(especially TVET).
• There is also need to offer TOT training to the current pool of trainers in curriculum
development so that cascade training can be adopted in training experts for the
country within prevailing time and resource constraints. Their training should involve
material development and vetting.
• Training of more examiners is also necessary, as only 18 such trainers currently
exist in Puntland.
• Support the establishment of a national textbook production unit. This will enable the
centre to publish textbooks and teacher guides for the primary, secondary and
technical education. Locally produced learning materials would be more cost
effective.
• The physical infrastructure of the centre should be expanded and adequate
equipment provided for it to function effectively. A modern multi-media unit with

9
offices, halls, seminar rooms, printing equipment, computers and printers are priority
needs for the department.
• Technical assistance is also needed to strengthen the centre to be able to carry out
its full mandate in curriculum development, assessment, examination and
certification.

3.2 Capacity Assessment of Puntland Community College (PCC)

3.2.1. Introduction

Puntland Community College is one of the programmes implemented by KAALO, Relief
and Development, a local non-governmental organization in the Puntland State of
Somalia. KAALO was established in 1991 just after the collapse of the central
government. PCC was transformed from Garowe School of Management (GSM), which
offered a one-year certificate programme in basic arithmetic, simple book keeping, office
practice, computer literacy, English communication skills and management courses.

3.2.2 Governance

a) Vision/Commitment
The mission of PCC is to “provide the best attainable, affordable, non-profit world
standard sustainable higher education for all Somalis”. This vision is clearly articulated
in the organizational profile and constitution. The vision, mission and goal are important
in the development of Puntland since PCC has been responding to the need to provide
skilled human resource necessary in the reconstruction efforts. PCC’S predecessor,
Garowe School of Management, was the first skills/professional training institute.

The rating of this component was very high (average – 5) though the vision was not
articulated in the profile but the mission statement and was clear. The mission
statement was also not fully shared and understood by staff, constituency and external
actors.

b) Governing Structure of PCC
The overall management of the organization is vested in a seven-member board of
directors. Two of the directors are founder members. Only one woman sits on the board.
The Board holds bi-annual meetings. The day- to-day running of the organization is done
by an executive director. The rating was fairly high (Average3.8). In the opinion of the
facilitator, the organization could still be strengthened by the establishment, through the
implementation of the new structure in which the General Assembly will be governing
body. The organization should consult on the composition of the proposed General
Assembly -as it was not clear on how it will be constituted. Aspects of the governing
structure of the organization that require significant improvement in good time are;
development of follow-up mechanisms to ensure that the executive body implements the
decisions taken by the overseeing bodies and a clear description of the various roles,
functions and duties in a written document and ensuring that this was by all the leaders
of PCC.

c) Leadership Style
Generally the leadership style of PCC is consultative and participatory. The organization
rated high in terms of actively encouraging collective decision-making processes, and
also in its involvement of its constituents in all program activities. The board of directors

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was inclusive- representatives of the relevant line ministry, civil society and the
community sit on the board. The high rating (average 4.7) reflects the practice.

(d) Legal Status
The rating was very high (Overall rating- 5). KALO Relief and Development was duly
registered by Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation an NGO “dedicated to
carrying out relief activities in Puntland State of Somalia, specifically in Nugal Region.”

3.2.3 Resources

The overall rating on resources was slightly above average (3.7) – PCC therefore needs
significant improvement in its human, financial and physical resources.

a) Human Resources

PCC rated all the aspects of its human resources as average or higher.

The organization employs permanent staff. Out of the 33 members of staff only 5 were
on contract. Most of the staff were professionally qualified and held a minimum
bachelors degree. PCC rated average in some aspects; internal and external skills and
capacity training of staff, including volunteers, level of staff motivation and ability to keep
its trained and competent staff. These aspects of human resources of PCC should be
targeted for improvement.

b) Financial Resources

The rating of financial resources was the lowest compared to physical and the human
resource aspects. The weakest aspect was that PCC was not generating any income
through sale of goods or services. Supporting IGAs would be useful not only in
increasing the financial base of the organization but also in ensuring sustainability. It
also rated low (rating was 2) its ability to consistently cover its core operational costs and
on the collection of membership fees, though the nature of KALO may not be applicable
to this dimension. Building PCC’s capacity to mobilize diverse resources is crucial.

c) Physical Resources.

This was rated equally high (Average 4). PCC has physical resources that are adequate
for its programmes.

3.2.4 Management Systems and Procedures

The management systems and procedures were rated barely above average (Average
Rating was 3.6). They therefore need significant improvement in good time.

a) Human Resource Management

PCC needs to maintain its effectiveness in ensuring that employees have a written,
signed contract and should be encouraged to complete the personnel policy that was
being developed with NOVIB’s support. It should have some improvement in segregation
of duties so that the few cases of overlap in members’ activities and duties are
eliminated. It will be important for PCC carry out regular and fair evaluation of staff
performance. Implementation of the proposed staff audit should be useful in this regard.

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Currently the only operational evaluation of staff is the evaluation of lecturers by
students.

b) Program Management

The organization was rated average on this aspect of management systems and
procedures (Average Rating, 3.3).

The organization had a strategic plan that could guide program implementation based on
strategic planning and operational medium term strategic plans. The five-year strategic
plan was developed by United States International University in Nairobi through the
support of UNDP. It was not clear whether the Plan was fully operational.

The organization was however rated high in being able to develop fundraising plans that
met the resource needs of planned activities. This rating should however be treated with
caution considering that PCC had rated itself low (Rating – 2) in terms of being
consistently able to cover its core functioning costs.

c) Financial Management

Financial management was rated at 4.1 (high).

PCC had a financial management manual, with well-defined and operational internal
controls and procedures and the finance and administration manager has been properly
trained to use the manual and put in place other financial management systems. The
basic financial control systems are in place, including procedures of approval, banking,
procurement etc.

The organization rated very high in the areas of timely and accurate reporting and
carrying out internal and external audits regularly thus enhancing transparency. This
could be attributed to the previous support PCC has received from development partners
such as Diakonia Sweden, NOVIB, UNDP, CARE international, UNICEF, UNESCO,
OCHA etc and through which its financial management capacity was built.

