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National Association of Communication Centers

NEXTGEN CommCenters
Richmond, Kentucky Eastern Kentucky University April 20-21, 2012 www.studio.eku.edu

Stay Connected during NACC


#nacc2012 www.facebook.com/NACCconference open access to free wifi provided by EKU

Welcome from the Conference Chair


Friends, Welcome to Eastern Kentucky University, home of the historic Crabbe Library and Noel Studio for Academic Cye|t~t|! Weye zo {ld |o u~e o} sotv }z tv Rtcuwovd, Kentucky. We have assembled what we hope will provide an inspiring and innovative conference for you this year. In addition to ~yte| or pvelz vd pyezev||tovz, o}ll vo|tce ve opportunities for you to exchange ideas with your colleagues, including digital installations. Engaging the Next-Gen Communication Center theme, we encourage you to think generatively about communication center spaces and the compositions that create and shape them. D}ytv{ o}y covreyevce epeytevce, I uope o}ll yecovztdey familiar conversations while composing next-generation spaces and exploring new ideas in communication center |ueoy vd pyc|tce. We~e tv~t|ed o} |o sotv }z tv o}y new homethe Noel Studioin hopes that collaborating in the space will bring as much inspiration to you as it has for us during our first years of operation. I offer my sincere appreciation to members of the NACC Executive Board; our local planning committee here at EKU; the Noel Studio staff, Leslie Valley, Shawn Apostel, and Trenia Napier; Nancy Davis for her administrative support; and Deans Zeigler and Gardner. Your unwavering support of such an ambitious effort, generosity of time

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and space, and overall visionary leadership made this conference possible. I offer a special thank you to President Whitlock and Provost Vice for their enthusiasm for this conference and support of the Noel Studio. Weye roy|}v|e |o be sotved b o}y dtz|tv{}tzued xevo|e speaker, Dr. Cheryl Ball, author of numerous books and articles on multimodal communication. What a perfect keynote speaker to set the tone for this conference! We hope you have an enjoyable and inspiring conference epeytevce z o} covztdey o}y yole tv |ue ve|{evey|tov.

Russell Carpenter, Eastern Kentucky University 2012 NACC Conference Chair

Program Committee
Shawn P. Apostel, Eastern Kentucky University Trenia Napier, Eastern Kentucky University Leslie A. Valley, Eastern Kentucky University

Local Planning Committee


Leah Banks, Eastern Kentucky University Emily Bayma, Eastern Kentucky University Anna Collister, Eastern Kentucky University Nancy Davis, Eastern Kentucky University Beverly Hisel, Eastern Kentucky University Polly Rose, Eastern Kentucky University Jeremy Turner, Eastern Kentucky University Marie York, Eastern Kentucky University

NACC Executive Board


Elected Positions Chair: Sue Weber (University of Pennsylvania) Vice Chair: Jennifer Butler Ellis (Northern Illinois University) Vice Chair Elect: Russell Carpenter (Eastern Kentucky University)

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Recorder: Luke LeFebvre (College of Southern Nevada) Past Chair: Wendy Atkins-Sayre (University of Southern Mississippi) Appointed Positions Student Advocate: Kim Cuny (University of North Carolina - Greensboro) Publications: Marlina Davidson (University of Nebraska Omaha) Web: Wendy Atkins-Sayre (University of Southern Mississippi) Excellence at the Center: Linda Hobgood (University of Richmond) Nominating Committee: Wendy Atkins-Sayre, Sue Weber, Jennifer Butler Ellis Nominating Committee Representative: Wendy Atkins-Sayre

About the Keynote Speaker:

Dr. Cheryl E. Ball

Keynote Presentation: Saturday, Noel Studio Greenhouse, 1:15-2:15 p.m. Dr. Cheryl E. Ball is an Associate Professor of New Media Studies in the English Department at Illinois State University. Her areas of specialization include multimodal composition and editing practices, digital media scholarship, and digital publishing.

