Assessment Gallery #1

Assessment Gallery #1
Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314-ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES

1

Scientific Realism
Exercise 1

Plasma display (Panasonic)’ is a full-page advert that appeared in The Weekend Australian magazine (23–24 November 2002 http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/ContentPageServerServlet/assessment/scientific-

realism/images/PH_Panasonic.html The ad is for a series of plasma display monitors produced by Panasonic. It attempts to capture an out of this world experience that is enabled by the realistic capabilities of the technology being displayed. As stated in ‘Big Idea’, “each form of representation is defined through its link with ‘reality’” (Ideas, Scientific Realism, 2011) relates to the mother-daughter relationship that is depicted in this advert. Since their introduction to society televisions have been categorised as a form of escapism from a mundane reality. The daily routine of a stay at home mum and the relationship between mother and child is no exception. Plasma screens and the technology it incorporates was invented due a growing need by scientists to have a computer screen that did not have to constantly refresh itself. The size and quality of display brought about a level of involvement that televisions of the past generation could not generate. The child is in awe of what she is seeing before her eyes, the mother has become distracted from whatever she was doing to become involved in the experience that the plasma is enabling her to do as she seems to be using a fry pan as a tennis racket. The ad details the screens “stunning 3-D realism” that enables “a picture so good, you wish you were there” allowing the assumption that the plasma will allow anyone to experience what they thought was impossible and at the same time attempt to distort the reader from what’s being represented and what really is reality.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

2 Exercise 2a
Copywriter: STEVE LEVIT Art Director: PETE SEAWARD Account Supervisor: SHERYL MORDIDI Advertiser Supervisor: STEVE STURM Creative Director: ROB SCHWARTZ Photographer: Typographer: Illustrator: Advertising Agency: Creative Team: Other: The Print Ad titled SUBWAY was done by Team One Advertising agency for product: Lexus Ls400 (brand: Lexus) in United States. It was released in the Jul 1998

http://www.coloribus.com/adsarchive/prints/lexus-ls400-subway-842755/ “Introducing a Lexus for those who’ve Never Seen Themselves in a Lexus” states a famous advertisement for Lexus automobiles. In the centre of the ad, a man stands, his back to the viewer, facing what looks like a large billboard advert. It’s portrayed as though it’s in a subway station waiting for a train. The ad image within the image shows a Lexus LS400 moving fast from right to left, its rear end blurred by speed. The car can be seen through the man’s back as if his body is transparent and ethereal. A silver metallic frame that resembles a high tech belt circulating the man’s waist frames the Lexus. He is thus dressed by the image. He is drawn by the car projecting his body into the ad. The product is projected onto him, and he seems to be absorbing the message bodily. His body has become the ads medium, representing the product by incorporating it into his body. It plays upon a number of visual conventions. He is clearly looking at an image; the scene resembles a museum goer gazing at a famous painting. One way to read the image is that he is now literally, “sees himself in a Lexus”. His surroundings are human made, the public realm of mass transportation. His partially nude form might signal a desire to return to a more natural state of being in if he were not subdued by culture. Ironically, the car represents the escape from culture-from reliance of mass public transport, from business clothing and from alienation. Instead the man’s natural state heeds his desire for independence, individuality, control over one’s own life, and sexual prowess.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

3 The copy reads, “When was the last time you felt this connected to a car?” The ad challenges the ‘natural’ view of a man as controlled, self-sufficient and rational subject. What we see in the ad is a synthetic male personality that is assembled out the flotsam and jetsam of contemporary commodities (Mort, 1996).Exercise 2b

This attempt at altering the ad so that it no longer resembles scientific realism was achieved by taking out all the aspects of fantasy, no longer is the male morphed into the product, he has been replaced with a tradesperson who has stopped what they were doing to view a billboard advertising the new series a home renovation show. There is no key message incorporated into the body, nor is the person portrayed in a transparent manner. By removing the belt the person is no longer dressed by the image.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