3.2.5 Program Performance

a) Technical Performance Aspects

With the self-rating score of 3.9 PCC still needs significant improvement in these aspects
within the pilot project period including development of an agreed and standardised TVE
curriculum.

b) Developmental Aspects

PCC is a community-based organization that targets relief and development issues that
are critical in the reconstruction phase of Somalia and as such its rating on this aspect
was expectedly above average (3.8). The weak component of this aspect is the lack of
an M&E system that evaluates the level of services and community ownership

3.2.6 External Relations

PCC rated high (average of 4.0) in this sub-category with good linkages with the
government and other local and international civil society organizations.
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a) General Communication Tools and Strategies

The rating was high (2.5) as well for communication tools and strategies. PCC was
developing its public relations manual and had state of the art technology which should
be further boosted by the planned intallation of VSAT for the organization by UNDP.
PCC has a website www.puntlandstateuniversity.com

b) Relationship with Constituents and Communities

This aspect was highly rated (average rating 4.0). It therefore needs some improvement
but not so urgently. The community was represented in the Board of Directors

c) Networking within the Local NGO Sector

Local networking capacity was rated high by PCC (Average- 4). PCC had very good
networks with local CBOs and NGOs. PCC is a member of the Volunteers for Local
Development and Non- State Actors (NSA). The networks and collaborations are around
issues of information sharing, capacity building and resource sharing and mobilization.

d) Developing Constructive Relationship with Civil Authorities

The organization rated itself above average as regards relationship with Civil Authorities
in the area of its jurisdiction. PCC implemented a one-month for Puntland Directorate of
Reintegration, De-mining and Demobilization (DRDD) employees, and in service training
for 18 employees of the Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation. The vice
minister of education was a member of the BoD.

e) Developing Collaborative Relationship with the International Community

This was also highly rated (Average Rating- 4.0). The organization has collaborated with
a number of international development partners such as Diakonia, UNICEF, UNHCR,
Diaspora, UNDP/USIU etc.

3.2.7 Recommendations

• There is an urgent need to develop an agreed and standardised PETT
curriculum
• PETT IBTVET institutions including PCC should diversify their course offerings.
At present all the PETT IBTVET trainees were offered one trade- office
management. There are many other traditional TVET trades that could be
mounted.
• Support for IGAs is needed not only in increasing the financial base of the
organization but also in ensuring sustainability. A production unit could be started
to market some of the goods that the tailoring and carpentry units should produce
for commercial purposes.
• Career guidance and mentoring should be started targeting girls so that they can
venture into trades that are currently regarded as masculine e.g. electronics and
fabrication.
• There was concern on the subsidy given for PETT trainees and PCC
recommended that the funding level be reviewed upwards

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• Mounting of an after training occupational program may be necessary to sharpen
the entrepreneurship skills learnt.
• Consider increasing the admission quota in institutions like PCC where the
number of applicants far exceeds the quota. There were 150 students meeting
the criteria against a quota of 50 trainees! Increasing the quota could be a way of
lowering the student costs of PETT project.

3.3 Capacity Assessment of Galkayo Education Centre for Peace and
Development

3.3.1 Introduction

Galkayo Education Centre for Peace and Development (GECPD) is primarily a Girls’ and
women’s centre in Galkayo town in Puntland State of Somalia. GECPD was established
in 1999. GECPD is a replica of the Juba Women Development Centre that was
operating in Kismayu.

3.3.2 Governance

Governance received a very high rating generally (an average of 4.9). The organization
needs its current level of effectiveness in the governance sub-category

a) Vision/Commitment

GECPD has a dual mandate of strengthening women’s capacities to seek, defend and
advance their fundamental rights in all spheres of life and promoting education for girls,
women, youth and the community at large for social reconstruction and peaceful building
of the Somali State. This mandate is the rallying and unifying factor of the GECPD
founders.

b) GECPD Governing Structure

The governance structure in GECPD was rated high (Average – 4.7) meaning the
component needs some improvement though not urgently. Overall, the organization has
a team based and participatory management, where the constituents are involved in
decision making and implementation of project initiatives.

The current structure has a Management Committee as the top governance and
administrative organ. But the constitution provides for a General Assembly composed of
all its members. It seems that this organ was not operational. The management
committee is chosen among GECPD supporters to oversee the organizational
operations. The members of the committee are drawn from both Somalia and abroad.
The GECPD structure has five office bearers, the committee president, vice president,
treasurer, secretary and the executive director. Each of the office bearers has clear roles
and responsibilities that are documented in the Statutes and Organizational Profile
Follow-up mechanisms to ensure that the executive body implements decisions taken by
the oversight boards require some improvement.

c) Leadership Style

This also received a high rating, maximum of 5.0. Though the executive director does
the day-to-day running of GECPD, other committee members are also involved at policy

14
and control levels. Support groups also assist especially in advocacy and fundraising.
But the organization needs to activate the General Assembly to ensure wider constituent
participation.

d) Legal Status

GECPD is registered with the Galkayo regional court as non-profit, non-governmental
organization .The organization is recognized by the Puntland’s Presidential Decree to
enjoy tax-exempt status

3.3.3 Resources

The overall rating of organization’s resource capacity was 3.6. The physical resources
component was the highest rated at 4.7 on average while financial resources human
resources were rated low (3.0). As such the general resource capacity of the
organization, especially human and financial component, needs significant improvement
in good time.

a) Human Resources

GECPD has a fairly large number of employees. There are 72 paid staff and 100
volunteers. All the 72 staff members are employed on project basis. The GECPD
management committee are an asset to the organization as they bring in a mix of
expertise compatible with it programmatic areas

GECPD’s human resource capacity needs to be improved especially in the following
components;
• Boosting its capacity to employ more permanent staff
• Internal and external capacity training for staff and volunteers
• Boosting its ability to attract and retain staff
• Motivation of staff and volunteers

b) Financial Resources

Two areas that need major and urgent improvement are its ability to mobilize diversified
resource and sourcing funding that is sustainable through mobilization of resources that
are also recurrent and regular.

c) Physical Resources

This sub-category was rated high. GECPD had a fairly good physical resource stock.
This includes seven education centres – Harfo girls’ hostel, Baad’Weyn women and girls’
centre, Women Skills Training centre/ hostel, Vocational Training centre for boys, Buula
Baalay Displaced and Minority, and GECPD Main Centre. Other assets were well
equipped offices and four old vehicles. Physical resources were well maintained, and
office assets were generally sufficient

3.3.4 Management Systems and Procedures

The rating of this component was high (4.1), with human resource management and
financial management being rated at an average of 4.0 each. . Programme management

15
had the highest rating of 4.4 among the management systems and procedures capacity
aspect.

a) Human Resource Management

GECPD has a very good system of keeping records on staff. Although a specific HR
manual had not been development the personnel policies and practices were
meticulous. Clear defined lines of authority and responsibility existed and staff has clear
job descriptions in line with the personnel policy that is known to staff and which is
always spelt out in their written contracts.

b) Program Management

This aspect was given a slightly above average rating and was the lowest among the
three aspects under Management Systems and Procedures. The areas that need
attention are policies to conduct constituent’s needs and priorities assessments, regular
training for staff in facilitation of needs and priorities assessment processes, ability of
staff to utilize strategic plans in developing operating plans, regular reporting on results
of evaluations and activities, involvement of service users in M&E and dissemination of
program information to all staff.

c) Administration and Finance

GECPD has adopted a detailed financial management system. The financial
management manual includes comprehensive financial, procurement and inventory
policies. Regular audits, both internal and external, are carried. Accurate and timely
financial accounting and reporting has also been institutionalized. GECPD voluntarily
requests donors to inbuilt training in financial management with all external financial
audits

3.3.5 Program Performance

Program performance was given an average rating of 4.4, an indication of high
organizational capacity in this aspect.

a) Technical Performance Aspects

It recorded a very high score (Average- 4.4). Given that GECPD was established within
the context of the decade long civil war whose impact on women was disproportionately
higher, education and empowerment of women and girls was of high priority to the
country. Community ownership has been promoted through, among other things, wider
consultations with the community both in Somalia and those in Diaspora.
The high rating on technical performance was however based on all programmes that
GECPD runs and it should be lower for PETT IBTVET since a curriculum was lacking at
the time of the OCA.

b) Developmental Aspects
The community is involved in project planning and implementation. However, there is
limited involvement in monitoring and evaluation. Probably, this is because the
organization has not developed concrete M&E systems.