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Dr. Ball teaches writers to compose multimodal texts by analyzing rhetorical options and choosing the most appropriate genres, technologies, media, and modes for a

particular situation. Since 2006, Dr. Ball has been editor of the online, peer-reviewed, open-access journal Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, which exclusively publishes digital media scholarship and is read in 180 countries. She has published articles in a range of rhetoric/composition, technical communication, and media studies journals including Computers and Composition, C&C Online, Fibreculture, Convergence, Programmatic Perspectives, and Technical Communication Quarterly. She has also published several textbooks about visual and multimodal rhetoric, including most recently visualizing composition with Kristin L. Arola (Bedford, 2010). Her most recent book, RAW: Reading and Writing New Media (with Jim Kalmbach, Hampton Press, 2010), is an edited collection about reading and writing multimodal texts and administering writing programs with multimodal design components. She is currently at work on a new multimodal, genre-studies-based textbook project, a digital-media scholarly book collection, and a National Endowment for the Humanities-sponsored contentmanagement system for Kairos.

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Crabbe Library and Noel Studio History


Ez|eyv Kev|}cx Uvt~eyzt|z oyt{tvl ltbyy b}tldtv{, designed by architect C.C. Weber in the Classical Revival style with four Ionic columns facing University Drive, was completed in 1924. The Noel Studio for Academic Cye|t~t|z zptyl z|tycze-encompassed reception desk occupies the original Crabbe Library, named for John Grant Crabbe, EKU president from 1910-1916. The campus community realized almost immediately that the Crabbe Library, built to accommodate 200 students, was insufficient for the rapidly growing student body, and, in 1935, Cybbe Ltbyyz rtyz| ddt|tov errec|t~el do}bled the librayz zte vd tvcl}ded |ue Gyvd Redtv{ Roow, located just outside the Noel Studio. Tue 1935 ddt|tov z vo| |ue ltbyyz lz|. Iv 1967, |ue library added a wrap-around extension and an additional floor, nearly quadrupling library space. The reconstructed new front entrance, which had a total of six columns, z}ccezzr}ll wtv|tved |ue b}tldtv{z clzztc ppeyvce. In 1994, the completion of the Thomas and Hazel Little Building added a modern twist and linked the oldest building on campus, the 1874 University Building, with the Crabbe Library and expanded library space by nearly fifty percent. The unique sky-lit atrium created during this project is the site of the library caf, a popular gathering space for faculty and students. Including additions constructed in 1935 and 1967 and major renovations in 1983 and 2010, the library now encompasses a span of

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over one-hundred thousand square feet and is home to nearly seven-hundred thousand books. In 2003, changes in student need once again prompted EKU Libraries to evaluate its spaces; however, this time shifts in service paradigms and major renovations led to the development of a new service point. In seven short years, an idea was born and enhanced by a creative team dedicated to an innovative library space: an integrated service point providing assistance not only for research, but also for writing and communication, which would serve students well into the future. In 2010, the dream became reality when renovations to 10,000 square feet of space located in the heart of the 1924 and the 1935 areas of Crabbe Library were completed to integrate writing, oral communication, and research support in the Noel Studio for Academic Creativity.

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Program at a Glance

Friday, April 20, 2012


Registration 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Noel Studio Foyer Noel Studio Tours 1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. Noel Studio Greenhouse Opening Session 2:00 p.m.-2:45 p.m. Noel Studio Discovery Classroom Session A 3:00-4:30 p.m. Meet-n-Greet 4:30-5:00 p.m. Noel Studio Greenhouse Public Speaking Competition 5:00-6:30 p.m. Noel Studio Greenhouse NACC Awards and Reception 6:30-8:00 p.m. Noel Studio Greenhouse

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Program at a Glance

Saturday, April 21, 2012


NACC Business Meeting 8:00-8:45 a.m. Noel Studio Conference Room Session B 9:00-9:45 a.m. Session C 10:00-10:45 a.m. Session D 11:00-11:45 a.m. Lunch, Installations, and Posters 12:00-1:00 p.m. Noel Studio Greenhouse Keynote 1:15-2:15 p.m. Noel Studio Greenhouse Session E 2:30-3:30 p.m. Session F 3:45-4:45 p.m.

Crossword Puzzle
Learn more about the Noel Studio by completing this crossword puzzle. Talk to Noel Studio staff, use Google, and look around. Have fun researching!