4

Simulation
Exercise 1

'Oral B Whitening Strips' is an advert that was broadcast on Channel 9 on 9th May 2005 during ‘Supernanny’ (7.00 – 7.30 p.m.). http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/assessment/simulation/IMA GES/Oral-B_83.jpg The advertisement uses a constructed reality of what is perceived to be an ideal view of female models who display having perfect, straight, clean and white teeth. The roles of the models are used to portray what a healthy and desirable set of white teeth can look like to enhance one’s own beauty as re-enforced in ‘Big Ideas’, saying that “a female fashion ‘model’ embodies our current knowledge about what women are and our attitudes towards what they could (should) be” (Ideas, Simulation, 2011) By including the visual appeal of attractiveness, it simulates what the ideal woman should look like. The creation of dissatisfaction of reality by not having white teeth solves this problem. The narrated voice throughout the advert, in particular, “What would happen” with the answer of a smiling model displaying her white teeth replying it would “light up the room” simulates how much better a woman’s quality of life could become if they used the product themselves. By incorporating woman from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds, it simulates that the product is not exclusive to only the good looking-having white teeth will make you good looking.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

5 Exercise 2a

http://thesparklypoo.blogspot.com/2011/01/perfume-adverts-good.html Gucci by Gucci - Raquel Zimmerman, Natasha Poly and Freja BehaErichsen Campaign The ad from Gucci uses a constructed reality of beauty and style. The model is presented to the reader, with nothing else than herself and the product. The model embodies the reader’s current knowledge that she is strong, sensual and driven by desire for both her achievement and unmistakable feminine allure. The reader’s attitude towards the product is constructed to believe that this is a signature fragrance for the modern day icon. It makes its entrance early and like all Gucci women, leaves a lasting impression. This is simulation: You may be a Gucci woman by scent, but not in reality.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

6 Exercise 2b

This attempt at altering the add so that it no longer resembles simulation was achieved by removing the product and all signs that referred to Gucci, by replacing the product so that now the woman is holding a dog and the new key message of “always adopt, never buy” turns the attention of the reader to support a well-known cause for the protection of animals by NOP group Peta.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

7

Modernism
Exercise 1

'LG art cooling' ‘LG Art Cool Converter’ is a full-page advert that appeared in The Age Melbourne Magazine in December 2004. http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/assessment/modernism/ima ges/PH_LGartcool.jpg This ad identifies and confirms the power of humans to make, improve and re-design the environment in which they live in with the assistance of technology. The modern technology (air conditioner) enhances the bedroom as it allows the individual owner to re-design the environment they live in by improving the climate to suit their own unique comfort levels. The advertisement is also an example of modernism due to the fact that it’s a representation of a product that displays distinct features such as its cutting edge, fresh and original design. The air conditioner is unique, through its modification from a typical wall mounted unit to one that is portrayed as a piece of art designed to complement and enhance ones environment. This is reenforced with the message “with a wide range of stunning colours and shades there is one to match your décor”. Also, the ad brings to the viewers’ attention that consumers, as individuals are able to make rational choices by the range of colours and designs that can be selected from. It demonstrates the modernist theory that individuals are in control of their destiny rather than having their destiny forced upon them. “Individuals are in control of their own destiny, rather than being controlled by it…” (Ideas, Modernism, 2011)

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

8 Exercise 2a

http://www.autospectator.com/cars/topics/subaru?page=5
New print ad for Subaru campaign, "It's What Makes a Subaru, a Subaru.” (PRNewsFoto/Subaru of America, Inc.)

‘What makes Subaru, Subaru’ exemplifies modernist rational. The ad aims to speak to opinion leaders, using its strengths of durability, performance and responsibility to deliver its message. It represents a product with distinct its cutting edge technological features that are designed to assist its user through its, “unique combination of standard Subaru All Wheel Drive and a boxer engine that together deliver unrivalled performance.” The ad incorporates use of populist tabloid writing of short and sharp sentences with key words highlighted boldly. Its “engineering excellence” that’s “recognized time and time again by industry experts for its world class safety, reliability and durability. It conveys its environmental responsibility; the Subaru plant in the heartland of America produces “zero landfill”. The ad distances itself from any emotional devices in favour of rational and educational facts to tell the reader of its unique capabilities and how it can benefit them. It simply defines its core values of the company, products to consumers.