The organization has made efforts that gender is taken into consideration. The rating on
this was an average of 4.3. .
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3.3.6 External Relations

From the self-rating and discussions with the management team and staff at GECPD,
this was the strongest area of capacity in the organization.

a) General Communication Tools and Strategies

This aspect obtained the maximum rating of 5. The organization was very strong in
documentation, publication, information sharing and public relations.

b) Relationship with Constituents and Communities

The rating was very high. The organization has very strong roots in the community and
is able to generate a significant amount of resources from the community. Community
participation is exemplified by its acceptance to take over provision of snacks. Also the
constituency of the organization has grown as the girls who complete become active role
models and alumni.

c) Networking within the Local NGO Sector

All the components of this aspect were given the highest rating possible. The facilitator’s
opinion is that the rating is realistic as GECPD has very strong networks locally. Some of
the networks include WAWA the Peace and Human Rights Network (PHRN).

d) Developing Constructive Relationships with Civil Authorities

The overall rating on this was high (4.3). GECPD works closely with the line ministries. It
has a 5-year agreement (2004-2007) with the Government as attested to its being
recognized for tax exempt status by the President.
Subject to availability of resources GECPD can to make improvements in these
components by expanding local networks, especially with the civil society and local
authorities

e) Developing Collaborative Relationship with the International Community

GECPD rated very high in this aspect as it has several international development
partners NOVIB Netherlands, UNHCR, DANIDA, Diakonia Sweden, UNIFEM, UNESCO
etc

3.3.7 Recommendations

• Increase the admission quota to reach more beneficiaries and enhance future project
impact
• Speed up the completion of the TVET curricula/syllabi
• There is need to make the project guidelines clear to the local implementing
agencies.
• A programmatic approach with all inbuilt systems rather than a project approach has
been adopted by GECPD and it could be emulated.
• The PETT project user fee was not adequate for institutional building. According to
all partners it was “more of institutional utilization rather institutional building as
intended.”

17
3.4 Capacity Assessment of Somali Institute for Business Administration (SIBA)

3.4.1 Introduction:

Somali Institute of Business Administration is an initiative of Ecological Preservation
Association (EPA), a non-profit, non-political relief, rehabilitation and development
organization. EPA was established in 1997 in Gardo, Puntland State of Somalia.

3.4.2 Governance

The organizational capacity of EPA/SIBA in the area of governance was rated high
(average of 4.3)

a) Vision/Commitment

EPA has a clear mission and vision statement that is articulated in a written document.
The vision is commitment to secure the existence of fragile ecosystem and the mission
aims to secure development and proper utilization of natural resources through provision
of good management and to enhance civil society programs. The facilitator’s concern
was how this vision and mission fits with its new initiative, SIBA.

b) Governing Structure

A general assembly and the Board of directors are the key administrative structures of
EPA/SIBA. But the various roles, functions and duties are not very clear or understood
clearly by all the leaders in the organization. The leaders of the organization had
relevant and varied qualifications that included a doctor, an engineer, agronomists and
business administration specialists.

c) Leadership Style

The aspect was rated high. Collective decision-making processes existed but
nominations were used to choose leaders and this may not be as democratic.

3.4.3 Resources

The resource capacity of EPA/SIBA was rated very low – an average of 2.6. The
organization therefore needs major improvements in most areas.

a) Human Resources

The overall rating was average (3.0). EPA did not have a fixed source of income so it did
not employ any permanent staff. Due to the limited financial resource base EPA
experienced very high staff turnover. There was no capacity training for staff either.

b) Financial Resources

Areas of concern for capacity building include collection of membership fees, developing
IGAs and widening the organization’s collection of local resources beyond the district.

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c) Physical Resources

EPA/SIBA lacked adequate equipment and facilities such as computers, classrooms and
furniture and explained the below average rating of this aspect.

3.4.4 Management Systems and Procedures

In this sub-category the administration and finance aspect was given the highest rating
followed by the human resource management. Programme Management was the
weakest area of capacity for EPA/ SIBA.

SIBA had a financial management manual and a personnel policy. But the voluntary staff
did not have written contracts. Lack of funds had made it difficult for SIBA management
to employ a full time accountant.

Very few members of staff had received training in facilitation of needs and priorities
assessment processes and use of appropriate tools. The strategic plan in place had
elapsed in 2005 but plans were on to develop a new one. The organization indicated that
it had limited knowledge in fundraising and this should be targeted in capacity building of
EPA/SIBA.

3.4.5 Programme Performance

This was rated above average. EPA/SIBA is a relatively young organization but its
activities are community based. Its activities reflect the community priorities as they
focus on the proper use of locally available natural resources by rural communities. The
staff and management committees are drawn from the communities

3.4.6 External Relations

EPA/SIBA enjoys credibility and has good linkages with LNGOs and a few government
ministries. EPA was strong in local advocacy and involves national and local authorities
in its management. For instance the mayor is a member of the BoD and two councillors
are involved in SIBA management. Most networks in Gardo were for women
organizations only but EPA was a member of the regional network-TALOWADAAG.

3.4.7 Recommendations

• EPA needs capacity building in resource mobilization and specifically in
fundraising
• Support for a staff capacity building program is necessary
• Adequate equipment such as computers and furniture should be made available
for effective implementation of the training programmes of SIBA
• EPA should be supported to develop a new strategic plan that will guide its
operations
• An external relations strategy should be developed to make EPA expand the
level of networking especially with the international community

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3.5 Capacity Assessment of School of Professional Studies and Services

3.5.1 Introduction

The School of Professional Studies and Services (SPSS) was established in 2004 in
Bossaso by a group of local consultants.

3.5.2 Governance
The overall rating on this sub-category was very high (4.5)

a) Legal status: The rating was quite high. The organization is registered as an institute
with MoE and also had a regional registration with the local government.

b) Vision/Mission/Goal: The group rated high but the facilitator recognized that the
group did not have a common V/M/G shared by everyone.

c) Leadership: Most of the components scored relatively high Board of four founders
may be limiting in terms of ensuring the leadership of the organization are chosen
through collective processes

d) Constituency Participation: This rated high, but the facilitator noted inconsistency in
Subsequent discussions as it came out clearly that there is a need to sensitize the
community at grassroots level.