Across 1 The Noel Studio classroom 3 Song that inspired a student promo for the Noel Studio 5 The band that inspired the Noel Studio flash mob 6. Name of Dan Barnesz zc}lp|}ye 8 Sv{ Ill be tv w S|}dto ov TV 10 TV show that inspired a student promo for the Noel Studio 11 Ron and Sherrie Lou ____

Down 2 Title of Noel Studio student employees 4 Noel Studio zombie game was inspired by this card game 7 Nickname for Noel Studio pedway 9 Unofficial Noel Studio Mascot

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Fri., April 20, 2012


Registration 1:00-4:00 p.m. Noel Studio Foyer Noel Studio Tours 1:00-2:00 p.m. Noel Studio Greenhouse Opening Session 2:00-2:45 p.m.

Concepts, Models, and Considerations for Creating a Communication Center Journal


Noel Studio Discovery Classroom
Moderator: Russell Carpenter Russell Carpenter, Eastern Kentucky University; Ted Sheckels, Randolph Macon College; Luke LeFebvre, College of Southern Nevada

The panelists will discuss concepts and options for creating a national peer-reviewed communication center journal. This interactive discussion will build off of conversations that occurred at the 2011 National Communication Association conference in New Orleans.

Session A 3:00-4:30 p.m. (Friday 4/20)

An Untapped Population: Helping Peer-Consultants Navigate the Needs of Graduate Students


Noel Studio Discovery Classroom
Moderator: Michael L. King Michael L. King, University of Southern Mississippi; Carl Brown, University of Southern Mississippi; Lacey Myers, University of Southern Mississippi; and Hannah Rachal, University of Southern Mississippi

This session will help your center learn to attract more graduate students, whose presentations have slightly different expectations. Specifically, attendees will learn about graduate school stressors, audience expectations of research presentations, and how to help them be successful in unique communicative exchanges (e.g., meetand-greet/cocktail parties).

Understanding the Communication Center: Findings on Center Practices and Outcomes


R&I Classroom
Moderator: Wendy Atkins-Sayre Wendy Atkins-Sayre, University of Southern Mississippi; Esther Yook, University of Mary Washington; Kim Cuny, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Amy Gaffney, University of Kentucky; Luke LeFebvre, College of Southern Nevada; and Susan Wilson, DePauw University

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Research in the area of communication centers has slowly been gathering steam. Reflecting the practices of many

successful centers, much of the research presented on this panel not only validates that work but also helps in the development of new communication centers. This panel will discuss the importance of research in communication center practices and summarize findings in the area of listening, peer tutoring, online tools, and tutor alumni experiences.

Visual Presentation Aids in the Communication Center: Tips and Techniques for Providing Useful Design Feedback
Noel Studio Conference Room
Shawn P. Apostel, Eastern Kentucky University

Providing helpful feedback on flyers, research posters, PowerPoints, and Prezis is not as difficult as you may think. This workshop will encourage you to consider Aristotle's audience, purpose, and context, take into account basic Gestalt principles, and use simple concepts that graphic designers use when discussing visual compositions.

Meet & Greet

Noel Studio Greenhouse 4:30-5:00 p.m. (Friday) 22


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Public Speaking Competition 5:00-6:30 p.m. (Friday)


Noel Studio Greenhouse Sponsored by

NACC Awards/Reception 6:30-8:00 p.m. (Friday)


Noel Studio Greenhouse

Sat. April 21, 2012


NACC Business Meeting 8:00-8:45 a.m. Noel Studio Conference Room Session B 9:00-9:45 a.m.

De-Centered: The NextGeneration Communication Center


Noel Studio Discovery Classroom
Moderator: Shannon Doyle Shannon Doyle, San Jose State University; Monica Peck, San Jose State University; and Luisa Pour, San Jose State University

In this panel, we will discuss the transformation of San Jos State Unt~eyzt|z woye |ydt|tovl Coww}vtc|tov Lb into a de-centered Communication Center. This next-generation Communication Center functions without a reception desk, paper, and computer lab.