Exercise 2b Lachlan Ross: 600108473 ALC314 Gallery One

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This attempt at altering an ad so that it no longer resembles the theory of modernism was achieved by removing all key messages that were associated with the car and its capabilities. Once the image was solely of the three cars I included some bright colours along with money so that it is now an ad for the chance to win a Subaru on behalf of a lifestyle magazine called that’s life which is well known for its reader’s competitions.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

10

Meaning by Association
Exercise 1

Ignoring cholesterol 'Ignoring cholesterol' is an advert for Pluravit that appeared in the The Age Good Weekend magazine (13 October 2001). http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/assessment/meaning-byassociation/images/PH_pluravit.jpg The ad includes an image of what is perceived as a male whose head is submerged in a sand pit. With his head buried, he is not looking at anyone who may be viewing the ad. It could be that he is to ashamed to be seen, that he has something to hide or that he is ignoring a problem by having “his head buried beneath the sand”. The main text displays “ignoring cholesterol won’t make it go away”. Instantly the image becomes an example of inherent meaning (hiding) being rejected for a relational meaning (ignoring) (Ideas, Meaning by Association, 2011) The text explaining, “Half of all healthy men over forty have elevated cholesterol. And most of them simply ignore it.” Confirms the suspicion of the identity of the person as a male aged forty plus, who is healthy. The text agrees that ignorance is “ridiculous” and that by taking the advertised supplement is a better choice “than sticking your head in the sand”. It associates good health with being honest with yourself. It displays that the product as a more than acceptable substitute for improving ones fitness and wellbeing by displaying a contrasting image showing the alternative, “...Something’s meaning is produced by its similarities to some things and its difference to others” (Ideas, Meaning by Association, 2011)

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

11 Exercise 2a Product: Gazeta Mercantil Agency: JWT, São Paulo Country: Brazil Illustrator: Pedro Izique Executive Creative Director: Mario D'Andrea Creative Director: Mario D'Andrea and Roberto Fernandez Art Director: Pedro Izique Copywriter: Gustavo Gusmão Published: 2008

http://mediacology.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/dollar-ad.jpg The ad features an array of images within the main image of a USA $1 bill. The image portrays a scene of destruction, that a major event is taking place such as a new world war or the beginning of the end of time. The ad is one of three with the other two focusing on the Yen and Euro economies’. It’s use of shocking images concerning money are a reference that the newspaper makes deeper analysis of the financial market and informs readers on political and social events exercising influence on the world economy. The main text displays, “Understand the real value of money”. It wants the reader to be made aware of the events happening around the world and that in global economy prosperity comes at a price, and that the people of Brazil greatly depend on a strong performing USA economy. This analysis shows how the ad associates a particular series of events can have an impact on ones views to the consequences of their actions.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

12

Exercise 2b

Within this ad I have removed the key message from the bottom of the image, the original message intended to explain the serious problems that are affecting the economy. My intended message on behalf of McDonalds was to portray that even though a customer’s money may be scare and that with all the troubles they may face, this one dollar still has the possibility to make you happy.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

13

Structuralism
Exercise 1 ‘Tree Bike” is a full-page magazine insert advert for the City of Toronto’s Live Green Campaign. Advertising Agency: Agency59, Canada Creative Director / Copywriter: Brian Howlett Art Director: Andrew Gillingham Photographer: Philip Rostron Published: June 2008

http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/assessment/structuralism/i mages/structuralism-3-thumbnail.jpg The concept of the image is best understood in relation to its ‘mom observational’ qualities and the system of visual images (Ideas, Structuralism, 2011). By using certain signs, ads are able to persuade the reader by instilling certain dominant ideological notions which are expected to be accepted. How the two unrelated images of a tree riding a bicycle can be best defined is by the clear contrast to the city backdrop as the reader can identify the relationship between non-polluting bicycles resulting in less emissions resulting in a cleaner environment. The relationship between the objects helps identify the meaning. By the city ignoring the tree is like humans ignoring the environment. Being sympathetic to the tree’s personal challenge constructs an individual’s own ideas about the need to protect the environment.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

14 Exercise 2a
Advertiser: Save Water Advert title(s): Save water. Save life. Creative Agency (Name, City, Country): Percept H , NA, India