3.5.3 Resources

The resource sub-category was rated average.

a) Human resources was rated barely average because of the high staff turnover that
makes SPSS unable to retain its competent and trained staff. The staff training and
capacity building aspect was also weak and so was its ability to employ permanent staff-
most of the staff were part-time.

b) Financial resource was rated low. SPSS does collect membership fees and it had
problems in being able to cover its core operational costs.

c) Physical resource aspects were all given an average rating of 3. The available
facilities were generally inadequate.

3.5.4 Management Systems and Procedures

A slightly above average rating was given to the management systems and procedures
subcategory. The organization did not have the basic governance and administrative
manuals such as personnel policy, financial management among others. Lack of
institutionalized internal or external audits was of concern to the facilitator. SPSS
however used a standard and professional accounting and cash management system.

3.5.5 Programme Performance

This also rated very high which gave the impression that all systems and structures are
in place and operational. There was no evidence of existence of a monitoring and
evaluation process and development of one is crucial.

20
3.5.6 External Relations

SPSS rated very high in this sub-category with good linkages with the government and
other civil society organizations. Local CSOs to which SPSS was a member included
WAWA a women activists’ organization that operates in all the 8 regions of Puntland,
Peace and Human Rights Network (PHRN), Rescue Management Somali Network
(RMSN), Strategic Initiatives for Horn of Africa (SIHA), ILSAN Women Coalition etc.

3.5.7 Recommendations
• Support should be given to SPSS to put up facilities on the plot it owns in Bossaso
as a way of cutting down operational costs.
• Training the organization in career guidance, mentoring would enhance appropriate
career placement of trainees.
• The management committee needs capacity building in Project Cycle Management
• SPSS should put in place audit systems to enhance transparency
• SPSS needs adequate facilities and equipment namely computers and self-
instruction materials in CD-ROM for English language courses
• Like all PETT partners, SPSS needs a standardized curricula/syllabi

3.6 Organizational Capacity Assessment of Galkayo VTC

3.6.1 Introduction

The Galkayo Vocational Training Center was built and partially equipped by IDB. Since
2002 the VTC has been operated by the Swedish INGO Gothenberg Initiative (GI) to
offer a range of appropriate TVET courses. GI provided additional tools and equipment
and has added additional workshops to increase the VTC trainee capacity.

3.6.2 Governance

The rating was high for this sub-category and its aspects. But the accessibility and
availability of Board and Project Managers based in the Head Office Goteborg was of
concern to the facilitator.

The overall responsibilities of GI activities in Puntland lies with the appointed Field
Manager based at the local office in Galkayo. The Rules, Procedures and Principles of
GI Somalia 2004-2005 clearly articulate the administrative structure and procedures.

3.6.3 Resources

The organization’s self-rating on the resources was above average (3.8).
The staff and volunteers skills and capacity training was rated rather low (an average of
2.0). This aspect therefore needs major and urgent improvement.

The high rating on physical resources was realistic. The Galkayo VTC has one the best
facilities which the EC feasibility study recommended that it should be established as a
model for IBTVET and EPS for Puntland. Some of the state of the art physical resources
include Milling machine, Lathe machine, Drilling machine, Radial Drilling Machine,
Surface Grinding Machine, Cylindrical Grinding Machine, Ended Grinding Machine,
Welding Machine. Others are Planer, Hack Sawing Machine, Tube Cutting Machine,
Kiln, Air compressor and Diesel Generator. The facilities are adequate to offer TVET at
technician level or higher.

21
3.6.4 Management Systems and Procedures

The sub-category was rated fairly high. Most human resource, programme and financial
management are in place. Some of the guidelines e.g. human resource and financial
management manuals was minimum and not as elaborate. Aspects on community
ownership of project, participation of community in the entire project cycle were given an
average rating. But the principle is that everything GI tries to implement needs to be
accepted and anchored with the local community.

3.6.5 Programme Performance

The technical performance aspects were rated high as GI has adequate facilities for the
programmes it runs at the VTC.
The development aspects of performance need some improvement in involving the
community more in setting project priorities and building the community to own the
projects throughout the project cycle.

3.6.6 External Relations

The external relations was rated high, an average of 4.0. GI works closely with various
government departments, INGOs and civil organizations in the area. There is close
relationship between GI and the business community, ministry of education through
which REOs countersign certificates and the office of the Mayor through which GI
receives tax exemptions.

3.6.7 Recommendations

• Support Galkayo VTC to transform into a centre of excellence in TVET in the
Puntland State of Somalia. The centre should be run by the relevant ministry but
technical and financial support from GI and other development partners will still be
necessary in the foreseeable future.
• GI should speed up the implementation of the PETT IBTVET training
• Review per diem rates to reflect local realities. The current level of Euro 11 is rather
low
• More PETT officers need to be recruited to reduce the travelling cost and time.
Stationing of an officer in each of the towns, Galkayo, Gardo and Bassaso would be
one option. The other option is to zone off areas for Diakonia and GI so that the
organizations oversee project by location rather than for respective partners, as is
the case now. An elaborate MOU needs to be worked out if this option is chosen.

22
3.7 Partners’ Training Plan
The OCA has shown that there is great need to mount training and capacity building for
the Ministry of Education and its key departments, the local implementing partners and
the IBTVET centres.

Organisation Training Capacity Building Requirement
Ministry of Education of the 1. Harmonization and standardization of NFE curriculum and
Puntland State of Somalia programmes
2. Development of Education and NFE policy
3. curriculum design and syllabi development for TVET
4. Training of trainers. Instructors and mentors in TVET
5. Management and supervisory skills for education officials
at the headquarters
6. Training of the NFE Director in office management, record
keeping, financial management, management of TVE
institutions, Monitoring and Evaluation of education
programmes and resource mobilization
7. Upgrading of skills of the examination and curriculum
8. department in curriculum design, development,
implementation, innovation and evaluation
Puntland Community College 1. PETT curriculum development
(PCC) 2. Career guidance and mentoring
3. Project Cycle Management
Galkayo Education Centre for 1. Gender training
Peace and Development 2. PETT curriculum development
(GECPD) 3. Internal Systems and Policies and Procedures
4. Educational Management
Somali Institute for Business 1. PETT curriculum development
Administration (SIBA) 2. Internal Systems and Policies and Procedures
3. Resource mobilization/ fundraising
4. Strategic Planning
5. Educational Management
School of Professional 1. Training the Management in career guidance, mentoring
Studies and Services 2. The management committee needs capacity building in
Project Cycle Management
3. Fundraising
4. Teambuilding
5. PETT curriculum development
6. Internal Systems and Policies and Procedures
7. Educational Management
Galkayo VTC 1. PETT curriculum development
2. Educational Management