CommCenter Assessment: How Students Can Help Shape the Future


Noel Studio Conference Room
Brandi A. Quesenberry, Virginia Tech; Imani Holmes, Virginia Tech; and Katie Mawyer, Virginia Tech

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Assessment is an importantand necessaryendeavor for every CommCenter. This presentation will provide an overview on the use of student-led focus groups and questionnaires as valuable methods of assessing the CommCenter; it will also address how utilizing students in the assessment process provides them with an opportunities to also engage in the research process.

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Customer Service Issues: Troubleshooting Common Problems in Communication Centers


R&I Classroom
Moderator: Carl J. Brown Carl J. Brown, University of Southern Mississippi; Hannah Rachal, University of Southern Mississippi; Aria Halliday, Davidson College; Leona Munro, College of Southern Nevada; and Taylor Williams, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Coww}vtc|tov cev|eyz rce v}wbey or c}z|owey zey~tce tzz}ez. A pvel dtzc}zztov ov u| pyoblewz wt{u| be encountered and how others have dealt with them in the past will prove useful to participants and audience members in similar situations.

Session C 10:00-10:45 a.m. (Saturday 4/21)

What Do you Do in a Case Like This?! A Workshop on Tutorial Practices


Noel Studio Discovery Classroom
Moderators: Kathleen J. Turner, Davidson College and Kyle B. Love, Columbia College Azmer Amer, Columbia College; Rose Cely, Columbia College; Yolina Elenkova, Columbia College; Andrew Evans, Davidson College; Billy Hackenson, Davidson College; Aria Halliday, Davidson College; Krista Jackson, Davidson College; Chantel Lucas, Columbia College; Taylor Stukes, Columbia College; Gabi Wallace, Davidson College; Kelby Wingert, Coe College

Using a GIFTS-style format, tutors will present difficult scenarios commonly faced in communication centers to attendees at each table; they will then facilitate discussions of ways to handle the situations. Attendees will change tables at timed intervals, enabling them to actively participate in the analysis of a variety of tutoring situations.

Giving the Art of Constructive Criticism Roots and Wings


Noel Studio Conference Room
Vicki H. Nelson, Curry College; Danielle Hausner, Curry College; and Molly Vance, Curry College

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What do turn-of-the-century elocutionists have to say to speech tutors today? This panel explores the art of criticism through the lens of Boston educators Charles Wesley Emerson and Samuel Silas Curry: What is good criticism? Does criticism differ from fault-finding? Through this session, you can consider how to improve your

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critiquing abilities in the communication center.

Your Class Requires What?


R&I Classroom
Moderator: Alyssa Davis Alyssa Davis, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Erin Ellis, University of North Carolina at Greensboro; and Taylor Williams, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

This panel is designed to start a discussion about the types of technology currently being used in different Speaking Centers. We have found that we continually have to add new technology to meet the needs of our speakers, causing many challenges that we have had to be creative to overcome. We will discuss our experiences with technology and involve the audience in examining the technology they use and the problems they face. This panel will help us move ahead of the curve by learning about new technologies and anticipating issues that may arise.

Session D 11:00-11:45 a.m. (Saturday 4/21)

From the Cave to the Complex: The Speaking Center @ Davidson College Moves to the Center for Teaching and Learning
Noel Studio Discovery Classroom
Moderator: Kathleen J. Turner Kathleen J. Turner, Davidson College; Andrew Evans, Davidson College; Billy Hackenson, Davidson College; Aria Halliday, Davidson College; Krista Jackson, Davidson; and Gabi Wallace, Davidson College

The Speaking Center @ Davidson College has moved from the main academic building to a Center for Teaching and Learning. This panel will address the challenges and opportunities created by this move, including layout, publicity, collaboration, technology, and assessment.

Lights..Camera...Action..Can Video Recording Tutoring Session be Beneficial?


R&I Classroom
Moderator: Beau Bingham Beau Bingham, University of Wyoming; Blaise Allen, University of Wyoming; Allyson Zinke, University of Wyoming; Brooke Eades, University of Wyoming; Anthony Fleak, University of Wyoming; Chelsie Knotwell, University of Wyoming; and Jamie Magrum, University of Wyoming

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Public Speaking instructors see the value of video recording student presentations. This workshop seeks to e|evd ~tdeo cyt|tq}ez tv|o |ue yelw or |}|oytv{. Az py| of this workshop, participants will discuss the impact video

recording has on tutoring sessions. It will examine the effects on tutors and the way they tutor.