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/9bfugEaWalw/TkNn4jSS8ZI/AAAAAAAAAAw/AhIsibCT_wo/s1600/water.jpg

The ad is a response to a USA nationwide campaign, “SAVE WATER, SAVE LIFE”. The ad uses negative space and colour to create a powerful, metaphorical message. The ad shows a cropped fishbowl containing a goldfish with a leaking tap extending from the bowl. In the negative space to the right of the fishbowl is the message in capital letters, “SAVE WATER, SAVE LIFE”. The use of negative space and the simple typeface creates a clean, concise and simple message which also carries a degree of strength. This ad can be interpreted in several ways, but essentially states that conservation and care of our Earth’s water supply is crucial for survival and well-being of all forms of life. It sends a message to the reader about the importance of allocating water efficiently throughout the world, and sanitizing it for the well-being of both the environment, the preservation of the earth itself, and the health of people all around the world which was noted in Big Ideas by, “Meanings are created by and within abstract ‘systems’ or ‘structures’…” (Ideas, Structuralism, 2011). This specific ad shows a tap dripping water from the fishbowl, slowly draining away from the container that is preserving a life form; the goldfish. Another strength of the ad is the use or limited use of colour. The entire ad is in grey scale, and while 3-dimensional, fairly simple. The emphasis comes with the bright orange fish, the life form of the image. This places the emphasis on the fish in the consumed positive space, while the reader’s eyes move onto the simple phrase in the negative space.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

15 Exercise 2b

With this ad, I removed the key message and the leaking tap and replaced it with a bottle of Evian water and the message, “no compromise”. By removing the framework, this ad has gone from an important message about saving water and protecting the environment to now simply being a promotional tactic for Evian that wants to say that no simple water compares to a bottle of Evian water.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

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Works Cited
Cook, G. (1992). The Discourse of Advertising. London: Routledge. Ideas, B. (2011, July 1). Meaning by Association. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Deakin University (DSO): http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/urw/lc4001923288051.tp7028592736041/RelativeResour ceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_Meaning_by_association.htm;JSESSIONIDVISTA=cm7QTPbVPpS7vbHcCcKzH qTpDFLvwHHlCCnS9pQJXpvVTPgJC2LC!963417462!vista-m6.its.deakin.edu.au! Ideas, B. (2011, July 1). Modernism. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Deakin University (DSO): http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/urw/lc4001923288051.tp7028592736041/RelativeResour ceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_Modernism.html;JSESSIONIDVISTA=cm7QTPbVPpS7vbHcCcKzHqTpDFLvwH HlCCnS9pQJXpvVTPgJC2LC!963417462!vista-m6.its.deakin.edu.au!80!-1!-18886 Ideas, B. (2011, July 1). Scientific Realism. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Deakin University (DSO): http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/urw/lc4001923288051.tp7028592736041/RelativeResour ceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_Scientific_Realism.html;JSESSIONIDVISTA=cm7QTPbVPpS7vbHcCcKzHqTpDF LvwHHlCCnS9pQJXpvVTPgJC2LC!963417462!vista-m6.its.deakin.edu.au!80! Ideas, B. (2011, July 1). Simulation. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Deakin University (DSO): http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/urw/lc4001923288051.tp7028592736041/RelativeResour ceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_simulation.html;JSESSIONIDVISTA=cm7QTPbVPpS7vbHcCcKzHqTpDFLvwHHl CCnS9pQJXpvVTPgJC2LC!963417462!vista-m6.its.deakin.edu.au!80!-1!-1888 Ideas, B. (2011, July 1). Structuralism. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Deakin University (DSO): http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/urw/lc4001923288051.tp7028592736041/RelativeResour ceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_Structuralism.html;JSESSIONIDVISTA=cm7QTPbVPpS7vbHcCcKzHqTpDFLvw HHlCCnS9pQJXpvVTPgJC2LC!963417462!vista-m6.its.deakin.edu.au!80!-1!-1 Mort, F. (1996). Cultures of Consumption. London: Routledge. Williamson, J. (2005). Decoding Advertisements: Ideology and Meaning in Advertising. London: Routlege.

Lachlan Ross: 600108473

ALC314

Gallery One

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