23
ANNEXES

24
ANNEXES

ANNEX 1: List of People Consulted

1. Molla Asnake Programme Manager, Save the Children Denmark
2. Stephen Ndichu PETT Project Coordinator, Save the Children Denmark
3. Abdirahman Abdi PETT Project Officer, Save the Children Denmark
4. Abdihakim Ahamed CARE- INTERNATIONAL, Somaliland
5. Ahmed Saed Noor Minister of Education Puntland State
6. Saida Hersi Egal Country Representative, Diakonia Office Somalia
7. Abdisalam Farah Education Coordinator Diakonia Office Somalia
8. Addisamad Jama PETT IBTVET Project Officer
9. Maymun Mohamed Assistant Education Coordinator, Diakonia Office Somalia
10. Farah Hussein PETT Project Team Leader
11. Abdi Musse PETT project Financial Officer
12. Saffia Sugulle Director NFE Department, Puntland State Somalia
13. Ismail Duale Puntland Examination Board
14. Mohamoud Hamud Chairperson KAALO Relief and Development
15. Romano Murimi Academic Advisor PCC
16. Said Abdemelmi Finance and Administration Manager PCC
17. Suleiman Ali Field Manager , GI, Puntland
18. Mohamed Hersi Galkayo VTC Teacher
19. Hasan Isman Galkayo VTC Teacher
20. Hawa Mohamed Executive Director, GECPD
21. Farah Nur Management Teacher, GECPD
22. Wema Nyaki English Teacher, GECPD
23. Ali Barre Computer Teacher, GECPD
24. Awil Omar Computer Teacher, GECPD
25. Maryan Ahmed NFE , GECPD
26. Osman M ohamed NFE, GECPD
27. Mana Karama EBTVET, GECPD
28. Mohamud Dalmar EBTVET, GECPD
29. Zeinab Ahmed Executive Director , SPSS
30. Hawa Jama Acting Director SPSS
31. Abdihakim Osman Chairperson EPA
32. Halimo Ahmed Accounting Teacher SIBA
33. Zeinab Omar Secretary, SIBA
34. Mohamed Elmi Management Trainer, SIBA
35. Ibrahim Duale IT Trainer, SBA

25
ANNEX 2: Operational Ratings for PCC and Galkayo VTC

1. GOVERNANCE

Rating by Organization
1.1 Vision/Commitment PCC Galkayo VTC
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
GOVERNANCE GOVERNANCE
Overall average ( 4.6 ) Overall average ( )
a) The organization has a clear vision linked to the role of an
NGO in the development of the country √ √ √
b) The organization has a clear mandate/mission statement
√ √
c) The vision and the mandate are shared and understood by
leaders and staff √ √
d) The organization communicates about the vision with
constituency and other external actors √ √
e) The vision is clearly articulated in a written document
√ √
Part 1.1 –Average Rating by institution Vision/Commitment - PCC Vision/Commitment - VTC
Average rating ( 5.0 ) Average rating ( 4.0 )
1.2 Governing Structure of the Organization

1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization has a collectively leadership/power is
shared in actuality by several bodies or persons, with specific √
roles and functions √
b) A collective governing body is responsible for keeping the
organization’s activities in line with its vision and mission √ √
c) A collective governing body oversees the management of
the organizations (is responsible for the formulation of policies
and of operational strategies, represents the organization in its
legal and public relations with the outside, leads its fundraising
and lobbying activities) √ √
d) The various roles, functions and duties are described
clearly in a written document and understood clearly by all
leaders √ √

26
e) The leaders of the organization have relevant and varied
qualifications and are available to fulfil their roles and duties
√ √
f) The organization has follow up mechanisms to ensure that
the executive body implements the decisions taken by the
overseeing bodies √ √
Governing Structure of the Governing Structure of the
Part 1.2 - Average Ratings Organization - PCC Organization - VTC
Average rating( 3.8 ) Average rating ( 4.1 )
1.3 Leadership Style 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The leadership style actively encourages collective
decision-making processes √ √
b) Leaders encourage actively the involvement of the
constituents in all program activities √ √
c) The leaders of the organization are chosen through
collective processes √ √
Part 1.3 - Average Rating by Institution Leadership Style - PCC Leadership Style - VTC
Average rating( 4.7 ) Average rating ( 4.0 )
1.4 Legal Status 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization is properly registered according to local
regulations √ √

Part 1.4 Average Rating by Institution Legal Status - PCC Legal Status - VTC
Average rating (5.0 ) Average rating ( 4.0 )
2. RESOURCES

2.1 Human Resources RESOURCES- PCC RESOURCES -VTC
Overall Average rating ( 3.5 ) Overall Average rating (3.8 )
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization employs permanent staff
√ √
b) Enough qualified and relevant appropriate gender and
personal background) persons (staff and volunteers) can be
mobilized to implement activities satisfactorily √

c) The staff and volunteers receive skills and capacity training
(internal and external) √ √
d) The organization is able to keep its trained and competent √
staff: staff turn over is low √

27
e) The staff and volunteers are motivated by their work
√ √
Part 2.1 Average Ratings Human Resources - PCC Human Resources - VTC
Average rating (3.6) Average rating (3.8)
2.2 Financial Resources 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization is able to mobilize diversified resources
√ √
b) The organization collects membership fees
√ √
c) The organization collects local donations (including from the
Diaspora and the Government) in cash and in kind

d) The organization generates income through the sale of
goods and/or services √ √
e) The organization is consistently able to cover its core
functioning costs √ √
f) Part of the resources mobilized are recurrent and regular
√ √
Part 2.2 - Average Rating Financial Resources Financial Resources - VTC
- PCC
Average rating( 3.0 ) Average rating ( 3.4 )

2.3 Physical Resources 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The equipment, assets and vehicle (s) are in good condition
and maintained regularly √ √
b) The organization has relevant and sufficient office assets
for its activities √ √
c) The organization has relevant and sufficient
equipment/machines in link with its activities √ √
Physical Resources - PCC Physical Resources - VTC
Part 2.3 - Average Rating Average rating (4.0 ) Average rating (4.3 )

3. MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS & PROCEDURES

3.1 Human Resource Management PCC VTC
Overall Average rating ( 3.6 ) Overall Average rating ( 3.8)
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

28
a) The lines of authority and responsibility in the organization
are clearly defined and understood by all staff
√ √
b) Each staff member has a clear and updated job description
(corresponding to the person’s actual duties and activities in
the team) √ √
c) Team member activities and duties do not overlap
√ √
d) Segregation of duties applies where necessary
√ √
e) The organization has a written personnel policy; staff knows
its contents √ √
f) Every employee has a written, signed contract
√ √
g) Regular and fair evaluations of staff performance are √
carried out √
h) The organization uses effective coordination, internal
communication and team building tools and procedures √ √
i) The organization has effective ways of sustaining staff
motivation √ √

j) The organization has effective ways of sustaining staff
motivation √ √
Part 3.1 - Average Rating Human Resource Human Resource Management
Management - PCC - VTC
Average rating( 3.5 ) Average rating ( 3.9 )