What Would Sue Sylvester Do? Using Pop Culture, Social Networking Platforms, Communication Technology, and Traditional Media to Market Speech Labs
Noel Studio Conference Room
Kyle B. Love, Columbia College

This session integrates research on pop culture, the millennial generation, communication technology, and social networking platforms to examine how communication centers can utilize better market themselves. The prime example will be our fall publicity campaign. This highly interactive panel will include video, PowerPoint, and performance.

When Crisis CalledWe Answered


R&I Conference Room
Erin Ellis, University of North Carolina at Greensboro and Alyssa Davis, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

This panel will discuss ways that we have worked to become active in courses across disciplines. Specifically, we will talk about our involvement with the Crisis Communication course on campus and how the collaboration has evolved over two semesters. The audience is invited to share the ways they have worked to become a part of different courses on campus and discuss ways to expand our services.

Lunch
12:00-1:00 p.m. (Saturday 4/21) Noel Studio Greenhouse Installations

Multimodal Communication and Invention: Concepts for Space Design


Noel Studio Greenhouse Media Cluster 1
Russell Carpenter, Eastern Kentucky University

Communication centers have much to gain from exploring virtual worlds like Second Life. Concepts such as immersion, augmentation, and persona come to life in virtual spaces. This installation encourages participants to ask questions about what communication centers can learn about space design from virtual worlds such as Second Life and beyond.

From Writing Center to Communications Center: Using Critical Thinking to Respond to Multimodal Composition
Noel Studio Greenhouse Media Cluster 2
Leslie A. Valley, Eastern Kentucky University

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This Prezi will illustrate experimental consultant training roc}zed ov P}l vd Eldeyz Iv|ellec|}l S|vdydz or Critical Thinking as they relate to traditional communication and multimodal composition. The presentation will include training and assessment materials as well as project results.

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In the Library with the Wrench: Using Library Nuts and Bolts to Identify Evidence for Argumentative Speeches
Noel Studio Greenhouse Media Cluster 3
Trenia Napier, Eastern Kentucky University

This interactive installation showcases how one librarian uses databases that cover controversial social issues to assist students in locating, identifying and using different types of evidence to support argumentative speeches. Participants are invited to consider how such a technique could be used in the both the classroom and communication center. Poster

Recording Sessions to Enhance Professional Development


Noel Studio Greenhouse
Eliza Charbonneau, James Madison University

The benefits of video recording speech consultations and its effectiveness in improving client presentation skills and consultant tutoring skills.

Adapting Scholarly Peer Review Practices for Student Workshops (and Vice Versa!) Dr. Cheryl E. Ball
Keynote Speaker 1:15-2:15 p.m. Noel Studio Greenhouse

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Session E 2:30-3:30 p.m. (Saturday 4/21) Noel Studio Discovery Classroom

The Image of Influence


Linda B. Hobgood, University of Richmond and Lacie V. Horak, University of Richmond

Personifications of the abstract concept of rhetoric are examined as they appeared between the eleventh and eighteenth centuries. If rhetorical history is a "continuous cycle of establishment and disestablishment," then the implications of the practical art as icon bear significantly on communication centers as they chart a future course.

Communication Between Centers: Next-Gen Challenges and Opportunities


Michael LeMahieu, Clemson University

This presentation identifies and examines some of the challenges and opportunities facing the Pearce Center for Professional Communication at Clemson University. Funded in 1989 through a healthy endowment, the Pearce Center exists alongside an independent Writing Center, operated by the English department, and an independent Communication Lab (Speaking Center), operating by the Communication Studies department. While Clemson thus possesses multiple institutional yezo}ycez cowwt||ed |o twpyo~tv{ z|}dev|z coww}vtc|tov skills, the potential for duplication of effort and the barriers to productive collaboration pose significant challenges. In addition, |ue Peyce Cev|eyz wtzztov tvcl}dez dwtvtz|eytv{ |ue }vt~eyzt|z CAC/WAC tvt|t|t~ez, zpovzoytv{ rc}l| yezeycu, and likely will soon include implementing a Quality Enhancement Proposal focused on critical thinking.