3.2 Program Management 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5

a) Policies and tools to conduct constituents’ needs and
priorities assessments exist in the organization and are used
on a regular basis √ √
b) These assessment exercises involve fully the constituents
and other stakeholders concerned √ √
c) Staff members receive training in facilitation of needs and
priorities assessment processes and use of appropriate tools
√ √

29
d) The strategic planning processes are under the
responsibility of a governing body keeping the programs in line
with the organization’s mission and values and with the needs
and priorities expressed by the constituents and community
√ √
e) Staff is able to utilize strategic plan to develop operating
plans; operating plans reflect the strategic planning √ √
f) Fund raising plans are developed to meet the resource
needs of planned activities √ √
g) The organization has a Monitoring and Evaluation system
and uses it on a regular basis √ √
h) M&E exercises always involve the services’ users
√ √
i) Program information is recorded and available to all staff
√ √
j) The organization regularly reports on activities and results of
evaluations √ √
Part 3.2 - Average Ratings by Institution Programme Management Programme Management
- PCC - VTC
Average rating (3.3 ) Average rating ( 3.9 )

3.3 Administration & Finance 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) Administrative procedures exist and are compiled in an
operating manual √ √
b) Relevant staff has been trained properly in using the
operating manual √ √
c) The administrative procedures are known to all concerned
staff and used √ √
d) The organization uses a proper accounting and cash
management system √ √
e) Budgeting is done regularly; an effective budget control and
follow up system is in place √ √
f) Financial reporting is accurate and timely
√ √
g) Internal and External financial audits are carried out
regularly to ensure transparency √ √

30
Administration and Finance Administration and Finance
Part 3.3 - Average Rating by Institution - PCC - VTC
Average rating ( 4.1 ) Average rating (3.7 )

4.PROGRAM PERFORMANCE
PROGRAMME PROGRAMME PERFORMANCE
4.1 Technical Performance Aspects PERFORMANCE - PCC - VTC
Overall Average rating ( 3.9 ) Overall Average rating ( )
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization is able to maintain a consistently good
technical quality for the services delivered √ √
b) The constituents and/or the community recognize the value
of the work carried out by the organization in the community
√ √
c) The organization uses appropriate technology
√ √
d) The delivery of services is organized to meet needs at
appropriate times of the community life and to respect
planning dates ad deadlines √ √
e) The delivery of service is cost effective
√ √
Part 4.1 - Average Rating by institution Technical Performance Technical Performance
Aspects Aspects
- PCC - VTC
Average rating ( 4.0 ) Average rating ( 4.0 )
4.2 Development Aspects 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) Priorities for projects to be carried out in a community are
set by the community members and/or the organization’s
constituents in the community
√ √
b) The organization systematically works on the building
community ownership for projects, throughout the project
cycle √ √
c) The organization systematically encourages and organizes
constituents’ involvement and participation in project,
throughout the project cycle √ √
d) The organization actively seeks to translate its vision and
values into practical ways to implement activities with
constituents √ √

31
e) The organization provides its staff with appropriate training
in community development and empowerment tools and
practices √ √
f) The organization’s M&E tools clearly seek to evaluate the
project beyond their technical aspects and include users’
evaluation of relevance of services, level of services. Level of
constituents and community ownership reached, etc √ √
Part 4.2 – Average Rating Developmental Aspects - Developmental Aspects - VTC
PCC Average rating (3.3 )
Average rating ( 3.8 )

5. EXTERNAL RELATIONS

EXTERNAL RELATIONS EXTERNAL RELATIONS
PCC VTC
Overall Average rating ( 4.0 ) Overall Average rating ( 4.0 )
5.1 General Communication Tools
and Strategies 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization publishes and disseminates towards its
partners or potential partners information and communication
items √ √
b) The organization carries out public relations or community
awareness campaigns regarding its activities √ √
Part 5.1 – Average Rating by Institution General Communication General Communication Tools
Tools and Strategies -PCC and Strategies -VTC
Average rating ( 4.0 )
Average rating ( 4.0 )
5.2 Relationship with Constituents
and Communities 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization’s members have specific links with the
constituents and their community √ √
b) The organization works consistently with the same
constituents/in the same communities and develops long term √ √
relationships with them
c) The organization contributes to building the awareness of
its constituents and/or their community about development √ √
issues

32
d) The organization devotes time and resources to
communicating with constituents and community during and
outside project implementation and ensures transparency of √ √
activities
e) The organization is able to attract resources from the
community to carry out its activities (expertise, influence,
contributions in cash and kind, voluntary work, etc) √ √
f) The organization advocates and lobbies for the community’s
needs and interests √ √
g) The community sees the organization as contributing to its
long term development and not as a private contractor
√ √
Part 5.2 – Average Score (5) Relationship with Relationship with Constituents
Constituents and and Communities -VTC
Communities -PCC Average rating ( 4.0 )
Average rating ( 4.0 )
5.3 Networking within the Local
NGO Sector 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization is member of a registered umbrella
√ √
b) The organization is a member of an informal LNGO
network, group and meets regularly √ √
C) The organization is active in networking activities
√ √
Part 5.3 – Average Rating by institution Networking within the Local Networking within the Local
NGO Sector - PCC NGO Sector - VTC
Average rating ( 4.3 ) Average rating ( 4.0 )
5.4 Developing Constructive
Relationship with Civil Authorities 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
a) The organization follows up the relevant line Ministries’
technical recommendation in its project activities √ √
b) The organization seeks or accepts direct collaboration with
the relevant Line Ministry or Local Authorities (Regional,
District or Municipality Authorities) for the implementation of √ √
some projects (joint projects)
c) The organization participates to communication and mutual
understanding efforts between Civil Society sector and civil √ √
authorities

33
d) The organization participates in the efforts of LNGOs’
umbrella lobbying for the official recognition of LNGOs in the √
legal frame of Somaliland
e) The organization participates in the Civil Society sectors
contributions to the democratization process in Somaliland √ √
f) The organization seeks to involve National/Local Authorities’
members in its membership or Board or through other ways √
Part 5.4 – Average Ratings by Institution) Developing Constructive Developing Constructive
Relationship with Civil Relationship with Civil Authorities
Authorities - PCC - VTC
Average rating ( 3.8 ) Average rating ( 4.0 )
5.5 Developing Collaborative
Relationship with the 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5
International Community
a) The organization participates in one/several Sectoral
Working Groups for coordination of project activities √ √
b) The organization contributes to the umbrellas’ efforts to
advocate for LNGOs among the INGOs √ √
c) The organization is involved in partnership relationship with
one/several donor (s) √ √
d) The organization attends relevant training seminars
organized by International Community √ √
Developing Collaborative Developing Collaborative
Part 5.5 – Average Ratings by Institution Relationship with the Relationship with the
International Community International Community
-PCC - VTC
Average rating ( 4.0 )
Average rating ( 4.0 )

34
ANNEX 3: Operational Ratings for GECPD, SPSS and EPA /SIBA

VERNANCE
Rating By Institution

GECPD SPSS EPA/SIBA
GOVERNANCE GOVERNANCE GOVERNANCE
(Overall average 4.9) (Overall average 4.5) (Overall average 4.3)
sion/Commitment
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
e organization has a clear vision
to the role of an NGO in the √ √ √
pment of the country
he organization has a clear
te/mission statement √ √
vision and the mandate are shared
derstood by leaders and staff √ √ √
organization communicates about
sion with constituency and other √ √ √
al actors
e vision is clearly articulated in a
document √ √
1 Vision/Commitment - Vision/Commitment - SPSS Vision/Commitment – EPA/S
ge ratings by Institution GECPD
Average rating( 5.0 ) Average rating ( 4.0 ) Average rating ( 4.2
verning Structure of the
ganization 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
e organization has a collectively
ship/power is shared in actuality by
l bodies or persons, with specific √ √ √
nd functions
collective governing body is
sible for keeping the organization’s
es in line with its vision and mission √ √ √

35
ollective governing body oversees
anagement of the organizations (is
sible for the formulation of policies
operational strategies, represents √ √ √
ganization in its legal and public
ns with the outside, leads its
sing and lobbying activities)
various roles, functions and duties
scribed clearly in a written
ent and understood clearly by all √ √ √
s
leaders of the organization have
nt and varied qualifications and are √ √ √
ble to fulfill their roles and duties
organization has follow up
nisms to ensure that the executive
mplements the decisions taken by √ √ √
erseeing bodies

2 Governing Structure of the Governing Structure of the Governing Structure of the
ge ratings by Institution Organization - GECPD Organization - SPSS Organization – EPA/SIBA
Average rating( 4.7 ) Average rating ( 4.5 )
Average rating ( 3.8
adership Style 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
leadership style actively
rages collective decision-making √ √ √
ses
ders encourage actively the
ement of the constituents in all √ √ √
m activities
leaders of the organization are
n through collective processes √ √
3 Leadership Style - GECPD Leadership Style - SPSS Leadership Style – EPA/SIB
ge ratings by Institution
Average rating( 5.0 ) Average rating (4.3 ) Average rating ( 4.3
gal Status 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
organization is properly registered
ing to local regulations √ √

36
4 Legal Status - GECPD Legal Status - SPSS Legal Status – EPA/SIBA
ge ratings by Institution
Average rating(5.0 ) Average rating ( 5.0 ) Average rating ( 5.0
2.Resources
GECPD SPSS EPA/SIBA
RESOURCES RESOURCES RESOURCES
(Overall average 3.6) (Overall average 3.0) (Overall average 2.6)
man Resources 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
organization employs permanent
√ √ √
nough qualified and relevant
priate gender and personal √ √ √
ound) persons (staff and
eers) can be mobilized to
ment activities satisfactorily
staff and volunteers receive skills
capacity training (internal and √ √ √
al)
e organization is able to keep its
and competent staff: staff turn √ √ √
low
staff and volunteers are motivated
r work √ √ √
1 Human Resources - GECPD Human Resources - SPSS Human Resources
ge ratings by Institution Average rating (3.0) Average rating (3.4) Average rating (3.0)
nancial Resources 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
e organization is able to mobilize
fied resources √ √ √
organization collects membership
√ √ √
he organization collects local
ons (including from the Diaspora √ √ √
e Government) in cash and in kind
e organization generates income
h the sale of goods and/or services √ √ √
organization is consistently able to
ts core functioning costs √ √ √

37
t of the resources mobilized are
ent and regular √ √ √
2 Financial Resources Financial Resources - SPSS Financial Resources – EPA
ge ratings by Institution - GECPD
Average rating( 3.0 ) Average rating ( 2.7 ) Average rating ( 2.0
ysical Resources 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
equipment, assets and vehicle (s)
good condition and maintained √ √ √
rly
e organization has relevant and
ent office assets for its activities √ √ √
e organization has relevant and
ent equipment/machines in link with √ √ √
vities
3 Average ratings by Institution Physical Resources - Physical Resources - SPSS Physical Resources – EPA/
GECPD Average rating (3.0 ) Average rating ( 2.7 )
Average rating (4.7 )

3. MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS AND PROCEDURES
GECPD SPSS EPA/SIBA
man Resource Management MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS A
AND PROCEDURES PROCEDURES PROCEDURES
(Overall average 4.1) (Overall average 3.4) (Overall average 3.5)
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
lines of authority and responsibility
organization are clearly defined and √ √
tood by all staff
ch staff member has a clear and
d job description (corresponding to √ √
rson’s actual duties and activities in
m)
m member activities and duties do
erlap √ √ √
gregation of duties applies where
sary √ √ √
he organization has a written
nel policy; staff knows its contents √ √ √

38
ry employee has a written, signed
ct √ √ √
gular and fair evaluations of staff
mance are carried out √ √ √
he organization uses effective
nation, internal communication and √ √ √
uilding tools and procedures
organization has effective ways of
ning staff motivation √ √ √
organization has effective ways of
ning staff motivation √
1 Averages Human Resource Human Resource Management Human Resource Managem
Management - GECPD - SPSS – EPA/SIBA
Average rating( 4.0 ) Average rating ( 4.2 ) Average rating (3.8 )
ogram Management 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
olicies and tools to conduct
uents’ needs and priorities √ √ √
sments exist in the organization and
ed on a regular basis
ese assessment exercises involve
the constituents and other √ √
olders concerned
aff members receive training in
tion of needs and priorities √ √ √
sment processes and use of
priate tools
e strategic planning processes are
the responsibility of a governing √ √ √
keeping the programs in line with
ganization’s mission and values and
e needs and priorities expressed by
nstituents and community
ff is able to utilize strategic plan to
p operating plans; operating plans √ √ √
the strategic planning
d raising plans are developed to
the resource needs of planned √ √ √
es

39
organization has a Monitoring and
tion system and uses it on a √ √ √
r basis
&E exercises always involve the
es’ users √ √ √
gram information is recorded and
ble to all staff √ √ √
organization regularly reports on
es and results of evaluations √ √ √
2 Averages Programme Management Programme Management Programme Management
- GECPD - SPSS - EPA/SIBA
Average rating ( 4.4 ) Average rating ( 3.0 ) Average rating ( 2.7 )

ministration & Finance 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
ministrative procedures exist and
mpiled in an operating manual √ √ √
elevant staff has been trained
ly in using the operating manual √ √ √
e administrative procedures are
to all concerned staff and used √ √
e organization uses a proper
nting and cash management √ √ √
m
udgeting is done regularly; an
ve budget control and follow up √ √ √
m is in place
ancial reporting is accurate and
√ √
ernal and External financial audits
arried out regularly to ensure √ √ √
arency
3 Averages Administration and Finance Administration and Finance Administration and Finance
- GECPD - SPSS - EPA/SIBA
Average rating ( 4.0 ) Average rating (3.1 ) Average rating (4.0 )