Session E 2:30-3:30 p.m. (Saturday 4/21)

R&I Classroom

Communication Fellows: Investigating Course-Embedded Oral Communication Tutoring


Michelle A. Moreau, James Madison University

This presentation investigates the effect of one type of communication center education intervention that shares elements common to content-based tutoring. An analysis of student speech scores shows some evidence that tutoring positively influences performance when anxiety and academic achievement are held constant. Implications for communication centers will be discussed.

Nontraditional and Traditional Students: Do Motivations Differ When Deciding to Use Speaking Centers?
Hannah Rachal, University of Southern Mississippi

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Recognizing known differences between traditional and nontraditional students in higher education, this study explores possible differences in motivations to use speaking centers using both traditional and nontraditional z|}dev|z uo ud }zed |uety }vt~eyzt|z zpextv{ cev|ey. Findings from this research have implications for both recruitment and tutoring practices.

Consultant Evaluations Meet GoogleDocs


Sarah Muse, University of Richmond

This paper will examine the effectiveness and necessity of having consultant evaluations put in an online, survey-style format. I will explain why they are important and ways in which our Speech Center has benefitted from the online evaluations.

Session F 3:45-4:45 p.m. (Saturday 4/21) Noel Studio Discovery Classroom

"There's a Communication Center Here?": How On-Campus Advertising and Social Media Presence Changed our Client Visitation
Lani Furbank, James Madison University; Katie Lese, James Madison University; and Alex Borgella, James Madison University

Starting in Fall 2011, a communication center launched an in-depth campaign to promote and explain its tutoring services. Although the data does not necessarily prove that advertising caused an increase in visits, the authors argue that making communication centers more appealing and accessible can impact the volume of appointments and the types of tutoring requested.

Speaking our Minds: Communication Centers and Critical Thinking


Wendy Atkins-Sayre, University of Southern Mississippi

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When we think about passionate speaking, we rarely envision research, outlines, planning, and practice. Instead, we imagine a speaker who is moved by the moment and zpextv{ orr |ue c}rr. Oyl coww}vtc|tov tz cleyl improved, however, with thorough research and reflection on the topic, careful audience analysis, and a heavy dose of delivery preparation. This essay argues that development of oral communication skills are linked to critical thinking

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and that communication centers are, consequently, an important part of the learning process.

Session F 3:45-4:45 p.m. (Saturday 4/21) R&I Classroom

Student Session
Presenters TBD (5)

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NACC 2012 Word Search


E V L O S M E L B O R P I V O A H I E U P O P C U L T U R E S E N D A Y O R N C V L Y R E M I X M U P F V I Q Z U A K H R I E T A R G E T N I E E C Q T K C O U N F T C A E D D T R A G N P L G W W X S R O A S K I O O J T R A T U G H R S E P Y E I U A Y C V X A G T C V W P O C S I C R I T I C A L T H I N K I N G I O N S M E I U A A H M N O C O M R T T D M N E J O D M V R P C L O C M E X C S U M L U N S E R L E O I R U I S E A I Y T U F L Z S B V X T M B E E E T R L G B S N Y I L E Y P A I S T A A A P A O C Z L I T T F F A X J L Z S R L L T L I Q P E C S E V N E R L L U C E A L O I C D B O A U R D U X U E A H A T R N O C V R E N T R A X B K N Q U B I T H P Y C H I E M E G C S I B A J S G K C E H X A T X T A N P Y K B N C B I R E W R I T E L D M Y T C C R I Z C D V T E R O L P X E P P F M E T

ART COLLABORATION COMMUNICATE CREATE CREATIVITY CRITICAL THINKING CULTURE DIGITAL PRACTICES EKU EVALUATE EXPAND EXPLORE EXPRESS INTEGRATE INVENT

LITERACY MEDIATION MONTAGE NOEL STUDIO PLAY POP CULTURE PROBLEM SOLVE REMEDIATION REMIX RESEARCH REWRITE NACC TECHNOLOGY TEXT VISUAL LITERACY