40
GRAMME PERFOMANCE
GECPD SPSS EPA/SIBA
PROGRAMME PERFOMANCE PROGRAMME PERFOMANCE PROGRAMME PERFO
nical Performance Aspects (Overall average 4.4) (Overall average 4.0) (Overall average 3.9)
1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
rganization is able to maintain a
tly good technical quality for the √ √ √
delivered
nstituents and/or the community
e the value of the work carried √ √ √
e organization in the community
organization uses appropriate
gy √ √ √
elivery of services is organized
eeds at appropriate times of the √ √ √
ty life and to respect planning
deadlines
elivery of service is cost effective
√ √ √
Technical Performance Technical Performance Aspects - Technical Performance A
Averages Aspects SPSS EPA/SIBA
- GECPD Average rating ( 4.0
Average rating ( 4.4 ) Average rating ( 4.0 )

lopmental Aspects 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
es for projects to be carried out
munity are set by the community √ √ √
and/or the organization’s
nts in the community
rganization systematically works
uilding community ownership for √ √ √
throughout the project cycle
organization systematically
es and organizes constituents’ √ √ √
ent and participation in project,
ut the project cycle

41
organization actively seeks to
its vision and values into √ √ √
ways to implement activities
tituents
ganization provides its staff with
te training in community
ment and empowerment tools √ √ √
ices
rganization’s M&E tools clearly
valuate the project beyond their
aspects and include users’
n of relevance of services, level √ √ √
es. Level of constituents and
ty ownership reached, etc
Averages Developmental Aspects - Developmental Aspects - SPSS Developmental Aspe
GECPD EPA/SIBA
Average rating ( 4.3 ) Average rating ( 4.0 ) Average rating ( 3.
5.0 EXTERNAL RELATIONS
GECPD SPSS EPA/SIBA
EXTERNAL RELATIONS EXTERNAL RELATIONS EXTERNAL RELATIO
(Overall average 4.7) (Overall average N/S) (Overall average 3.
ral Communication Tools
Strategies 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
organization publishes and
ates towards its partners or √ √ √
partners information and
cation items
organization carries out public
or community awareness √ √ √
ns regarding its activities
Averages General Communication Tools General Communication Tools General Communication T
and Strategies -GECPD and Strategies -SPSS and Strategies - EPA

Average rating ( 5.0 ) Average rating ( 4 ) Average rating ( 2.5
ionship with Constituents
Communities 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
organization’s members have
inks with the constituents and √ √ √
munity

42
organization works consistently
same constituents/in the same √ √ √
ties and develops long term
hips with them
organization contributes to
he awareness of its constituents √ √ √
their community about
ment issues
organization devotes time and
s to communicating with
nts and community during and √ √ √
project implementation and
ransparency of activities
organization is able to attract
s from the community to carry
activities (expertise, influence, √ √ √
ons in cash and kind, voluntary
)
organization advocates and
or the community’s needs and √ √ √

ommunity sees the organization
tributing to its long term
ment and not as a private √ √ √
r
Average Ratings by Institution Relationship with Constituents Relationship with Constituents and Relationship with Const
and Communities -GECPD Communities -SPSS and Communities - EPA
Average rating ( 4.7 ) Average rating ( 4.8 ) Overall average rating (
orking within the Local
Sector 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
organization is member of a
d umbrella √ √ √
rganization is a member of an
LNGO network, group and √ √ √
gularly
ganization is active in
g activities √ √ √

43
Networking within the Local Networking within the Local NGO Networking within the Lo
Average Ratings by Institution NGO Sector - GECPD Sector - SPSS Sector - EPA/SIBA
Average rating ( 5.0 )
Average rating ( 4.7 ) Average rating ( 3.0
loping Constructive
ionship with Civil 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
orities
ganization follows up the
ne Ministries’ technical √ √ √
ndation in its project activities
organization seeks or accepts
laboration with the relevant Line
or Local Authorities (Regional, √ √ √
r Municipality Authorities) for the
ntation of some projects (joint

organization participates to
cation and mutual √ √ √
nding efforts between Civil
ector and civil authorities
organization participates in the
LNGOs’ umbrella lobbying for √ √ √
al recognition of LNGOs in the
me of Somaliland
organization participates in the
ety sectors contributions to the √ √ √
ization process in Somaliland
organization seeks to involve
Local Authorities’ members in its √ √ √
hip or Board or through other

Averages Developing Constructive Developing Constructive Developing Construc
Relationship with Civil Relationship with Civil Authorities - Relationship with Civil Au
Authorities - GECPD SPSS - EPA/SIBA
Average rating ( 4.3 ) Average rating ( 4.8 ) Average rating ( 4.
loping Collaborative
ionship with the 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4
national Community

44
organization participates in
ral Sectoral Working Groups for √ √
ion of project activities
organization contributes to the
s’ efforts to advocate for LNGOs √ √ √
e INGOs
organization is involved in
ip relationship with one/several √ √ √

organization attends relevant
seminars organized by √ √ √
nal Community
Averages Developing Collaborative Developing Collaborative Developing Collabora
Relationship with the Relationship with the International Relationship with th
International Community Community International Commu
- GECPD - SPSS - EPA/SIBA
Average rating ( 4.5 ) Average rating ( 5.0 )
Average rating ( 3.3

Legend
Code Rating Interpretation

1 Strongly disagree Needs major and urgent improvement in all areas

2 Disagree Needs major and urgent improvement in most areas

3 Somewhat agree Needs significant improvement in good time

4 Agree Needs some improvement but not so urgent

5 Strongly Agree Needs to maintain current levels of effectiveness

45
46
Proposed Structure of the Puntland Education System Middle Level Tertiary Institutions

- 1 2 3
Home based Home and Technical and Vocational Training
ECD (early centre based Institutions
stimulation ECD 3-6 years
for 0-3 years)
Non Formal Education (NFE) 1 2
Alternative primary education for out-of-school children

Puntland
1 2 1 2 3? 4 5 6 7 8 PSLE 1 2 3 4 State
PSCE Universities
Early Childhood Development TVT
Intermediate 1 2 3
Elementary
Cycle 19 years
Cycle
0years 15 years Secondary Primary Teachers
5 years
6 years 14 years 18 years
Primary Education
Education Education
Garowe Teachers

Improved Training College (GTTC)
Koranic
Curriculum 1 2

Secondary teacher
PSLE - Puntland School Leaving Examination Education

PSCE - Puntland Secondary Certificate Examination 1 2 3

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1